A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8

A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Martin J. Bastiaans
30th November 2014
Abstract
A history of IEEE Region 8 spanning its origins from the IRE Region in Europe, through the
IRE/AIEE merger forming the IEEE and subsequently to the present day Region 8 consisting of
Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Included are personal reflections of past directors, committee
meetings and conferences, student activities, award recipients from Region 8, and Region 8 history
papers presented at HISTELCON 2012. A number of archival documents are attached as appendices,
including ephemera and minutes from early Region 8 Committee meetings.
This paper is a living document and is updated whenever new material becomes available.
Feel free to send any comments and suggestions for additions to [email protected]
Contents
Contents
1 Preliminary steps towards and the early history of a new
1.1 Information taken from the Benelux Section archives . . . .
1.2 IRE Region in Europe – Bruce B. Barrow . . . . . . . . . .
1.3 A Region’s ‘Birth Certificate’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.4 The start of Region 8 and its Sections – Robert C. Winton .
1.5 IRE/AIEE Merger – Bruce B. Barrow . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3 IEEE Region 8 Operating Committees and Appointed Members
3.1 Operating Committees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Appointed Representatives – until 1997 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Appointed Coordinators and Subcommittee Chairs – 1998–2006 . . .
3.4 Appointed Coordinators and Subcommittee Chairs – 2007–2012 . . .
3.5 Appointed Coordinators and Subcommittee Chairs – 2013–2014 . . .
3.6 Past Directors gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4 Personal reflections of Past Directors
4.1 Jean D. Lebel (Director 1965-1966) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2 Rolf Remshardt (Treasurer 1983–1998, Director 1999–2000)
4.3 Anthony C. Davies (Director 2003–2004) . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4 Baldomir Zajc (Director 2005–2006) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2 The
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
Region
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later history of IEEE Region 8
The creation of IEEE Region 10 and the extension of Region 8
The Eastward spread of Sections in Region 8 – Tony Davies . .
Yugoslavia Section from 1971 to 1992 – Baldomir Zajc . . . . .
The present IEEE Region 8 Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Geographic Unit statistics at year end . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Membership statistics at year end . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5 IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
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6 IEEE Region 8 conferences
6.1 EUROCON 71 – Reminiscences by Fritz Eggimann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2 Conference activities in Region 8 – The first 30 years – Jacob Baal Schem . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.3 Conference activities in Region 8 – After the first 30 years – Baldomir Zajc . . . . . . . . . . .
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7 Student activities
7.1 The early years of IEEE Region 8 Student Activities – until 1984
7.2 Student Activities Committee meetings – until 1984 . . . . . . .
7.3 Student Branch (and GOLD) Congresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4 Student Paper Contest Finals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
8.1 Medal of Honor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2 IEEE Major Medals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.1 Alexander Graham Bell Medal . . . . .
8.2.2 Edison Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.3 James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal
8.2.4 Medal for Engineering Excellence . . . .
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A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
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Contents
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
8.7
8.2.5 Medal for Environmental & Safety Technologies . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.6 Founders Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.7 Richard W. Hamming Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.8 Heinrich Hertz Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.9 Medal for Innovations in Healthcare Technology . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.10 Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.11 Lamme Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.12 Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.13 Robert N. Noyce Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.14 Dennis J. Picard Medal for Radar Technologies and Applications
8.2.15 Medal in Power Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.16 Simon Ramo Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.17 John von Neumann Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.18 IEEE/RSE Wolfson James Clerk Maxwell Award . . . . . . . . .
IEEE Recognitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3.1 Honorary Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IEEE Service Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.1 Richard M. Emberson Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.2 Haraden Pratt Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IEEE Corporate Recognitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.1 Corporate Innovation Recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.2 Ernst Weber Engineering Leadership Recognition . . . . . . . . .
IEEE Prize Paper Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.1 W.R.G. Baker Prize Paper Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.2 Donald G. Fink Prize Paper Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.3 Leon K. Kirchmayer Prize Paper Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.4 Browder J. Thompson Memorial Prize Paper Award . . . . . . .
IEEE Technical Field Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.1 Biomedical Engineering Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.2 Cledo Brunetti Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.3 Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology Award .
8.7.4 Control Systems Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.5 Electromagnetics Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.6 James L. Flanagan Speech and Audio Processing Award . . . . .
8.7.7 Andrew S. Grove Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.8 William M. Habirshaw Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.9 Herman Halperin Electric Transmission and Distribution Award .
8.7.10 Masaru Ibuka Consumer Electronics Award . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.11 Award in International Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.12 Internet Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.13 Reynold B. Johnson Data Storage Device Technology Award . . .
8.7.14 Reynold B. Johnson Information Storage Systems Award . . . . .
8.7.15 Richard Harold Kaufmann Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.16 Joseph F. Keithley Award in Instrumentation and Measurement .
8.7.17 Mervin J. Kelly Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.18 Gustav Robert Kirchhoff Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.19 Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award . . . . .
8.7.20 Eli Lilly Award in Medical and Biological Engineering . . . . . .
8.7.21 Morris E. Leeds Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.22 Morris N. Liebmann Memorial Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
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Contents
8.7.23 Jack A. Morton Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.24 William E. Newell Power Electronics Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.25 Daniel E. Noble Award for Emerging Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.26 Frederik Philips Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.27 Photonics Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.28 Emanuel R. Piore Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.29 Judith A. Resnik Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.30 Robotics and Automation Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.31 Frank Rosenblatt Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.32 David Sarnoff Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.33 Marie Sklodowska-Curie Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.34 Donald O. Pederson Award in Solid-State Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.35 Charles Proteus Steinmetz Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.36 Eric E. Sumner Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.37 Leon K. Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.38 Undergraduate Teaching Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.39 Nikola Tesla Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.40 Kiyo Tomiyasu Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.41 Vladimir K. Zworykin Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.8 Member and Geographic Activities Board Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.8.1 Outstanding Section Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.8.2 Larry K. Wilson Transnational Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.8.3 Innovation Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.8.4 Leadership Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.8.5 Achievement Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.8.6 GOLD (Graduates of the Last Decade) Achievement Award . . . . . . . . . .
8.8.7 IEEE GOLD / Young Professionals Affinity Group Hall of Fame Award . . .
8.8.8 Friend of IEEE Member and Geographic Activities Awards . . . . . . . . . .
8.9 Educational Activities Board Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.9.1 Meritorious Achievement in Accreditation Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.9.2 Meritorious Achievement in Continuing Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.9.3 Meritorious Achievement in Informal Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.9.4 Pre-University Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.9.5 Major Educational Innovation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.9.6 Meritorious Service to IEEE EAB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.9.7 Employer Professional Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.9.8 Section Professional Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.9.9 EAB Vice President’s Recognition Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.10 Joint Awards Established with National Societies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.10.1 France – SEE/IEEE Joint Brillouin-Glavieux Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.10.2 Iceland – VFI/IEEE Joint Electrical Engineer of the Year Award . . . . . . .
8.11 Region 8 Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.11.1 Region 8 (Section) Volunteer Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.11.2 Region 8 Outstanding Section Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.11.3 Region 8 (Outstanding) GOLD / Young Professionals (Affinity Group) Award
8.11.4 Region 8 GOLD / Young Professionals Exceptional Volunteer Award . . . . .
8.11.5 Region 8 (Small and Large) Chapter of the Year Award . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.11.6 Region 8 Student Branch Chapter of the Year Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.11.7 Larry K. Wilson Regional Student Activities Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.11.8 Clementina Saduwa Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
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Contents
9 Miscellaneous lists
93
9.1 Region 8 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
9.2 IEEE Milestones in Region 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
9.3 Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
10.1 Researching the roots of IEEE Region 8 . . . . .
10.2 Setting up the basis for Region 8 . . . . . . . . .
10.3 Conferences, technical societies and development
10.4 . . . Go East, Region 8, Go East . . . . . . . . . .
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A history of synergy
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A Minutes of the meeting of the IRE Inter-Sectional Committee
125
B Birth certificate
127
C IEEE Regions after the merger
128
D Invitations/agendas for the IRE Region 9 Committee meetings
D.1 Towards the inaugural meeting on Wednesday 6 June 1962 . . . . . .
D.1.1 Letter of 3 May 1962 – Ronald L. McFarlan . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.2 Memorandum of 16 May 1962 – Bruce B. Barrow . . . . . . .
D.1.3 Memorandum (meeting invitation) of 30 May 1962 – Bruce B.
D.2 Towards the second meeting on Monday 22 October 1962 . . . . . .
D.2.1 Notice – John H. Gayer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.2 Meeting invitation of 8 October 1962 – John H. Gayer . . . .
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Barrow
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E Minutes of the two IRE Region 9 Committee meetings
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E.1 Wednesday 6 June 1962 – the inaugural meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
E.2 Monday 22 October 1962 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
F Invitations/agendas for the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
F.1 Monday 22 April 1963 – the first IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting
F.2 Monday 4 November 1963 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.3 Monday 27 April 1964 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.4 Monday 26 October 1964 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.5 Monday 26 April 1965 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.6 Tuesday 7 September 1965 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G Minutes of the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
G.1 Monday 22 April 1963 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.2 Monday 4 November 1963 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.3 Monday 27 April 1964 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.4 Monday 26 October 1964 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.5 Monday 26 April 1965 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
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5
1 Preliminary steps towards and the early history of a new Region
1
Preliminary steps towards and the early history of a new Region
All indented parts are transcriptions of documents that are available in the IEEE Benelux Section archives or
in some other locations. Scanned copies of these documents can be provided upon request. Unfortunately, the
quality of the original documents is very bad; while they can of course be scanned, optical character recognition
is almost impossible. During the transcription, the rough lay-out of the original document has been maintained,
but no effort has been made to correct grammatical errors and remove inconsistencies.
The research in the Benelux Section archives led to the following important dates with respect to the foundation
of our Region.
14 February 1962
6 March 1962
24 April 1962
24 May 1962
6 June 1962
22 October 1962
8 January 1963
22 April 1963
1 January 1970
1 January 1981
1.1
informal meeting of the Inter-Sectional Committee, Europe
4 Sections: Benelux, France, Geneva, Italy
sending of a petition by the Benelux Section to the IRE Board of Directors
to form a new Region, with its territory based on the European Broadcasting
Area defined in the Radio Regulations of the International Telecommunication
Union; the European Broadcasting Area includes the Western part of the
USSR and the territories bordering on the Mediterranean.
approval of the new Region by the IRE Executive Committee
approval of the new Region by the IRE Board of Directors
inaugural meeting of the IRE Region 9 Committee – 12 attendees
6 Sections: Benelux, Egypt (not present), France, Geneva, Israel, Italy
second IRE Region 9 Committee meeting
7 Sections; new Section: United Kingdom & Eire
re-approval by the IEEE Board of Directors (after the merger):
renaming of IRE Region 9 to IEEE Region 8
first IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting
8 Sections; new Section: Norway
Greenland was added to Region 8, and all the countries that were partly in
Region 8 (the USSR and countries in North Africa) are now considered to
belong completely to Region 8.
The rest of Africa was added to Region 8.
Information taken from the Benelux Section archives
The idea for an IRE Region Europe arose at the end of 1959 in the Benelux Section, especially
on the initiative of Bruce B. Barrow,1 at that time the Section’s first Secretary/Treasurer
(till August 1961, but remaining a member of the Section’s Executive Committee until his
returning to the USA in summer 1962). The idea was actually brought up when Lloyd
V. Berkner, a member of the IRE Board of Directors, attended the first (!) Benelux Section
meeting on 3 October 1959. In a subsequent letter to Lloyd Berkner dated 4 October 1959,
Bruce Barrow states:
We believe it would be very helpful to us to have Europe (including Russia) designated as Region 9.
Boundaries might be drawn to include Egypt and Israel Sections. Such a step would give Europe a
Regional Director, and might accelerate the formation of other European Sections, with whom we
could effectively cooperate.
However, at that time, the IRE Board of Directors decided that the time was not yet ripe.
One year later, the idea was brought to the attention of the IRE President, Ronald L. McFarlan, in a letter by
Bruce Barrow, dated 17 October 1960.
1
From 1958 till 1961 on leave with SHAPE Air Defense Technical Center, The Hague, Netherlands, where he was studying
improved methods of transmitting digital data over fading radio paths.
6
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
1.1 Information taken from the Benelux Section archives
Secondly, I wonder if you would care to bring up the question of establishing Region 9 with the
Board of Directors. I know that it was discussed about a year ago, and that the Board decided the
time was not yet ripe. Since you have left here, I have given the question a good deal of thought,
and would like to argue that the time is now ripe, or at any rate that it will be by the time the
necessary preliminaries are taken care of.
At the same time, in a letter to Lloyd Berkner, dated 18 October 1960, Bruce Barrow writes:
I am pushing Dr. McFarlan, quite informally, to bring up once more the question of establishing
Region 9 in Europe, so you may hear something of this in one of your next meetings. My points in
favor of such a move are, briefly, as follows:
1. 1961 would be the year to elect the regional director of an odd-numbered region. Even if the
Board moved now, he would not take office until Jan. 1962.
2. Europe has roughly 1500 IRE members, far more than Canada had when it was given regional
status.
3. We need a region to promote the orderly development of sections in Europe. Our problems are
not the same as those of other sections.
4. The Region would be appropriate for the coming united Europe (see editorial).2
5. We need the Educational Committee of a region.
In his answer of 10 November 1960, Ronald McFarlan expressed his sympathy with the idea of a ‘European
Region’ and promised to discuss the issue with the IRE Executive Committee.
Support was then sought from the Italy Section (established, like the Benelux Section, 13 May 1959) by
sending a letter on 28 November 1960, with a positive reply on 22 December 1960, and from the Geneva
Section (established 13 December 1960). There was a general feeling not to take any formal step towards the
IRE Executive Committee until a France Section (established 17 October 1961) would have been formed. Since
this took more time than expected, the Benelux Section sent a formal petition to the IRE Executive Committee
on 3 March 1961, followed by a similar petition from the Italy Section on 16 March 1961 and one from the
Geneva Section, as well. The text of the petition reads as follows:
PETITION
To the Executive Committee of the Institute of Radio Engineers, Inc.
From the Executive Committee of the Benelux Section of the IRE:
WHEREAS
• there are at present more than 1500 IRE members in western Europe, as well as three active
IRE Sections;
• we believe these members and Sections to be entitled to direct representation by a European
member on the IRE Board of Directors;
• there is an increasing and frequently expressed desire on the part of the European IRE members
for international meetings and opportunities for professional contacts;
• there is similarly a desire among members in several countries to establish new IRE Sections;
• the presence in Europe of a representative of the IRE Board of Directors would help to ensure
that future expansion of European IRE activities would be carried out in an orderly manner, to
the benefit of both the IRE members and the various European radio and electrical engineering
societies;
2
Bruce Barrow refers to a guest editorial for the March issue of the Transactions on Communication Systems, in which he would
like to write on the expansion of the IRE activity in Europe.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
7
1 Preliminary steps towards and the early history of a new Region
WE HEREBY PETITION
the Executive Committee of the IRE, in the name of the Executive Committee of the Benelux
Section,
• to go on record as favoring the establishment without delay of IRE Region 9 in western Europe;
• to draft the changes in the IRE Bylaws necessary to effect the establishment of this Region
and to present these changes to the Board of Directors for action at their meeting in May 1961;
• to fix the composition of a provisional Regional Committee;
• and to authorize a meeting of this provisional Regional Committee for April 1961 for the
purpose of nominating one or more candidates for the office of Regional Delegate-Regional
Director as provided for in the IRE Bylaws, and of conducting such other business as may
seem desirable.
The Hague, 3 March 1961
H. Rinia, Chairman
The Benelux Section of the IRE
B.B. Barrow, Secretary-Treasurer
The Benelux Section of the IRE
Postbus 174, The Hague, Netherlands
In the mean time, on 4 January 1961, IRE had formed a special committee (the IRE International Activities
Committee) to study the international aspects of the IRE, which was chaired by IRE’s former president Ronald
L. McFarlan and with Herre Rinia, the first Benelux Section Chair (until 1962), as one of its members. In March
1961, after having received the petitions mentioned earlier, this committee decided to visit various European
countries (in particular UK, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, Italy) at
the end of June 1961,
“. . . to find out whether local societies would welcome such a region and, if so, to try and smooth
over any stumbling blocks and establish cooperation.”
(Quotation taken from a letter by Herre Rinia to Bruce Barrow, dated 28 March 1961). See also a partial
transcript of the letter of 21 April 1961 by Ronald McFarlan to Bruce Barrow below:
George Bailey’s letter of April 19, 1961 to you regarding the Executive Committee action on the
petition for the formation of Region 9 in Western Europe has just come to my attention. Since it
was upon my recommendation that the Executive Committee deferred action on the petition I owe
you an explanation.
Starting in London on June 19th the IRE Ad Hoc Committee for Activities Outside Existing Regions
will visit in sequence England, France, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany,
Switzerland and Italy. This committee comprises, in addition to myself as Chairman, E. Finley
Carter, John T. Henderson, Herre Rinia and Ernst Weber. Among the matters to be discussed will
be the formation of new IRE Sections and their areas, Professional Group activities, relations with
the national societies of these countries, and so forth. It has been my feeling that formation of
Region 9 should await the results of the forthcoming European discussions of this committee.
...
Let me also say, if I may, that I personally favor the formation of a Region 9 in Western Europe
after the necessary exploratory work has been accomplished. This is one of the topics that will be
high on the agenda when we meet in June.
8
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
1.1 Information taken from the Benelux Section archives
Unfortunately, the IRE Executive Committee was not yet convinced of the desirability of establishing a new
Region before the end of 1961. This was caused by the upcoming merger between IRE and AIEE, which led the
IRE President Lloyd V. Berkner to the statement in December 1961 “. . . that this matter should be postponed
until the negotiations with AIEE are completed.” See a partial transcript of the letter of 20 December 1961 by
Lloyd Berkner to Bruce Barrow below:
The idea of a quick formation of an IRE Region 9 at this time represents a great many plusses and
minuses. In the balance, it would be my judgement that this matter should be postponed until the
negotiations with AIEE are completed, since I believe it highly probable that a new society would
recognize the need for Region 9, and it could be organized as a part of the shift to a new society.
Prior to a meeting of the IRE International Activities Committee in New York on 27 March 1962, Herre
Rinia, member of that committee, called for an informal meeting in Geneva on 14 February 1962 of representatives of the four existing IRE Sections in Europe (Benelux, France, Geneva and Italy) and some people from
countries where the forming of a Section was foreseen: Germany (established 12 July 1963; invitation sent to
Prof. W.J. Kleen, Munich) and Sweden (established 29 March 1965; invitation sent to Dr. C.E. Granqvist,
Stockholm). One of the motions that came out of this meeting was that the new region should consist of all of
Greater Europe (and only Greater Europe, thus explicitly excluding such territories as South America and the
Far East), where Greater Europe is to correspond by definition to the European Broadcasting Area, defined in
the Radio Regulations of the ITU, 1959 (Article 5, Nos. 126, 131 and 133): bounded on the West by the Western
boundary of Region 1, on the East by the meridian 40◦ East of Greenwich and on the South by the parallel
30◦ North so as to include the western part of the USSR and the territories bordering the Mediterranean, with
the exception of the parts of Arabia and Saudi-Arabia included in this sector. In addition, Iraq is included
in the European Broadcasting Area. The minutes of this Inter-Sectional Committee meeting are available in
Appendix A.
A final petition to establish such a region (see below) was then sent to the IRE Executive Committee by the
Benelux Section on 6 March 1962, and the Sections in France, Geneva and Italy were asked to do the same.
Board of Directors of the Institute of Radio Engineers
1 East 79 Street
New York 21, N.Y.
U.S.A.
Dear Sirs,
The Executive Committee of the Benelux Section wishes to ratify the action taken by its representatives at the meeting of the I.R.E. Intersectional Committee, Europe, held on 14 February 1962 in
Geneva to discuss matters of interest to the European I.R.E. Sections and to report to the I.R.E.
Committee on International Activities. It, therefore, submits the following
PETITION.
We, the undersigned, officers and executive Committee members of the Benelux Section of the
Institute of Radio Engineers, hereby petition the Board of Directors of the Institute of Radio
Engineers to establish a Region that will compass the territory of Greater Europe.
Because the purpose of such a Region would be to provide representation of the European I.R.E.
members on the Board of Directors and to coordinate I.R.E. activities in Europe we request that
territories in the Far East and in South America not be included in the new Region. We suggest that
the territory of the new Region be based on the European Broadcasting Area defined in the Radio
Regulations of the I.T.U. which area produced a definition of Europe that has proved practical
and that has been internationally agreed to for certain telecommunication purposes. The European
Broadcasting Area includes the Western part of the U.S.S.R. and the territories bordering on the
Mediterranean.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
9
1 Preliminary steps towards and the early history of a new Region
H. Rinia, Chairman
G.J. Siezen, Secretary-Treasurer
B.B. Barrow
W. Metselaar
H.P. Williams
H.R. van Nauta Lemke
C.B. Broersma
As a result, the IRE Executive Committee approved the new region, Region 9, on 24 April 1962, and the IRE
Board of Directors gave its final approval on 24 May 1962. The inaugural meeting took place in Geneva on
Wednesday 6 June 1962, with invitations sent to 6 Sections: Benelux, Egypt (established 8 September 1955),
France, Geneva, Israel (established 5 October 1954) and Italy. The first meeting was attended by 12 people:
H. Rinia, G.J. Siezen, H.P. Williams, B.B. Barrow (Benelux), J. Lebel (France), J.H. Gayer, W. Gerber,
W. Baumgarten (Geneva), E.H. Frei (Israel), G.P. Tarchini, V. Svelto (representing E. Gatti, Italy), and
R.L. McFarlan (IRE Headquarters); Egypt was not represented. Herre Rinia was elected as Region 9 Director,
and he appointed E. Gatti as Vice Chair and J.H. Gayer as Secretary/Treasurer. The second meeting, with UK
& Eire as a new Section (established 10 July 1962), took place on Monday 22 October 1962, again in Geneva.
Transcripts of the invitations/agendas of the first two IRE Region 9 Committee meetings are available in
Appendix D; the transcripts of the minutes can be found in Appendix E.
1. Wednesday 6 June 1962
2. Monday 22 October 1962
The next meeting was held on Monday 22 April 1963, being the first meeting after the merger of IRE and AIEE
to IEEE, and the renaming of IRE Region 9 to IEEE Region 8; during this meeting, Norway was welcomed
as a new Section (established 28 March 1963). The second meeting of Region 8, with the Federal Republic
of Germany as a new Section (established 12 July 1963), was held on Monday 4 November 1963. The third
meeting took place on Monday 27 April 1964, during which Jean D. Lebel was nominated as the next Region 8
Director (and as such elected later in 1964). The fourth meeting was held on Monday 26 October 1964. The
fifth meeting took place on Monday 26 April 1965, with Sweden as a new Section (established 29 March 1965).
The sixth meeting was held on Tuesday 7 September 1965. Note that all these meetings took place at the ITU
(International Telecommunication Union) Building, Place des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.
Transcripts of the invitations/agendas of the first six IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings are available in
Appendix F; the transcripts of the minutes can be found in Appendix G.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
1.2
Monday 22 April 1963
Monday 4 November 1963
Monday 27 April 1964
Monday 26 October 1964
Monday 26 April 1965
Tuesday 7 September 1965 (agenda only)
IRE Region in Europe – Bruce B. Barrow
The transcript below is taken from the article “The Benelux Section and Early IRE/IEEE Activity in
Europe” by Jan Biemond and Bruce B. Barrow, presented at the 2009 IEEE Conference on the History
of Technical Societies, Philadelphia, PA, 5–7 August 2009. The article is available in IEEEXplore at
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HTS.2009.5337847.
In 1960 the Executive Committee of the Benelux Section had already begun to consider the idea
of asking the IRE to establish a formal “region” in Europe. The regional structure would give the
10
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
1.3 A Region’s ‘Birth Certificate’
European Sections an opportunity to interact with each other and, more importantly, would permit
the members in the region to elect a representative to the IRE Board of Directors. The idea was
discussed with senior IRE officers, and on December 27, 1961, Barrow sent a letter to Dr. McFarlan,
then Chairman of the IRE International Activities Committee, requesting authorization for himself
to initiate exploratory contacts with other newly founded European sections and requesting authorization for Mr. Rinia to convene an inter-sectional meeting to discuss IRE activity in Europe. Such a
meeting was held in Geneva on February 14, 1962, at the headquarters of the International Telecommunications Union. It was attended by representatives of the Benelux, Geneva, Italy, and France
Sections, and an IRE member from Germany, where formation of a section was being considered.
Following this meeting, on March 6th, the Benelux section formally petitioned the Board of Directors
of the IRE “to establish a Region that will compass the territory of Greater Europe” and suggesting
“that the territory of the new Region be based on the European Broadcasting Area defined in
the Radio Regulations of the I.T.U. which area produced a definition of Europe that has proved
practical and that has been internationally agreed to for certain telecommunication purposes. The
European Broadcasting Area includes the western part of the U.S.S.R. and the territories bordering
on the Mediterranean.” On Rinia’s request, the other Sections submitted similar petitions.
On May 9 [sic],3 1962 the IRE Board of Directors gave formal approval of Region 9, with boundaries closely following the recommendations of the sections. Note that inclusion of the Mediterranean
area brought in the sections in Israel and Egypt. Region 9 was born, and Rinia was appointed its
first Director.
It must not be assumed that the expansion of IRE activity into Europe took place without
opposition. Although IRE members welcomed the new opportunities for sharing information and
other professional contact, a number of the established engineering societies felt threatened. In
1948 a “Conference of Representatives from the Engineering Societies of Western Europe and the
United States of America” had been held in London. This conference, which became known by the
acronym EUSEC, was “of the opinion that international cooperation between professional engineers
by direct contact between recognized national Societies is to be desired.” One of their explicit
recommendations was, “That the formation by one Constituent Society of a branch in the territory
of another is undesirable except by mutual agreement.”
