STATE OF GEORGIA Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG)

STATE OF GEORGIA
Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG)
For State FY 2015
Program Guidelines
February 28, 2014
INTRODUCTION
The Georgia Department of Community Affairs has developed a single application process for the distribution
of HUD ESG funds, plus State matching funds for ESG provided through the State Housing Trust Fund for the
Homeless (HTF). Utilizing both Federal and State funding resources, and although Federal fiscal year 2014
appropriations have not yet been made for this program, approximately $5.8 million dollars is expected to be
available.
Applications will be accepted within nine (9) funding categories
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
Emergency Shelter Operations and Services,
Transitional Housing Operations and Services,
Supportive Service Programs for Homeless Persons,
Homelessness Prevention,
Rapid Re-Housing,
Project Homeless Connect,
Street Outreach and Associated Services,
Hotel/Motel Vouchers,
HMIS
Program policy, eligible beneficiaries, eligible activities and other criteria have been revised as a result of the
Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing (HEARTH) Act of 2009. HUD has issued
“interim regulations” to guide us until final regulations are released. HUD continues to issue implementation
guidance for the program on the HUD ONECPD website that takes the form of regulations. Based on the new
law, key changes that applicants and July 1, 2014 ESG grantees must honor include:
•
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•
•
•
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Organizations receiving HUD HEARTH funds (ESG or CoC) for emergency shelter to families with
children under age 18 shall not deny admission to any family based on the age of any child under age
18;
New definitions of “homelessness” and “at risk of homelessness” finalized in 2012;
Additional changes may be issued as HUD continues its HEARTH implementation;
HUD funds will no longer be available for supportive services other than those specified as a part of
“Outreach” and “Shelter” components; and
HUD ESG funds are not available for transitional housing. However the State Housing Trust Fund
will provide a small amount of funding for this intervention;
Housing and service programs to serve persons in permanent supportive housing are not eligible for
ESG funds.
It is essential that applicants prepare application documents in accordance with the instructions contained
herein and as outlined at the workshop sessions. Applications should be clear, thorough and sufficiently
detailed to provide all information requested. Failure to answer all questions may result in threshold rejection
or denial of your application. Of the nine (9) applications listed above, only submit applications for which
ESG funds are requested. For example, if your organization is proposing to provide emergency shelter only,
you should submit only Application I. In this example, your organization would not submit Applications II
through IX.
It is important for applicants to note that proposals may be accepted only in part by DCA. DCA reserves the
right to approve an application for a lesser grant amount than requested and will make adjustments to the
proposed program design, implementation strategy, targeted population, eligible activities, etc. to ensure that
grant requirements and best practices are adhered to. Successful applicants must adjust the scale and approach
to program implementation at the time contracts are executed. In addition, applicants requesting funds for
multiple programs may receive funds for one, but not all programs.
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The first action recommended in the application process is to read the sections on local government approval
and certification of consistency with local consolidated plans. Applicants should immediately make
appropriate contact within local governments to assure timely coordination.
NOTICES TO APPLICANTS
Application Rating Criteria/Thresholds
The Georgia Department of Community Affairs wants to ensure that the limited pool of funding received is
used in the most effective way possible to help organizations provide services to the homeless individuals and
families of the state of Georgia. In order to do this, funds awarded will be based on points awarded within
various criteria. Individual scores by program may be assessed for completeness of the grant application, past
performance as outlined later in this document. Further details are provided in this document.
In addition, there are certain conditions, which may result in an application being rejected without being
scored. These threshold requirements are also detailed later in these guidelines.
HMIS/ALICE for New Grantees
All current or previously funded ESG applicants (including those not receiving funds in the present grant
year), are required to be in full compliance with HMIS implementation guidelines and adhere to Housing
Support Standards at the time of application. New grantees who have never received ESG funds from DCA
must be in full compliance with HMIS/ALICE within 3-months or assistance will be terminated.
DCA may conduct a site inspection during the review process. ESG funds are not intended for start-up, and
DCA wishes to avoid duplicative efforts. Generally, applicants are expected to have homeless programs
established prior to participating in the DCA ESG application process.
Housing Support Standards
All DCA grantees must demonstrate basic standards of care across all programs. The DCA Housing Support
Standards are not meant to replace standards and guidelines required by licensing agencies. Rather, through
the implementation of these basic standards, we hope to see a reduction across Georgia in the amount of time
participants experience homelessness and an increase in each participant’s housing stability as they are moved
through the Continuum of Care.
Housing Support Services
Housing Support Service programs provide services focused on increasing a client’s housing stability and selfsufficiency. Services should include: assessment, housing stability plan development; with an emphasis on
acting as a liaison to secure and maintain housing; employment, a connection to mainstream resources and
services; coordination with other providers; monitoring of progress; and advocating on behalf of the client.
Services should also focus on building a set of supports that can help prevent the recurrence of a housing
crisis.
Immigration and Security
Georgia law requires contractors and subcontractors to file affidavits that they have registered and participate
in a federal work authorization program intended to insure that only lawful citizens or lawful immigrants are
employed by the contractor or subcontractor. Contractors must also file an affidavit to assure that they have
legal status in the U. S.
Victim Service Providers
DCA will work to ensure the confidentiality of records pertaining to any individual served by a victim service
provider who receives housing or services under any project assisted. The address or location of any family
violence facility assisted under this program will, except with written authorization of the person or persons
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responsible for the operation of such facility and program, not be made public. The term `victim service
provider' means a community-based organization whose primary mission is to provide services to victims of
domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking. Such term includes rape crisis centers, battered
women's shelters, domestic violence transitional housing programs, and other programs. Agencies of this type
are expected to provide de-identified data generated from ALICE to comply with program requirements.
HEARTH Act and Relevant Regulations
All awardees are expected to be in compliance with the HEARTH regulations including the new definitions of
homelessness, the ESG Interim Rule regulations, and other implementation guidance provided by HUD
including information found on the OneCPD website. DCA provides guidance, links to relevant information
on the ESG web pages and access to training, but it is the responsibility of service providers to implement
compliant programs.
Application and Program Information
The DCA ESG web pages should serve as the primary sources of information for ESG applicants and program
implementation.
Contract Awards and Start Dates
All contracts will be awarded according to the current State Fiscal Year, from July 1, 2014 through June 30,
2015. If awarded an ESG grant applicants should be aware that DCA typically does not receive funding for
this program until around October of each year. This does not mean that agencies should not operate programs
from July 1 through October; only that reimbursement for ESG awarded activities cannot be sought until
contracts are fully executed and DCA has received Federal funds from HUD. Successful applicants should
execute their responsibilities regarding contracts, policies and procedures, staffing, HMIS/ALICE, etc. as
quickly as possible upon receiving notice of a grant award.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION – DCA HTF STAFF LISTING
Cox, Jonathan
(404) 679-0571
[email protected]
DiNapoli, Brian Andrew
(404) 327-6811
[email protected]
Hahn, Christy
(404) 679-5293
[email protected]
Mazur, Libby
(404)982-3577
[email protected]
Miller, Elayne
(404) 679-4942
[email protected]
Mitchell, Whittney
(404) 679-0564
[email protected]
Moore, Tina L.
(404) 327-6870
[email protected]
Moseley, Gary
(404) 327-6847
[email protected]
Rodriguez, Jason
Thomas, Phillis
Totten, Dave
Woods, Bonnie H.
Wright, Patricia L.
(404) 679-3102
(404) 679-0651
(404) 679-4945
(404) 679-3150
(404) 327-6856
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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Definitions
(Additional information can be found in the program applications)
Emergency Shelter - Any facility where the primary purpose is to provide a temporary shelter for the
homeless in general or for specific populations of the homeless and which does not require occupants to sign
leases or occupancy agreements.
Transitional Housing - Facilities created for homeless individuals and families to facilitate the movement to
permanent housing. It is housing in which homeless persons may live up to 24 months and receive supportive
services that enable them to live more independently.
Chronic Homeless - Unaccompanied homeless individual with a disabling condition who has either been
continuously homeless for a year or more OR has had at least four (4) episodes of homeless in the past three
(3) years. To be considered chronically homeless, persons must have been sleeping in a place not meant for
human habitation and/or in an emergency shelter during that time.