The engineering societies of Germany and Denmark, as well as the IEE in the United Kingdom,
all members of EUSEC, formally expressed displeasure with the expansion of IRE section activity
in Europe. One of the aims of EUSEC was that “no participating Society will initiate any action
within the country of another without first informing the participating Society of that country and
obtaining its co-operation.”
The IRE, in all its European activities, had sincerely sought the cooperation of the local
societies, but the idea that a national society could veto the formation of an IRE section was
quite unacceptable, and Rinia had to engage in careful diplomacy. With the merger pending, the
situation was complicated by the fact that, although the IRE was not a participant in EUSEC, the
AIEE was. The Benelux Section objected strongly to bringing the merged society into EUSEC, and
this matter became one of the agenda items in the merger discussions.
1.3
A Region’s ‘Birth Certificate’
The following is a transcript of a message from Emily Sirjane, IRE Office manager, to the IRE Board of
Directors and Section and Subsection Officers. It is interesting to note that this ‘Birth Certificate’ of Region 9
is at the same time a ‘Birth Certificate’ of the United Kingdom Section. The second interesting point is that
the IRE Office manager refers to the approval of a new Region by the IRE Executive Committee (on 24 April
3
This is apparently an error and should read May 24.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
11
1 Preliminary steps towards and the early history of a new Region
1962) and not to the approval by the IRE Board of Directors (on 24 May 1962), although the memorandum
itself was dated after the Board has reached its decision. This might lead to the conclusion that IRE considered
24 April 1962 as the date at which the new Region was formed. A scanned copy of the original document is
available in Appendix B.
THE INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS
INCORPORATED
August 7, 1962
To:
Board of Directors
Section and Subsection Officers
From:
Emily Sirjane, Office Manager
Subject:
IRE Section Manual Revisions
The following actions were taken by the IRE Executive Committee under dates of April 24 and
July 10, 1962:
1. Approval of the formation of a new Region, Region 9.
2. Approval of the establishment of a new Section, the United Kingdom Section.
The necessary corrections have been made to the IRE Section Manual, and you are requested to
substitute the enclosed sheet for that page which immediately follows the territorial assignment of
Region 8 in Section 20 of your copy of this Manual.
Enclosure (1)
1.4
The start of Region 8 and its Sections – Robert C. Winton
After the merger of the IRE and the AIEE to IEEE on 1 January 1963, the IEEE Board of Directors renamed
the former IRE Region 9 into the new IEEE Region 8 on 8 January 1963. A partial transcript of “The Start of
Region 8 and its Sections” as it appeared in the “Region 8 Centennial Review” reads as follows:
Region 8 was created when the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE) and the
Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE) merged in January 1963 (see the article “Our First 100 Years” in
this Review). However, its seeds were planted by the IRE which, unlike the AIEE, was a transnational society with Sections outside the U.S.A.
The IRE initially had seven Regions in the U.S.A., Canada was Region 8, and there were no
Regions in other countries, although Sections existed. However, on 12 May 1962,4 shortly before the
merger, the IRE created Region 9 consisting of twelve Sections in other countries, seven of these
Sections being in Europe.5
At the time of the merger it was agreed that the IEEE should continue the transnational concept.
The IRE type of structure was adopted, but revised: the number of Regions in the U.S.A. was
reduced from seven to six; Canada became Region 7; Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa
became Region 8 on 8 January 1963, which is therefore the date on which our Region was founded;6
other parts of the world were covered by Region 9. The present Regional structure resulted from
later changes: in 1966 South America became Region 9, with Region 10 covering other parts of the
world; finally in 1981 the remainder of Africa became part of Region 8.
4
This is an error; the date should read 24 May 1962.
This is an error; Region 9 was restricted to Greater Europe with six IRE Sections: Benelux, Egypt, France, Geneva, Italy,
Israel. The IRE Sections Buenos Aires, Chile, Colombia, India, Rio de Janeiro and Tokyo were located in the ‘Rest of the World,’
i.e., outside Regions 1 through 9. The United Kingdom Sections was not founded yet.
6
This is questionable; it neglects the fact that our Region started as an IRE Region.
5
12
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
1.5 IRE/AIEE Merger – Bruce B. Barrow
1.5
IRE/AIEE Merger – Bruce B. Barrow
The transcript below is taken from the article “The Benelux Section and Early IRE/IEEE Activity in
Europe” by Jan Biemond and Bruce B. Barrow, presented at the 2009 IEEE Conference on the History
of Technical Societies, Philadelphia, PA, 5–7 August 2009. The article is available in IEEEXplore at
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HTS.2009.5337847.
The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) was formed on January 1, 1963, by
the merger of the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE, founded 1912) and the American Institute of
Electrical Engineers (AIEE, founded 1884).
Notable Presidents of IEEE and its founding organizations include Elihu Thomson (AIEE, 18891890), Alexander Graham Bell (AIEE, 1891-1892), Charles Proteus Steinmetz (AIEE, 1901-1902),
Lee De Forest (IRE, 1930), Frederick E. Terman (IRE, 1941), William R. Hewlett (IRE, 1954), and
Ernst Weber (IRE, 1959; IEEE, 1963).
Fundamental characteristics of the merged society were taken from the IRE, which, unlike the
AIEE, was a transnational society with sections outside the USA. At the time of the merger it
was agreed that the IEEE should continue the transnational concept. The IRE type of structure
was adopted, but revised; the number of Regions in the USA was reduced to six; Canada became
Region 7; Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa became Region 8. On January 8, 1963, at
the first IEEE Board meeting in New York, Rinia was appointed first Director of IEEE Region 8
(formerly IRE Region 9). Since no AIEE sections had existed in Europe, the section structure of
IRE Region 9 was adopted for IEEE Region 8, and the AIEE members were automatically included
in the IEEE Sections. What follows is a short reflection on the merger, the international policy of
the IEEE and the concerns raised by European Societies about the organization of IEEE Sections
in European countries.
A. Reflection on the merger
The major interests of the AIEE were wire communications (telegraph and telephony), machinery,
and light and power systems. The IRE concerned mostly radio engineering, and was formed from two
smaller organizations, the Society of Wireless and Telegraph Engineers and the Wireless Institute.
With the rise of electronics in the 1930s, electronics engineers usually became members of the IRE,
but the applications of electron tube technology became so extensive that the technical boundaries
differentiating the IRE and the AIEE became blurred. After World War II the two organizations
became increasingly competitive. In 1957 the IRE, with 55,500 members, was the larger organization,
and it had more appeal to students and young electrical engineers. Negotiations about a merger
started that year, and in 1961 the leadership of both the IRE and the AIEE resolved to consolidate
the two organizations. In 1962 the IRE had 96,500 members, and the AIEE 57,000.
In the summer of 1962, having successfully defended his dissertation, Barrow returned to the
U.S., where he had a small part in the discussions that were taking place as details of the merger
were worked out. The President of the AIEE at that time was Dr. B. Richard Teare, Dean of
the College of Engineering and Science at Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon
University). Teare had been Barrow’s professor when Barrow was an undergraduate, and the two
felt warm mutual respect.
B. Some diplomacy
Late in September, Barrow traveled to Pittsburgh and had an opportunity to talk at length with
Dr. Teare. Following are quotes from the letter-report that Barrow sent to Rinia. “The central topic
of our conversation, which lasted some five hours, was international policy of the IEEE, and we
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
13
1 Preliminary steps towards and the early history of a new Region
concentrated specifically on the attitudes that would be brought into the IEEE from the AIEE.
Dr. Teare emphasized that he could not speak for the AIEE Board, nor for the 14-man committee
that is now implementing the merger. . . . He pointed out that the non-national character of IEEE
is specified in the new constitution, and he defined ‘non-national’ as meaning that the activities of
the new society would be carried out throughout the world, wherever IEEE members wanted such
activities, and without regard to national boundaries.”
“Dr. Teare himself has thought a good deal about questions of international policy, partly
because several of the secretaries of EUSEC societies have brought such questions to his attention.
. . . Because of these contacts with the European societies he was very interested to hear something
of our views.”
“I talked at great length (as usual), and emphasized that IRE relations with European societies
are in general rather good. I also pointed out that each country, and each society, had to be
considered individually, and I then said what I could about each individual problem. I pointed out
the specific accord that had been reached with the SFER in France, and the proposals that had
been discussed with . . . the VDE in Germany. I also told him what I knew of our difficulties and
inhospitable reception in Denmark, and of the obstacles that certain of the EUSEC societies placed
in the way of IRE Region 9. I emphasized that EUSEC societies were not the ones that represented
the electronics profession in a number of countries, such as Belgium and France. . . . ”
“The second point – the real point of contention – concerns the organization of IEEE sections
in European countries. . . . I emphasized that the EUSEC societies interpreted [the EUSEC
Memorandum of Organization] to mean that they had a right to veto activity by another society in
their territory. . . . Dr. Teare agreed with me . . . that the IEEE must retain the right to organize
sections anywhere in the world, and that IEEE members who petition in a responsible manner to
form such sections must be able to expect an affirmative response from the IEEE Board. The IEEE
has announced its intention of operating in the entire world, and it must be willing to support its
members, wherever they live. On this all-important and fundamental principle, Dr. Teare agrees
with us completely. He is, however, very concerned that every effort be made to conciliate the
various national societies, and he very much wishes to move carefully enough, and tactfully enough,
to avoid open ruptures with the European societies.”
Rinia and other IEEE leaders did indeed move carefully and tactfully, and relationships with
the European societies have been conciliatory. But the IEEE did not affiliate with EUSEC.
14
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
2
2.1
The later history of IEEE Region 8
The creation of IEEE Region 10 and the extension of Region 8
IEEE Region 8 was formed (as an IEEE Region after the IRE/AIEE merger) on 8th January 1963. At that
time it comprised Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The ‘rest of the world’ was all Region 9 at that
time, until on 1 January 1967, Region 9 was limited to South America and the ‘rest of the world’ became
Region 10, with Shigeo Shima as its first Director (1967–68). During its meeting on 13–14 November 1969,
the Board of Directors agreed to change Bylaw 401.1 such that ‘Region 8 shall consist of Greenland, Europe,
U.S.S.R. and the following countries in North Africa and the Near East: Aden Protectorate, Algeria, Bahrain,
Chad, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco,
Muscat, Oman, Niger, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Spanish Sahara, Sudan, Syria, Trucial Coast, Tunisia,
Turkey, the United Arab Republic, and Yemen.’ Note that ‘United Arab Republic’ was at that time and until
1971 the official name for Egypt; between 1958 and 1961, it was the name of a union between Egypt and Syria.
South Africa Section (established 5 August 1977) and the Nigeria Section (established 12 January 1978) were
part of IEEE Region 10 till 1981. At the 14 December 1979 meeting of the Regional Activities Board, Region 8
Director Dick C.J. Poortvliet and Region 10 Director S.Y. King announced that Region 8 will add the Continent
of Africa to its territory in 1981 and that a proposal for revisions in the Bylaws would be presented at the
February meeting. Said proposal was accepted unanimously at the 15 February 1980 RAB meeting, pending
acceptance of the concerned sections (South Africa and Nigeria). In the 22 August 1980 RAB meeting, the
motion to recommend to the Board of Directors adoption of the revision of Bylaw 401.2 passed. In its subsequent
meeting of 24–25 August 1980, Vice President Larry K. Wilson (Regional Activities) moved for (1) adoption of
revised Bylaw 401.2 which would assign the continent of Africa to Region 8, as recommended by the Region 8
and 10 Committee and RAB, this boundary change to become effective January 1, 1981, (2) approval to waive
the 1981 Region 8 assessment for those members involved in the transfer from Region 10 to Region 8, and (3)
approval to include in the 1981 RAB Budget the funding of travel expenses of the Nigeria and South Africa
Section Chairmen to attend 1981 Region 8 Committee meetings. The motion passed, after which Bylaw 401.2
reads: . . . Region 8 shall consist of Africa, Europe, Greenland, Iceland, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics,
and the Near and Middle East countries located west of Afghanistan and Pakistan. . . .
2.2
The Eastward spread of Sections in Region 8 – Tony Davies
The transcript below is taken from the article “Some recollections of the Eastward spread of IEEE Sections in
Region 8” by Tony Davies as it appears on the IEEE Region 8 web site.
In the days before the end of the Berlin Wall, and the associated political changes in Eastern and
Central Europe, IEEE activity in the countries east of the ‘Iron Curtain’ was limited. There was
a Poland Section in Region 8, formed in 1972, and occasional IEEE related conferences had taken
place there. Other International Organisations such as IFAC and IFIP were rather more successful
in organising conferences in this part of the world, because of the way that they had ‘representatives’
of each country in their management bodies.
The Hungary Section was formed in 1987, and the Region 8 Committee held a meeting in
Budapest in April 1989.
After the changes, there was a rapid development of IEEE activity and formation of new Sections.
A Region 8 Committee meeting was held in Warsaw, Poland, in Spring 1991 during what were still
difficult economic times for Poland.
However, growth in membership numbers was (and still is) slow. The economic changes meant
that IEEE membership was unaffordable for many professional engineers and academics. Senior
members of national research institutes were often able to join using other than personal funds,
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
15
2 The later history of IEEE Region 8
but in a few cases, they regarded IEEE membership as something of a privilege which they were
reluctant to share with junior colleagues.
Somewhat later, the R8 Committee held several more of its meetings in the Central and Eastern
European areas: Prague, Czech Republic, in 1994, Berlin, Germany in 1999, in what had been East
Berlin (part of the former GDR), then at Budapest, Hungary in 2002 and at Kraków, Poland in
2004. The Czechoslovakia Section was formed in 1992 and despite the split of Czechoslovakia into
the Czech and Slovakian Republics, a single Section for both has been retained, although that may
not be sustainable in the long term.
Russia was something of a special case – a huge country with many locations which have extensive
Scientific and Engineering activity at a high level – where one might expect, in the long term, to
see many IEEE activities develop. However after the IEEE Russia Section was formed in 1990,
membership growth was very slow, mainly for economic reasons, although many Chapters were
formed, partly with the aid of a financial support initiative from some IEEE Societies, especially
from Electron Devices, and who paid for initial memberships so that Chapter formation petitions
could be created, and there were a number of IEEE conferences held. Chapter Chairs meetings
were held in various places in Region 8 with financial support from Societies in Division I and
IV and from Region 8, generally alongside the major conferences of one of the Societies, and the
support was enough to pay for the attendance of Chapter Chairs from many of the Central and
Eastern European locations. The Microwave Theory and Techniques Society was also very active
in this initiative and still is. This led to several similar Chapter Chairs meetings for other Societies
being initiated by the Region 8 Committee (for example, one for Signal Processing Chapter Chairs
alongside the ICASSP in Istanbul, Turkey in June 2000).
However, Chapters in parts of Russia remote from Moscow sometimes complained of lack of
support from their Section, and after a while moves to provide some independence for activities in
St. Petersburg and Siberia arose. After some suggestions to form a Russia Council were abandoned,
there was finally agreement to form three Russia Sections, one to be called ‘North West’ and one
‘Siberia’ – while the original Russia Section retained responsibility for all other parts of the country.
Existing Chapters were transferred to the newly formed Sections where the location of their principal
activities justified it.
Another “problem” with some of the new Chapters was an unwillingness of the initial Chapter
Chairs to hold elections and be replaced by other volunteers, resulting in some very long-serving
Chairs. This also happened with a few of the new Sections. In the Ukraine Section, there were
strong ‘differences of opinion’ between a Chapter in the East part and another in the West part!
When the three Baltic Republics (Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia) gained their independence
from Russia, there was a suggestion from the Region 8 Committee management to try to form a
single ‘Baltic’ IEEE Section, combining the three countries. There was a mistaken belief that they
were all rather similar, with languages incorrectly assumed to be Slavic! It took some persuasion
to convince some senior R8 IEEE volunteers that this was not the case, and that each had a very
different language and culture.
An early step was the formation of a Chapter in Estonia, which was affiliated with Finland since
there was no Estonia Section. I had the pleasure of announcing the formation of this Chapter to
the Region 8 Committee when they met in Piscataway in Spring 1998. To the puzzlement of all
except the IEEE Finland Chair, I preceded my announcement by asking the Committee to listen to
some music played over the audio system – this was a recording of the Estonian National Anthem,
to celebrate the formation of the first IEEE unit in Estonia. It was immediately recognised by the
Finland Section Chair because both countries share the same tune for their National Anthems, even
though the words are quite different. During the time of the Soviet Union, playing the Estonian
National Anthem or showing the Estonian flag were serious offences. Some time passed before the
16
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
2.3 Yugoslavia Section from 1971 to 1992 – Baldomir Zajc
three Baltic countries had their own Sections, with the Latvia Section having only recently been
established (in 2008).
As mentioned in the September 1995 interview by Bob Winton (archived at the IEEE History
Center at Rutgers University, with a link from the Region 8 website), initial attempts to form a
Lithuanian Section involved Prof. Raimundas Jasinevicius, from Kaunas University of Technology,
who had established links with Universities in London, England many years before, for the exchange
of junior academics, etc. Progress with Section formation was very slow and made slower by his
absence in Denmark for six years as Lithuanian Ambassador. However, the Section was finally
established in 2005, based mainly in Vilnius. This was followed by the Estonia Section formation
in 2006.
IEEE activities in the former Yugoslavia were another special case.7 The Yugoslavian Section
was formed in 1971 in Ljubljana, Slovenia, and became moderately active in holding conferences and
in providing IEEE volunteers. Because of a ‘blocked currency’ situation, an arrangement was made
to keep the funds in a Bank in Ljubljana where they could be utilized for organization of local IEEE
conferences and also to pay the local costs of conference attendance there by visitors from Western
countries, who could then reimburse IEEE in USA. Following the wars in Yugoslavia, in 1992 the
Region 8 Director Kurt Richter organized a meeting with three members of the Yugoslavian Section
Executive Committee in Graz, Austria. It was decided to form by petitions three new Sections,
as three equal successors of the previous Yugoslavian Section: the Slovenia Section, the Croatia
Section, and the Yugoslavia Section. It was a friendly splitting into three new Sections and in 1996
all three Sections celebrated their 25th anniversary. In 1997 the Republic of Macedonia Section was
formed. The name Yugoslavia became an increasing anomaly, and in 2005 it was renamed the Serbia
and Montenegro Section; the Bosnia and Herzegovina Section was formed later that year.
Because of a number of rather new Sections wanting to host the R8 Committee, and because
the R8 Committee management was glad of the opportunities to welcome these new Sections by
meeting on their territory, the Committee meetings were held in Vilnius, Lithuania, in 2006 and in
Sofia, Bulgaria and Bucharest, Romania, in 2007.
The next few meetings of the R8 Committee are likely to be in Western Europe, and so the long
term average will seem more balanced.
Prof. Tony Davies, 8 June 2008
2.3
Yugoslavia Section from 1971 to 1992 – Baldomir Zajc
In 1970 and even before there were some IEEE members living in Yugoslavia, using benefits of such
membership for their professional activity. At that time we noted some contacts between members
in Yugoslavia and in other countries, experienced with the significance and benefits of IEEE Sections
there. So information was collected. Then contacts between C. Reginald Russell, Assistant Secretary
of IEEE Region 8 and Dr. Jože Furlan, Professor at the Faculty of EE, University of Ljubljana in
November 1970 resulted in IEEE Membership Services mailing in December 1970 the information
on requirements to establish an IEEE Section, and providing also the IEEE Constitution, Bylaws
and Section Manual by the request of Mr. Russell.
Section Formation Petitions normally require the signatures of at least 50 members. However,
the signed petition with far less signatures was sent on 10th May, 1971, at the suggestion of Region 8
Director P. Jespers, who proposed that less than 50 members were sufficient (only 15 members were
available at different locations in Yugoslavia at that time). At the beginning Dr. Furlan explained
the difficulties with payment the dues in foreign currency. It was decided that the future payments
7
This paragraph is slightly adapted and extended by Aleksandar Szabo.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
17
2 The later history of IEEE Region 8
could be in local currency using a blocked custody account established in a Yugoslavian bank, but
that the Section should be set up first. Of course there was also a high interest in IEEE to start
activities in Eastern Europe. Director Jespers also visited Yugoslavia in the summer.
The newly formed and developing Section promised to new members the possibility of
membership dues payment in dinars and giving all IEEE benefits and services, including magazines,
conference participation and also with strong student activity support available. This was
throughout the next 20 years a real salvation for the entire international literature of engineering
in the country, because of the permanent scarcity of foreign currency which meant that books and
magazines could not be imported.
The formal date of the RAB approval of the establishment of the Yugoslavia Section
was 21st June, 1971.
On 13th October, 1971 at the Faculty of EE, University of Ljubljana, the Founding Assembly
for an official formation of Yugoslavia Section took place, at which officers were elected for the
first Yugoslavia Section Executive Committee and the first Yugoslavia Section Chairman Mirjam
Gruden. Later elected Chairmen were, in February 1981 Jože Furlan, then Mirko Vehovec
in June 1985 and Baldomir Zajc in January 1988. Through the years participants in Executive
Committees included the following volunteers: Vinko Albert, Stanoje Bingulac, Andrej Dobnikar,
Jože Mlakar, Albin Wedam, Drago Hercog, Franc Bratkovič, Aleksandar Szabo, Dušan Drajić,
Ferdinand Gubina, Rudi Zorko, Bogomir Horvat, France Kranjc, Dejan Lazić, Andrej Levstek,
Hrvoje Babić, Branka Jokanović and Marko Jagodič.
On 12th June, 1971 a Petition was also signed for the establishment of a Student Branch at the
University of Ljubljana.
On July 1972 an IEEE Custody Bank Account in Yugoslavia was agreed by the IEEE Executive
Committee, and as a result the payments of membership dues were possible after 1st February,
1973 when the National Bank approved the bank account at Ljubljanska Banka where four persons
from USA were authorized to sign withdrawals. So the membership development was enabled and
encouraged. This was the beginning of a 20 year long period when the Section Secretary was acting
as a benevolent book-keeper over IEEE membership dues payments in the Yugoslavia Section. It
was quite an office!
According to the Petition for the State registration of the Yugoslavia Section from 9th November,
1971 the Statement of the official State registration of Yugoslavia Section in Yugoslavia was
issued on 18th October, 1972.
Later in 1976 according a new “Yugoslav Law for Societies’ registration” a direct registration of
the Yugoslavia Section was no longer possible and the Yugoslavia Section joined under the umbrella
of the Electrotechnical Association of Slovenia – EZS, in order to be officially allowed.
On 10–13th June, 1984 the President of IEEE, Richard J. Gowen and Executive Director
Eric Herz visited Ljubljana and on 12th June at the University of Ljubljana granted three IEEE
Centennial Medals to Rajko Tomović, Hrvoje Požar and Lojze Vodovnik.
The RAB Section Membership Growth Award was granted to the Yugoslavia Section for
outstanding leadership and results in IEEE membership development activities for Region 8 in
1985.
About 300 members (including 40 Student members) were reported at the middle of the eighties.
An IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting was organized by the Yugoslavia Section at Brdo, Slovenia
on 19–20th September, 1987. This was the 3rd such meeting, after those in Dubrovnik on 25–26th
October, 1974 and Split on 11–12th November, 1978.
In 1988–1989 the following chapters were established:
18
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
2.3 Yugoslavia Section from 1971 to 1992 – Baldomir Zajc
• Chapter on SP/CAS (001/041), Chair Hrvoje Babić, Elektrotehnički fakultet, Zagreb
• Chapter on MTT (017), Chair Branka Jokanović, Institut za primenjenu fiziku, Novi Beograd
• Chapter on Com (019), Chair Marko Jagodič, Iskra, Kranj
In 1998 Region 8 Committee accepted the candidacy of the Yugoslavia Section for organization
of MELECON 91 on 22–24nd May, 1991 in Ljubljana. The Conference was held and was very
successful, although the political situation in Yugoslavia at that time prevented a high attendance
of participants.
The Yugoslavia Section cooperated with National Societies ETAN, JUGEL, JUREMA, EZS and
with all Yugoslav Universities in the organization of several conferences during those years.
After nearly 20 years of its existence the Yugoslavia Section reported a membership of about
700.
Already during the Annual Assembly in January 1990 there were visible different political
attitudes of the Yugoslav Republics and their disagreement was apparent. In 1991 even the currencies
used became different and therefore on 9th December, 1991 the Yugoslavia Section Chairman
Baldomir Zajc proposed to form three IEEE Sections, in Ljubljana, Zagreb and Belgrade and to
split the custody account at the bank into 3 parts because the contacts between the Republics no
longer existed.
On 30th April, 1992 Region 8 Director Kurt Richter at the proposal of Baldomir Zajc invited
Aleksandar Szabo from Zagreb, Ðorđe Paunović from Belgrade and Baldomir Zajc from Ljubljana
to form new Sections. All agreed to the proposal for three Sections: Slovenia, Croatia and for the
remainder, a new Yugoslavia Section instead of the 20 years old Yugoslavia Section. 1st August,
1992 is the date of the formations of these 3 Sections. In Macedonia and Bosnia and
Herzegovina there was scarcity of members at that time. The Republic of Macedonia Section was
established after the first visit of IEEE President Wally Read to Bulgaria (where a delegation from
Macedonia was present) and to Slovenia in 1996. In 1997 Wally Read visited this already established
Republic of Macedonia Section. In Bosnia and Herzegovina an IEEE Section was established at the
end of 2005 in the time of Region 8 Director Baldomir Zajc’s term of office, 2005–06.
This description covers the 20 fruitful years of IEEE activity in the area, and after that five
Sections were developed in this territory and now, everywhere the IEEE activity is going on successfully with new challenges and new volunteers.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
19
2 The later history of IEEE Region 8
2.4
The present IEEE Region 8 Sections
The following list of Sections, chronologically sorted by their foundation date, is taken from the Region 8 web
site.
5-Oct-1954
8-Sep-1955
13-May-1959
13-May-1959
13-Dec-1960
17-Oct-1961
10-Jul-1962
28-Mar-1963
12-Jul-1963
20-Mar-1965
16-Apr-1968
18-Aug-1968
12-Feb-1970
17-Mar-1970
21-Jun-1971
21-Jun-1971
21-Jun-1971
1-Dec-1972
12-Jun-1973
5-Aug-1977
12-Jan-1978
21-Dec-1979
5-Jun-1981
4-Dec-1981
17-Nov-1982
20-Jun-1987
21-Aug-1987
18-Nov-1988
18-Aug-1989
20-Feb-1990
Israel
Egypt
Benelux
Italy(a)
Switzerland(b)
France
UK and Ireland(c)
Norway
Germany(d)
Sweden
Spain
Denmark
Iran
Greece
Croatia(e)
Serbia and Montenegro(e)
Slovenia(e)
Poland
Finland
South Africa(f )
Nigeria(f )
Austria
Saudi Arabia
Portugal
Kenya(g)
United Arab Emirates
Hungary
Western Saudi Arabia(h)
Turkey
Kuwait
15-Aug-1990
15-Aug-1990
21-Nov-1991
1-Aug-1992
30-Jun-1993
24-Jun-1995
14-Feb-1997
12-Nov-1999
23-Jun-2000
22-Jun-2001
15-Feb-2002
13-Feb-2003
13-Feb-2003
18-Nov-2004
18-Nov-2004
18-Nov-2004
18-Jun-2005
12-Nov-2005
18-Feb-2006
23-Jun-2006
18-Nov-2006
16-Feb-2008
21-Jun-2008
21-Jun-2008
5-Sep-2008
15-Nov-2008
Romania
Russia(i)
Ukraine
Czechoslovakia
Cyprus(j)
Bulgaria
Rep of Macedonia(e)
Jordan
Iceland
Bahrain
Belarus
Russia (Northwest)(i)
Russia (Siberia)(i)
Lebanon
Morocco
Qatar
Lithuania
Bosnia and Herzegovina(e)
Oman
Estonia
Malta
Latvia
Iraq
Tunisia
Ghana
Zambia
(a). The Italy Section was split into two Sections, Italy (North) and Italy (Central & South) on 23 May 1966;
until 1988, Italy (Central & South) was called Italy (Middle & South). The two Sections were merged
again in November 2005.
(b). The Switzerland Section was called Geneva Section until 20 September 1967.
(c). The UK and Ireland Section was called the UK & Eire Section until 1 November 1966 and the UK &
Rep of Ireland Section from 1 November 1966 until 21 June 2014.
(d ). The Germany Section was called the West Germany Section until 20 September 1967 and the Germany
(West) Section from 20 September 1967 until 17 June 1991.
(e). The Yugoslavian Section was established on 21 June 1971. Following the wars in Yugoslavia, in 1992
the Region 8 Director Kurt Richter organized a meeting with three members of the Yugoslavian Section
Executive Committee in Graz, Austria. It was decided to form by petitions three new Sections, as three
equal successors of the previous Yugoslavian Section: the Slovenia Section, the Croatia Section, and the
Yugoslavia Section, all established on 1 August 1992. It was a friendly splitting into three new Sections
and in 1996 all three Sections celebrated their 25th anniversary. In 1997 the Republic of Macedonia
20
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
2.4 The present IEEE Region 8 Sections
(f ).
(g).
(h).
(i).
(j ).
Section was formed. The name Yugoslavia became an increasing anomaly, and in 2005 it was renamed
the Serbia and Montenegro Section; the Bosnia and Herzegovina Section was formed later that year. See
also Section 2.2.
The South Africa and Nigeria Section were initially Sections of Region 10. They were assigned to Region 8
on 1 January 1981, when all of Africa was shifted from Region 10 to Region 8.
The Kenya Section has been called the East Africa Section for a couple of years, and was renamed Kenya
Section again in August 1990.
The Western Saudi Arabia Section started as the Jeddah Subsection of the Saudi Arabia Section;
formation date 16 February 1987. Until 15 August 1990 it was called the Jeddah Section.
After the Russia Section (initially: Moscow Section, until 28 February 1993) was formed in 1990,
membership growth was very slow, mainly for economic reasons, although many Chapters were formed,
partly with the aid of a financial support initiative from some IEEE Societies, especially from Electron
Devices, and who paid for initial memberships so that Chapter formation petitions could be created,
and there were a number of IEEE conferences held. However, Chapters in parts of Russia remote from
Moscow sometimes complained of lack of support from their Section, and after a while moves to provide
some independence for activities in St. Petersburg and Siberia arose. After some suggestions to form a
Russia Council were abandoned, there was finally agreement in 1993 to form three Russia Sections, one
to be called ‘Northwest’ and one ‘Siberia’ – while the original Russia Section retained responsibility for
all other parts of the country. Existing Chapters were transferred to the newly formed Sections where the
location of their principal activities justified it. See also Section 2.2.
The Cyprus Section started as a Subsection of the Greece Section; formation date 18 July 1988.
Following is a list of past and present Subsections.
10-Jul-1983
16-Feb-1987
18-Jul-1988
18-Jul-1988
5-May-1990
4-Dec-1992
23-Jun-2006
15-Nov-2008
20-Nov-2010
25-Jun-2011
25-Jun-2011
19-Nov-2011
1-Jan-2012
Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia
Greece
Saudi Arabia
Norway
Egypt
Region 8
Region 8
Tunisia
Region 8
Region 8
Region 8
Region 8
Jubail Subsection
Jeddah Subsection, transformed into a Section 18-Nov-1988
Cyprus Subsection, transformed into a Section 30-Jun-1993
Riyadh Subsection
Bergen Subsection, dissolved 15-Feb-2002
Alexandria Subsection
Tanzania Subsection
Botswana Subsection
Sfax Subsection
Mauritius Subsection
Sudan Subsection
Algeria Subsection
Palestine Subsection
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
21
2 The later history of IEEE Region 8
2.5
Year
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Geographic Unit statistics at year end
Sections
7
9
9
10
†
11
11
13
13
15
16
17
18
18
18
18
18
18
19
19
23
24
24
24
24
24
26
27
28
31
32
35
36
36
37
37
38
38
39
40
41
42
44
47
‡
48
51
51
56
56
56
56
56
56
Subsect.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
4
4
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
9
10
10
Chapters
.
.
.
.
1
2
2
3
3
3
5
5
5
5
6
7
8
9
11
13
16
21
27
29
34
36
42
50
66
77
93
103
125
151
178
209
235
260
278
299
312
353
367
398
422
446
449
484
495
524
543
552
Aff. Groups
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
2
6
8
9
13
14
28
32
36
43
45
57
63
68
71
Stud. Branches
1
2
3
4
5
7
12
18
24
29
31
31
36
31
31
33
33
33
38
41
41
42
42
43
44
44
46
54
60
63
70
74
80
84
91
100
117
132
152
133
177
196
213
236
257
273
290
316
345
377
416
449
SB Chap.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
2
2
2
2
4
4
4
4
4
2
3
4
4
4
5
5
13
14
22
29
32
36
36
36
41
42
49
69
83
106
125
SB Aff. Groups
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
4
11
16
16
33
33
40
40
49
55
58
† Italy Section was split into two Sections: Italy (North) and Italy (Central & South) in 1966.
‡ Italy (North) and Italy (Central & South) were merged into one Italy Section in 2005.
22
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
2.6 Membership statistics at year end
2.6
Year
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Membership statistics at year end
HonM
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
StudM
449
271
233
288
447
994
988
1131
1118
904
1117
1091
1153
1107
1347
1374
1667
1915
2078
2173
2264
2422
2339
2693
3112
3914
4404
4701
5084
4854
5142
5466
5369
6183
7304
8068
9293
10059
12152
11655
11069
12967
14895
16439
9753
9713
9539
9826
10761
10420
10909
GradStudM
7708
8651
10028
11036
11119
11658
12036
AssocM
503
509
529
538
500
520
478
475
477
472
450
447
444
445
480
556
663
728
751
756
788
914
1113
1279
1281
1843
2180
2480
2418
2347
2347
3005
4233
5093
5283
5617
6886
7630
9887
9911
5818
4622
5215
4868
4894
4169
3242
3098
3208
2546
2119
Member
1716
1812
1915
2238
2243
2348
2602
2903
3248
3554
3789
4213
4607
5004
5090
5478
6037
6713
7679
8673
9291
9672
10088
10771
11838
12690
14053
15424
16346
17886
18632
18865
20033
20618
21891
24000
25581
27359
27534
26581
29804
31985
32682
34969
37707
39447
41982
43424
44841
46350
46110
SeniorM
711
752
736
768
807
807
851
884
904
885
914
932
916
905
917
918
944
943
994
1043
1199
1262
1287
1360
1416
1477
1494
1614
1717
1791
1824
1880
1924
2008
2092
2213
2482
2587
2686
2886
3025
3290
3513
3896
4180
4462
4743
5036
5459
5955
6389
Fellow
94
94
100
106
126
141
146
158
173
175
177
180
178
191
194
194
202
207
215
227
227
231
240
250
246
253
276
298
306
322
346
375
397
418
441
458
485
517
544
564
573
601
642
677
727
772
830
870
927
973
1027
Total
3473
3438
3513
3938
4123
4810
5065
5551
5920
5990
6447
6863
7298
7652
8028
8520
9513
10506
11717
12873
13770
14502
15068
16354
17894
20178
22408
24518
25872
27202
28293
29594
31960
34324
37016
40361
44732
48157
52808
51602
50295
53471
56953
60856
64976
67221
70371
73297
76322
77909
78597
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
23
3 IEEE Region 8 Operating Committees and Appointed Members
3
3.1
IEEE Region 8 Operating Committees and Appointed Members
Operating Committees
1962–1964
Director
Vice Chair
Secretary-Treasurer
Herre Rinia (Benelux)
Emilio C. Gatti (1962 only?)
John H. Gayer
1965–1966
Director
Secretary-Treasurer
Student Activities
Jean D. Lebel (France)
John H. Gayer (1965) / Robert C.G. Williams (1966)
Paul G.A. Jespers (1966)
1967–1968
Director
Vice Chair
Secretary-Treasurer
Student Activities
Acting SAC Chair
Robert C.G. Williams (UK and Ireland)
Jean D. Lebel
C. Reginald Russell
Paul G.A. Jespers
André Vander Vorst
1969–1970
Director
Secretary-Treasurer
Student Activities
Roger P. Wellinger (Switzerland)
Fritz Eggimann
Paul G.A. Jespers (1969) / E. Folke Bolinder (1970)
1971–1972
Director
Secretary-Treasurer
Student Activities
Paul G.A. Jespers (Benelux)
C. Reginald Russell
E. Folke Bolinder (1971) / André S. Vander Vorst (1972)
1973–1974
Director
Secretary-Treasurer
Student Activities
C. Reginald Russell (UK and Ireland)
R.C. (Bob) Winton
André S. Vander Vorst (1973) / E. Folke Bolinder (1974)
In 1975, the Region 8 Committee elected for the first time a Vice Chair = Immediate Past Director.
1975–1976
Director
Vice Chair
Secretary-Treasurer
Student Activities
F. Louis H.M. Stumpers (Benelux)
C. Reginald Russell
F. Wim de Vrijer
O.W. Memelink (1975) / Jean-Gabriel Rémy (1976)
1977–1978
Director
Vice Chair
Secretary-Treasurer
Student Activities
E. Folke Bolinder (Sweden)
F. Louis H.M. Stumpers
F. Wim de Vrijer (1977) / R.C. (Bob) Winton (1978)
Jean-Gabriel Rémy (1977) / André S. Vander Vorst (1978)
1979–1980
Director
Vice Chair
Secretary-Treasurer
Student Activities
Dick C.J. Poortvliet (Benelux)
E. Folke Bolinder
R.C. (Bob) Winton
André S. Vander Vorst
1981–1982
Director
Vice Chair
Secretary
Treasurer
Student Activities
Walter E. Proebster (Germany)
Dick C.J. Poortvliet
R.C. (Bob) Winton
Herbert A. May
André S. Vander Vorst
24
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
3.1 Operating Committees
Starting in 1983, the new Regional Director was elected one year earlier, to serve as Director-Elect for one year
prior to the actual term as Director. In 1984, this position was called Vice Chair.
1983–1984
Director
Vice Chair
Secretary
Treasurer
Student Activities
Karsten E. Drangeid (Switzerland)
Walter E. Proebster (1983) / Basil W. Osborne (1984)
R.C. (Bob) Winton
Rolf A. Remshardt
André S. Vander Vorst (1983) / Dick C.J. Poortvliet (1984)
1985–1986
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Student Activities
Basil W. Osborne (UK and Ireland)
Karsten E. Drangeid (1985)
Hugo Ruechardt (1986)
R.C. (Bob) Winton
Rolf A. Remshardt
Dick C.J. Poortvliet
1987–1988
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Student Activities
Hugo Ruechardt (Germany)
Basil W. Osborne (1987)
Sven-Olof Öhrvik (1988)
Basil W. Osborne
Rolf A. Remshardt
Dick C.J. Poortvliet
1989–1990
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Student Activities
Sven-Olof Öhrvik (Sweden)
Hugo Ruechardt (1989)
Kurt R. Richter (1990)
Basil W. Osborne
Rolf A. Remshardt
Dick C.J. Poortvliet
1991–1992
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Student Activities
Kurt R. Richter (Austria)
Sven-Olof Öhrvik (1991)
Charles W. Turner (1992)
Basil W. Osborne
Rolf A. Remshardt
Dick C.J. Poortvliet
At the Spring 1993 meeting, the following changes in the election and appointment procedure were made, with
a corresponding bylaw change later that year:
• The Nominations and Appointments (N & A) Committee will present each year, for the approval of
the Region 8 Committee, nominations for all Regional Officer and Appointed Representative posts
falling vacant. [The 8 Appointed Representatives are: Awards & Recognitions,3 Chapter Coordinator,1
Conference Coordinator,2 Continuing Education,1 Forward Planning,3 Membership Development,2
Region 8 News,3 Student Activities Chairman.2 The former position of Industry Liaison is presently
vacant.]
• The N & A Committee will comprise the Junior Past Director (Chairman); the Director; the Director-elect
(when appropriate); and three Section Chairs, elected by the Section Chairs currently on the Region 8
Committee to serve a two-year term.
• All Region Officers and Appointed Representatives will serve for a three-year term initially, and would
be eligible for re-election by the Section Chairs.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
25
3 IEEE Region 8 Operating Committees and Appointed Members
• To allow an orderly transition to the new procedures, two Appointed Representative posts will fall vacant
at the end of 1993,1 three at the end of 1994,2 and the remaining three at the end of 1995.3 In all cases
the retiring members will be eligible for re-election, at the discretion of the Director.
• The Student Representative is appointed for one two-year term of office by the Director, in consultation
with the Student Activities Chairman.
1993–1994
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Student Activities
Charles W. Turner (UK and Ireland)
Kurt R. Richter (1993)
Peer Martin Larsen (1994)
Basil W. Osborne
Rolf A. Remshardt
Dick C.J. Poortvliet
1995–1996
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Student Activities
Peer Martin Larsen (Denmark)
Charles W. Turner (1995)
Maurice Papo (1996)
Basil W. Osborne
Rolf A. Remshardt
Levent Onural
Revised Region 8 Bylaws were drafted during 1997 in order to enable a new Region 8 structure to be introduced,
and to be compatible with new RAB (Regional Activities Board) Bylaws. Following approval by the Committee
in November 1997 and by RAB in February 1998, acting Vice Chairs were appointed for 1998: Vice Chairs for
Membership Activities, Technical Activities, and Student Activities. The Past Director is ex officio the fourth
Vice Chair, for Strategic Planning and Nominations & Appointments. Starting with the Fall 1998 meeting, the
three Vice-Chairs are elected by the Region 8 Committee.
1997–1998
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Membership Activities
Student Activities
Technical Activities
Maurice Papo (France)
Peer Martin Larsen (1997)
Rolf A. Remshardt (1998)
Basil W. Osborne
Rolf A. Remshardt / Hans J. Schmitt (1998)
Peer Martin Larsen (acting Vice Chair in 1998)
Levent Onural (remains active Vice Chair in 1998)
Charles W. Turner (acting Vice Chair in 1998)
1999–2000
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Membership Activities
Student Activities
Technical Activities
Rolf A. Remshardt (Germany)
Maurice Papo
Levent Onural (2000 only)
Basil W. Osborne (1999) / Charles W. Turner (2000)
Hans J. Schmitt
Raul F.M. Vidal (1999) / Adolf Schwab (2000)
Gözde Bozdaˇgi Akar
Kurt R. Richter
2001–2002
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Membership Activities
Student Activities
Technical Activities
Levent Onural (Turkey)
Rolf A. Remshardt
Anthony C. Davies (2002 only)
Charles W. Turner
Hans J. Schmitt
Gerhard Hancke
Christian Borgert
Anthony C. Davies
26
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
3.1 Operating Committees
2003–2004
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Membership Activities
Student Activities
Technical Activities
Anthony C. Davies (UK and Ireland)
Levent Onural
Baldomir Zajc (2004 only)
Charles W. Turner
Hans J. Schmitt
Rolf A. Remshardt
Pilar Molina Gaudó
Tariq Durrani
2005–2006
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Membership Activities
Student Activities
Technical Activities
Baldomir Zajc (Slovenia)
Anthony C. Davies
Jean-Gabriel Rémy (2006 only)
Christian Borgert
Brian Harrington
Jaafar Al-Ibraham
Marko Delimar
Józef W. Modelski
2007–2008
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Membership Activities
Student Activities
Technical Activities
Jean-Gabriel Rémy (France)
Baldomir Zajc
Józef W. Modelski (2008 only)
Christian Borgert (2007) / Costas Stasopoulos (2008)
Brian Harrington
Marko Delimar
Martin J. Bastiaans
George Paunović
Starting in 2008, the Director-Elect was elected one year earlier, to serve as Director-Elect for two years prior
to the actual term as Director.
2009–2010
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Membership Activities
Student Activities
Technical Activities
Józef W. Modelski (Poland)
Jean-Gabriel Rémy
Marko Delimar
Costas Stasopoulos
Brian Harrington
Pilar Molina Gaudó
Eva Lang
Rami Al-Mushcab (2009) / Fritz Bekkadal (2010)
2011–2012
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Member Activities
Student Activities
Technical Activities
Marko Delimar (Croatia)
Józef W. Modelski
Martin J. Bastiaans
Costas Stasopoulos
Brian Harrington
Ali El-Mousa
Elias Nassar
Saurabh Sinha
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
27
3 IEEE Region 8 Operating Committees and Appointed Members
2013–2014
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Member Activities
Student Activities
Technical Activities
Martin J. Bastiaans (Benelux)
Marko Delimar
Costas Stasopoulos
Ali El-Mousa
Brian Harrington
Aleksandar Szabo
Pablo Herrero
Carl Debono
2015–2016
Director
Past Director
Director-Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Member Activities
Student Activities
Technical Activities
Costas Stasopoulos (Cyprus)
Martin J. Bastiaans
Margaretha Eriksson
Christian Schmid
Brian Harrington
Dušanka Bošković
Mona Ghassemian
Igor Kuzle
28
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
3.2 Appointed Representatives – until 1997
3.2
Appointed Representatives – until 1997
Awards & Recognition
Awards & Recognition / Fellows
Awards & Recognition / Fellows
Awards & Recognition
Awards & Recognition / Fellows
Chapter Coordination
Chapter Coordination
Chapter Coordination
Conference Coordination
Conference Coordination
Continuing Education
Continuing Education
Continuing Education
Continuing Education
Continuing Education
Continuing Education
Continuing Education
Continuing Education
Educational Activities
Electronic Mail
Electronic Publishing
Electronic Communications
EUROCON Trust Fund
Fellows
Fellows
Fellows
Long Range Planning
Forward Planning
Forward Planning
GOLD Program Coordinator
Industry Liaison
Membership Development
Membership Development
Membership Development
Membership Development
Membership Development
Newsletter
Publications
Publications
Region 8 News Editor
Region 8 News Editor
Sections Congress Coordinator
Sections Congress Coordinator
Sections Congress Coordinator
Student Representative
Student Representative
Student Representative
Student Representative
Student Representative
Fritz E. Borgnis
F. Louis H.M. Stumpers
Roger P. Wellinger
Jean P. Voge
E. Folke Bolinder
André S. Vander Vorst
Basil C. Papadias
Anthony C. Davies
Jacob Baal-Schem
Baldomir Zajc
Robert C. Winton
André S. Vander Vorst
Jean-Gabriel Rémy
André S. Vander Vorst
Michael A. Giddings
Karl F. Goser
André S. Vander Vorst
G. Molinari
Kurt R. Richter
Albert T. Kündig
Brian R. Harrington
Jacob Baal-Schem
Fritz Eggimann
Herre Rinia
Roger P. Wellinger
John A. Stegopoulos
Karsten E. Drangeid
Robert C. Winton
Charles W. Turner
William Watté
Hugo Ruechardt
Andreas W. Rannestad
Dick C.J. Poortvliet
C.J.M. (Kees) van der Wulp
Peter Peiser
Walter E. Proebster
Robert C.G. Williams
Roger P. Wellinger
G.J. (Frits) Arink
W.H. (Bill) Devenish
G.H. (Mick) Byford
G.J. (Frits) Arink
J. Costa Freire
Charles W.Turner
Mikko Katajamäki
Gözde Bozdaˇ
gi
Roman Mittendorfer
Andrej Zemva
Jens Klimaschewski/Hannemann
1968–1970
1971–1973
1974–1976
1977–1980
1981–1997
1988–1993
1994–1996
1997–2000
1981–1994
1995–2000
1968–1970
1971–1972
1973–1977
1978–1978
1979–1982
1982–1985
1986–1990
1991–1993
1994–1999
1990–1991
1996–1998
1996–1997
1971–1982
1968–1970
1977–1978
1979–1980
1985–1986
1987–1995
1996–1997
1997–2000
1988–1991
1973–1976
1977–1978
1979–1981
1982–1983
1984–1997
1967–1986
–1982
1983–1985
1967–1985
1985–1998
1985–1987
1988–1990
1997–1999
1988–1990
1991–1992
1993–1994
1995–1996
1997–1998
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
29
3 IEEE Region 8 Operating Committees and Appointed Members
3.3
Appointed Coordinators and Subcommittee Chairs – 1998–2006
Awards & Recognition
Awards & Recognition
Awards & Recognition
Chapter Coordination
Chapter Coordination
Chapter Coordination
Conference Coordination
Conference Coordination
Conference Coordination
Conference Coordination
Educational Activities
Educational Activities
Educational Activities
Educational Activities
Educational Activities
Electronic Communications
Electronic Communications
GOLD Program Coordinator
GOLD Program Coordinator
GOLD Activities
GOLD Activities
Industry Relations
Industry Relations
Life Members
Life Members
Membership Development
Membership Development
Membership Development
Membership Development
Region 8 News Editor
Region 8 News Editor
Region 8 News Editor
Sections Congress Coordinator
Sections Congress Coordinator
Sections Congress Coordinator
Sections Congress Coordinator
Sections 99 Coordinator
Sections Development
Standards Coordinator
Student Representative
Student Representative
Student Representative
Student Representative
Student Representative
Voluntary Contribution Fund
Voluntary Contribution Fund
Voluntary Contribution Fund
30
Hans Peek
Duncan C. Baker
Kurt R. Richter
Anthony C. Davies
Józef Modelski
Ninoslav Stojadinovic
Baldomir Zajc
Tariq Durrani
Magdalena Salazar Palma
Peter Farkas
Kurt R. Richter
Aleksandar Szabo
Tuncay Birand
Simon Jones
Victor Fouad Hanna
Christian Borgert
Jeremy Newberry
William Watté
Jorge-Luis Sánchez-Ponz
Mario De Weerd
Rolf A. Remshardt
Terje Gjengedal
Jean-Gabriel Rémy
G.H. (Mick) Byford
Jacob Baal-Schem
Peer Martin Larsen
Jaafar Al-Ibrahim
Margaretha Eriksson
Aleksandar Szabo
G.H. (Mick) Byford
Duncan C. Baker
Roland J. Saam
Charles W. Turner
Rolf A. Remshardt
Christian Borgert
Anthony C. Davies
Jaafar Al-Ibrahim
Jaafar Al-Ibrahim
Ingo Ruesch
Jens Klimaschewski/Hannemann
Jorge-Luis Sánchez-Ponz
Giorgia German
Başak Yüksel
Ricardo Varela Iglesias
Charles W. Turner
Zbynek Skvor
Vlatko Stoilkov
8901 . . . . .
. . . . 234 . .
. . . . . . . 56
890 . . . . . .
. . . 1234 . .
. . . . . . . 56
890 . . . . . .
. . . 12 . . . .
. . . . . 34 . .
. . . . . . . 56
89 . . . . . . .
. .0. . . . . .
. . .1. . . . .
. . . . 23 . . .
. . . . . . 456
890 . . . . . .
. . . 123456
890 . . . . . .
. . . 12 . . . .
. . . . . 34 . .
. . . . . . . 56
. . . .2. . . .
. . . . . 3456
8. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . 456
890 . . . . . .
. . . 12 . . . .
. . . . . 34 . .
. . . . . . . 56
8. . . . . . . .
8901 . . . . .
. . . . 23456
89 . . . . . . .
. . 012 . . . .
. . . . . 345 .