Beds - Beds provided for homeless individuals within a unit of housing. Units of housing may consist of
dedicated facilities for emergency shelter, transitional housing, or supportive housing units, etc.
Unit - Secure sleeping place containing beds (shelter, room, apartment, house, etc.). If a shelter houses more
than one family in one room, you should consult DCA for assistance in determining the number of units.
HMIS - Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) - in Georgia, the system currently used by eight
(8) of the nine (9) Continuua of Care for HMIS is Pathways COMPASS. All DCA-funded homeless service
providers must use PATHWAYS COMPASS and follow DCA HMIS standards in order to comply with DCA
requirements for reporting and HSS compliance. Domestic violence providers must use the equivalent
database for Georgia, ALICE.
HMIS Program Name - The name that your agency assigned to a particular program when setting the
program up within the Pathways system (for example, “Emergency Shelter” or “Hope House”). It would be
the program that you enroll your consumers into when you enter them into Pathways. All programs (except
Project Homeless Connect) should have a program name listed in HMIS.
Victim service provider - The term `victim service provider' means a private nonprofit organization whose
primary mission is to provide services to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or
stalking. Such term includes rape crisis centers, battered women's shelters, domestic violence transitional
housing programs, and other programs.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction ………………...………………………………………………………...…………...............…….ii
Reminders for 2014 ………………...………………………………………………...…………...............……iii
DCA Staff Listing…………...………………………………………………………...…………..............…….iv
Definitions ………………...………………………………………………………...…………...............………v
SECTION 1: Deadlines and Submission Requirements…...………………………………….………...…....1
SECTION 2: Local Government Approvals..……………………………………………......................……..1
SECTION 3: Consolidated Plan Certification – Local Contacts………………………..………...………....2
SECTION 4: ESG Program Purpose….…………………………………………………………….…………4
SECTION 5: Program Funding Priorities………………………….…………………………………………4
SECTION 6: Eligible Applicants – Qualifications………………….…………………………………………4
SECTION 7: Nonprofit Organizations – Capacity Considerations.…………………………………………5
SECTION 8: Eligible Activities and Beneficiaries………………….…………………………………………5
SECTION 9: Serving Families with Children……………..……….………………………………………...12
SECTION 10: Rapid Re-Housing and Homelessness Prevention...………..………………………….....…12
SECTION 11: Project Homeless Connect…………...…………………………………………………...…..12
SECTION 12: Funding Limits………………..……...…………………………………………………...…...13
SECTION 13: Application Rating Criteria…….…...…………………………………………………....…..13
SECTION 14: Matching Requirements……..….…...…………………………………………………...…..14
SECTION 15: Other Application Guidance and Requirements..……………….…………………….....…15
(HMIS, HSS, Outcome Expectation, Faith-Based Activities, Open Records Act,
Serving Persons with Disabilities, State and Federal Reporting Requirements)
SECTION 16: Financial Reporting Requirements for Nonprofits…………..….…………………….....…17
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SECTION 1: DEADLINES AND SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Application Deadlines –
DCA will have a 2 part online application process for 2014, as follows:
Part 1 – Sunday, March 16, 2014 Online Before 5:00 p.m.
All ESG applicants must submit an online “Notice of Intent (NOI)” to apply. In addition, the prospective
applicant will submit the name, type and location for each program for which funds may be requested. Once
prospective applicants submit their online NOI, they will receive a login and password by email from DCA
that will enable the organization to complete additional information requests online. This email will come
from [email protected]
Applicants must submit or update all organizational information by this same date. Applicants that do not
meet this deadline will not be considered for funding. All prospective applicants must make a 100% online
submission of organizational information. This submission will provide DCA with information on the
prospective applicant that includes complete contact information, IRS 501c3 determination, agency Articles of
Incorporation, agency Certificate of Incorporation, organization’s board list, organization’s board meeting
minutes (most recent three meetings), organization’s staff list, organization’s current IRS filing, organization’s
current annual financial statement, and other information that may be required by DCA.
To file the Notice of Intent and organizational documentation, go to
http://htf.dca.ga.gov/HF/HTFOnline/HTFOnlineNOI2014.htm .
APPLICANTS THAT DO NOT MEET THE PART 1 DEADLINE WILL NOT BE FUNDED.
THERE WILL BE NO TECHNICAL SUPPORT FOR PART 1 OF THE APPLICATION AFTER
FRIDAY, MARCH 14 AT 5:00PM.
Part 2 – Friday, March 28, 2014, Online Before Noon
Part 1 submissions must be made to the satisfaction of DCA by prospective applicants prior to this due date.
Separate program applications must be made for each program type; outreach, shelter, transitional housing,
homelessness prevention or rapid re-housing program, etc. proposed for funding. Complete, program by
program information will be due on or before March 28, 2014. Also due on or before this date will be original
documents executed by the applicant, to include an application summary of all program requests, required
certifications, local approval(s) (by program), and as applicable, Certification of Consistency with local HUD
consolidated plans.
Submission Requirements/Completeness -- To receive funding consideration, applications must be
submitted on appropriate online PDF formats provided by DCA. Each applicant must demonstrate to the
satisfaction of DCA that it is in compliance with Federal, State and local laws and regulations, and that it is
capable of carrying out requested programs.
LATE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED FOR FUNDING.
SECTION 2: LOCAL GOVERNMENT APPROVAL(S)
Nonprofit organizations are eligible to receive funds only if such funding is approved by the local government
jurisdiction where programs are based or where applicants control program sites (housing, service centers,
etc.). Community-based state entities, local boards and authorities are not subject to the local approval
requirement. Ultimate responsibility for local approval remains with the Applicant. This responsibility
cannot be assigned by the Applicant.
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In issuing approval, the local government may use its discretion regarding the depth of each review. Factors
that may be considered by local governments in granting approval might include participation in local provider
networks, local Continuum of Care Planning, past performance, etc. Approval may also be subject to local
codes and ordinances. Local approval subject to locally specified conditions is acceptable and welcomed by
DCA, provided that the local government clearly authorizes DCA to proceed with funding. Applications that
do not adequately address local approval may be denied or returned unprocessed.
Which local government “approves” my application? To determine the appropriate approving local
jurisdiction(s) the applicant must determine whether or not the program or applicant-controlled program site is
located within the corporate limits of a city. If so, then the appropriate approving jurisdiction is that city. If
not, the appropriate approving jurisdiction is the county. If the applicant proposes ESG funding for primary
program sites in multiple jurisdictions, then multiple jurisdictional approvals may be necessary. Contact DCA
and proceed based upon written guidance if you should have questions about local approval.
In most cases the authority to issue local government approval is vested in the agency head responsible for the
HUD Consolidated plans. Please refer to the next section for this information. If your program is located in
one of these jurisdictions, you should contact the designated representative(s). Otherwise, please contact the
city/county administrator/manager, or the senior elected official, as appropriate to each jurisdiction.
Incomplete or ineligible applications, including applications that do not adequately address local approval(s)
may be denied or returned unprocessed. With regard to local approval, DCA will consider an application to be
“complete” if the application contains a letter from appropriate approving jurisdiction(s) that:
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•
•
The nonprofit applicant has complied with its request(s) for application and program information and that
the approval process has been initiated,
The applicant has identified each program under consideration, and
The approving jurisdiction includes a timetable for completion of the process on or before June 1, 2014.
SECTION 3: CONSOLIDATED PLAN CERTIFICATION
All applicants for housing and service programs located within local HUD Consolidated Plan jurisdictions
must obtain “certification of consistency” with the local HUD Consolidated Plan. Local HUD Consolidated
Plan jurisdictions are the cities of Albany, Atlanta, Brunswick, Dalton, Gainesville, Hinesville, Johns Creek,
Macon, Rome, Sandy Springs, Savannah, Valdosta and Warner Robins, the counties of Cherokee, Clayton,
Cobb (including Marietta), DeKalb, Fulton (including Roswell) and Gwinnett, and the consolidated
governments of Athens-Clarke, Augusta-Richmond and Columbus-Muscogee. Contacts are listed on the
following page.