. . . . . . . .6
. . 012 . . . .
. . . . .3. . .
. . . . 23456
8. . . . . . . .
. 90 . . . . . .
. . . 12 . . . .
. . . . . 34 . .
. . . . . . . 56
.9. . . . . . .
. . 01234 . .
. . . . . . . 56
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
3.3 Appointed Coordinators and Subcommittee Chairs – 1998–2006
3.4
Appointed Coordinators and Subcommittee Chairs – 2007–2012
Awards & Recognition
Awards & Recognition
Chapter Coordination
Chapter Coordination
Chapter Coordination
Conference Coordination
Conference Coordination
Conference Coordination
Educational Activities
Educational Activities
Educational Activities
Educational Activities
Electronic Communications
Electronic Communications
GOLD Activities
GOLD Activities
GOLD Activities
GOLD Activities
History Activities
Industry Relations
Industry Relations
Industry Relations
Information Management
Jubilee Book
Life Members
Life Members
Life Members
Membership Development
Membership Development
Membership Development
Professional Activities
Professional Activities
Professional Activities
Publications Coordinator
Region 8 News
Region 8 News
Section Development
Section Presentation
Sections Congress Coordinator
Sections Congress Coordinator
Sections Congress Coordinator
Standards Coordinator
Student Representative
Student Representative
Student Representative
Student Representative
Technical Committees Liaison
Voluntary Contribution Fund
Voluntary Contribution Fund
Voluntary Contribution Fund
Women In Engineering
Women In Engineering
Women In Engineering
Women in Engineering
Workshop Coordinator
Victor Fouad Hanna
Charles W. Turner
Gérard Capolino
Péter Magyar
Daniel Pasquet
Francisco Sandoval
Marian P. Kaźmierkowski
Carl Debono
Charles W. Turner
Fanny Klett
João Costa Freire
Bakr Hassan
Thomas Watteyne
Giorgos Mixail
Pilar Molina Gaudó
Eva Gutsmiedl Lang
João Carlos Prazeres Figueiras
Salima Kaissi
Jacob Baal-Schem
Rami Al-Mushcab
Benito Palumbo
Ghaleb Al-Dandan
Diogo Mónica
Kurt R. Richter
Peter Hill
Jacob Baal-Schem
Aleksandar Szabo
Rolf A. Remshardt
Aleksandar Szabo
Dirk Van Hertem
Charles W. Turner
Emine Gökçe Aydal
Matej Zajc
Stefano Zanero
Roland J. Saam
Zhijia Huang
Vlatko Stoilkov
Baldomir Zajc
Anthony C. Davies
Pilar Molina Gaudó
Ali El-Mousa
David Law
Michael Gloegl
Pablo Herrero
Amélie Anglade
Jorge Soares
Vladimir Katić
Christine Nora
Milan Polivka
Vlatko Stoilkov
Maryam Al Thani
Shaimaa Yehia
Bashayer Al Awwad
Ferdi Ponci
Matej Zajc
7890 . .
. . . . 12
78 . . . .
. . 90 . .
. . . . 12
78 . . . .
. . 90 . .
. . . . 12
7. . . . .
.8. . . .
. . 90 . .
. . . . 12
78 . . . .
. . 9012
7. . . . .
.8. . . .
. . 90 . .
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7890 . .
78 . . . .
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78 . . . .
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. . . . 12
78 . . . .
. . 90 . .
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78 . . . .
. . 90 . .
. . . . 12
. . . . 12
789012
. . . . 12
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7. . . . .
78 . . . .
. . 901 .
. . . .1.
789012
7. . . . .
. 89 . . .
. . .0. .
. . . . 12
. . . . 12
789 . . .
. . .0. .
. . . . 12
78 . . . .
. .9. . .
. . .0. .
. . . . 12
78 . . . .
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
31
3 IEEE Region 8 Operating Committees and Appointed Members
3.5
Appointed Coordinators and Subcommittee Chairs – 2013–2014
Awards & Recognition
Chapter Coordination
Conference Coordination
Educational Activities
Electronic Communications
Young Professionals (GOLD)
History Activities
Industry Relations
Industry Relations
Jubilee Book
Life Members
Membership Development
Professional Activities
Professional Activities
Region 8 News
Region 8 News
Sections Congress Coordinator
Sections Congress Coordinator
Standards Coordinator
Student Representative
Voluntary Contribution Fund
Women In Engineering
32
Charles W. Turner
Elya Joffe
Jan Haase
Niovi Pavlidou
Giorgos Mixail
Rafal Sliz
Anthony C. Davies
Andreas Neumeier
Terje Gjengedal
Kurt R. Richter
Jacob Baal-Schem
Antonio Luque Estepa
Jan Verveckken
Urmet Jänes
Roland J. Saam
Zhijia Huang
Athanassios Skodras
Saurabh Sinha
David Law
Christian Schmid
Daniel Pasquet
Joyce Mwangama
34....
34....
34....
34....
34....
34....
34....
3 . ....
. 4....
3 . ....
34....
34....
3 . ....
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34....
34....
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34....
34....
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A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
3.6 Past Directors gallery
3.6
Past Directors gallery
†
†
†
†
†
†
†
Rinia†
Lebel
Williams†
Wellinger
Jespers
Russell
Stumpers†
Bolinder
Poortvliet†
Proebster
Drangeid
Osborne
Ruechardt†
Ohrvik†
Richter
Turner
Larsen
Papo
Remshardt†
Onural
Herre Rinia
Robert C.G. Williams
F. Louis H.M. Stumpers
Dick C.J. Poortvliet
Hugo Ruechardt
Sven-Olof Öhrvik
Rolf A. Remshardt
Cornwerd 30–03–1905 / Eindhoven 29–05–1985
London 28–12–1907 / Guildford 25–03–2000
Eindhoven 30–08–1911 / Eindhoven (?) 30–09–2003
Poortvliet 14–01–1935 / Limassol, Cyprus 25–06–1995
? 30–12–1927 / Gauting (Munich) (?) 03–05–1992
Stockholm 14–10–1928 / Stockholm 15–04–2014
? 03–10–1936 / Böblingen 16–07–2013
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
33
3 IEEE Region 8 Operating Committees and Appointed Members
Davies
Zajc
Rémy
Modelski
Bastiaans
34
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Delimar
4
Personal reflections of Past Directors
Past Directors have been asked to write down some personal reflections of their time as Director. Moreover,
oral history interviews have been carried out with the following Past Directors:
• Jean D. Lebel – http://ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Oral-History:Jean_Lebel
• Robert C.G. Williams, together with Gordon H. (Mick) Byford and Bob Winton
– http://ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Oral-History:Mick_Byford,_Robert_Williams_and_Bob_Winton
• C. Reginald Russell – http://ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Oral-History:Reginald_Russell
• Basil W. Osborne – http://ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Oral-History:Basil_Osborne
• Kurt R. Richter – to be published
• Peer Martin Larsen – to be published
• Rolf A. Remshardt – http://ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Oral-History:Rolf_Remshardt
• Baldomir Zajc – http://ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Oral-History:Baldomir_Zajc
Transcripts of these interviews are available on IEEE’s Global History Network.
4.1
Jean D. Lebel (Director 1965-1966)
For the contribution of Jean Lebel, we refer to the paper “Setting up the basis for Region 8” that he presented
at HISTELCON 2012, see Sect. 10.
4.2
Rolf Remshardt (Treasurer 1983–1998, Director 1999–2000)
Memories of my time as R8 Treasurer (1983–1998)
I started my career as active IEEE volunteer in the position of the R8 Treasurer. Region 8 Director
Walter Proebster had asked me to assume the responsibility of the Treasurer for our region. After
accepting this responsibility, he invited me to attend my first R8 Committee Meeting 1983 in
Athens, Greece at MELECON 1983. At the meeting I became elected and took over from Dr. Mai,
who served as Treasurer only for 1-2 years. I received the old documents from R.C. Winton, who
served as R8 Secretary and Treasurer for many years up to 1981.
When I started with my new job, the annual Region 8 budget showed an amount of $ 25 000
and consisted only of a few handwritten pages. The financial status of R8 was relatively poor at
this time. IEEE HQ did not regularly transfer our money and there was not even enough cash on
the bank to reimburse the travel expenses of our section chairs in Athens. Significant improvements
were necessary. After my queries IEEE increased the Direct Support for our region and provided
more regular payments. The main problem, however, was that we received our income in US dollars
and our expenses had to be paid mostly in European currencies.
Our net income depended therefore very much on the varying exchange rates. As an example
one US dollar was equivalent to 3.30 DM (Deutsche Mark) at that time. From 1985 to 1987 the
exchange rate decreased to 1.70 DM and went even further down some years later. Our net income
in European currency had decreased by more than 50 % and I was not able anymore to pay for
our regular R8 expenses. We had to extend our income and I recommended to increasing the R8
assessment from $7 to $11. The assessment is money that has to be paid by our members together
with the IEEE dues and is supporting directly the region. This caused a lot of discussions in the
R8 Committee because it increased the cost for our members. Finally it was accepted and it took
another two years for approval by the IEEE Board of Directors. The assessment increase guaranteed
a solid financial situation in our region for a very long time.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
35
4 Personal reflections of Past Directors
It was also time to stop the manual bookkeeping and introduce first simple programs for budget
and finance control with computers.
It was my job during all the years to annually estimate our income and generate a balanced
R8 budget, to finance and control the many activities in our sections, chapters, student branches,
and conferences. Due to the geographically large region and the continuously increasing number of
sections, the size of our R8 Committee grew from year to year and the cost of the R8 Committee
meetings, which included airfares, hotel accommodation and meals became a major part of our
expenses. We had to select larger and more expensive hotels and hotel chains, which could accommodate all committee members and guests and offered larger conference rooms for our meetings. In
particular R8 meetings outside the region, like the visit of a Sections Congress in the United States,
became more difficult to finance. During my 15 years as Treasurer the annual R8 budget developed
from US$ 25 000 to over US$ 600 000.
When I became R8 Director for 1999 and 2000 I was glad that Prof. Hans Schmitt stepped in
as successor in 1998 and continued with my work. Nowadays our R8 budget has reached more than
three quarter of a million US Dollar and is operated by Brian Harrington in England with the latest
financial computer programs.
It was a very interesting time to handle and control the finances of our global region and I
enjoyed it very much.
Memories of my time as R8 Director (1999–2000)
A few colleagues encouraged me to run for the position of R8 Director. I did and became elected
as Director for 1999 and 2000. One of the most interesting parts of this position is the chance to
promote activities in the region and set priorities for things you personally believe are important
and have been neglected in the past.
During my term I wanted to focus my work on the needs and problems of our members in
particular also of those in the Near and Middle-East of our region as well as in countries of Africa.
I wanted to better understand the kind and nature of their problems and find ways how we might
be able to help. At this time there were not many IEEE activities in these areas and I believe IEEE
had not given much attention to them. So I wanted to encourage those members in particular also
the students and young people to start more activities in their sections, chapters, and branches and
increase membership.
The best opportunity to achieve this was by visiting the members in this region and meet and
talk with them. I visited the United Arab Emirates (Dubai, Abu Dhabi) Oman, Kuwait, and Saudi
Arabia and was invited to attend a GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) meeting. The three IEEE
sections, Saudi Arabia, UAE, and Kuwait are members of this council providing close cooperation
in the fields of Electrical Engineering. I also attended the “IEEE Technical Exchange Meeting” at
King Fahd University in Dhahran and presented IEEE Overviews at all visits. Another trip was
to the section of South Africa, to Johannesburg, Capetown, and the University of Stellenbosch.
I enjoyed a very warm welcome in all sections and met with highly motivated and enthusiastic
members. All were interested in education and to learn about the latest innovations in technology
and looking for IEEE lecturers to come to their sections. The IEEE dues payment in US currency
turned out to be the most significant problem especially for students. We discussed ways how to
best solve this issue.
One of my most exciting experiences which is still active in my mind was the trip to Tehran
in the Iran Section together with IEEE President Ken Laker. In 1998 we had a very nice Student
Branch Congress in Istanbul, organized by the Turkish Section in a beautiful campus on top of the
Bosporus. Three students from Iran approached Ken Laker and me and invited us to come to Tehran
and visit their section and student branches. To my surprise the President agreed immediately and
36
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
4.2 Rolf Remshardt (Treasurer 1983–1998, Director 1999–2000)
promised the students that we will come to Iran and asked me to organize a visit for both of us. I
mailed the Iran Section Chair, Dr. Ghafoori-Fard and asked him for permission to visit his section.
The political situation in Iran was not very clear at this time and I was told the section chair is
a high level person and a member of the Iran Parliament. We received a very kind response letter
that the chair would be glad to welcome us in Tehran.
Since we had an official invitation I met with Ken in Frankfurt on 20 February 1999 and we
flew together to Tehran with Iran Air. When we got closer to Iran I realized that several passengers
– men and women – had changed clothes to Oriental looking dresses. I also detected some small
cabins in the plane with carpets on the floor obviously for praying and to change clothes. This was
my first impression of a different culture. Arriving in Tehran Dr. Ghafoori-Fard picked us up at the
airport and brought us to the hotel in the city. On the next day he invited us to his office at the
University and we met with some IEEE section officers. He presented his planned agenda for our
visit. It included the visit of several technical universities in Tehran as well as a two days trip to
Isfahan, one of the most beautiful cities in Iran. This trip required a flight with a local airline.
On the first day we succeeded to visit two universities of the planned four to five in Tehran. The
traffic was chaotic and we had an extensive lunch with our hosts and IEEE section members, which
took much longer than planned. All our hosts were more than polite and wanted us to stay the whole
day instead of the planned two hours. On the next day Ken Laker gave a technical presentation
on electrical circuit design and I had prepared an IEEE overview, describing our organisation,
activities, and benefits. We had a large lecture hall at University with an audience of approximately
200 people, most of them students. We faced a situation, which we had never seen before, male
students sitting on one side casually dressed in jeans and T-shirts and on the other side of the hall
completely separated female students dressed in black gowns and their heads covered with veils or
chadors. It was interesting to learn, that universities in Iran have about 50 % female students in
Electrical Engineering. I have never seen this in Europe. All students were highly interested in our
presentations and asked enthusiastically all kinds of questions after our presentations.
It turned out that we never could make the planned agenda, since we were running out of time
and we had to apologize with the other universities in Tehran, we could not visit. The Secretary
of the Iran Section accompanied us on our trip to Isfahan. We had half a day for sightseeing and
our guide showed us the old part of the beautiful city with its famous mosques and the magnificent
mosaic. We had a chance to see local places, study their customs and try to smoke water-pipes.
Isfahan has a modern university and we were invited to give our presentations. It was just a
repetition of our experiences in Tehran with respect to the seating and dresses of the students. The
next day we had to fly back to Tehran and return to Germany in the following night.
Looking back to this trip it was a unique experience to learn a lot about the people and their
culture in this country. We made many friends and both the IEEE President and I were impressed on
the students’ high interest in technology and their enthusiasm for the profession. We were not used
to this in the western hemisphere. As a result of this visit, the amount of IEEE student members
and branches grew substantially in the Iran section.
My term as R8 Director did of course not only consist of visits to sections, I had also to organize
and manage our two R8 Committee meetings every year. The first one in May 1999 was in Berlin,
the old and new capitol of Germany. Some highlights were the Focus Groups, the preparation for
Sections Congress 99 (SC 99), the highest membership increase in IEEE and R8, an Accreditation
and Abet workshop, and not to forget a sightseeing tour through the restored and renewed city of
Berlin without the wall.
My predecessor Maurice Papo had already initiated the IEEE Transnational Committee. The
globalization process is one outcome and caused significant steps in 1999. The IEEE Board of
Directors Meeting together with the HONOR Ceremony met in London, June 1999 for the first
time outside the United States. R8 made another global decision to have the second Committee
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
37
4 Personal reflections of Past Directors
Meeting together with SC 99 in Minneapolis in the United States. The cost was very high to
bring all Committee members to the USA, but they got the unique chance to meet with all their
IEEE colleagues worldwide and exchange ideas and activities. The meeting in Minneapolis with the
Section Congress was quite a success. Some highlights were the Branding Committee, the Leadership
Development Program, discussions on problems with the SAMIEEE database, and the transition
of our R8 News production to IEEE Spectrum in order to save cost.
The third Committee Meeting in May 2000 happened in Oslo, Norway. Some highlights were:
IEEE President Bruce Eisenstein presented Millennium Medals to some R8 Officers, goals were
defined for a better operation of the IEEE Brussels Office, reports of the successful Student Branch
Congress in Eindhoven were given, and the International Student Exchange Program was established.
My fourth and last R8 Committee Meeting was on 14 October 2000 in Cairo, Egypt. It was the
75th R8 Meeting and I had chosen Cairo because we had never been before in Egypt and I wanted to
raise more activities in this area. Reports were presented on highlights like: successful MELECON
2000 in Cyprus with R8 Student Paper Contest, high attendance on both Division I+IV R8 chapter
meeting in Paris and Division IX chapter meeting in Istanbul, and a visit of the Higher Technical
Institute in the 10th of Ramadan City near Cairo. Due to the excellent warm climate in Egypt, we
had an open air dinner with view to the illuminated pyramids on Saturday evening and later we
attended a special light and music show in front of the pyramids, which is still in our memory as a
beautiful souvenir to Cairo. The Committee Meeting concluded on Sunday with Focus Groups and
workshops chaired by incoming Director Levent Onural.
I enjoyed my two year term as Regional Director very much. I believe I could reach most of my
goals in several areas, I learned a lot on our members and on their problems in the geographically
large Region 8. I will never miss this time.
4.3
Anthony C. Davies (Director 2003–2004)
Past IEEE Region 8 Director Memoirs and Recollections
In order to explain adequately my time as Region 8 Director, I will start by providing the context
in which I became an IEEE member and active volunteer.
During my army service after leaving school, the standard advice was ‘never volunteer’: it will
be seen that I did not take this advice!
During my subsequent time as an electrical engineering undergraduate at Southampton
University, the Head of Department persuaded me to join a local IEE committee; as a result I
met various senior engineers, and had responsibilities to organise ‘events’ which included giving a
lecture-demonstration on frequency modulation. Preparation included library searches, by which
I became very familiar with and impressed by the IRE Proceedings and other IRE publications.
Later, working for the General Electric Co. at Coventry, I regularly used IRE Transactions, etc. and
followed the discussions about the AIEE-IRE merger.
Over all this time, I had no expectation of joining as a member. It was after joining academia
that I became involved with the local (by then IEEE) UK&RI Circuit Theory Chapter, and joined
as a member of IEEE (in 1967). The Chapter was then very active, and when I went to British
Columbia for a year (1968–1969), I naturally took interest in what IEEE did locally (actually not
much, but far more than the local IEE branch in Vancouver, which did nothing at all).
On return to England, I became deeply involved in the organisation of an IEEE conference in
London: this brought me into personal contact with many of the key people in my research field
(some later became IEEE Society Presidents, etc.). The conference was the first held by the IEEE
38
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
4.3 Anthony C. Davies (Director 2003–2004)
Circuit Theory Group (now CAS Society) outside the USA, and its success initiated the regular
holding of ISCAS in many locations around the world.
Since then, being an active ‘IEEE volunteer’ has been a part of my life, and I would say that
the two features which I liked best were its international/transnational nature and its distributed
management, whereby junior, local people (such as myself) had the freedom and power to initiate,
arrange and control local events. This was a big contrast to IEE, in which I was also a volunteer in
various ways, which had very rigid centralised control.
I became involved at the UK&RI Section level as a result of being asked to assist with the
business of Conference Sponsorship: at that time, the Section received many invitations to cosponsor conferences, from IEE, Institute of Physics, etc., and this usually required finding a suitablyqualified IEEE member to serve on the organising committee as IEEE representative.
Attending IEEE conferences in USA was generally too expensive for me. However, the start of
cheap flights by Laker Airways enabled me to attend two conferences in Canada in early 1973. I
travelled on the first Laker “advance booking charter” flight, with a round-trip fare of £45 (no added
taxes or supplements or surcharges then!). Later I went to Purdue University for a year as a visiting
professor (1973–1974) – which also brought me into more contact with IEEE members and IEEE
events (including the 1974 ISCAS in San Francisco, my first visit to California).
I was invited (at short notice) in April 1978 to attend (as ‘observer’) a R8 Committee meeting in
Eindhoven, because they needed a judge for a student paper contest. The R8 Committee was then
quite small (the Minutes record an attendance of twenty people), but what left a lasting impression
on me was this group of people from many countries, sitting around a big table in the Philips
company boardroom, involved in friendly and cooperative discussions of many issues, which struck
me as in marked contrast to the way that typical international meetings of politicians take place.
Another relevant memory is a nice visit to IEEE at Piscataway. I was on my way to an IEEE
conference in Philadelphia in 1987, and because of some issues connected with an exchange-link
between The City University in London and Rutgers University, the suggestion arose that I should
visit the latter en route, since that could be done for a small incremental cost. I shared a rented car
with a colleague from University of Kent at Canterbury, which we collected at Kennedy Airport,
and spent a few days travelling to Philadelphia, visiting Rutgers University on the way. This gave
me the opportunity to visit IEEE Piscataway – with which I already had some personal contacts in
the part then called ‘IEEE Field Services’ – what later became Regional Activities, I suppose.
The steps towards becoming R8 Director really started in the early 1990s when André Vander
Vorst asked me to become the R8 CAS Chapter Coordinator – the aim was to increase the activity of
the existing Chapters and encourage the formation of new Chapters where there were sufficient CAS
members – this was at a time of many changes and new opportunities which followed the removal
of the Berlin Wall. This brought me into regular contact with the R8 Committee by attendance at
its meetings (I had attended a few of these meetings previously for various reasons). My activities
included arranging Chapter Chairs’ meetings, and forming stronger links with the CAS Society
management. Then, e-mail was in its infancy, and my academic-base gave me a better framework
for making use of this for international communications. All this led, among other things, to being
elected to the CAS Society Board of Governors as Vice President for R8. Being at a time when
the Society had rather substantial financial reserves, and an expanding programme of activities,
meant that as a member of the CAS ExCom I had the opportunity to attend meetings in all sorts of
interesting places which I might otherwise have never visited. I was also elected as UK&RI Section
Chair, which of course included attending the R8 Committee meetings, twice per year.
Notable steps along the way towards being elected as R8 Director included attending a meeting
of Chapter Chairs in New Orleans, in February 2000. This was followed by the IEEE Board Series
meetings, which I was able to remain in New Orleans to observe. I was struck by the scale of this
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
39
4 Personal reflections of Past Directors
operation: I thought I knew all that mattered about the way IEEE operated, but realised that there
was a whole world of activity on a large scale (meetings of TAB, RAB, BoD and many more) about
which I had been almost unaware.
Later, a significant step was standing in as a voting member for the CAS President at a TAB
meeting when some important issues for CAS were being decided, from which I became better aware
of TAB operation.
My success at R8 Chapter Coordination, including the stimulation of new chapters (especially
in Eastern Europe where new opportunities were arising) and arranging Chapter Chair meetings,
led me to being elected by the R8 Committee as Vice Chair for Technical Activities. By then I was
rather well known to the R8 Committee membership, and was nominated as a candidate for R8
Director.
I suppose that I did not expect to be elected. I did not do any active ‘electioneering’ and thought
that it was sufficient to provide my biography and a position statement. I was rather surprised to
get a late-evening long-distance phone call from Ray Findlay (then IEEE President), and even more
surprised to be told by him that I had been elected (I had not realised that this was the method to
inform successful candidates).
I feel that it is somewhat regrettable that now candidates typically spend a huge time and effort
(and sometimes much personal money) in promoting their own candidature.
At that time, the Director-Elect term was one year, not two, but I feel that I was very well
prepared before that, because of my involvements with the R8 Committee and with the CAS Society
in many ways over many years, and because I had met quite a few of the staff from Piscataway at
various events. What I also believe is very important is that my ‘connections’ were with both the
Technical (e.g. Society) side of IEEE and with the Geographic (e.g. Region) side of IEEE. I feel it
is regrettable that some senior volunteers (including some Section Chairs and some Society Board
of Governors members) seem to connect with only one of the two.
Three major issues which I remember as being prominent during my time as R8 Director were
the IEEE sanctions on Iran members, the Transnational Committee business, and discussions about
IEEE Governance (e.g. possible changes to the Board of Directors structure). The Iran sanctions
problem was a particularly unwelcome situation, because of the outrage felt particularly by many
of the younger members in R8 at what they felt was a failure of IEEE to behave in accordance with
its own code of ethics. There seemed a risk that the reactions could spread to the destruction of the
very good and active student branch activities throughout R8.
Perhaps my overall memory of my volunteer activity in IEEE, including being a Director, is of
‘meeting interesting and talented people’, which is one of the rewards of IEEE volunteer activities.
Specifically, I saw my role on the Board as including keeping the members ‘aware’ of the differences
between the needs, wishes, culture and general situation of R8 compared to R1–6 (and to some
extent R7). It is important to realise that this was not an attempt to get special favours for R8
(e.g. not what is called ‘pork-barrel politics’). The responsibility of Directors is clearly to IEEE as
a whole and not to the Region (or Division) which elected them.
Additionally I saw my role as taking back to the IEEE committees in R8 information about the
Board of Directors discussions and decisions, and where appropriate to seek their opinions.
So, in serving IEEE as a Director I perceived my main duties to be
1. to inform the BoD about R8 issues
2. to inform the R8 Committee about activities at the higher levels of IEEE (BoD, RAB, TAB)
and at the same time to generally promote and explain what I considered to be the good features and
activities of IEEE. This included travelling to events where I could explain about the structure and
achievements of IEEE, and encourage membership development (by which I mean not only getting
40
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
4.3 Anthony C. Davies (Director 2003–2004)
more members, but helping existing members to get more from their membership, and stimulating
Chapter and Student Branch activity).