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Athens-Clarke County
Samanta Carvalho
Unified Government of AthensClarke County
P. O. Box 1868
Athens, GA 30603
Phone: 706.613.3155 x 1205
Fax: 706. 613.3158
[email protected]
ounty.com
City of Atlanta
For assistance and instructions on
the Certification process, please
call 404.330.6112 ext. 5072.
Clayton County (includes all
Augusta-Richmond County
Ms. Vicki Johnson
Augusta-Richmond County
925 Laney - Walker Blvd., 2nd FL
Augusta, GA 30901
Phone: 706.821.1797 x1887
Fax: 706.821.1784
[email protected]
City of Brunswick
Mr. William M. Weeks
P. O. Box 550
601 Gloucester Street
Brunswick, GA 31521-0550
Phone: 912.267.4610
Fax: 912.267.5549
[email protected]
Cobb County (all jurisdictions)
jurisdictions within County)
Ms. Eryca Fambro
Sule Carpenter
121 Haynes Street,
1671 Adamson Parkway, Suite 101 Marietta, GA 30060
Morrow, GA 30260
Phone: 770.528.1460
Phone: 770.473.5732
Fax: 770.528.1466
[email protected]
[email protected]
City of Dalton
DeKalb County (all jurisdictions)
Ms. Gaile R. Jennings
Ms. Melvia W. Richards
P.O. Box 248
150 East Ponce de Leon Ave.,
Dalton, GA 30722-0248
Suite 330, Decatur, GA 30030
Phone: 706.876.1677
Phone: 404.286.3366
Fax: 706.876.1440
Fax: 404.286.3337
[email protected]
[email protected]
Gainesville, City of
Mr. Chris Davis
P.O. Box 2496
Gainesville, GA 30503
Phone: 770.531.2693
Fax: 770.538.2494
[email protected]
Gwinnett County (all jurisdictions)
Ms. Shannon Candler
One Justice Square
446 West Crogan Street
Suite 275
Lawrenceville, GA 30046-2439
Phone: 678.518.6038
[email protected]
Johns Creek, City of
Ms. Susan Canon
12000 Findley Road, Suite 400
Johns Creek, GA 30097
(678) 512-3278
Fax (678) 512-3303
City of Macon
Ms. Wanzina Jackson
200 Cherry Street, Suite 300
Macon, GA 31201
Phone: 478.751.7190
Fax: 478.751.7390
[email protected]
[email protected]
City of Albany
Ms. Shelena Hawkins
Interim Director
230 South Jackson Street
Suite 315
Albany, GA 31701
Phone: 229.483.7650
Fax: 229.430.2737
[email protected]
Cherokee County
Ms Marianne Pieper
Community Services Agency
1130 Bluffs Parkway
Canton, GA 30114
Phone 770-721-7806
[email protected]
Columbus-Muscogee County
Mr. Mark McCollum
P.O. Box 1340
Columbus, GA 31902
Phone: 706.225.3914
Fax: 706.653.4486
[email protected]
Fulton County (except Atlanta
and Sandy Springs)
Mr. Leonard Westmoreland
1135 Jefferson Street, NW
Atlanta, GA 30318
Phone 404-613-0416
Leonard.Westmoreland
@fultoncountyga.gov
Hinesville, City of
Mr. Kenneth Howard
115 East M.L.K. Jr. Drive
Hinesville, GA 31313
Phone: 912.876.3564
Fax: 912.369.2416,
[email protected]
Rome, City of
Ms. Bekki Fox
P.O. Box 1433
607 Broad Street, Suite 130
Rome, GA 30162
Phone: 706.236.4477
Fax: 706.236.4448
Email: [email protected]
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City of Savannah
Ms. Keri Reid
PO Box 1027
2203 Abercorn St.
Savannah, GA 31401
Phone: 912-651-6520
Fax: 912-651-6525
City of Sandy Springs
Ms. Patrice Dickerson
7840 Roswell Road, Bldg 500,
Sandy Springs, GA 30350
Phone 770-206-1513
Fax 678-731-6601
[email protected]
[email protected]
City of Warner Robins
Ms. Sherri Windham
P. O. Box 1488
Warner Robins, GA 31099
Phone: 912-929-1118
Fax: 912-929-6944
[email protected]
Valdosta, City of
Ms. Vanassa Flucas
P.O. Box 1125
300 N. Lee Street
Valdosta, GA 31603
Phone: 229-259-3571
Fax: 229-259-3539
[email protected]
Henry County
Ms. Shannan Sagnot
140 Henry Parkway
McDonough, GA, 30253
Phone: 770-288-7525
[email protected]
SECTION 4: PROGRAM PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION
The HEARTH Act and resulting ESG Interim regulation (ESG Interim Rule) renamed and significantly
modified the Emergency Solutions Grants (HUD ESG) program. The revised program maintains support for a
crisis response system through emergency shelters, but places an emphasis on identifying and preventing
homelessness and returning those who experience homelessness back into the housing within the community
as quickly as possible.
SECTION 5: PROGRAM FUNDING PRIORITIES
DCA priorities for Federal ESG funds for State Fiscal Year 2015 are rapid re-housing (rental assistance and
stabilization services), emergency shelter (operations and essential services), and HMIS. DCA reserves the
right to emphasize funding for DCA ESG Entitlement communities.
Priorities for State Housing Trust Fund dollars are hotel/motel vouchers and transitional housing for
populations for which rapid re-housing is not a preferred intervention. DCA reserves the right to set aside a
reasonable amount of funding for Project Homeless Connect projects throughout the state.
SECTION 6: ELIGIBLE APPLICANTS - APPLICANT QUALIFICATIONS
Eligible Applicants: Local units of government are eligible to apply. To the extent determined under State
law by HTF and DCA, private, secular or faith-based nonprofit organizations are also eligible to apply for
funds. Nonprofit organizations must demonstrate collaboration with local mainstream service providers and
local homeless provider groups. Applicants are expected to participate in continuum of care planning
appropriate to the jurisdiction where their activities are located to the satisfaction of those jurisdiction(s).
According to Federal law and regulation, the term "private nonprofit organization" means a secular or
religious organization described in section 501(c) of Title 26 that is exempt from taxation under Subtitle A, has
an accounting system and a voluntary board, and practices nondiscrimination in the provision of assistance in a
manner that is free from religious influences.
According to the State law, 'nonprofit organization' means any corporation, trust, association, cooperative, or
other organization that is operated primarily for scientific, educational, service, charitable, or similar purposes
in the public interest; is not organized primarily for profit; and uses its net proceeds to maintain, improve, or
expand its operations. The term nonprofit organization includes nonprofit institutions of higher education and
hospitals.
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While all programs must be provided in a manner that is free from religious influences, it should be noted that
the Georgia Constitution allows the State Housing Trust Fund for the Homeless to expend funds “... for
programs of purely public charity for the homeless, including programs involving the participation of churches
and religious institutions ...”.
Under State law, DCA must collect and evaluate organizational and financial information from nonprofit
organizations in order to establish the capacity of the nonprofit organization prior to making an award, and to
report funding amounts to the Georgia Department of Audits and Accounts.
Additional Eligibility Criteria Current or past DCA grantees must be in compliance with all DCA programs
and grant agreements to apply for and receive funds under this program.
SECTION 7: NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS – CAPACITY CONSIDERATIONS
DCA is required by state law to perform due diligence around organizational capacity before making awards to
nonprofit organizations. Funding decisions for non-profit agencies will be based, in part, on a review of the
following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The complexity or nature of the request,
Organizational structure, operating processes and capacity,
The extent to which the organization operates under the authority of a diversified, involved, volunteer,
community-based board of directors,
Professional management,
The consistency of the organization’s identity or its mission to the provision of homeless or HIV (as
applicable) services,
The extent to which the organization utilizes networks to avoid duplication of housing and services,
Participation in appropriate provider groups and Continuums of Care,
Sound operating procedures, accounting policy and controls;
The presence and accuracy of financial management systems, accounts, funds, reports, tax returns, etc.,
Unrestricted financial resources available to the agency; and
Organizational and financial policy, controls, stability and capacity.
SECTION 8: ELIGIBLE ACTIVITIES AND BENEFICIARIES
This section is based on the HEARTH Act and is subject to change based upon further refinement of
regulations or other rules issued by HUD.
A. HUD ESG Eligible Activities
(1) Street Outreach – ESG funds may be used for costs of providing essential services necessary to
reach out to unsheltered homeless people; connect them with emergency shelter, housing, or critical
services; and provide urgent, non-facility-based care to unsheltered homeless people who are
unwilling or unable to access emergency shelter, housing, or an appropriate health facility. For the
purposes of this section, the term ‘‘unsheltered homeless people’’ means individuals and families
who qualify as homeless under paragraph (1)(i) of the ‘‘homeless’’ definition under § 576.2. The
eligible costs and requirements for essential services consist of:
a.
Engagement. The costs of activities to locate, identify, and build relationships with
unsheltered homeless people and engage them for the purpose of providing immediate support,
intervention, and connections with homeless assistance programs and/or mainstream social services
and housing programs. These activities consist of making an initial assessment of needs and
eligibility; providing crisis counseling; addressing urgent physical needs, such as providing meals,
blankets, clothes, or toiletries; and actively connecting and providing information and referrals to
programs targeted to homeless people and mainstream social services and housing programs,
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including emergency shelter, transitional housing, community-based services, permanent supportive
housing, and rapid re-housing programs. Eligible costs include the cell phone costs of outreach
workers during the performance of these activities.
b.
Case management. The cost of assessing housing and service needs, arranging, coordinating,
and monitoring the delivery of individualized services to meet the needs of the program participant.
Eligible services and activities are as follows: using the centralized or coordinated assessment system
as required under § 576.400(d); conducting the initial evaluation required under § 576.401(a),
including verifying and documenting eligibility; counseling; developing, securing and coordinating
services; obtaining Federal, State, and local benefits; monitoring and evaluating program participant
progress; providing information and referrals to other providers; and developing an individualized
housing and service plan, including planning a path to permanent housing stability.
c.
Emergency health services. (i) Eligible costs are for the direct outpatient treatment of medical
conditions and are provided by licensed medical professionals operating in community-based
settings, including streets, parks, and other places where unsheltered homeless people are living. (ii)
ESG funds may be used only for these services to the extent that other appropriate health services are
inaccessible or unavailable within the area. (iii) Eligible treatment consists of assessing a program
participant’s health problems and developing a treatment plan; assisting program participants to
understand their health needs; providing directly or assisting program participants to obtain
appropriate emergency medical treatment; and providing medication and follow-up services.
d.
Emergency mental health services: (i) Eligible costs are the direct outpatient treatment by
licensed professionals of mental health conditions operating in community-based settings, including
streets, parks, and other places where unsheltered people are living. (ii) ESG funds may be used
only for these services to the extent that other appropriate mental health services are inaccessible or
unavailable within the community. (iii) Mental health services are the application of therapeutic
processes to personal, family, situational, or occupational problems in order to bring about positive
resolution of the problem or improved individual or family functioning or circumstances. (iv)
Eligible treatment consists of crisis interventions, the prescription of psychotropic medications,
explanation about the use and management of medications, and combinations of therapeutic
approaches to address multiple problems.
e.
Transportation. The transportation costs of travel by outreach workers, social workers,
medical professionals, or other service providers are eligible, provided that this travel takes place
during the provision of services eligible under this section. The costs of transporting unsheltered
people to emergency shelters or other service facilities are also eligible. These costs include the
following: (i) The cost of a program participant’s travel on public transportation; (ii) If service
workers use their own vehicles, mileage allowance for service workers to visit program participants;
(iii) The cost of purchasing or leasing a vehicle for the recipient or subrecipient in which staff
transports program participants and/or staff serving program participants, and the cost of gas,
insurance, taxes and maintenance for the vehicle; and (iv) The travel costs of recipient or
subrecipient staff to accompany or assist program participants to use public transportation.
(2) Emergency Shelter - ESG funds may be used for costs of providing essential services to homeless
families and individuals in emergency shelters, operating emergency shelters and issuing hotel/motel
vouchers.
Hotel/Motel Vouchers – to be used in the absence of adequate or appropriate shelter based upon
documented needs in areas where rapid re-housing or outreach programs exist. Recipients awarded
with this funding must have a direct connection to a program making placements into permanent
housing and must be located within the Georgia Balance of State CoC.
Services:
12
a.
Case management. The cost of assessing, arranging, coordinating, and monitoring the delivery
of individualized services to meet the needs of the program participant is eligible. Component
services and activities consist of: (A) Using the centralized or coordinated assessment system as
required under § 576.400(d); (B) Conducting the initial evaluation required under § 576.401(a),
including verifying and documenting eligibility; (C) Counseling; (D) Developing, securing, and
coordinating services and obtaining Federal, State, and local benefits; (E) Monitoring and evaluating
program participant progress; (F) Providing information and referrals to other providers; (G)
Providing ongoing risk assessment and safety planning with victims of domestic violence, dating
violence, sexual assault, and stalking; and (H) Developing an individualized housing and service
plan, including planning a path to permanent housing stability.
b.
Child care. The costs of child care for program participants, including providing meals and
snacks, and comprehensive and coordinated sets of appropriate developmental activities, are eligible.
The children must be under the age of 13, unless they are disabled. Disabled children must be under
the age of 18. The child-care center must be licensed by the jurisdiction in which it operates in order
for its costs to be eligible.
c.
Education services. When necessary for the program participant to obtain and maintain
housing, the costs of improving knowledge and basic educational skills are eligible. Services include
instruction or training in consumer education, health education, substance abuse prevention, literacy,
English as a Second Language, and General Educational Development (GED). Component services
or activities are screening, assessment and testing; individual or group instruction; tutoring; provision
of books, supplies and instructional material; counseling; and referral to community resources.
d.
Employment assistance and job training. The costs of employment assistance and job training
programs are eligible, including classroom, online, and/or computer instruction; on-the-job
instruction; and services that assist individuals in securing employment, acquiring learning skills,
and/or increasing earning potential. Learning skills include those skills that can be used to secure and
retain a job. Services that assist individuals in securing employment consist of employment
screening, assessment, or testing; structured job skills and job-seeking skills; special training and
tutoring, including literacy training and prevocational training; books and instructional material;
counseling or job coaching; and referral to community resources.
e.
Outpatient health services. Eligible costs are for the direct outpatient treatment of medical
conditions and are provided by licensed medical professionals. Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG)
funds may be used only for these services to the extent that other appropriate health services are
unavailable within the community. Eligible treatment consists of assessing a program participant’s
health problems and developing a treatment plan; assisting program participants to understand their
health needs; providing directly or assisting program participants to obtain appropriate medical
treatment, preventive medical care, and health maintenance services, including emergency medical
services; providing medication and follow-up services; and providing preventive and non-cosmetic
dental care.
f.
Legal services. (A) Eligible costs are the hourly fees for legal advice and representation by
attorneys licensed and in good standing with the bar association of the State in which the services are
provided, and by person(s) under the supervision of the licensed attorney, regarding matters that
interfere with the program participant’s ability to obtain and retain housing. (B) Emergency
Solutions Grant (ESG) funds may be used only for these services to the extent that other appropriate
legal services are unavailable or inaccessible within the community. (C) Eligible subject matters are
child support, guardianship, paternity, emancipation, and legal separation, orders of protection and
other civil remedies for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking,
and appeal of veterans and public benefit claim denials. (D) Component services or activities may
include client intake, preparation of cases for trial, provision of legal advice, representation at
hearings, and counseling. (E) Fees based on the actual service performed (i.e., fee for service) are
also eligible, but only if the cost would be less than the cost of hourly fees. Filing fees and other
necessary court costs are also eligible. If the subrecipient is a legal services provider and performs
13
the services itself, the eligible costs are the subrecipient’s employees’ salaries and other costs
necessary to perform the services. (F) Legal services for immigration and citizenship matters and
issues relating to mortgages are ineligible costs. Retainer fee arrangements and contingency fee
arrangements are ineligible costs.
g.