Within this context. I tried to ‘entertain’ and even ‘educate’ the members of the BoD, by bringing
a distinct and different perspective that they might not otherwise have seen. I reported to them a
‘visit to Crna Gora’ specifically to see if any had the courage to ask where it was – none did have
the courage, though I am sure that few, if any, knew.
It was a fortunate feature of the airline ticket pricing policies that in many cases, by staying for
a Saturday night, it was possible to buy highly discounted tickets, making it economical to stay for
extra days in some meeting location (e.g. the saving on the air fare at least paid for added hotel
nights). This meant, for example, that I could often attend additional events at a Board Series
meeting. I also commonly took the opportunity to extend my stay at my own expense in order to
travel in the vicinity of the meeting place, and so to visit places that I would otherwise never have
seen. Perhaps I should add that I have a personal preference for generally using public transport
(e.g. buses, trams, etc.) rather than expensive taxi cabs, and it became customary for organisers of
some of the meetings to ask me to provide a ‘travel advice’ document (usually for places that I knew
fairly well from previous visits, etc. but sometimes for places which I had never visited myself!) This
was before the easy availability of detailed maps and travel data on the internet, which mean that
special skills and expertise is no longer needed.
Over many previous years experience of attending international conferences, etc. on a very
restricted budget, I had acquired skills in travelling cheaply, and finding low cost air fares, long
before the internet made this ability generally available to all.
My recollections of chairing the R8 Committee for the four meetings during which I was Director
include:
1. a struggle to finish on time (which was then about 1700 on a Sunday, we spent two full days,
including a caucus on Saturday, with various pre-meetings on Friday).
2. trying to get the Section Chairs to actively participate.
3. getting the presentations by Vice-Chairs, etc. to finish on schedule.
4. preparing the main meeting room with the help of the R8 Secretary and others – because
the hotels were often only partially ready for us and meeting-room access was sometimes only
possible early on the Saturday morning, despite an 0800 meeting-start being usual.
The (informal) policy which I supported was holding the meetings in newly-formed Sections or
other Sections where R8 Committee meetings had not previously taken place, and using the smaller
meetings (OpCom, N&A Committee, etc.) to visit locations in Sections where it would be impractical
to take the whole R8 Committee – for example, Novosibirsk. The importance of this was to find out
about the local situation, problems, etc. and especially to meet more of their volunteers (e.g. not
only the Section Chairs). I also felt that I had an indirect responsibility to keep expenses within
bounds (which included assisting the R8 Treasurer in responding to a few excessive travel-expense
claims).
During my two years as Director, the four meetings were held in: Reykjavík, Iceland; Zagreb,
Croatia; Kraków, Poland; Stockholm, Sweden.
Being R8 Director involves a great deal of long-distance travel. Fortunately I enjoy travel, and
this was possible because I had retired before becoming Director – it would hardly have been
possible if I had also had a ‘real’ job at the same time. Also fortunate is that much of this travel
was before the main restrictions and inconveniences which have arisen as a result of the responses
to international terrorism. Sometimes my wife travelled with me, and sometimes we used this as an
opportunity for some additional vacation travel – on other occasions it was either not convenient
for her to travel with me or the meetings were in some obscure place where spending a few days
while I was all the time in meetings was not an attraction for her – so I have to acknowledge a very
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
41
4 Personal reflections of Past Directors
tolerant wife who allowed me to spend a huge amount of time on IEEE matters, including many
absences from home over many years!
After my two years as Director, I remained very active as a Past Director, which provided
continuing involvement in various ways over several years. However, I think it important to record
my belief that ‘hanging-on’ to IEEE positions needs to moderated by the need to allow new (and
younger) people to have opportunities to be elected to IEEE positions.
I have always promoted the concept that a favourable and essential feature of IEEE is that it is
a member-directed, staff-supported organisation (rather than the other way around).
Overall. I am very satisfied with the many interesting opportunities which IEEE brought to me,
and I hope that I have contributed something worthwhile in return.
I am somewhat discouraged by some recent trends in IEEE, which seems to be moving towards
more centralised control, more rules, and more decisions in the hands of people who have a USAcentred knowledge and outlook.
Tony Davies, 16th July 2012
4.4
Baldomir Zajc (Director 2005–2006)
Memories of my time as member of the IEEE R8 Committee
Chair of the Yugoslavia Section (1987–1992) and Slovenia Section (1992–1995)
My time in the Region 8 Committee was rather long. I came first as the Chairman of the Yugoslavia
Section in 1987. Soon, in 1991 Republics of Yugoslavia were becoming independent countries, even
having different currencies. All general contacts between them became impossible for quite some
time and also the IEEE custody bank-account, which was created for paying IEEE membership
dues in Yugoslav Dinar currency, and had existed for 20 years, ceased to be available and so was
not functioning for any IEEE members in the manner in which it had previously been used. In 1992
I proposed instead of the existing common Yugoslavia Section the formation of three independent
Sections: centered in Ljubljana, Zagreb and Belgrade. Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina had very
few members at that time, insufficient for forming Sections. Macedonia got Section status in 1997
after the visit of IEEE President Wally Read to the Bulgaria and the Slovenia Section in 1996, and
Bosnia and Herzegovina in 2005 while I served as the Region 8 Director.
In the Slovenia Section I served for the first four years as the Chairman until 1995 when I became
Region 8 Conference Committee Chairman.
Region 8 Conference Coordinator (1995–1999)
Regional conferences of the MELECON and AFRICON type went well, but EUROCONs after
EUROCON’92 in Zurich had to be cancelled were not so far being continued. I began very slowly to
reestablish support for re-starting this type of conference. I was proposing quite new characteristics:
beside the usual conference format of only technical papers given by participants, the proposed
idea was to have an additional IEEE education program and incorporate the promotion of IEEE
activities and membership as an included component. At that time in Central and Eastern Europe
as a consequence of the changed political system, conditions were changing and were developing
more quickly and some additional scope for professional discussion was obviously needed. The
Region 8 Committee decided that a new kind of EUROCON should be reestablished, starting in
2001 in Bratislava. In the beginning the new kind of EUROCON was to be run with much lower
organisation and running expenses by locating it on university campuses. In 2003 in Ljubljana, in
42
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
4.4 Baldomir Zajc (Director 2005–2006)
2005 in Belgrade and in 2007 in Warsaw the idea was developed further to become successful in a
broader sense. Because of success in charging lower fees the number of participants became higher
and higher, since more people were able to afford the participation.
IEEE Region 8 Director-Elect (2004) and Director (2005–2006)
In 2004 I was elected as Region 8 Director-Elect. At that time the term of office was just one
year. I served as a member in RAB as RAB Liaison to EAB, in EAB N&A Committee, and in the
Transnational and Rejuvenation Committees.
The next year, when I became Region 8 Director and so was a Member of RAB and of the BoD,
I proposed a change to a two-year term for Director Elect (as several other Regions had already).
This term of two years was approved.
In Region 8 we had about 50 Sections at that time. Since many laws and regulations are different
in each country only the local people can appreciate and work adequately with them. There were
still many countries where an IEEE Section did not exist but in them there were some members
willing to start with a Subsection (having the objective of being a ‘Section in Development’), or
a Chapter or a Student Branch, operating until there would be sufficient IEEE activity developed
and enough members to form a Section. But according to the IEEE Bylaws any such IEEE sub unit
(including a Sub-Section) should belong to a Section, and could not exist in isolation. Of course,
in such situations no such supervising Section existed. Some Chapters and Student Branches were
allowed exceptionally.
Such a function could not be taken over by some other Section from another country because
of the defined territory for each Section, which meant it was not considered appropriate for the
Section to take charge of sub-units outside its boundaries. The proposal to solve this difficulty
was discussed and modified at the RAB and TAB Section Support Committee and the concept
of a special “Summation Section” was in our mind such that those Subsections, Chapters, and
Branches in an empty territory without its own Section would be allowed and would belong to
the R8 Committee, which would play the “Summation Section” role and take the responsibility for
them.
In everyday Region 8 Committee activity during these years that I was Director, the usual
operation of the Region was continuing and this activity I found very interesting and very
challenging.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
43
5 IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
5
IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
year
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
44
Spring meeting
Geneva, Switzerland (IRE Region 9), 06–06
Geneva, Switzerland, 22–04
Geneva, Switzerland, 27–04
Geneva, Switzerland, 26–04
Rome, Italy, 13–04
London, United Kingdom, 22–05
Paris, France, 02–04
Montreux, Switzerland, 24–05
Gothenburg, Sweden, 18–04
Paris, France, 17–04
Madrid, Spain, 12–02
London, United Kingdom, 06/07–04
Amsterdam, Netherlands, 26/27–04
Venice, Italy, 18/19–04
London, United Kingdom, 26/27–03
Venice, Italy, 06/07–05
Eindhoven, Netherlands, 20/21–04
Zurich, Switzerland, 27/28–04
Friedrichsruhe, Germany, 29/30–03
Herzlia, Israel, 28/29–05
Vedbaek, Denmark, 19/20–06
Athens, Greece, 27/28–05
–
Herzlia, Israel, 24/25–03
Enghien (Paris), France, 19/20–04
Rome, Italy, 28/29–03
Stockholm, Sweden, 11/12–06
Budapest, Hungary, 08/09–04
Brussels, Belgium, 12/13–05
Warsaw, Poland, 20/21–04
Lausanne, Switzerland, 16/17–05
Vouliagmeni (Athens), Greece, 03/04–04
Hillerød (Copenhagen), Denmark, 28/29–05
Dun Laoghaire (Dublin), Ireland, 21–05
Espoo (Helsinki), Finland, 02–06
Rome, Italy, 11–05
Piscataway, NJ, USA, 09/10–05
Berlin, Germany, 08/09–05
Oslo, Norway, 20/21–05
Seville, Spain, 03/04–03
Budapest, Hungary, 20/21–04
Reykjavik, Iceland, 28/29–06
Krakow, Poland, 24/25–04
Paris, France, 16/17–04
Vilnius, Lithuania, 08/09-04
Sofia, Bulgaria, 14/15–04
San Julian, Malta, 26/27–04
Fall meeting
Geneva, Switzerland (IRE Region 9), 22–10
Geneva, Switzerland, 04–11
Geneva, Switzerland, 26–10
Geneva, Switzerland, 07–09
Leuven, Belgium, 16–09
Lausanne, Switzerland 08–09,
Tel-Aviv, Israel, 24–10
Brussels, Belgium, 03–10
Geneva, Switzerland, 30–10
Lausanne, Switzerland, 23–10
Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, 18–11
Munich, Germany, 26/27–10
Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, 25/26–10
Zurich, Switzerland, 31–10/01–11
Athens, Greece, 29/30–10
Madrid, Spain, 09/10–12
Split, Yugoslavia, 11/12–11
London, United Kingdom, 09/10–11
Rome, Italy, 21/23–11
Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, 02/03–10
Versailles, France, 09/10–10
Vienna, Austria, 05/06–11
London, United Kingdom, 28–09/01–10
Madrid, Spain, 12/13–10
Lisbon, Portugal, 27/28–09
Brdo near Kranj (Ljubljana), Yugoslavia, 19/20–09
Munich, Germany, 08/09–10
Vienna, Austria, 14/15–10
Toronto, Canada, 02/03–10 (at Sections Congress 3)
Santa Margherita Ligure (Genua), Italy, 28/29–09
Istanbul, Turkey, 03/04–10
Nice, France, 09/10–10
Prague, Czech Republic, 08/09–10
Barcelona, Spain, 08–10
Denver, CO, USA, 05–11 (at SC 5)
Porto, Portugal, 26–10
Larnaca, Cyprus, 17/18–10
Minneapolis, MN, USA, 11/12–10 (at SC 6)
Cairo, Egypt, 14/15–10
Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 01/02–09
Washington, DC, USA, 17–10 (at SC 7)
Zagreb, Croatia, 11/12–10
Stockholm, Sweden, 02/03–10
Tampa, FL, USA, 13/14–10 (at SC 8)
Belgrade, Serbia, 14/15–10
Bucharest, Romania, 13/14-10
Quebec, Canada, 18/19-09 (at SC 9)
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
year
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
Spring meeting
Venice, Italy, 25/26–04
Riga, Latvia, 08/09–05
London, United Kingdom, 26/27–03
Berlin, Germany, 31–03/01–04
Madrid, Spain, 20/21–04
Budapest, Hungary, 05/06–04
Limassol, Cyprus, 28/29–03
Fall meeting
Lisbon, Portugal, 10/11–10
Prague, Czech Republic, 09/10–10
San Francisco, CA, USA, 18/19–08 (at SC 10)
Tallinn, Estonia, 6/7–10
Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, 05/06–10
Amsterdam, Netherlands, 21/22–08 (at SC 11)
Switzerland 15; Italy 8; UK and Ireland 7+1=8; BeNeLux 4+3+0=7; France 6; Spain 6; Germany 5
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
45
6 IEEE Region 8 conferences
6
IEEE Region 8 conferences
E = EUROCON, M = MELECON, A = AFRICON, C = CompEuro
year
1971
1974
1977
1980
1981
1982
1983
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1987
1987
1988
1988
1989
1989
1990
1991
1991
1992
1992
1992
1993
1994
1996
1996
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2002
2003
2004
2004
2005
2006
2007
2007
E
1
2
3
4
M
A
C
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
1
MELECON
5
EUROCON
2
MELECON
1
AFRICON
6
EUROCON
3
MELECON
7
EUROCON
4
MELECON
1
2
CompEuro
AFRICON
2
8
CompEuro
EUROCON
5
MELECON
3
4
5
6
CompEuro
CompEuro
CompEuro
MELECON
x
EUROCON
6
3
AFRICON
7
7
8
CompEuro
CompEuro
MELECON
MELECON
4
9
AFRICON
MELECON
5
10
AFRICON
MELECON
9
EUROCON
11
MELECON
6
10
AFRICON
EUROCON
12
MELECON
7
11
AFRICON
EUROCON
13
MELECON
12
EUROCON
8
AFRICON
Lausanne, Switzerland, 18–22 October 1971
Amsterdam, Netherlands, 22–26 April 1974
Venice, Italy, 3–6 May 1977
Stuttgart, Germany, 24–28 March 1980
Tel-Aviv, Israel, 24–28 May 1981
Copenhagen, Denmark, 14–18 June 1982
Athens, Greece, 24–26 May 1983
Nairobi, Kenya, 7–9 December 1983
Brighton, UK, 26–28 September 1984
Madrid, Spain, 8–10 October 1985
Paris, France, 21–23 April 1986
Rome, Italy, 24–26 March 1987
Hamburg, Germany, 11–15 May 1987
Abidjan, Ivory Coast, 30 November – 2 December 1987
Brussels, Belgium, 11–14 April 1988
Stockholm, Sweden, 13–17 June 1988
Lisbon, Portugal, 11–13 April 1989
Hamburg, Germany, 8–12 May 1989
Tel-Aviv, Israel, 8–10 May 1990
Bologna, Italy, 13–16 May 1991
Ljubljana, Yugoslavia, 22–24 May 1991
Zurich, Switzerland, 18–21 May 1992, canceled
The Hague, Netherlands, 4–8 May 1992
Mbabane, Swaziland, 22–24 September 1992
Paris-Evry, France, 24–27 May 1993
Antalya, Turkey, 12–14 April 1994
Bari, Italy, 13–16 May 1996
Stellenbosch, South Africa, 24–27 September 1996
Tel-Aviv, Israel, 18–20 May 1998
Cape Town, South Africa, 28 September – 1 October 1999
Limassol, Cyprus, 29–31 May 2000
Bratislava, Slovakia, 5–7 July 2001
Cairo, Egypt, 7–9 May 2002
George, South Africa, 2–4 October 2002
Ljubljana, Slovenia, 22–24 September 2003
Dubrovnik, Croatia, 12–15 May 2004
Gaborone, Botswana, 15–17 September 2004
Belgrade, Serbia, 21–24 November 2005
Benalmádena (Málaga), Spain, 16–19 May 2006
Warsaw, Poland, 9–12 September 2007
Windhoek, Namibia, 26–28 September 2007
CompEuro was organized jointly with the IEEE Computer Society.
46
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
6.1 EUROCON 71 – Reminiscences by Fritz Eggimann
E = EUROCON, M = MELECON, A = AFRICON, S= SIBIRCON, H = HISTELCON, N = ENERGYCON
year
2008
2008
2008
2009
2009
2010
2010
2010
2010
2011
2011
2012
2012
2012
2013
2013
2014
2014
2015
2015
2015
E
M
14
A
S
H
N
MELECON
1
SIBIRCON
1
HISTELCON
13
EUROCON
9
AFRICON
15
MELECON
2
SIBIRCON
2
HISTELCON
1
14
ENERGYCON
EUROCON
10
AFRICON
16
MELECON
3
HISTELCON
2
15
ENERGYCON
EUROCON
11
AFRICON
17
MELECON
3
4
16
ENERGYCON
HISTELCON
EUROCON
12
AFRICON
Ajaccio, Corsica, France, 5–7 May 2008
Novosibirsk, Russia, 21–25 July 2008
Paris, France, 11–12 September 2008
St. Petersburg, Russia, 18–23 May 2009
Nairobi, Kenya, 23–25 September 2009
Valletta, Malta, 25–28 April 2010
Irkutsk Listvyanka, Russia, 11–15 July 2010
Madrid, Spain, 3–5 November 2010
Manama, Bahrain, 18–22 December 2010
Lisbon, Portugal, 27–29 April 2011
Livingstone, Zambia, 13–15 September 2011
Yasmine Hammamet, Tunisia, 25–28 March 2012
Pavia, Italy, 5–7 September 2012
Florence, Italy, 9–12 September 2012
Zagreb, Croatia, 1–4 July 2013
Pointe aux Piments, Mauritius, 9–12 September 2013
Beirut, Lebanon, 13–16 April 2014
Dubrovnik, Croatia, 13–16 May 2014
Tel-Aviv, Israel, 16–21 August 2015
Salamanca, Spain, 8–11 September 2015
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 14–17 September 2015
The following contributions – by Fritz Eggimann, Jacob Baal-Schem, and Baldomir Zajc – describe ONLY those
conferences organised via the IEEE Region 8 Committee in collaboration with Region 8 Sections (as mentioned
in the table above); they do not mention the very large numbers of conferences organised in Region 8 over
many years by IEEE Societies, Sections and Chapters.
6.1
EUROCON 71 – Reminiscences by Fritz Eggimann
EUROCON 71, 18–22 October 1971,
Palais de Beaulieu, Lausanne, Switzerland
Fritz Eggimann, IEEE LSM
Chair of the EUROCON 71 Steering Committee
Basic concept
The initiative to start a big convention within Region 8 of IEEE (just 8 years since its birth)
is a brainchild of Roger Wellinger. He had been living in the US for quite many years, working
professionally in academia and later at GE Schenectady R&D Labs. Following a call in 1961 from
Gerard Bauer, then Chair of the Swiss Watch Industry Association, he came back to Switzerland to
build up and lead the pioneering Centre Electronique Horloger (CEH) in Neuchâtel, which has been
honoured with a Historical IEEE Milestone in 2002. Leaving the General Manager position there
in 1968, he took over the duty as Director of Region 8, keeping a lot of personal contacts within
Switzerland’s Section.
Roger’s idea was to start and establish for the benefit of all Region 8 members (then mostly
located in Europe) a periodical trans-national convention, following the example of either the East
Coast one in New York or of WESCON in California. At that time my boss at Brown Boveri &
C. (the Swiss company later merged into ASEA) was Gustav Guanella, who unfortunately passed
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
47
6 IEEE Region 8 conferences
away few years afterward. He was also the Chair of Switzerland’s IEEE Section. In that capacity he
entrusted me with the task of starting a Student Branch at ETH in Zurich (then the only Federal
Institute of Technology). Roger asked me bluntly, if I would like to take up the challenge of acting
as General Manager of such a European Convention, having of course checked before hand with
Gustav Guanella that Brown Boveri would very actively support myself for tackling the task.
After having well considered the proposal, finally I decided to venture into this new direction.
Together with Roger we went 1969 to visit IEEE Headquarters in New York, where we were
thoroughly coached during many days into the intricacies of organizing, managing and budgeting this
truly international convention. I vividly remember the deep discussions we had with Emily Sirjane,
then Manager of Membership Services as well as with Richard M. Emberson, Staff Secretary of the
Technical Activity Board. They introduced us to all subtleties linked to cultural, human and organizational aspects of large IEEE sponsored conventions. One critical point was financial planning and
budgeting, trying to avoid very probable losses. Many international conferences were publishing very
expensive proceedings, which met subsequently with very low market demand. So we did, to start
with, only print a 500 pages booklet, where the papers were digested into a 2 page presentation.
Starting, Organizing and Implementing EUROCON8
There were 3 main points to be addressed:
• Which broad technical subjects could best attract the attention of Region 8 members?
• Who will underwrite and sponsor organization of such a big meeting and where is the best site
for carrying it out?
• How to ensure that major European national engineering associations would join into the effort
and support it?9
Andreas Rannestad from Norway, Chairing the Technical Program Committee, was able to
condense the scope of the convention into following fields:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Information Processing in Large Systems
Long Distance Communication
Solid State Circuits
Distribution of Electrical Power
Bio-Medical Engineering
Electronic Time-Keeping
Alain Jenny from EPUL in Lausanne (the forerunning University of EPFL) was acting as Chair of
the Financial Committee as well as local Secretary. He succeeded in enlisting the Palais de Beaulieu
as the venue of EUROCON and thanks to the active support of many Swiss IEEE members, he could
secure financial grants from many Swiss Industries, totalling about 30’000 Swiss Francs (a sum then
convertible into some 7,000 US$). But also IEEE Headquarters joined into the effort, extending a
loan of about 9,000$! During a night session at Geneva Airport together with Andreas Rannestad
we had to clear all the inquiries that Jim Mulligan, then IEEE VP, was bluntly submitting to us,
especially with reference to the planned attendance of 750 members. Just crossing the Atlantic he
had made a stopover in the UK, visiting the English national association IEE, where he was told
in non uncertain terms, that the goal of reaching 600 participants in London (forget about 750)
8
The venue being in French speaking Switzerland, the newly minted name “EUROCON” met with a very cold reception, because
of the undesired French meaning of the word “con,” which at best sounded like the English “dummy.” Note from Hugo Wyss, March
2012.
9
As opposed to the US situation, where IEEE is the national electrical engineering association, Region 8 comprised many
European nations, using many languages, where since long time national engineering associations with different management
structures were established. Often these associations were suspicious of getting competition from the newly established and English
speaking IEEE. Note from Hugo Wyss, March 2012.
48
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
6.2 Conference activities in Region 8 – The first 30 years – Jacob Baal Schem
was very unlikely. But at the very end we got 1100 attendees, 900 of which paying and about 100
students. Refunding the loan from Headquarters became unexpectedly easy, we swiftly handed a
cheque to the puzzled Jim Mulligan, who was also attending the conference.
Roland Richard, Chair of SEV (Swiss Electrotechnical Association), acting as Chair of the
Honorary Committee, successfully got the support from 13 national engineering associations within
Europe, who became “supporting societies” of EUROCON. The crowning of the event happened at
the closing banquet, when Jim Mulligan bestowed for the first time IEEE Frederik Philips Award
(a gold medal) upon the attending principal of the Dutch Philips Gloeilampen N.V. company.
The first EUROCON took off with a roaring financial and technical content success and accumulated a surplus of more than 30’000 Swiss Francs, a carry-over which put all subsequent conventions
on a very solid footing.
F. Eggimann, Untersiggenthal, March 2011
6.2
Conference activities in Region 8 – The first 30 years – Jacob Baal Schem
Conference activities in Region 8
The first 30 years (1963–1993)
Jacob Baal-Schem, IEEE Life Senior Member
Tel-Aviv University, Israel
Abstract – Holding Technical Conferences is one of the major activities of IEEE Operating Units.
Soon after its founding in 1963, Region 8 Committee decided to initiate a Regional IEEE Conference,
in cooperation with EUREL, the Convention of National Associations of Electrical Engineers of
Europe. As the demand grew, additional series of Conferences were established. This paper looks
at the development of Regional Conference activities in Region 8 (Europe, The Middle East and
Africa) during the years 1963–1993.
Introduction
IEEE is known worldwide for the level of its technical conferences, and therefore, soon after the
founding of Region 8 in 1963, there was a demand for holding technical conferences in Europe. This
required approval of, and cooperation with the National Societies of Engineers, who had to form a
joint association for this purpose.
EUREL was founded in 1972 as a counterpart to the European part of the IEEE’s Region 8,
which actually includes Africa and the Middle East. The EUREL Secretariat rotated among the
EUREL member organizations every three years. Despite the name, a few of the member societies
also admitted other than electrical engineers, and some also have corporations as members.
As years passed, and the number of Sections all over the large area of Region 8 grew, it was
felt that additional series of Conferences are required, mainly based on areas and their different
emphasizes (solar energy, technology transfer, etc.). A trial to hold theme oriented Conferences
(e.g. Computers) was discontinued after a few issues.
EUROCON
EUREL and IEEE Region 8 cooperated on projects such as the EUROCON meetings – first
once every three years, and from 1980 – every second year. They agreed that EUROCON will be
conducted by the IEEE, with local national engineering societies invited to cosponsor the conference,
to be held in English. The first EUROCON was held in 1971 in Lausanne, Switzerland and the next
ones were held in different countries in Europe – see the attached table. The partnership between
IEEE Region 8 and EUREL was discontinued in 1988 and the parties agreed that Region 8 can
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
49
6 IEEE Region 8 conferences
continue to use the EUROCON brand for its meetings. EUROCON Conferences are actually held
every second year as IEEE Region 8 events.