Life skills training. The costs of teaching critical life management skills that may never have
been learned or have been lost during the course of physical or mental illness, domestic violence,
substance use, and homelessness are eligible costs. These services must be necessary to assist the
program participant to function independently in the community. Component life skills training are
budgeting resources, managing money, managing a household, resolving conflict, shopping for food
and needed items, improving nutrition, using public transportation, and parenting.
h.
Mental health services. (A) Eligible costs are the direct outpatient treatment by licensed
professionals of mental health conditions. (B) ESG funds may only be used for these services to the
extent that other appropriate mental health services are unavailable or inaccessible within the
community. (C) Mental health services are the application of therapeutic processes to personal,
family, situational, or occupational problems in order to bring about positive resolution of the
problem or improved individual or family functioning or circumstances. Problem areas may include
family and marital relationships, parent-child problems, or symptom management. (D) Eligible
treatment consists of crisis interventions; individual, family, or group therapy sessions; the
prescription of psychotropic medications or explanations about the use and management of
medications; and combinations of therapeutic approaches to address multiple problems.
i.
Substance abuse treatment services. (A) Eligible substance abuse treatment services are
designed to prevent, reduce, eliminate, or deter relapse of substance abuse or addictive behaviors and
are provided by licensed or certified professionals. (B) ESG funds may only be used for these
services to the extent that other appropriate substance abuse treatment services are unavailable or
inaccessible within the community. (C) Eligible treatment consists of client intake and assessment,
and outpatient treatment for up to 30 days. Group and individual counseling and drug testing are
eligible costs. Inpatient detoxification and other inpatient drug or alcohol treatment are not eligible
costs.
j.
Transportation. Eligible costs consist of the transportation costs of a program participant’s
travel to and from medical care, employment, child care, or other eligible essential services facilities.
These costs include the following: (A) The cost of a program participant’s travel on public
transportation; (B) If service workers use their own vehicles, mileage allowance for service workers
to visit program participants; (C) The travel costs of recipient or subrecipient staff to accompany or
assist program participants to use public transportation.
k.
Shelter operations. Eligible costs are the costs of maintenance (including minor or routine
repairs), rent, security, fuel, equipment, insurance, utilities, food, furnishings, and supplies necessary
for the operation of the emergency shelter. Where no appropriate emergency shelter is available for a
homeless family or individual, eligible costs may also include a hotel or motel voucher for that
family or individual.
The age, of a child under age 18 must not be used as a basis for denying any family’s admission to
an emergency shelter that uses Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funding or services and provides
shelter to families with children under age 18.
(3) Rental Assistance – See 24 CFR 576.104 – 106 for detailed and further guidance. Includes the
provision of short-term or medium-term payments for rents or utilities. Assistance may be tenant or
project-based. Beneficiaries may include homeless individuals or families (rapid re-housing), or
individuals or families at risk of homelessness (homelessness prevention). Regional implementations
are preferred for this activity.
(4) Stabilization Services – See 24 CFR 576.104 – 106 for detailed and further guidance. Includes
services associated with rental assistance, to include housing search, mediation or outreach to
landlords, legal services, credit repair, providing security or utility deposits, utility payments, rental
14
assistance for a final month at a location, assistance with moving costs, or other activities (including
hotel/motel vouchers) that are effective at:
(a) stabilizing individuals and families in their current housing (homelessness
prevention); or
(b) (quickly moving such individuals and families to other permanent housing (rapid rehousing).
(5) HMIS – See 24 CFR 576.107 for detailed and further guidance. Includes costs of contributing data
to the Pathways COMPASS Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) or ALICE in
support of the efforts of an emergency shelter or a rapid re-housing program. These funds are
reserved for Balance of State Continuum of Care or DCA ESG Entitlement areas for Federallyfunded ESG programs with large implementations; those serving a high volume of clients or
programs with particularly demanding HMIS requirements such as prevention. Eligible costs
include: software, data entry, limited assistance obtaining HMIS technical assistance and training,
and user fees.
B. HTF ESG Eligible Activities
In addition to the HUD ESG Eligible Activities named in the preceding section, HTF ESG Eligibility
Activities may also include:
(1) Hotel/Motel Vouchers – to be used in the absence of adequate or appropriate shelter based upon
documented needs in areas where rapid re-housing or outreach programs exist. Recipients awarded
with this funding must have a direct connection to a program making placements into permanent
housing and must be located in Continua of Care (CoC) other than the Georgia Balance of State CoC.
(2) Transitional Housing - maintenance, operation, insurance, provision of utilities, provision of
furnishings or the provision of essential services related to Transitional Housing.
(3) Essential Services - the provision of essential services, limited to employment, transportation, child
care, aftercare case management, and SSI/SSDI Outreach And Recovery benefits services. These
programs must be directly connected to programs moving clients into permanent housing.
(4) Project Homeless Connect - funding to coordinate and sponsor a one-day, one-stop Project Homeless
Connect event to deliver services to people experiencing homelessness in the community. At a
minimum, the event should provide an array of social services including healthcare, legal aid,
housing assistance, job opportunities, benefits enrollment opportunities and quality of life resources
with the underlying idea to get as many as possible on a track to self-sufficiency and, ultimately, into
permanent housing.
15
C. Definition of “Homeless” Individual or Family
Category 1
(1) A “homeless” individual or family is generally defined as follows:
a. an individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence;
b. an individual or family with a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not
designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings, including
a car, park, abandoned building, bus or train station, airport, or camping ground;
c. a homeless, as defined above, individual or family immediately thereafter living in a supervised
publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements
(including hotels and motels paid for by Federal, State, or local government programs for lowincome individuals or by charitable organizations, congregate shelters, and transitional housing);
d. an individual who resided in a shelter or place not meant for human habitation [see a. and b.
above] and who is exiting an institution where he or she … resided less than 90-days;
Category 2
e. an individual or family who—
(A)
will imminently lose their housing, including housing they own, rent, or live in without
paying rent, are sharing with others, and rooms in hotels or motels not paid for by Federal,
State, or local government programs for low-income individuals or by charitable
organizations, as evidenced by:
(i) a court order resulting from an eviction action that notifies the individual or family
that they must leave within 14 days;
(ii) the individual or family having a primary nighttime residence that is a room in a
hotel or motel and where they lack the resources necessary to reside there for more than
14 days; or
(iii) credible evidence indicating that the owner or renter of the housing will not allow the
individual or family to stay for more than 14 days, and any oral statement from an
individual or family seeking homeless assistance that is found to be credible shall be
considered credible evidence for purposes of this clause;
(B)
has no subsequent residence identified; and
(C)
lacks the resources or support networks needed to obtain other permanent housing; and
Category 3
f.
unaccompanied youth and homeless families with children and youth defined as homeless under
other Federal statutes who-(A) have experienced a long term period without living independently in permanent housing,
(B) have experienced persistent instability as measured by frequent moves over such period, and
(C) can be expected to continue in such status for an extended period of time because of chronic
disabilities, chronic physical health or mental health conditions, substance addiction, histories
of domestic violence or childhood abuse, the presence of a child or youth with a disability, or
multiple barriers to employment.
Category 4
(2) Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, any individual or family who is fleeing, or is
attempting to flee, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or other dangerous or
life-threatening conditions in the individual's or family's current housing situation, including where
the health and safety of children are jeopardized, and who have no other residence and lack the
resources or support networks to obtain other permanent housing.
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Exclusion
(3) Exclusion – Eligible persons do not include any individual imprisoned or otherwise detained pursuant
to an Act of the Congress or a State law.
D. Definition of “At Risk” Individual or Family
An “at risk” individual or family is generally defined as follows:
Category 1
(1) has family income below 30 percent of median income for the geographic area;
(2) has insufficient resources immediately available to attain housing stability; and
(3) meets one or more of the following criteria:
(i)
has moved frequently because of economic reasons;
(ii)
is living in the home of another because of economic hardship;
(iii) has been notified that their right to occupy their current housing or living situation will be
terminated;
(iv)
lives in a hotel or motel;
(v)
lives in severely overcrowded housing;
(vi)
is exiting an institution; or
(vii) otherwise lives in housing that has characteristics associated with instability and an increased
risk of homelessness (as defined in the Consolidated Plan for the jurisdiction).
Category 2
Such term includes all families with children and youth defined as homeless under other Federal statutes. Note
that there are limits on expenses within this category in continuums where homelessness (sheltered and
unsheltered) is 1/10 or more of 1% of the total population (reference CPD-12-001).
Category 3
This category includes children/youth who qualify as homeless under the Education for Children and Youth
program (Section 725(2) of the McKinney-Vento Act) and the parents or guardians of that child/youth if living
with him/her.
E. Definition of “Chronically Homeless” Individual or Family
The term `chronically homeless' means, with respect to an individual or family, that the individual or family:
(1) is currently homeless and lives or resides in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or
in an emergency shelter; and
(2) has been homeless and living or residing in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or
in an emergency shelter continuously for at least 1 year OR on at least 4 separate occasions in the last
3 years; and
(3) has an adult head of household (or a minor head of household if no adult is present in the household)
with a diagnosable substance use disorder, serious mental illness, developmental disability [as
defined in section 102 of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000
(42 U.S.C. 15002)], post traumatic stress disorder, cognitive impairments resulting from a brain
injury, or chronic physical illness or disability, including the co-occurrence of 2 or more of those
conditions
A person who currently lives or resides in an institutional care facility, including a jail, substance abuse or
mental health treatment facility, hospital or other similar facility, and has resided there for fewer than 90 days
shall be considered “chronically homeless” if such person met all of the requirements described above prior to
entering that facility.
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F. Definition of “Homeless Individual with a Disability”
The term `homeless individual with a disability' means an individual who is “homeless,” as otherwise defined
herein, and has a disability that -
(1) meets all four of the following criteria:
a.
b.
c.
d.
is expected to be long-continuing or of indefinite duration;
substantially impedes the individual's ability to live independently;
could be improved by the provision of more suitable housing conditions; and
is either
(A) a physical, mental, or emotional impairment, including an impairment caused by alcohol or
drug abuse, post traumatic stress disorder, or brain injury;
(B) a developmental disability, as defined in section 102 of the Developmental Disabilities
Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000 (42 U.S.C. 15002); OR
(C) the disease of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or any condition arising from the
etiologic agency for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.
For all ESG activities besides Homelessness Prevention, only “homeless persons” are eligible to receive
benefits. Organizations receiving funds must maintain DCA-prescribed documentation to support benefit to
homeless persons.
SECTION 9: SERVING FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN
Organizations that provide HUD HEARTH funds (ESG or CoC) for emergency shelter to families with
children under age 18 shall not deny admission to any family based on the age of any child under age 18.
Providing these families with stays in a hotel/motel or other off-site facility does not suffice. If your facility
serves families, it must accommodate all families.
SECTION 10: RAPID RE-HOUSING AND HOMELESSNESS PREVENTION
Of the $5.8 million dollars expected to be available for awards this year, DCA expects to make about
approximately$500,000 available for homelessness prevention and $2 million dollars available for rapid rehousing. DCA is expecting to make primary prevention and re-housing investments within its congressionally
mandated 153-county balance of state Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG) entitlement area. Based on the
2013 homeless census, approximately 7,650 persons were homeless within this area, which has been
historically underserved. Moreover, there is a congressional requirement to spend at least 40% of the total
federal allotment of ESG funds allocated to DCA on prevention and rapid re-housing activities.
Rapid Re-Housing programs are designed to help those who are homeless quickly transition out of
homelessness into permanent housing. The primary goal is to stabilize a program participant in permanent
housing as quickly as possible and to provide wrap-around services after the family or individual obtains
housing. Individuals or households receiving this funding must have an income level at or below 50% AMI.
Enrollment in a rapid re-housing program should rely heavily on a guided case management plan to ensure
long term stability for program participants. First preference for this funding will be given to applicants who
demonstrate an effective implementation plan that will increase household incomes for program participants
and those who demonstrate low barriers to entry for program participants. Length of stay should be based on
the needs of individual households participating in the program.
Homelessness prevention services are most efficiently used when targeted to those at greatest risk of losing
housing due to an eviction notice. Households receiving this funding must have an income level below 30%
AMI, must demonstrate that they do not have sufficient resources or support networks to prevent them from
moving to an emergency shelter or other place defined under Category 1 of the homeless definition.
Successful implementation of a prevention program relies heavily on a guided case management plan to ensure
long term stability for program participants. First preference for this funding will be given to applicants who
18
demonstrate an ability to negotiate with landlords as the first step in resolving eviction crises. First preference
will also be given to applicants who demonstrate an implementation plan to effectively target households at
greatest risk of homelessness. Successful applicants will demonstrate a plan to effectively increase household
incomes for program participants. Length of stay should be based on the needs of individual households
participating in the program.
SECTION 11: PROJECT HOMELESS CONNECT
Project Homeless Connect
Eligible applicants may receive funding to coordinate and sponsor a one-day Project Homeless Connect event
to deliver services to people experiencing homelessness in the community. Project Homeless Connect events
are designed to facilitate understanding and cooperation among homeless service providers, volunteers,
homeless individuals and families, community leaders, local government, housing agencies, funding agencies,
human service agencies, ecumenical groups and others with an interest in homeless issues.
At a minimum, the event should provide an array of social services including housing assistance, legal aid, job
opportunities, benefits enrollment opportunities and quality of life resources, healthcare, including access to
services offered through the Affordable Healthcare Act. Additional services can be offered, but the goal is to
provide permanent housing to as many participants as necessary.
Limited funding is available and DCA will not fund duplicative efforts. Only one agency per community,
service area or region (at DCA discretion) may receive these funds. Funded agencies are expected to
demonstrate collaboration in making application for funds.
All applicants must submit a proposed date and location for the event.
General administration of the applicant agency is not an eligible ESG activity. Only program costs are
eligible, and costs are eligible only to the extent that they are eligible under Federal ESG regulations (24 CFR
576.21).
SECTION 12: FUNDING LIMITS
DCA will make minimum grant awards of $20,000 for all eligible activities except HMIS, Project Homeless
Connect, and Hotel/Motel Voucher grants. Maximum grant amounts are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Emergency Shelter, up to $50,000 per program or $1,000/$500 per average family/person per night
Transitional Housing, up to $30,000 per program or $700/$300 per average family/person per night
Essential Services, up to $75,000 per program
Short- and Medium-Term Rental Assistance and Stabilization Services, average costs per
family/household will vary by region according to rent reasonableness and fair market rents for the
area and approval by DCA
Project Homeless Connect, $2,000
HMIS, up to $25,000
Hotel/Motel Vouchers, up to $25,000
Street Outreach, up to $30,000
SECTION 13: RATING CRITERIA
Funding decisions and amounts will be based upon the following:
1. Threshold Criteria
There are certain considerations that may result in an application being automatically returned or denied for
funding without being scored. These threshold requirements include, but are not limited to –
19
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
One of the two deadlines is missed,
HMIS or ALICE non-participation or substantial non-compliance,
Application substantially incomplete,
Consistent lack of performance,
Consistent non-compliance (financial, reporting, other),
Ineligible applicant – lacks 501(c)3,
New organizations should have been in business and fully operational for 2 years and able to produce
minimum financial statements and filings with the IRS for that period, financial policies and
procedures, program policies and procedures,
Failure to Obtain Local Approval or Certification of Consistency, as applicable,
Serving ineligible populations (not homeless by HUD definition and verification standard),
Insufficient or ineligible match amount or source,
Use of projected program income or client fees as a match source,
For DV agencies a failure to submit HUD Annual Performance Report (APR) for entire prior or
current program year by application deadline,
Inability to keep families intact for service,
Non-compliance with McKinney Vento education requirements (DCA policy),
Non-compliance with completion of Barriers to Housing Stability. Assessments (other than new
applicants),
Non-compliance with coordinated assessment/intake,
Transitional housing programs must primarily serve special needs populations to include those
experiencing challenges of mental health, substance abuse, chronic homelessness, domestic violence,
runaway and homeless youth. This must be reflected in the HMIS data,
Length of stay less than two weeks for an emergency shelter.