MELECON
In 1979, as Israel was not accepted as a venue for EUROCON, the Chairman of the Israel Section,
Dr. Jacob Baal-Schem, proposed to the Region 8 Committee the holding of a biennial Mediterranean
Electrotechnical Conference, to be called MELECON. The proposal was accepted and Tel-Aviv was
chosen as venue for the first MELECON, to be held on May 1981, with 50 % partnership of the
Region and 25 % partnership by each – the Section and the National Society. MELECON ’81 was a
big success, with over 1200 participants and a surplus that enabled Region 8 to set-up a Conference
reserve fund – which provided advance money to future Regional Conferences, in which the Region
was a financial co-sponsor. It is continuously followed every second year by another conference in
Mediterranean Sections, as shown in the table.
AFRICON
At the end of the ’80s, it was felt that there is a need for holding Technical Conferences in Africa
and Region 8 initiated AFRICON – African Electrical Technology Conference. The first Conference
was held on 7–9 December 1983 at the Jomo Kenyata Conference Center, Nairobi, Kenya. This
Conference was followed by a series of Conferences held in different parts of the African continent.
CompEuro
A joint Region 8 - Computer Society Conference – COMPEURO – was initiated in the 1980’s and
the first CompEuro was held in Hamburg, Germany in May 1987. A joint steering committee with
representatives of Region 8 and IEEE Computer society was formed, and a MOU and Procedures
document were signed by the parties. The series of joint conferences continued yearly, until 1993,
as shown in the table.
Conference coordination
All Regional Conferences were discussed in the Regional Conference Committee and brought to
approval by the Regional Committee. They received advance funding from the Conference reserve,
with Regional partnership in the Conference income. The Conference Committee received guidance
by the Regional Conference Coordinator and all events were conducted according to IEEE Procedures and Region 8 Bylaws.
In November 1991, the Region 8 Conference Committee published a “Guide to Conference activities in Region 8,” which includes Policy and Procedures including Sponsoring Conferences (as
approved by Region 8 Committee in October 1984) as well as Aim. Procedures and Management
of the Conference reserve fund (as approved by Region 8 Committee in 1983).
In addition to Regional Conferences, IEEE Region 8 hosted and co-sponsored – mainly technically – many IEEE Societies’ Conferences, and many members from Region 8 participated as
Committee members, authors and attendees in IEEE Technical Conferences.
Conclusions
During these first 30 years of IEEE Region 8 activities, Technical Conferences were one of the
major activities and many of the Sections participated actively in the organization and holding
of Conferences. This type of activities continues since then and provides venues for professional
meetings of IEEE members in the Region, as well as for other professionals. EUROCON, MELECON
50
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
6.3 Conference activities in Region 8 – After the first 30 years – Baldomir Zajc
and AFRICON Conferences continue to be successfully held and additional Conferences have been
established.
Dr. Jacob Baal-Schem (BSc–1959; MSc–1966; DSc–1979; Technion – Israel); Member of IEEE History
Committee, Region 8 Life Member and History activities coordinator; Member ComSoc History Committee.
Senior Lecturer at Tel-Aviv University. Was R8 Conference Coordinator from 1981 to 1993.
6.3
Conference activities in Region 8 – After the first 30 years – Baldomir Zajc
Conference activities in Region 8
After the first 30 years (i.e., after 1993)
Baldomir Zajc, IEEE Life Senior Member
University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Abstract – This paper is dedicated to the development of Conference activity by the Region 8
Committee from the year 1993 onwards.
Introduction
By 1991 the series of EUROCONs was believed to be most important among conference events in
Region 8 and as such EUROCON’91 was prepared to be held in Zurich, Switzerland. According to
the well-going economy of that time there was a strong desire to attract more papers from industry
in contrast to the usual conference content of papers from academia. It was planned to include topics
such as reliability, productivity and so on, in order to support such expectations. But, for reasons
not to be analysed here again, the conference had to be cancelled because of not having enough
papers and experienced a very low number of registrations. After that nobody in the R8 Committee
wanted to discuss future conferences of this type. Such an atmosphere was present when, in 1994,
I became R8 Conference Coordinator.
By then, two other R8 conference series, MELECON and AFRICON, were running quite
smoothly and successfully, every two years for the first and every three years for the second. Another
R8 conference series, called CompEuro, ceased being organized after CompEuro’93 in Paris-Evry
(I was present and considered it successful as it had always been before). I do not know anything
about the reasons for the decision not to continue CompEuro.
Later, at the end of the nineties I began to very very slowly introduce in the R8 Conference
Coordination Committee the idea of reestablishment of EUROCONs again. Very few people were
supporting such an idea at that time.
EUROCONS
Despite the lack of support for re-starting EUROCON, the idea had been developing more and
more. By the nineties the political system in Europe had dramatically changed. All those countries
which had changed their political and economical system needed help from IEEE and this was a new
broader opportunity for IEEE. There was a scarcity of conferences and meetings where professionals
could gather and exchange ideas in those countries. Also all the various IEEE Services became of
interest, and helpful to a much larger number of new members.
Therefore the decision to reestablish EUROCON in 2001 in Bratislava, Slovakia, a location
centrally placed in these newly-involved countries, was more easily accepted.
There were also proposed some new guidelines for other less expensive conferences which could
thereby make possible lower fees for participants. It was proposed to organize events on university
campuses instead of in expensive hotels, getting space and equipment for free or at a low price
and with a lot of people available for organizational tasks. It was advised also to join with other
local events to create a better atmosphere and to attract a bigger number of participants. There
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
51
6 IEEE Region 8 conferences
are always also some accommodation facilities available in universities, at least for students. And
beside the normal conference program the proposal was to organize and include sessions comprising
educational programs from IEEE Services and in other ways to help newly-joining members.
These propositions were considered in all later R8 Conferences. After reestablishing EUROCON
2001 in Bratislava, EUROCONs followed every two years, held in Ljubljana 2003, Belgrade 2005,
Warsaw 2007, Saint-Petersburg 2009 and Lisbon 2011.
For EUROCON 2003 in Ljubljana I created the title-motto “Computer as a Tool” for attracting
the papers, and this title was broad enough to describe the intentions of this type of conference.
This motto was used still for EUROCON 2011 in Lisbon.
MELECONS
MELECON conferences were running successfully all the time since the first one in 1981, moving
from one Mediterranean country to another, slowly covering the whole area. The aims of these
conferences were to select those topics which were important in that geographical area.
AFRICONs
Of course the needs in Africa are somewhat different and the AFRICON conferences are dedicated to
these needs. The first three were organized as individual initiatives but from 1996, after Stellenbosch,
all the subsequent conferences were organized with the help of the skills attained by the South
Africa Section, which were developed together with the IEEE Region 8 Conference Committee.
These skills were later shared with the AFRICON organizers in Botswana, Namibia and Zambia
under the supervision of the South Africa Section
SIBIRCONs
Recently Region 8 also began conference activity in Siberia, with the scope to gather participants
from that neigbourhood, and also from Region 10.
ENERGYCONs
At the end of 2010 an additional conference was organized in Manama, Bahrain, 18–22 December,
called ENERGYCON. With 1000 participants and supporters, they had a lot to tell and discuss.
The next conference with this title took place in Firenze, Italy. So after longer preparation maybe
another series of R8 conferences has been started?
52
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
7
7.1
Student activities
The early years of IEEE Region 8 Student Activities – until 1984
This is a transcription of the history parts as they appeared in the SAC reports by Paul Jespers and André
Vander Vorst, with a few minor corrections.
The Region 8 Committee has always placed great importance on student activities. At the
Committee’s Fifth Meeting, held in Geneva on April 26, 1965, the newly elected Director Mr. J. Lebel
expressed his concern about subscription rates for students, the interests of graduate students, and
how to encourage student membership without competition with the national societies.
There were four Student Branches at that time: the University of Roma, established in 1961
with Prof. Barzilai as counselor; the University of Padova, established in 1963 (Prof. Cariolaro), the
E.T.S.I.T. Madrid, 1964 (Prof. Millan), and the University of Louvain, 1965 (Prof. Jespers).
At the Seventh Region 8 Committee Meeting, held in Rome on April 13, 1966. Director Lebel
suggested establishing an inter-Branch competition for the best student papers, which would receive
prizes, and participation in the international contest organized in New York by the IEEE. He also
appointed Prof. P. Jespers as the first Student Activities Committee Chairman, and this Committee
held its first meeting in Rome on April 15, 1966.
At the end of the year 1966, a Branch was established at Chalmers Institute of Technology,
Goteborg (Prof. Wallmark), while at the meeting held in Leuven on September 17 of the same year,
the Student Activities Committee approved the rules governing the Undergraduate Student Paper
Contest.
The first Contest took place in Lausanne on September 7, 1967. Five papers were entered, and
the winner went to New York to participate to the Institute Contest. Since this first edition, interest
in this Contest has never decreased.
Due to a six-months leave of absence of Prof. P. Jespers, Prof. A. Vander Vorst acted as SAC
Chairman in 1967–1968. In 1967, Branches were established at the Royal Institute of Technology,
Stockholm (Prof. Enander) and at the University of Uppsala (Prof. Tove), while student membership
increased at the University of Naples (Prof. Capuccini) although a Branch was never established.
Activities developed in 1967 led to the establishment of Branches at the Technical University of
Helsinki (Prof. Tiuri), Lund Institute of Technology (Prof. Stigmark), in the United Kingdom and
Republic of Ireland on a Section Student Branch (Prof. Ash) as well as in the Switzerland Section
(Dr. Eggimann), and at the Institut Supérieur d’Electronique, Paris (Mr. Magne).
Several branches were established in 1969: at the Technical University of Twente (Mr. Poortvliet),
the Ecole Supérieure d’Ingénieurs en Electrotechnique et Electronique, Paris (Mr. Roumegoux), the
Ecole Supérieure d’Electricité, Paris (Prof. Hebenstreit), the Politecnico di Milano (Prof. Ferrari),
and the University of Trieste (Prof. Zoldan), with an Associate Student Branch at the Istituto
Radiotecnico A. Beltrami, Milano (Prof. Mosca).
The period 1965–1970 has been characterized by rather large exchange programs between
Headquarters and Region 8: the winners of the Region 8 Contest were invited to participate in
the Contest at the Institute level and to attend the IEEE Convention. Student Branch representatives were also invited to a meeting during the Convention.
In 1970, a new SAC Chairman was appointed: Prof. E.F. Bolinder. At that time, there were
18 Student Branches, which have already been mentioned, and counselors had been appointed
in several other Universities and Institutes: Genova (Prof. Biorci), Zürich (Prof. Borgnis),
Lyngby (Prof. Bruun), Eindhoven (Prof. Butterweck), Napoli (Prof. Cappucini), Barcelona
(Prof. Companys), Bologna (Prof. Monaco), and Trondheim (Dr. Selseth).
New Branches were founded in 1970 at the Universities of Bologna (Prof. Monaco), Genova
(Prof. Biorci), Liège (Prof. Danthine), Cairo (Dr. Kamal), Ljubljana (Prof. Wedam), and Lille
(Prof. Vidal).
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
53
7 Student activities
The 1971–series was formed of Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, (Mr. Nilsson), AinShams (Prof. Saad-El-Din Yousef), Politecnico di Torino (Dr. Pozzolo), while two Branches arise
from the University of Louvain. respectively in Leuven (Prof. Van Overstraeten) and Louvain-laNeuve (Prof. Vander Vorst), and two others from the Switzerland Section Student Branch, respectively at E.T.H. Zürich (Prof. Borgnis) and at E.P.F. Lausanne (Prof. de Coulon).
In 1972, Prof. A. Vander Vorst became the new SAC Chairman. At that time. an activity was
developing between Region 8 SAC Chairman and the Student Policy and Planning Committee,
New York, Region 8 students went to the U.S. under this program and reported at the 10th SAC
meeting, held in Louvain-la-Neuve, in November 1972.
Branches were established in 1973 at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Télécommunications,
Paris (Mr. Hirschler), at Technion Haifa (Prof. Navot), and the University of Tel-Aviv (Prof. Ur),
while the Branch at Beltrami was dissolved. The next year came the Branches at the University of
Linköping (Prof. Fjällbrant) and Alexandria (Dr. M. Ez-EI Arab), the E.N.S. d’Electrotechnique et
de Génie Physique, Grenoble (Mr. Sabonnadière), I.S.E.N. Lille (Prof. Vandenberghe), and H.T.S.
voor Radiotechniek en Elektronika Haarlem (Mr. Van der Werff).
After EUROCON 74 Amsterdam, April 1974, Prof. Bolinder was again appointed SAC Chairman
until the end of the year. He was then followed by Prof. O. Memelink. A new Branch was established
at the University of Oulu (Prof. Lappalainen), while several were dissolved in 1975: Lyngby, AinShams, Alexandria, E.N.S. Electricité Paris, University of Lille, and Torino. Budget limitations due
to inflation started and no general counselor meeting was held until 1980. The SAC Chairman
organized local meetings in Venice, Stockholm and Louvain-la-Neuve in 1975.
Mr. J.G. Rémy took over as SAC Chairman in 1976 and organized local counselor meetings
in Paris, London and Venice in 1977, while new Branches were established at the Universities of
Athens (Prof. Protonotarios) and Tampere (Prof. Neuvo).
In 1978, Prof. A. Vander Vorst was appointed SAC Chairman again. A Branch was established at
the University of Thessaloniki (Prof. Kriezis) in 1979 while the one at I.S.E.N. Lille was dissolved.
A general Counselor meeting, the first since six years, was held in Stuttgart on the occasion of
EUROCON 80. The 1980-series of new Branches was composed of the Technical University of
Eindhoven (Dr. Vinck), the University of Florence (Prof. Cappellini) and Kuwait (Prof. El-Gabaly),
the E.T.S.I.T. Barcelona (Prof. Delgado-Penin) while the Branch at Torino started again (Prof. Del
Corso) and activities expanded at the University of Roma (Dr. Sorrentino).
In 1980 a Postgraduate Student Paper Contest was organized for the first time, within the
framework of EUROCON.
The 1981 new Branches were established at the Technical University of Delft (Prof. Dewilde),
and at the University of Negev, Beer-Sheva (Prof. Tabak), as well as in Denmark, as a Section
Student Branch (Dr. Joersboe).
The Region 8 Committee approved in October 1982 the idea of a system of grants established in
the Region to help Branches financially in organizing trips abroad, to encourage inter-Branch and
international contacts.
In 1983, a new SAC chairman was appointed, D.C.J. Poortvliet. A Branch was established at
the University of Munich in 1985, while the Region 8 Committee approved the establishment of a
Student Activities Executive Committee.
In 1984, the IEEE centennial year, each Region selected a centennial Student, who was invited
to the centennial celebrations in Boston. The Region 8 Centennial Student was Philippe Siraut
from Louvain-la-Neuve. His alternate was Lex van Gijsel from Eindhoven. Those two students were
appointed as the two student members of the first Student Activities Excom.
54
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
7.2 Student Activities Committee meetings – until 1984
7.2
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
7.3
Student Activities Committee meetings – until 1984
Rome, Italy – 15 April 1966 (Jespers)
Leuven, Belgium – 17 September 1966 (Jespers)
London, UK – 23 May 1967 (Jespers)
Lausanne, Switzerland – 7 September 1967 (Vander Vorst)
Paris, France – 1 April 1968 (Jespers)
Tel-Aviv, Israel – 24 October 1968 (Jespers)
Montreux, Switzerland – 23 May 1969 (Jespers)
Gothenburg, Sweden – 17 April 1970 (Bolinder)
Paris, France – 16 April 1971 (Bolinder)
Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium – 17 November 1972 (Vander Vorst)
Amsterdam, Netherlands – 26 April 1974 (Vander Vorst)
Venice, Italy (18 April); Stockholm, Sweden (24 June); Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium (26 September) –
1975 (Memelink)
Paris, France (31 January); London, UK (7 March); Venice, Italy (2 May) – 1977 (Rémy)
Stuttgart, Germany – 28 March 1980 (Vander Vorst)
Lyngby, Denmark – 18 June 1982 (Vander Vorst)
Brighton, UK – 25 September 1984 (Poortvliet)
Student Branch (and GOLD) Congresses
It is important to note that prior to the Student Branch (and GOLD) Congresses, (annual) Transnational
Student Meetings were organized where representatives of Region 8 Student Branches met. For instance, in
the Netherlands (1985), Finland (1986), Switzerland (1987), Belgium (1988: over 40 students from Benelux,
Denmark, UK, Finland, Germany, Greece, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland and the USA), Portugal (1989),
the Netherlands (1991: 76 students from 12 countries) and Turkey (1992: over 45 students from 16 countries).
Especially at the early student meetings, the oral finals of the Student Paper Contest were held at these
meetings.
After the change of ‘IEEE GOLD’ into ‘IEEE Young Professionals,’ the name of the congress became
‘Student and Young Professional Congress.’
1998
2000
2002
2004
2006
2008
2010
2012
2014
Istanbul, Turkey, 10–13 August 1998
Eindhoven, Netherlands, 14–19 May 2000
Cairo, Egypt, 1–5 May 2002
Passau, Germany, 4–7 September 2004
Paris, France, 30 August – 3 September 2006
London, United Kingdom, 28–31 August 2008
Leuven, Belgium, 4–8 August 2010
Madrid, Spain, 25–29 July 2012
Kraków, Poland, 6–10 August 2014
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
55
7 Student activities
7.4
Student Paper Contest Finals
The IEEE Region 8 Student Paper Contest was an initiative of the second Region 8 Director, Jean Lebel.
1967 Lausanne, Switzerland, 7 September 1967, in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting and the
4th Region 8 Student Activities Committee meeting
1. Ingemar Lundström (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden) Analysis of current
spreading in firing thyristors
2. Michel Declercq (Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium) Synthèse d’un convertisseur d’impédance
négative
3. Giorgio Leskovic (Padova University, Italy) Determination of cardiopulmonary circulation parameters by analog computer simulation of cardiac dilution curves
1968 Paris, France, 1 April 1968, in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting and the 5th Region 8
Student Activities Committee meeting
1. Lars Odman (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden) Analog computation of
surface field at p-n junctions
2. Alessandro Birolini (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland) Simulation d’une
installation hydroélectrique en marche isolée sur charge ohmique symétrique
3. Hannu Marsalo (Technical University of Helsinki, Finland) Device for recording of diaphragm
movements during breathing
1969 Montreux, Switzerland, 22 May 1969, in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting and the 7th
Region 8 Student Activities Committee meeting
1. Claude André Vouga (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland) Les conditions de
stabilité des systèmes échantillonnés obtenues algébriquement à l’aide d’un ordinateur
2. Lennart Almstrom, R. Bertilsson, R. Bergstrand (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg,
Sweden) Theory and construction of a binary to ternary coder
3. Henrik van Brussel, R. Thore (Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium) Stability and design criteria
for action linear two-ports with generalised scattering parameters
1970 Gothenburg, Sweden, 17 April 1970, in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting and the 8th
Region 8 Student Activities Committee meeting
1. Bernard P. Zisermann, Michel Codou (Ecole Supérieure d’Ingénieurs d’Electrotechnique et
d’Electronique, Paris, France) Etude théorique et technologique d’ensembles complets de fonctions
ternaires
2. Ex aequo: D. Anderson (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden) Nonlinear
analysis by means of a variational principle
2. Ex aequo: R. Meylan (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland) Générateur de
bruit pseudo-aléatoire à densité de probabilité sélectionnable
1971 Paris, France, 16 April 1970, in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting and the 9th Region 8
Student Activities Committee meeting
1. Frank J. Furrer (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland) Coupled transmission
lines with non-linear terminations
2. Etienne Loute, M.C. Decréton (University of Louvain, Heverlee, Belgium) Optimisation d’isolateurs
à résonance
3. Pertii E.M. Poulakka (Helsinki University of Technology, Finland) A novel design method for threeport circulators
56
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
7.4 Student Paper Contest Finals
1972 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, 17 November 1972, in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting
and the 10th Region 8 Student Activities Committee meeting
1. E. Schutz (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) Etude d’un gyrateur
intégrable deséquilibré
2. W.A. Vervoort (Technological University Twente, Enschede, Netherlands) AAS — An Addressing
System
3. B. Marthinsson, E. Max (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden) Automatic
check and calibration of digital voltmeters
1973 No contest
1974 Amsterdam, Netherlands, 26 April 1974, as part of EUROCON 1974, the European Conference on
Electrotechnics (22–26 April 1974), and in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting and the
11th Region 8 Student Activities Committee meeting
1. P. Gravez, M. Minck (Ecole Supérieure d’Ingénieurs en Electrotechnique et Electronique, Paris,
France) Joncteur de conférence par voies téléphoniques
2. A. Sewerinsson (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden) An active group delay
equalizer for the intermediate frequency range
3. E. Jonckeere (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) On the stochastic
optimal control of a discrete-time linear system with a finite set of allowable actions
1975 Venice, Italy, 19 April 1975, in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting and the 12th Region 8
Student Activities Committee meeting
1. Norbert Bayoux, Jean François Scheffers (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve,
Belgium) Réalisation et mesure de transistors à substrat inhomogène
2. Willi Vollenweider, Piers Kasser (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland)
3. Alexandra Izhkar (Technion, Haifa, Israel) On Horowitz’s optimization problem in active RC
network synthesis and the solution of an associated nonlinear programming problem
1976 London, UK, 26 March 1976, in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting
1. B.F. Pfister, W.Ch. Oehen (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland) A
microprocessor-implemented recursive adaptive filter for on-line data equalization
2. P. Couvreur (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
3. C. Rossier (Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne, Switzerland)
1977 Venice, Italy, 6 May 1977, as part of EUROCON 1977, the European Conference on Electrotechnics (3–6
May 1977), and in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting and the 13th Region 8 Student
Activities Committee meeting
1. Giuseppe A. Marino (Università di Genova, Italy) A computer-aided ultrasonic B-scan system for
ophtalmology
2. T. Laurent (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
3. J. Starr (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium)
1978 Eindhoven, Netherlands, 21 April 1978, in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting
1. Xavier Sinéchal (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) Analyse spectrale
du comportement de l’opérateur humain soumis à des conditions de stress
2. Paul Schöbi (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland) Synchronization of binary
pseudo noise sequences
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
57
7 Student activities
3. Patrick de Ryck (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) Realisation of a testing system for charge
coupled devices with matrix structure
1979 Zurich, Switzerland, 27 April 1979, in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting
1. W. Blaser, P.L. Heinzmann (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland) New cryptographic device with high security using public key distribution
2. M. Nazarathy (Technion, Haifa, Israel) Optical spatial spectrum analysis using a simplified approach
3. S. Abbeloos, M. de Grève (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) Etude et
réalisation d’un modem à microprocesseur à 2400 bits/sec
1980 Stuttgart, Germany, 28 March 1980, as part of EUROCON 1980, the European Conference on
Electrotechnics (24–28 March 1980), and in conjunction with the 14th Region 8 Student Activities
Committee meeting
1. Jesús A. del Alamo (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain) Photovoltaic solar energy conversion
by means of bifacial DSSF solar cells
2. Ex aequo: S. Jespers, Ph. Tibaut (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
Study and realization of a high speed specialized processor designed for a network analyser
2. Ex aequo: Håkan Persson (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden) Blissograph –
A printer for Bliss symbols
Postgraduate Paper Contest winners
1. Ex aequo: Arne Alping, Ulf Aiff (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden) Development of an optical spectrum analyzer using a lateral photodiode
1. Ex aequo: D. Maravall Gomez-Allende (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain) New solutions
in adaptive signal detection
2. S.O. Ishrak (King’s College, London, UK) A review of optically switched transducers for acoustic
imaging
1981 Tel-Aviv, Israel, 27 May 1981, as part of MELECON 1981, the (1st) Mediterranean Electrotechnical
Conference (24–28 May 1981)
1. Zeev Shpiro, Rony Weissman (Technion, Haifa, Israel), Word recognition system
2. Frans J.J. Gielkens (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) The influence of the wind
direction on rain-induced cross polarization
3. Jacques Godet (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) Optimal control of
the primary coolant temperature in a nuclear power plant
1982 Lyngby, Denmark, 18 June 1982, as part of EUROCON 1982, the European Conference on Electrotechnics
(14–18 June 1982), and in conjunction with the 15th Region 8 Student Activities Committee meeting
1. W.J. Geldmacher, R.E. Schoepflin (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland)
Cross-compiler for pocket calculator
2. Ex aequo: Maria-Gabriella Di Benedetto (Università degli Studi di Roma, Italy) Voiced-unvoicedsilence classification of sounds in the speech signal
2. Ex aequo: Per Andersson (Chalmers University of technology, Gothenburg, Sweden) Absorption
coefficients at CO2 -laser wavelengths for toluene, m-xylene, o-xylene, and p-xylene
Postgraduate Paper Contest winner
Torben Rottbøl Andersen, Søren Beyer Nielsen (Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark)
An efficient single output fuzzy control algorithm for adaptive applications
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A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
7.4 Student Paper Contest Finals
1983 Athens, Greece, 26 May 1983, as part of MELECON 1983, the 2nd Mediterranean Electrotechnical
Conference (24–26 May 1983), and in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting
1. P.J. Miller (Hull University, UK) A dynamic Boolean algebra
2. Carlos Muñoz, Alberto Sanz (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain) Hierarchical image transmission
3. Marc Juckler, Stéphane de Mahieu (Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
Design of a totally self-checking arithmetic and logic unit
1984 Brighton, UK, 25 September 1984, as part of EUROCON 1984, the European Conference on
Electrotechnics (26–28 September 1984), and in conjunction with the 16th Region 8 Student Activities
Committee meeting
1. Etienne Denoël, Jean Philippe Solvay (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve,
Belgium) Speech linear prediction using a least absolute value criterion
2. Martin Frick, Conradin V. Gugleberg (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland)
Computer aided design for the manufacture of printed circuit boards
3. Aarne Rantala (Helsinki University of Technology, Finland) Digital image processing applied to
traffic surveillance
1985 Madrid, Spain, 10 October 1985, as part of MELECON 1985, the 3rd Mediterranean Electrotechnical
Conference (8–10 October 1985), and in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting
1. Ex aequo: Jean-Pierre Ksenicz and Oliver Nys (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve,
Belgium) ROM testability and autocorrelation
1. Ex aequo: Peter Andrekson (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden) Semiconductor laser stabilization using an external cavity and electronic control systems
3. Ex aequo: Maurice H.A. Paquay (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) Analysis and
comparison of the calibration methods for a six-port reflectometer
3. Ex aequo: Gabriel Eckert and Max Felser (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich,
Switzerland) On line observation of Modula-2 programs
1986 Paris, France, 22 April 1986, as part of EUROCON 1986, the European Conference on Electrotechnics
(21–23 April 1986), and in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting
1. (ETH Zurich, Switzerland) On linear complexity and correlation immunity of the summation cypher
2. (Greece) Approximate and plausible reasoning using attribute grammars
3. (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
1987 Rome, Italy, as part of MELECON 1987, the 4th Mediterranean Electrotechnical Conference (24–26
March 1987), and in conjunction with the Region 8 Committee meeting
1.