2. Rating Criteria
Individual scores by program will be assessed according to the following criteria -•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Extent to which program serves exclusively (100%) “homeless” persons,
Completeness of the grant application,
Whether program is in DCA ESG Entitlement area or Balance of State Continuum of Care (CoC),
Lack of barriers to program entry, including proven track record of serving program participants with high
needs, such as chronically homeless, and clients with mental health or substance abuse issues,
Need for project and population serviced,
Agency participation in:
o CoC Planning, Homeless Coalition meetings
o Homeless Count, Project Homeless Connect
o DCA-sponsored trainings for current ESG grantees
Ability to design and successfully manage program under current regulations and priorities for the ESG
program,
Program and agency performance including -o monitoring compliance,
o compliance with HMIS or ALICE policies and procedures,
o ability to meet program requirements and goals successfully,
o ability to spend past grant awards in timely manner,
o increases in income and benefits during program enrollment,
o exits to permanent destinations,
o returns to homelessness
Strength of program design and implementation strategy,
Use of reputable data to describe need (homeless counts), clients served, local coordination, goals, outputs,
outcomes, etc.),
20
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Staffing and match levels promote ability to serve number of participants projected,
Organizational experience, capacity, and stability,
o Capacity and oversight of Board of Directors,
o Budgeting and financial reporting,
Efficient and effective use of HMIS, adherence to HMIS policy and procedures, and ability to deliver data
of high quality,
Adherence to DCA Housing Support Standards,
For supportive services, the degree to which the application demonstrates that mainstream services are not
available for the program,
Consistency with local need, conformance to local plans and service delivery strategy, and priorities
outlined by the local Continuum of Care,
Ability to procure outside resources for programs in application, including the value and quality of
applicant’s contributions (cash and in-kind),
Ability to demonstrate how match sources benefit specific program participants,
Standard costs for housing and services in the area,
Degree of compliance demonstrated during DCA monitoring visits or in desk audits,
Relative quality of housing or standards for services to be provided,
Amount of funds requested compared to service provided,
Level of service (numbers of persons, hours of service, etc.),
Demonstrated ability of the agency to provide necessary services to homeless individuals or through
documented MOUs or letters of agreement with other service providers,
Other relevant factors.
Lower scoring applications will not be funded.
SECTION 14: MATCHING REQUIREMENTS
DCA should not be the sole source of funding for any program for which application is made in this
competition. In addition, all match sources and amounts reported in applications should reflect resources that
directly benefit recipients of the program contained within the application.
All applicants must provide at least a 100% match consisting of documented non-McKinney Vento resources.
In addition to cash, match sources may include the value of any lease on a building, the actual value of
professional services, any salary paid to staff to carry out the program, and the value of the time and services
contributed by volunteers to carry out the program. The value of volunteer hours should equal the cost
necessary to provide the services in question if the agency had to pay for these services at market rates.
Regulation states that, “Services provided by individuals must be valued at rates consistent with those
ordinarily paid for similar work in the recipient‘s or subrecipient‘s organization. If the recipient or subrecipient
does not have employees performing similar work, the rates must be consistent with those ordinarily paid by
other employers for similar work in the same labor market.”
SECTION 15: OTHER APPLICATION GUIDANCE AND REQUIREMENTS
A. Shelter and Housing Standards
All emergency shelter and transitional housing facilities funded by ESG must comply with Section 576.403 of
regulations requiring:
(b) Minimum standards for emergency shelters.
21
… Any emergency shelter that receives assistance for shelter operations must also meet the following minimum
safety, sanitation, and privacy standards.
(1) Structure and materials. The shelter building must be structurally sound to protect residents from the elements
and not pose any threat to health and safety of the residents. Any renovation (including major rehabilitation and
conversion) carried out with ESG assistance must use Energy Star and WaterSense products and appliances.
(2) Access. The shelter must be accessible in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794)
and implementing regulations at 24 CFR part 8; the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601 et seq.) and implementing
regulations at 24 CFR part 100; and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (42 U.S.C. 12131 et seq.) and 28
CFR part 35; where applicable.
(3) Space and security. Except where the shelter is intended for day use only, the shelter must provide each program
participant in the shelter with an acceptable place to sleep and adequate space and security for themselves and their
belongings.
(4) Interior air quality. Each room or space within the shelter must have a natural or mechanical means of
ventilation. The interior air must be free of pollutants at a level that might threaten or harm the health of residents.
(5) Water supply. The shelter’s water supply must be free of contamination.
(6) Sanitary facilities. Each program participant in the shelter must have access to sanitary facilities that are in
proper operating condition, are private, and are adequate for personal cleanliness and the disposal of human waste.
(7) Thermal environment. The shelter must have any necessary heating/ cooling facilities in proper operating
condition.
(8) Illumination and electricity. The shelter must have adequate natural or artificial illumination to permit normal
indoor activities and support health and safety. There must be sufficient electrical sources to permit the safe use of
electrical appliances in the shelter.
(9) Food preparation. Food preparation areas, if any, must contain suitable space and equipment to store, prepare,
and serve food in a safe and sanitary manner.
(10) Sanitary conditions. The shelter must be maintained in a sanitary condition.
(11) Fire safety. There must be at least one working smoke detector in each occupied unit of the shelter. Where
possible, smoke detectors must be located near sleeping areas. The fire alarm system must be designed for hearingimpaired residents. All public areas of the shelter must have at least one working smoke detector. There must also
be a second means of exiting the building in the event of fire or other emergency.
(c) Minimum standards for permanent housing.
For Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing programs, all housing must meet the following minimum
safety, sanitation and privacy standards:
(1) Structure and materials. The structures must be structurally sound to protect residents from the elements and not
pose any threat to the health and safety of the residents.
(2) Space and security. Each resident must be provided adequate space and security for themselves and their
belongings. Each resident must be provided an acceptable place to sleep.
(3) Interior air quality. Each room or space must have a natural or mechanical means of ventilation. The interior air
must be free of pollutants at a level that might threaten or harm the health of residents.
(4) Water supply. The water supply must be free from contamination.
(5) Sanitary facilities. Residents must have access to sufficient sanitary facilities that are in proper operating
condition, are private, and are adequate for personal cleanliness and the disposal of human waste.
(6) Thermal environment. The housing must have any necessary heating/cooling facilities in proper operating
condition.
(7) Illumination and electricity. The structure must have adequate natural or artificial illumination to permit normal
indoor activities and support health and safety. There must be sufficient electrical sources to permit the safe use of
electrical appliances in the structure.
(8) Food preparation. All food preparation areas must contain suitable space and equipment to store, prepare, and
serve food in a safe and sanitary manner.
(9) Sanitary conditions. The housing must be maintained in a sanitary condition.
(10) Fire safety. (i) There must be a second means of exiting the building in the event of fire or other emergency.
(ii) Each unit must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper working condition,
on each occupied level of the unit. Smoke detectors must be located, to the extent practicable, in a hallway adjacent
to a bedroom. If the unit is occupied by hearing impaired persons, smoke detectors must have an alarm system
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designed for hearing-impaired persons in each bedroom occupied by a hearing-impaired person. (iii) The public
areas of all housing must be equipped with a sufficient number, but not less than one for each area, of batteryoperated or hard-wired smoke detectors. Public areas include, but are not limited to, laundry rooms, community
rooms, day care centers, hallways, stairwells, and other common areas.
B. Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) and ALICE Compliance
In conjunction with entitlement communities, continuums of care, other partners throughout the State and the
PATHWAYS Community Network Institute, DCA will continue to support agency level implementation and
use of HMIS.
Applicants with existing DCA ESG or S+C awards must be in compliance with DCA’s HMIS policies and
procedures, as updated from time to time and posted on the DCA website. New applicants must be in full
compliance prior to grant agreement and drawdown of funds. Substantial failure to address DCA’s written
HMIS concerns or findings may result in application rejection without scoring. Per page 24 in the ESG
Guidebook, DV providers must provide DCA with data from the HUD Annual Performance Report (APR) in
ALICE that meets the same standards required of agencies using HMIS.
C. Housing Support Standards and Performance Measurement
All ESG applicants and grantees must comply with DCA’s Housing Support Standards in order to receive and
retain funds. These standards are posted on the DCA website and may be updated from time to time by DCA
staff.
The Housing Support Standards require participation in coordinated outreach, intake, referral, and case
management systems within the continuum of care in order to provide, in conjunction with other providers,
appropriate housing and supportive services to better enable homeless persons to achieve success and end their
homelessness. The standards require most grantees to: a) assess consumer needs and barriers to housing; b)
work to move homeless individuals into transitional housing, permanent supportive housing, or other
permanent housing; c) document and track referrals to housing and service providers; and d) track participant
progress and outcomes; including post-discharge outcomes.
Organizations will be required to document these efforts through the Pathways COMPASS system. Family
violence agencies that are exempt from participating in HMIS are required to document these efforts through
an alternative method. Information regarding the Standards and how to implement them can be found on the
DCA website at http://www.dca.ga.gov/housing/specialneeds/programs/HousingSupportStandards.asp.
D. Faith-Based Activities
Faith-based and religious organizations may not discriminate against a program beneficiary or prospective
program beneficiary on the basis of religion or religious belief.
Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible on the same basis as any other non-profit
organization. These organizations may not engage in inherently religious activities, such as worship, religious
instruction or proselytization as a part of programs or services funded under the ESG or HOPWA programs. If
an organization conducts such activities, the activities must be offered separately in time or location from the
programs or services funded under the ESG and HOPWA programs. Participation in these programs must be
voluntary for clients.
Faith-based or religious organizations will retain their independence from Federal, State and local
governments, and may carry out their missions, including the definition, practice and expression of religious
beliefs, provided that no ESG or HOPWA funds are used to support any inherently religious activities, such as
worship, instruction or proselytization. Organizations may use space in their facilities to provide ESG or
HOPWA services without removing religious art, icons, scriptures or other religious symbols. Organizations
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may also retain authority over internal governance, including terms in organization name, selection of board
members on a religious basis, and religious references in mission statements and other governing documents.
E. Georgia Open Records Act
All records created as a result of the submission of an Application to participate are subject to disclosure under
the Georgia Open Records Act and the applicant expressly consents to such disclosure. The Applicant agrees
to hold harmless the State Housing Trust Fund for the Homeless, the Georgia Housing and Finance Authority
and the Georgia Department of Community Affairs against all losses, costs, damages, expenses, and liability
of any nature or kind (including but not limited to attorney’s fees, litigation and court costs) directly or
indirectly resulting from or arising out of the release of any information pertaining to the Applicant’s
submission of an Application and implementation of any activities as a result of funding under this program,
pursuant to a request under the Georgia Open Records Act.
F. Persons With Disabilities
ESG grantees are strongly encouraged to document disability at first encounter. This is because HUD places
much preference for persons with disabilities in its Continuum of Care programs. DCA’s disability
verification format (required for DCA S+C programs) is on line at
http://www.dca.ga.gov/housing/specialneeds/programs/downloads/ShelterPlusCare/2_DCA_Disability_Verific
ation_(REV09-06).doc.
In general, HUD finds a person with disabilities to be an adult who is either (1) on SSI/SSDI, (2) with
developmental disability, or (3) based on physician certification, a person with a physical, mental, or
emotional impairment that is expected to be of long-continued and indefinite duration; substantially impedes
his or her ability to live independently; and is of such a nature that ability to live independently could be
improved by more suitable housing conditions.
G. State and Federal Financial Reporting/Audit Requirements for Nonprofit Agencies
On July 1, 1998 Senate Bill 474 became effective as law (OCGA Title 50, Chapter 20) in Georgia. This
chapter is entitled Relations With Nonprofit Contractors. The law states that “The intent of this chapter is to
provide auditing and reporting requirements for nonprofit organizations which provide services and facilities
to the state, to ensure the financial accountability of nonprofit contractors, and to develop adequate
information concerning nonprofit contractors. The General Assembly finds that the state has a right and a
duty to monitor nonprofit organizations which contract with the state to ensure that their activities are in the
public interest and to ensure that public funds are used for proper purposes.”
H. Other State and Federal Requirements
Program requirements include, but are by no means limited to, the following:
To the extent practicable, as determined by DCA, grantees must comply with the HUD Emergency Solutions
Grant Program Regulations at 24 CFR Part 576, as amended.
1) All grants to non-profit organizations are subject to the administrative requirements and cost principals
outlined in OMB Circulars A-110 and A-122. These requirements for local governments are outlined
in 24 CFR, Part 85 and OMB Circular A-87.
2) Costs requested for reimbursement via automatic deposit by DCA must be “reasonable and
justifiable,” and are only eligible to the extent that they are consistent with the program approved by
DCA.
3) All funds will be reimbursable to grantees based upon actual program expenses with supporting
documentation (retained by grantee).
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4) Expenses are only eligible to the extent that they benefit “homeless persons” under the ESG program,
as defined or referenced herein.
5) All grants are subject to environmental review in accordance with the federal regulations governing
ESG programs.
6) Provisions of House Bill (HB) 87 The Illegal Immigration Reform and Enforcement Act of 2011,
including Contractor Affidavit under O.C.G.A. § 13-10-91(b)(1) and Subcontractor Affidavit under
O.C.G.A. § 13-10-91(b)(3) must be met.
7) All grants are subject to the Federal Requirements of the ESG regulations at 24 CFR 576.407.
(a) The requirements in 24 CFR part 5, subpart A are applicable, including the nondiscrimination and
equal opportunity requirements at 24 CFR 5.105(a). Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development
Act of 1968, 12 U.S.C. 1701u, and implementing regulations at 24 CFR part 135 apply, except that
homeless individuals have priority over other Section 3 residents in accordance with § 576.405(c).
(b) Affirmative outreach. The recipient or subrecipient must make known that use of the facilities,
assistance, and services are available to all on a nondiscriminatory basis. If it is unlikely that the
procedures that the recipient or subrecipient intends to use to make known the availability of the
facilities, assistance, and services will to reach persons of any particular race, color, religion, sex, age,
national origin, familial status, or disability who may qualify for those facilities and services, the
recipient or subrecipient must establish additional procedures that ensure that those persons are made
aware of the facilities, assistance, and services. The recipient and its subrecipients must take
appropriate steps to ensure effective communication with persons with disabilities including, but not
limited to, adopting procedures that will make available to interested persons information concerning
the location of assistance, services, and facilities that are accessible to persons with disabilities.
Consistent with Title VI and Executive Order 13166, recipients and subrecipients are also required to
take reasonable steps to ensure meaningful access to programs and activities for limited English
proficiency (LEP) persons.
SECTION 16: FINANCIAL COMPLIANCE FOR NONPROFIT AGENCIES
According to the State law, 'nonprofit organization' means any corporation, trust, association, cooperative, or
other organization that is operated primarily for scientific, educational, service, charitable, or similar
purposes in the public interest; is not organized primarily for profit; and uses its net proceeds to maintain,
improve, or expand its operations. The term nonprofit organization includes nonprofit institutions of higher
education and hospitals. For financial reporting purposes, guidelines issued by the American Institute of
Certified Public Accountants should be followed in determining nonprofit status.
As a result and among other requirements, DCA must obtain minimum organizational and financial
information from nonprofit organizations in order to establish the viability of the nonprofit organization and to
report award and funding amounts to the Georgia Department of Audits and Accounts.
In return for funds, and among other requirements, nonprofit organizations must make appropriate reports to
the state auditor and to each state agency from which it received funds for each fiscal year within 180 days
from the close of the nonprofit organization’s fiscal year. Reporting formats vary based upon the amount of
“state funds” received by nonprofit organizations during the organization’s fiscal year.
This law also sets forth responsibilities of the state auditor and covers measures to be taken by state agencies if
there are matters of non-compliance. Copies of the law and associated guidance are available upon request by
calling Patricia Wright of DCA at (404) 327-6856. For further compliance information nonprofit applicants
are encouraged to first contact their own internal auditors. Additional information may be obtained from the
State Office of Audits as follows: Georgia Department of Audits and Accounts, Non-Profit and Local
Government Audits Division, 270 Washington Street SW, Suite 1-156, Atlanta, GA 30334-8400. The contact
is Mr. Edward Blaha; phone (404) 651-5115, Email [email protected]
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