2.
3.
1988 Brussels, Belgium, as part of CompEuro’88, the Second Conference on Computer Technology, Systems,
and Applications (12–15 April 1988). The contest took place during the 25th anniversary students
meeting, which was held on the occasion of the Region’s 25th anniversary. In close cooperation with the
Benelux IEEE Student Branches a four days program was organized. Over 40 students from Benelux,
Denmark, England, Finland, Germany, Greece, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland and the U.S.A.
attended the program. A workshop on development skills was followed by the student paper contest,
with all 10 contestants invited on this occasion.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
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7 Student activities
1. Olivier Poncin, Béatrice van Caillie (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
Filtering and standards conversion in digital television
2. Andreas Lusser (EFPL, Lausanne, Switzerland) Ordering schemes for local loadflow solutions
3. Réjane Forré (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland) Analysis of a keystream
generator producing binary sequences with controllable complexity and ideal r-tuple distribution
1989 Lisbon, Portugal, 12 April 1989, as part of MELECON 1989, the 5th Mediterranean Electrotechnical
Conference (11–13 April 1989)
1. P.M. Domingos, P.N. Diniz, R.P. Casteleiro (Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon, Portugal) GEAR
– A 3D computer animation system for CAD and simulation
2. (Belgium)
3. (Belgium)
1990 Rome, Italy, 19 April 1990, as part of GAAS ’90, the Gallium Arsenide Applications Symposium (19-20
April 1990)
1. Heikki Valmu (Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo, Finland) A cooled millimeter-wave
radiometer for the ground-based detection of atmospheric ozone
2. René J. van der Vleuten (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) Controlled ALOHA
for two-way data communication in a cable television network
3.
1991 Ljubljana, Yugoslavia, 23 May 1991, as part of MELECON 1991, the 6th Mediterranean Electrotechnical
Conference (22–24 May 1991)
1. Dejan Križaj (University of Ljubljana, Yugoslavia) Fast reverse biased semiconductor device model
nonlinear multigrid method
2. Andreja Umek (Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia) Modelling, computation and evaluation of human arm workspace
3. Juhana Jaatinen (Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo, Finland) Optimizing assembler code
generator for Digital Signal Processor
1992 The Hague, Netherlands, 6 May 1992, as part of CompEuro’92, the International Conference on Computer
Systems and Software Engineering (4–8 May 1992)
1. Vieri Vanghi (University of Florence, Italy) Analysis of an all-digital demodulator for Trellis-coded
8-PSK modulation
2. Alain Baudhuin, Marc Fossion (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
Development of double-sided planar microwave circuits and application to mixer
3. Ex aequo: Pascale Francis, Frédéric Vermaut (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve,
Belgium) Conversion from interlaced to progressive formats by means of motion compensation based
techniques
3. Ex aequo: Emmanuel D. Frimout (Delft University of Technology, Netherlands)
1993 Paris-Evry, France, 26 May 1993, as part of CompEuro’93, the International Conference on Computers
in Design, Manufacturing, and Production (24–27 May 1993)
1. André J.W. van der Kouwe (University of Pretoria, South Africa) EEG-based interface for the
severely handicapped
2. Aleš Časar, Robert Meolic (University of Maribor, Slovenia) Representation of Boolean functions
with ROBDDs
3. Guido Van den Berghe (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium)) Piano key action models for
electric pianos
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A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
7.4 Student Paper Contest Finals
1994 Antalya, Turkey, 13 April 1994, as part of MELECON 1994, the 7th Mediterranean Electrotechnical
Conference (12–14 April 1994)
1. Alexandre Hoffmann (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) Iterative
performance enhancement in the control of a flexible arm / Iterative refinement of a GPC controller
2. A.J.C. (René) van Workum (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) A model of the
non-idealities in a DPSK modulation system with direct detection
3. Mehmet Alper Kutay (Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey) An adaptive speckle suppression filter
for medical ultrasonic imaging
1995 Limassol, Cyprus, 27 June 1995, as part of DSP’95, the International Conference on Digital Signal
Processing (26–28 June 1995)
1. Thierry Delmot, Henri de la Vallée Poussin (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve,
Belgium) Analog design and realization of a Kohonen map using SOI technology
2. Denis Ðonlagić (University of Maribor, Slovenia) The use of acoustic resonance in measuring the
level of fluids
3. Olivier Bruyndonckx (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) Non linear
perceptual post-processing of noisy digital pictures
1996 Bari, Italy, 15 May 1996, as part of MELECON 1996, the 8th Mediterranean Electrotechnical Conference
(13–16 May 1996)
1. Magne Setnes (Delft University of Technology, Netherlands) Similarity driven fuzzy rule-base simplification
2. Jyri Huopaniemi (Helsinki University of Technology, Finland) Design and implementation of a
binaural real-time room simulation system
3. Benoît Codrons, Bruno Ceysens (Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
Iterative identificationless control design
1997 Munich, Germany, 23 April 1997, as part of ICASSP-97, the 1997 IEEE International Conference on
Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (21–24 April 1997)
1. Matthias A. Senn (Technical University of Munich, Germany) Reconvergence analysis for power
estimation at logic level
2. Johan Driesen (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) Aspects of electrical energy measurement
in the presence of harmonics
3. Bernhard G. Wimmer (Technical University of Munich, Germany) Robust error protection scheme
for mobile applications
1998 Tel-Aviv, Israel, 19 May 1998, as part of MELECON 1998, the 9th Mediterranean Electrotechnical
Conference (18–20 May 1998)
1. Peter Bienstman (Ghent University, Belgium) Analysis and characterization of microcavity-LEDs
for optical interconnect applications
2. Martijn van Beurden (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) Analysis of infinite phased
arrays of printed antennas
3. Christian Wolters (Bochum University, Germany) Fault detection using higher-order frequency
response functions
1999 Bled, Slovenia, 13 July 1999, as part of ISIE’99, the International Symposium on Industrial Electronics
(12–16 July 1999)
1. Vili Podgorelec (Maribor University, Slovenia) Self-adapting evolutionary decision support model
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
61
7 Student activities
2. Dimitri Vandeville (Ghent University, Belgium) Non linear resampling for edge-preserving moiré
suppression
3. Katrin Schroeder (Bochum University, Germany) Synthetic aperture-based reconstruction of
intravascular ultrasound images in the time domain and frequency domain
2000 Limassol, Cyprus, 30 May 2000, as part of MELECON 2000, the 10th Mediterranean Electrotechnical
Conference (29–31 May 2000)
1. Aleš Bardorfer (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) Connecting haptic interface with a robot
2. Allert van Zelst (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) Extending the capacity of
wireless LANs using space division multiplexing combined with OFDM
3. Christian Gunselmann (Bochum University, Germany) A contribution to the modeling of short
channel MOSFETs for HF circuit simulations
2001 Bratislava, Slovakia, 6 July 2001, as part of EUROCON 2001, the International Conference on Trends
in Communications (5–7 July 2001)
1. Johann Groszschaedl (Graz University of Technology, Austria) Area-efficient VLSI implementation
of arithmetic operations in the binary finite field GF(2m )
2. Arjan Meijerink (University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands) Performance improvement of a
generalized coherence multiplexing system
3. Matjaz Divjak, Aleš Holobar, Iztok Prelog (University of Maribor, Slovenia) VIDERO – Virtual
delivery room
2002 Cairo, Egypt, 8 May 2002, as part of MELECON 2002, the 11th Mediterranean Electrotechnical
Conference (7–9 May 2002)
1. Hans B. Roelofs, Jeroen A.J. Thijs (University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands) Performance and
cellular capacity of M-ary PSK in co-channel interference
2. Matej Artac (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) Mobile robot localisation with incremental PCA
3. Saurabh Sinha (University of Pretoria, South Africa) Design of an integrated CMOS PLL frequency
synthesizer
2003 Ljubljana, Slovenia, 23 September 2003, as part of EUROCON 2003, the International Conference on
“Computer as a Tool” (22–24 September 2003)
1. Ulrich Stein, Marwan Younis (Universität Karlsruhe, Germany) Suppression of range ambiguities
in synthetic aperture radar systems
2. Els Kok (Universiteit Twente, Enschede, Netherlands) Completely multimode arrayed waveguide
grating-based wavelength demultiplexer
3. Noha A. El-Yamany (Alexandria University, Egypt) A new fuzzy gradient-adaptive lossy predictive
coding system for still image compression
2004 Dubrovnik, Croatia, 12 May 2004, as part of MELECON 2004, the 12th Mediterranean Electrotechnical
Conference (12–15 May 2004)
1. Antonin Descampe, François Devaux (Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
A flexible line-based JPEG2000 decoder for digital cinema
2. Biswa Sengupta (University of York, UK) Optimisation of timing properties in a platform
independent manner
3. Ahmed Abdelrahman Muhammad, George Isaac Aziz (Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt) 2D
single mode channel waveguide and MMI beam splitter fabrication and characterization
2005 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro, 23 November 2005, as part of EUROCON 2005, the International
Conference on “Computer as a tool” (21–24 November 2005)
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A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
7.4 Student Paper Contest Finals
1. Hansjörg Oliver Prinz (University of Karlsruhe, Germany) Design and development of a broadband
real-time 100-175 GHz frequency measurement system for gyrotron diagnostics
2. Elke De Mulder, Pieter Buysschaert (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) Electromagnetic
analysis attack on a FPGA implementation of an elliptic curve cryptosystem
3. Ioannis Yiakoumis, Markos Papadonikolakis, Haralambos Michail (University of Patras, Greece)
Efficient small-sized implementation of the keyed-hash message authentication code
2006 Benalmádena (Málaga), Spain, 16 May 2006, as part of MELECON 2006, the 13th IEEE Mediterranean
Electrotechnical Conference (16–19 May 2006)
1. Daniel Vikenmark (Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden) Reactive obstacle avoidance
for mobile robots that operate in confined 3D workspaces
2. Ex aequo: Jurij Rakun (University of Maribor, Slovenia) The computer-aided detection of inferior
printing quality and errors
2. Ex aequo: Dimitrios Schinianakis (University of Patras, Greece) A new approach to elliptic curve
cryptography: an RNS architecture
2007 Warsaw, Poland, 11 September 2007, as part of IEEE Region 8 EUROCON 2007, the International
Conference on “Computer as a Tool” (9–12 September 2007)
1. Wilm Decré (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) Application of a generic constraint-based
programming approach to an industrially relevant robot task with geometric uncertainties
2. Aleš Zamuda (University of Maribor, Slovenia) Modelling, simulation, and visualization of forest
ecosystems
3. Jan Verveckken (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) Design of inverse controller with crosscoupling suppression for UPFC series converter
2008 Ajaccio, Corsica, France, 6 May 2008, as part of MELECON 2008, the 14th IEEE Mediterranean Electrotechnical Conference (5–7 May 2008)
1. Geert Hellings (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) AlGaN Schottky diodes for detector applications in the UV wavelength range
2. William Vandenberghe (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) Analytical model for a tunnel
field-effect transistor
3. Herman Myburgh (University of Pretoria, South Africa) Near-optimal low complexity MLSE equalization
2009 Saint-Petersburg, Russia, 19 May 2009, as part of EUROCON 2009 (18–23 May 2009)
1. Ralph Hermans (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) Low-complexity model
predictive control of electromagnetic actuators
2. Bernhard Geiger (Technical University of Graz, Austria) Ranging in the IEEE 802.15.4a standard
using energy detectors
3. Jef Beerten (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) Comparison of three-level torque hysteresis
controllers for Direct Torque Control
2010 Valletta, Malta, 26 April 2010, as part of MELECON 2010, the 15th IEEE Mediterranean Electrotechnical
Conference (25–28 April 2010)
1. Maxime Taquet (Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) Feature-based error
processing for robust surface registration in computer assisted orthopedic surgery
2. Ex aequo: Daniel Johannes Louw, P.R. Botha, B.T. Maharaj (University of Pretoria, South Africa)
A low complexity Soft-Input Soft-Output MIMO detector which combines a sphere decoder with a
Hopfield network
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
63
7 Student activities
2. Ex aequo: Micha Linde (Karlsruhe University, Germany) A simple stochastic channel simulator for
car-to-car communication at 24 GHz
2011 Lisbon, Portugal, 27 April 2011, as part of EUROCON 2011, the International Conference on “Computer
as a Tool” (27–29 April 2011)
1. Shailesh Kulkarni, Patrick Reynaert, Cicero Vaucher, Domine Leenaerts, Maarten Tytgat
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) Design of a Ka-band upconverter for satellite communication
2. Jaymin Mankowitz, Andrew Paverd (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa)
Mobile device-based cellular network coverage analysis using crowd sourcing
3. Ralph Tanbourgi (Karlsruhe University, Germany) Resolving the connectivity-throughput trade-off
in random networks
2012 Yasmine Hammamet, Tunisia, 27 March 2012, as part of MELECON 2012, the 16th IEEE Mediterranean
Electrotechnical Conference (25–28 March 2012)
1. Mike Domenik Rinderknecht (EFPL, Lausanne, Switzerland) Device for a novel hand and wrist
rehabilitation strategy for stroke patients based on illusory movements induced by tendon vibration
2. Chen Zhu (Technical University of Munich, Germany) High accuracy multi-link synchronization in
LTE: Applications in localization
3. Augustin Cosse (Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) Diffeomorphic surfacebased registration for MR-US fusion in prostate brachytherapy
2013 Zagreb, Croatia, 1 July 2013, as part of EUROCON 2013 (1–4 July 2013)
1. Maarten Van de Put (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) Band-to-band tunneling in III-V
semiconductor heterostructures
2. Saeed Karimimehr (Isfahan University of Technology, Iran) A novel face recognition system inspired
by computational neuroscience
3. Diego Marmsoler (Technical University of Munich, Germany) On the laws of failure: A theory of
compensable programs
2014 Beirut, Lebanon, 14 April 2014, as part of MELECON 2014 (13-16 April 2014)
1. Slobodan Mitrović (Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland) Homometric sets in
diameter-two and outerplanar graphs
2. Nick Janssen (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) Analysis and design of complex
structures with an eigencurrent expansion method
3. Nicolas Van der Noot and Allan Barrea (Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
Zero-moment point on a bipedal robot under bio-inspired walking control
The Dick Poortvliet Award (a plaque and an amount of $250, funded by the regional SAC, for the Student
Branch where the winner of the Student Paper Contest comes from) was established on 7 November 1996, to
honour the 1995 Student Paper Contest Coordinator (as well as Past Region 8 Director and Past Region 8
Student Activities Chair) Dick C.J. Poortvliet, who died on 25 June 1995 in Limassol, Cyprus, where he
attended DSP’95, the International Conference on Digital Signal Processing (26–28 June 1995) during which
the oral finals of the 1995 Student Paper Contest took place.
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A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
8
IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
The IEEE currently bestows a Medal of Honor, fifteen Medals, thirty-three Technical Field Awards, two IEEE
Service Awards, two Corporate Recognitions, two Prize Paper Awards, Honorary Memberships, one Scholarship,
one Fellowship, a Staff Award and one Co-Sponsored Medal. The Medals are normally awarded to IEEE
members.
8.1
Medal of Honor
The IEEE Medal of Honor is the highest IEEE award. The Medal was established in 1917 and is awarded for
an exceptional contribution or an extraordinary career in the IEEE fields of interest. The candidate need not
be a member of the IEEE. The IEEE Medal of Honor is sponsored by the IEEE Foundation.
1970 Dennis Gabor, UK and Ireland Section – For his ingenious and exciting discovery and verification of the
principles of holography.
1993 Karl Johan Åström, Sweden Section – For fundamental contributions to theory and applications of
adaptive control technology.
8.2
8.2.1
IEEE Major Medals
Alexander Graham Bell Medal
The IEEE Alexander Graham Bell Medal was established in 1976 and is awarded for exceptional contributions
to the advancement of communications sciences and engineering. The Medal is sponsored by Alcatel-Lucent
Bell Labs.
1979 A. Christian Jacobaeus, Sweden Section – For pioneering work in the theory of switching systems and
technical leadership in the development of telecommunication systems.
1992 James L. Massey, Switzerland Section – For contributions to the theory and practical implementation of
forward-error-correcting codes, multi-user communications, and cryptographic systems; and for excellence
in engineering education.
2000 Vladimir A. Kotelnikov, Russia Section – For fundamental contributions to signal theory.
2003 Joachim Hagenauer, Germany Section – For contributions to soft decoding and its application to iterative
decoding algorithm.
2015 Frank Kelly, UK and Ireland Section – .
8.2.2
Edison Medal
The IEEE Edison Medal was established in 1904 and is presented for a career of meritorious achievement in
electrical science, electrical engineering or the electrical arts. The Medal is sponsored by Samsung Electronics
Co. Ltd.
1973 B.D.H. Tellegen, Benelux Section – For a creative career of significant achievement in electrical circuit
theory, including the gyrator.
1999 Kees A. Schouhamer Immink, Germany Section – For a career of creative contributions to the technologies
of digital video, audio, and data recording.
2005 Peter Lawrenson, UK and Ireland Section – For outstanding contributions to the field of electrical
machines, most notably the development and commercialization of switched reluctance drives.
2008 Dov Frohman-Bentchkowsky, Israel Section – For pioneering the development of the MOS Erasable,
Programmable Read Only Memory (EPROM), a key enabler of the information age revolution.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
65
8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
8.2.3
James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal
The IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal was established in 1956 and is awarded for a career of
outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest of IEEE. The medal was renamed in 1999 in
honor of James H. Mulligan, Jr. The medal is sponsored by MathWorks, National Instruments Foundation,
Pearson Prentice Hall and IEEE Life Members Committee.
1971 Franz Ollendorff, Israel Section – For contributions to the teaching of electrical engineering, especially
the preparation of classic texts on electromagnetic fields, and for leadership in building a distinguished
program in a new institute.
2007 Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Benelux Section – For contributions to education in computing, especially
computer organization, networking and operating systems.
8.2.4
Medal for Engineering Excellence
The Medal for Engineering Excellence was established in 1986 and is presented for exceptional achievement in
application engineering in the technical disciplines of the IEEE, for the benefit of the public and the engineering
profession. The medal was discontinued in November 2009.
1994 Heiner Sussner, France Section – For engineering leadership in the demonstration of one gigabit per
square inch storage density on a digital magnetic rigid disk.
8.2.5
Medal for Environmental & Safety Technologies
The IEEE Medal for Environmental and Safety Technologies was established in 2008 and is awarded for
outstanding accomplishments in the application of technology in the fields of interest to the IEEE that improve
the environment and/or public safety. The first presentation is scheduled for 2010. The medal is sponsored by
Toyota Motor Corporation.
2015 Rodolfo Schoeneburg, Marica Paurevic, and Hans Weisbarth, Germany Section – .
8.2.6
Founders Medal
The IEEE Founders Medal was established in 1952 and is awarded for outstanding contributions in the
leadership, planning, and administration of affairs of great value to the electrical and electronics engineering
profession. The Medal is sponsored by the IEEE Foundation.
1998 Alan W. Rudge, UK and Ireland Section – For distinguished leadership in the field of telecommunications
and for advancement of the electrical and electronic engineering profession.
8.2.7
Richard W. Hamming Medal
The IEEE Richard W. Hamming Medal was established in 1986 and is presented for exceptional contributions
to information sciences, systems and/or technology. The Medal is sponsored by QUALCOMM, Inc.
1994 Gottfried Ungerboeck, Switzerland Section – For the development and application of trellis modulation
to digital communications.
1995 Jacob Ziv, Israel Section – For contributions to information theory, and the theory and practice of data
compression.
1996 Mark S. Pinsker, Russia Section – For outstanding contributions to information theory, statistical
estimation and coding theory.
2003 Claude Berrou and Alain Glavieux, France Section – For the invention of turbo codes, which have revolutionized digital communications.
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A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
8.2 IEEE Major Medals
2006 Vladimir I. Levenshtein, Russia Section – For contributions to the theory of error-correcting codes and
information theory, including the Levenshtein distance.
2007 Abraham Lempel, Israel Section – For pioneering work in data compression especially the Lempel-Ziv
algorithm.
2012 Amin Shokrollahi, Switzerland Section, and Michael G. Luby – For the conception, development, and
analysis of practical rateless codes.
2014 Rüdiger Urbanke, Switzerland Section, and Thomas Richardson – For fundamental contributions to
coding theory, iterative information processing, and applications.
2015 Imre Csiszar, Hungary Section – .
8.2.8
Heinrich Hertz Medal
The IEEE Heinrich Hertz Medal was established in 1987 and is awarded for outstanding achievements in
electromagnetic waves. The medal was discontinued in November 2009.
1995 Jean Van Bladel, Benelux Section
2001 Adrianus T. De Hoop, Benelux Section
8.2.9
Medal for Innovations in Healthcare Technology
The IEEE Medal for Innovations in Healthcare Technology was established in 2009 and is presented for
outstanding contributions and/or innovations in engineering within fields of medicine, biology, and healthcare
technology. The medal is sponsored by the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society.
No recipients in Region 8.
8.2.10
Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal
The IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal was established in 1995 and is presented for outstanding
achievements in signal processing. The Medal is sponsored by Texas Instruments, Incorporated.
2003 Hans W. Schuessler, Germany Section – For his role in the early development of the field of Digital
Signal Processing, especially the theory, design, and implementation of analog and digital filters.
8.2.11
Lamme Medal
The IEEE Lamme Medal was established in 1928 and is presented for meritorious achievement in the development of electrical or electronic power apparatus or systems. The award was discontinued in August 2008.
1992 Dietrich R. Lambrecht, Germany Section – For outstanding contributions to the advancement of turbinegenerator engineering and technology, particularly superconducting rotor winding.
1994 Michel E. Pouloujadoff, France Section – For advancements in the theory and application of high-power
electromagnetic apparatus, including transformers and electronically controlled machine drives.
1997 André J. Calvaer, Benelux Section – For outstanding contributions to the analysis of the dynamic performance of electric power systems, including the vital role of reactive power.
2000 Joachim Holtz, Germany Section – For pioneering inventions related to magnetically levitated high-speed
trains, ac drive systems for railway traction and modulation theory of power converters.
8.2.12
Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal
The IEEE Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal was established in 2002 and is awarded for outstanding contributions
to material and device science technology, including practical application. The medal is sponsored by the
Federation of Electric Power Companies, Japan & Semiconductor Research Foundation.
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
2007 Nicolaas Frans De Rooij, Switzerland Section – For pioneering contributions to microsystem technology
and effective transfer into industrial products and applications.
2008 Wolfgang Helfrich, Germany Section, Martin Schadt, Switzerland Section, and James Fergason – For
pioneering development of twisted-nematic liquid crystal technology.
2014 Franz Laermer and Andrea Urban, Germany Section – For inventing and developing the Bosch deep
reactive ion etching process that has impacted the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) field.
8.2.13
Robert N. Noyce Medal
The IEEE Robert N. Noyce Medal was established in 1999 and is awarded for exceptional contributions to the
microelectronics industry. The medal is funded in perpetuity through an endowment from the Intel Foundation.
2011 Pasquale Pistorio, Switzerland Section – For contributions to, and leadership in, the technology, business
and environmental development of the global semiconductor and electronics industry.
2015 Martin van den Brink, Benelux Section – .
8.2.14
Dennis J. Picard Medal for Radar Technologies and Applications
The IEEE Dennis J. Picard Medal for Radar Technologies and Applications was established in 1999 and is
awarded for outstanding accomplishments in advancing the fields of radar technologies and their applications.
The medal is sponsored by the Raytheon Company.
2009 Philip M. Woodward, UK and Ireland Section – For pioneering work of fundamental importance in radar
waveform design, including the Woodward Ambiguity Function, the standard tool for waveform and
matched filter analysis.
2010 Alfonso Farina, Italy Section – For continuous, innovative, theoretical and practical contributions to
radar systems and adaptive signal processing techniques.
8.2.15
Medal in Power Engineering
The IEEE Medal in Power Engineering was established in 2008 and is awarded for outstanding contributions to
the technology associated with the generation, transmission, distribution, application and utilization of electric
power for the betterment of society. The medal is sponsored by IEEE Applications Society, IEEE Industrial
Electronics Society, IEEE Power Electronics Society and IEEE Power and Energy Society.
No recipients in Region 8.
8.2.16
Simon Ramo Medal
The IEEE Simon Ramo Medal was established in 1982 and is awarded for exceptional achievement in systems
engineering and systems science. The medal is sponsored by Northrop Grumman.
1986 Arnaldo Maria Angelini Enel, Italy (Central & South) Section – For technical and managerial leadership
in the integration of the Italian electric power system and for contributions to education in Systems
Science and Engineering.
2004 Boris E. Chertok and Nikolai N. Sheremetevsky, Russia Section – For significant contributions to systems
engineering and technical leadership of control systems design for the orbiting space station Mir (Peace).
2014 Lyndon Evans, Switzerland Section – For systems leadership of the Large Hadron Collider Project from
conceptual design through completion of construction.
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8.3 IEEE Recognitions
8.2.17
John von Neumann Medal
The IEEE John von Neumann Medal was established in 1990 and is presented for outstanding achievements in
computer-related science and technology. The Medal is sponsored by IBM Corporation.
1997 Maurice V. Wilkes, UK and Ireland Section – For a lifelong career of seminal contributions to computing,
including the first full-scale operational stored program computer and to the foundations of programming.
2002 Ole-Johan Dahl and Kristen Nygaard, Norway Section – For the introduction of the concepts underlying
object-oriented programming through the design and implementation of SIMULA 67.
2011 C.A.R. (Tony) Hoare, UK and Ireland Section – For seminal contributions to the scientific foundation
of software design.
8.2.18
IEEE/RSE Wolfson James Clerk Maxwell Award
The IEEE/RSE Wolfson James Clerk Maxwell Award was established in 2006 and is awarded for groundbreaking
contributions that have had an exceptional impact on the development of electronics and electrical engineering
or related fields. The award is funded by Wolfson Microelectronics plc.
2012 Gerhard M. Sessler, Germany Section – For pioneering contributions to electroacoustic transducers, the
development of silicon microphone technology, and seminal work on electroactive materials.
2014 David Neil Payne, UK and Ireland Section – For ground-breaking contributions to optical fiber
technologies and their application to optical communications.
8.3
8.3.1
IEEE Recognitions
Honorary Membership
IEEE Honorary Members are elected by the IEEE Board of Directors from among those who have rendered
meritorious service to mankind in IEEE’s designated fields of interest and who are not members of the IEEE.
The award is sponsored by the IEEE.
1982 Brian D. Josephson, UK and Ireland Section – For his prediction (discovery) of pair tunneling between
superconductors which constitutes the basis of a Josephson junction technology for high speed and low
power computing elements and memories.
1992 Mark Krivocheev, Russia Section – For technical contributions to television and leadership in developing
international standardization.
1994 Michel A.G. Carpentier, Benelux Section – For leadership in pioneering the R&D and policy initiatives
at the European Community level in the areas of environment and information and communication
technologies.
1995 Lars H. Ramqvist, Sweden Section – For distinguished and far-sighted leadership of the Ericsson Group
in a period of rapid technology change and market development.
1997 Pekka J. Tarjanne, Switzerland Section – For outstanding leadership and contributions to the implementation of new working methods and structures for the International Telecommunications Union.
2003 Jorma Ollila, Finland Section – For contributions to launching mobile communications, a major global
industry that has fundamentally changed the way people communicate.
2007 Ian C. McRae, South Africa Section – For contributions to electrification and development of the electrical
grid in Southern Africa.
8.4
8.4.1
IEEE Service Awards
Richard M. Emberson Award
The IEEE Richard M. Emberson Award was established in 1986 and is presented for distinguished service to
the development, viability, advancement, and pursuit of the technical objectives of the IEEE. The Award is
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
sponsored by IEEE Technical Activities.
No recipients in Region 8.
8.4.2
Haraden Pratt Award
The IEEE Haraden Pratt Award was established in 1971 and is presented to recognize individuals who have
rendered outstanding service to the IEEE. The Award is sponsored by the IEEE Foundation.
1986 Robert C. Winton, UK and Ireland Section – For outstanding service to the IEEE in furthering its
transnational activities in Region 8.
1996 Walter E. Proebster, Germany Section – For outstanding leadership and service to the Institute, especially
for fostering a variety of activities and membership growth in Region 8.
2003 Charles W. Turner, UK and Ireland Section – For his outstanding leadership in extending the transnational activities of the IEEE into Eastern & Central Europe.
2008 Maurice Papo, France Section – For furthering IEEE transnational activities and for conceiving and
implementing major operational improvements leading to more effective and efficient IEEE volunteer
activities.
2011 Levent Onural, Turkey Section – For leadership in the worldwide promotion of the values embraced by
IEEE.
8.5
8.5.1
IEEE Corporate Recognitions
Corporate Innovation Recognition
The Corporate Innovation Recognition was established in 1985 and is presented for outstanding and exemplary
contributions by an industrial entity, governmental or academic organization, or other corporate body, which
have resulted in major advancement of electrotechnology. The award is sponsored by the IEEE.
1992 Ericsson Radio Systems AB, Sweden Section – For significant contributions to the development and
implementation of analog and digital cellular radio technology.
1992 Philips Electronics, Benelux Section – For pioneering research in electronics and the development of much
of the basic technology leading to the creation of the optical recording industry.
1999 Nokia Corporation, Finland Section – For creation of a new class of integrated communication devices as
exemplified by the Nokia 9000 Communicator, and for leadership in the development of cellular network
systems.
2006 ARM Ltd., Cambridge, UK and Ireland Section – For creating the ARM microprocessor technology that
has been successfully embedded into a broad spectrum of today’s digital consumer electronic products.
2011 IMEC, Benelux Section – For continuous contributions to CMOS technology and for innovations in global
business development and university-industry collaborations.
8.5.2
Ernst Weber Engineering Leadership Recognition
The IEEE Ernst Weber Engineering Leadership Recognition was established in 1985 and is awarded for exceptional managerial leadership in the fields of interest to the IEEE. The award is sponsored by the IEEE.
1989 Arnaldo Maria Angelini Enel, Italy (Central & South) Section – For his leadership and exceptional
contribution to the reconstruction of his country after the war and the development of electric power
systems elevating the level and the prestige of the engineering profession.
1993 Percy Barnevik, Switzerland Section – For managerial leadership in creating a global enterprise in the
areas of electric power apparatus and systems, transportation, and environmental technologies.
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8.6 IEEE Prize Paper Awards
2001 Christopher Martin Earnshaw, UK and Ireland Section – For technical and managerial leadership as
Chief Technology Officer of British Telecommunications in the development and introduction of advanced
networking technologies and communications platforms.
2004 Pasquale Pistorio, Switzerland Section – For leadership in revitalizing the semiconductor industry in
Europe and increasing its influence worldwide.
8.6
8.6.1
IEEE Prize Paper Awards
W.R.G. Baker Prize Paper Award
The IEEE W.R.G. Baker Prize Paper Award was established in 1956 and is presented for the most outstanding
paper reporting original work published in any IEEE archival publications (such as TRANSACTIONS,
JOURNALS, and LETTERS), MAGAZINES, or PROCEEDINGS published during a three to five year window
prior to the presentation of the award.
1983 Kurt Feser, Switzerland Section, Ryszard Malewski, Chinh T. Nguyen and Nils Hylten-Cavallius, “Elimination of the skin effect error in heavy-current shunts,” IEEE Transactions on Power Apparatus and
Systems, March 1981.
1986 Adi Shamir, Israel Section, “A polynomial-time algorithm for breaking the basic Merkle-Hellman
cryptosystem,” IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, September 1984.
1987 James L. Massey, Switzerland Section, and Peter Mathys, “The collision channel without feedback,”
IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, March 1985.
1991 Keith Clover, UK and Ireland Section, John C. Doyle, Bruce A. Francis and Pramod P. Khargonekar,
“State-space solutions to standard H2 and H∞ control problems,” IEEE Transactions on Automatic
Control, August 1989.
2000 Petra Stoica, Sweden Section, and A. Lee Swindlehurst, “Maximum likelihood methods in radar array
signal processing,” Proceedings of IEEE, Vol. 86, No. 2, February 1998, pp. 421–441.
2012 Gerhard Krieger, Alberto Moreira, Hauke Fiedler, Irena Hajnsek, Marian Werner, Marwan Younis and
Manfred Zink, Germany Section, “TanDEM-X: A satellite formation for high-resolution SAR interferometry,” IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 45, Issue 11, Part 1, November
2007, pp. 3317–3341.
2013 Erdal Arikan, Turkey Section, “Channel polarization: A method for constructing capacity-achieving codes
for symmetric binary-input memoryless channels,” IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, Vol. 5,
Issue 7, July 2009, pp. 3051–3073.
2014 Mário A.T. Figueiredo, Portugal Section, Stephen J. Wright and Robert Nowak, “Sparse Reconstruction
by Separable Approximation,” IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, Vol. 57, Issue 7, July 2009,
pp. 2479–2493.
8.6.2
Donald G. Fink Prize Paper Award
The IEEE Donald G. Fink Prize Paper Award was established in 1979 and is presented for the outstanding
survey, review, or tutorial paper in any of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS, JOURNALS, MAGAZINES, or
PROCEEDINGS issued between 1 January and 31 December of the preceding year. The Award is sponsored
by the IEEE Life Members Committee.
1989 Karl Johan Åström, Sweden Section – Adaptive Feedback Control.
2000 Ezio Biglieri, Italy (North) Section, Shlomo Shamai, Israel Section, and John Proakis – Fading channels:
Information-theoretic and communications aspects.
2001 Xin Yao, UK and Ireland Section – Evolving artificial neural networks.
2005 Christoph Hagleitner, Andreas Hierlemann, Henry Baltes, Switzerland Section, and Oliver Brand – Microfabrication techniques for chemical/biosensors.
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
2006 Suhas N. Diggavi, Switzerland Section, Naofal Al-Dhahir, A. Stamoulis and A.R. Calderbank – Great
expectations: The value of spatial diversity in wireless networks.
2007 Arturas Zukauskas, Lithuania Section, and Michael Shur – Solid-state lighting: Towards superior illumination.
2010 John W. Arthur, UK and Ireland Section – The fundamentals of electromagnetic theory revisited.
8.6.3
Leon K. Kirchmayer Prize Paper Award
The IEEE Leon K. Kirchmayer Prize Paper Award was established in 1997 and is presented for the most
outstanding paper in any IEEE publication issued between 1 January and 31 December of the preceding year
by an author or joint authors under thirty years of age at the time the original manuscript was submitted. The
award was discontinued in 2002.
No recipients in Region 8.
8.6.4
Browder J. Thompson Memorial Prize Paper Award
The IEEE Browder J. Thompson Memorial Prize Paper Award was established in 1945 and is presented for the
most outstanding paper in any IEEE publication issued between 1 January and 31 December of the preceding
year by an author or joint authors under thirty years of age at the time the original manuscript was submitted.
This award was discontinued after the 1997 Award and replaced by the Leon K. Kirchmayer Prize Paper Award.
1974 Jørn Justesen, Denmark Section – A class of constructive asymptotically good algebraic codes.
1982 Stig Skelboe, Denmark Section – Computation of the periodic steady-state response of nonlinear networks
by extrapolation methods.
1988 Lothar Thiele, Germany Section – On the sensitivity of linear state-space systems.
8.7
8.7.1
IEEE Technical Field Awards
Biomedical Engineering Award
The IEEE Biomedical Engineering Award was established in 2010 and is presented for outstanding contributions
to the field of biomedical engineering.
2015 Christofer Toumazou, UK and Ireland Section – For outstanding contributions to biomedical circuit
technology.
8.7.2
Cledo Brunetti Award
The IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award was established in 1975 and is presented for outstanding contributions to
nanotechnology and miniaturization in the electronic arts. The Award is funded by Taiwan Semiconductor
Manufacturing Company Limited and through a bequest of the Cledo Brunetti family.
1979 Geoffrey W.A. Dummer, UK and Ireland Section, and Philip J. Franklin – For contributions to materials
development and fabrication techniques for miniature passive electronic components and assemblies.
2008 Michel Bruel, France Section – For inventing Smart CutTM layer transfer technology that enabled
widespread adoption of SOI for CMOS circuits.
2013 Giorgio Baccarani, Italy Section – For contributions to scaling theory and modeling of metal oxide
semiconductor (MOS) devices.
2014 Martin van den Brink , Benelux Section – For designing new lithography tool concepts and bringing these
to the market, enabling micrometer to nanometer imaging.
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8.7 IEEE Technical Field Awards
8.7.3
Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology Award
The IEEE Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology Award was established in 2002 and is
awarded for meritorious contributions to the advancement of components, electronic packaging or manufacturing
technologies. The award is sponsored by the IEEE Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology
Society.
2010 Herbert Reichl, Germany Section – For contributions to the integration of reliability in electronic systems,
and leadership in research and education in electronic packaging.
8.7.4
Control Systems Award
The IEEE Control Systems Award was established in 1980 and is presented for outstanding contributions to
control systems engineering, science, or technology. The Award is sponsored by the IEEE Control Systems
Society.
1982 Howard H. Rosenbrock, UK and Ireland Section – For contributions to multivariable control theory and
design methods.
1990 Karl Johan Åström, Sweden Section – For fundamental contributions in control theory with emphasis
on its practical application.
1993 Moshe M. Zakai, Israel Section – For contributions to non-linear stochastic analysis, and its applications
to control systems.
1996 Vladimir A. Yakubovich, Russia Section – For pioneering and fundamental contributions to stability
analysis and optimal control.
1998 Jan C. Willems, Benelux Section – For seminal contributions to control theory and leadership in systems
research.
2001 Keith Glover, UK and Ireland Section – For pioneering and fundamental contributions to robust controller
design and model order reduction.
2003 Nikolai Nicolaevich Krasovski, Russia Section – For pioneering contributions to the theories of stability,
control, and differential games.
2005 Manfred Morari, Switzerland Section – For pioneering contributions to the theory and application of
robust process, model predictive, and hybrid systems control.
2007 Lennart Ljung, Sweden Section – For seminal contributions to system identification and its impact on
industrial practice.
2009 David Q. Mayne, UK and Ireland Section – For contributions to the application of optimization to
modern control theory.
2012 Alberto Isidori, Italy Section – For pioneering contributions to nonlinear control theory.
8.7.5
Electromagnetics Award
The IEEE Electromagnetics Award was established in 1996 and is presented for outstanding contributions to
electromagnetics in theory, application or education. The Award is sponsored by the IEEE Antennas and Propagation, Microwave Theory and Techniques, Geoscience and Remote Sensing and Electromagnetic Compatibility
Societies.
2008 Werner Wiesbeck, Germany Section – For innovative electromagnetic applications in communication
systems, remote sensing, and EM compatibility.
8.7.6
James L. Flanagan Speech and Audio Processing Award
The IEEE James L. Flanagan Award was established in 2002 and is presented for an outstanding contribution
to the advancement of speech and/or audio signal processing. The award is sponsored by the IEEE Signal
Processing Society.
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
2004 Gunnar Fant, Sweden Section, and Kenneth N. Stevens – For fundamental contributions to the theory
and practice of acoustic phonetics and speech perception.
2015 Stephen John Young, UK and Ireland Section – For pioneering contributions to the theory and practice
of automatic speech recognition and statistical spoken dialogue systems.
8.7.7
Andrew S. Grove Award
The IEEE Andrew S. Grove Award was established in 1999 and is presented for outstanding contributions to
solid-state devices and technology. The award is sponsored by the IEEE Electron Devices Society.
2000 Wolfgang Fichtner, Switzerland Section – For outstanding contributions to semiconductor device simulations.
2012 Jean-Pierre Colinge, UK and Ireland Section – For contributions to silicon-on-insulator devices and
technology.
8.7.8
William M. Habirshaw Award
The William M. Habirshaw Award was presented for outstanding contributions in the field of the transmission
and distribution of electric power. This award was discontinued after the 1986 Award and replaced by the IEEE
Herman Halperin Electric Transmission and Distribution Award.
1971 Gunnar Jancke, Sweden Section – For leadership in the creation of the world’s first 400 kV extra-high
voltage transmission system, including the application of series capacitors at that voltage.
1976 Francis John Lane, UK and Ireland Section – For his international leadership in development and application of high-voltage ac and dc transmission.
8.7.9
Herman Halperin Electric Transmission and Distribution Award
The IEEE Herman Halperin Electric Transmission and Distribution Award was established in 1986 and is
awarded for outstanding contributions to electric transmission and distribution. The Award is sponsored by the
Robert and Ruth Halperin Foundation, in memory of the late Herman & Edna Halperin, and the IEEE Power
and Energy Society.
1988 Luigi Paris, Italy (Central & South) Section – For contributions to the development of Extra- and
Ultra-High Voltage transmission engineering technology.
2004 Andrew John Eriksson, Norway Section – For lightning research and its application to lightning protection
of transmission lines and substations.
2014 Willem Boone, Benelux Section – For successful international leadership and guidance in understanding
critical factors affecting power cable life and in improving diagnostic test procedures.
2015 Wolfram Boeck, Germany Section – For contributions to the understanding of dielectric behavior of SF6
insulated systems for high- and extra-high-voltage substations and transmission lines.
8.7.10
Masaru Ibuka Consumer Electronics Award
The IEEE Masaru Ibuka Consumer Electronics Award was established in 1987 and is presented for outstanding
contributions in the field of consumer electronics technology. The Award is sponsored by Sony Corporation.
1989 Johannes Petrus (Joop) Sinjou, Benelux Section, and Heitaro Nakajima – For technical innovation and
leadership in the development of the digital audio compact disk system and the achievement of international cooperation in both the development and introduction of this system.
1993 George L. Brantingham, Italy (Central & South) Section, Paul S. Breedlove and Richard H. Wiggins –
For pioneering contributions to consumer electronics products employing synthetic speech for education
and entertainment.
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A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
8.7 IEEE Technical Field Awards
1996 Kees A. Schouhamer Immink, Benelux Section – For pioneering contributions to consumer digital audio
and video recording products.
1999 Leonardo Chiariglione, Italy (North) Section – For technical leadership in the development of the Moving
Picture Experts Group (MPEG) international standards for motion video and audio.
2001 Ulrich Reimers, Germany Section – For visionary leadership in the development of digital video broadcast
(DVB) Standards and implementation guidelines for satellite, terrestrial and cable equipment.
2004 Karlheinz Brandenburg, Germany Section – For major contributions to digital audio source coding.
2012 Gisle Bjøntegaard, Norway Section, Thomas Wiegand, Germany Section, and Gary J. Sullivan – For
leadership and technical contributions to the development of the globally deployed video coding standard
H.264/MPEG4-AVC.
2013 Martin Dietz, Germany Section, and Kristofer Kjörling and Lars Liljerd, Sweden Section – For pioneering
innovations in digital audio coding, technology leadership, and contributions to the development of HighEfficiency AAC (HE-AAC).
8.7.11
Award in International Communication
The IEEE Award in International Communication was established in 1966 and is awarded for outstanding
contributions to international communication. The award was discontinued in November 2007.
1966 E. Maurice Deloraine, France Section – In consideration of his outstanding technical and scientific contributions in the field of international communication extending over a period of more than 45 years and
particularly for his active leadership in many fields of communication in Europe and in the U.S.A.
1970 Herre Rinia, Benelux Section – For outstanding contributions as a distinguished research organizer and
leader in the technology of international communications.
1972 Frank de Jager and Johannes A. Greefkes, Benelux Section – For their contributions to communication
systems research, in particular for their inventions in the delta-modulation area.
1973 Vladimir A. Kotelnikov, Russia Section – For fundamental contributions to communication theory and
practice, and for pioneering research and leadership in radar astronomy.
1974 Leslie H. Bedford, UK and Ireland Section – For his outstanding pioneering and development work in
the fields of telecommunications and radar.
1978 F. Louis H.M. Stumpers, Benelux Section – For contributions to the theory and application of frequency
modulation and for the promotion of radio sciences on an international level.
1979 A. Nejat Ince, Benelux Section – For contributions to satellite communications systems and the planning
and design of automatically switched international communications.
1981 Richard Cyril Kirby, Switzerland Section – For sustained leadership in the development and management
of international radio communications.
1989 Theodor Irmer, Switzerland Section – For leadership in international standards development for digital
communications and integrated digital networks.
1992 Francesco Carassa, Italy (North) Section – For original contributions in the field of microwave radio relay
and satellite communications.
1993 Pekka J. Tarjanne, Switzerland Section – For his vision and leadership in re-structuring and re-orienting
the International Telecommunication Union to the new telecommunications environment.
1994 Stephen Robin Temple, UK and Ireland Section – For contributions to the development and furtherance
of worldwide telecommunications standards.
1997 Maurizio Decina, Italy (North) Section – For leadership and contributions to international digital network
development and for fostering international cooperation.
2002 Karl Heinz Rosenbrock, France Section – For leadership in Pan-European and International standardization that has created innovative modes of cooperation that has resulted in technical agreements that
serve the global community.
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
8.7.12
Internet Award
The IEEE Internet Award was established in 1999 and is presented for exceptional contributions to the
advancement of Internet technology for network architecture, mobility and/or end-use applications. The award
is sponsored by Nokia Corporation.
2000 Donald W. Davies, UK and Ireland Section, Paul Baran, Leonard Kleinrock and Lawrence Roberts –
For their early, preeminent contributions in conceiving, analyzing and demonstrating packet switching
networks, the foundation technology of the Internet.
2001 Louis H. Pouzin, France Section – For his pioneering development and effective advocacy of datagram
networking, the technology that enabled the rapid, inexpensive, decentralized expansion of the Internet.
2012 Mark Handley, UK and Ireland Section – For contributions to Internet multicast, telephony, congestion
control and the shaping of open Internet standards and open-source systems in all these areas.
2014 John Crowcroft, UK and Ireland Section – For contributions to research in and teaching of Internet
protocols, including multicast, transport, quality of service, security, mobility, and opportunistic
networking.
8.7.13
Reynold B. Johnson Data Storage Device Technology Award
The IEEE Reynold B. Johnson Data Storage Device Technology Award was established in 2004 and is presented
for outstanding contributions to the advancement of information storage with emphasis on technical contributions in computer data storage device technology. The award was discontinued in February 2011.
No recipients in Region 8.
8.7.14
Reynold B. Johnson Information Storage Systems Award
The IEEE Reynold B. Johnson Information Storage Systems Award was established in 1992 and is presented
for outstanding contributions to information storage, with emphasis on computer storage systems. The Award
is sponsored by Hitachi Data Systems.
1998 Jean-Pierre Lazzari, France Section – For contributions and key innovations in media and heads for
magnetic disk drives.
2005 François B. Dolivo, Switzerland Section – For the application of digital signal processing to the magnetic
recording channel in hard disk drives.
2015 Dov Moran, Amir Ban, and Simon Litsyn, Israel Section – For pioneering contributions to storage systems
based on flash memory.
8.7.15
Richard Harold Kaufmann Award
The IEEE Richard Harold Kaufmann Award was established in 1986 and is presented for outstanding contributions in industrial systems engineering. The Award is sponsored by the IEEE Industry Applications Society.
No recipients in Region 8.
8.7.16
Joseph F. Keithley Award in Instrumentation and Measurement
The IEEE Joseph F. Keithley Award in Instrumentation and Measurement was established in 2000 for
outstanding contributions in electrical measurement. The Award is sponsored by Keithley Instruments, Inc.
2006 Alessandro M. Ferrero, Italy (North) Section – For advancing the measurement of electrical quantities
in electric power systems under non-sinusoidal conditions.
2009 Brian Peter Kibble, UK and Ireland Section – For pioneering experiments and techniques in the field of
fundamental electrical metrology leading to the realization of SI units.
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A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
8.7 IEEE Technical Field Awards
2012 Rik Pintelon, Benelux Section – For the development of innovative system identification methods for
measurement applications.
2015 Jean-Charles Bolomey, France Section – For pioneering contributions to efficient modulated probe array
technology for fast electromagnetic near-field techniques and microwave imagery.
8.7.17
Mervin J. Kelly Award
The IEEE Mervin J. Kelly Award was bestowed in recognition of outstanding contributions in the field of
telecommunication. This award was discontinued in 1975.
1969 Hendrik C.A. van Duuren, Benelux Section – For his fundamental contributions to data communications.
1974 Harold M. Barlow, UK and Ireland Section – For outstanding work in the measurement and properties
of radio frequency waves, and their application to telecommunications.
8.7.18
Gustav Robert Kirchhoff Award
The IEEE Gustav Robert Kirchhoff Award was established in 2003 and is presented for outstanding contribution
to the fundamentals of any aspect of electronic circuits and systems that has a long-term significance or impact.
The Award is sponsored by the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society.
2008 Alfred Fettweis, Germany Section – For sustained contributions to circuits, systems, and signal processing,
especially his seminal work on wave digital filters.
8.7.19
Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award
The IEEE Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award was established in 1986 and is awarded for
outstanding contributions to the integration of computers and communications. The Award is sponsored by
NEC Corporation.
1991 Martin Reiser, Switzerland Section, and Stephen S. Lavenberg – For fundamental contributions to the
theory and practice of computer and communications systems performance modeling.
1993 Gottfried Ungerboeck, Switzerland Section – For contributions to signal processing for data communications, specifically for pioneering trellis-coded modulation.
2000 Adi Shamir, Israel Section, Ronald Linn Rivest and Leonard Adleman – For the revolutionary invention
of the RSA public key cryptosystem which is the first to be widely-adopted.
2005 Frank Kelly, UK and Ireland Section – For contributions to the development of fundamental theories for
the understanding, performance evaluation, and enhancement of telecommunications networks.
2011 Rüdiger L. Urbanke, Switzerland Section, and Thomas J. Richardson – For developing the theory and
practice of transmitting data reliably at rates approaching channel capacity.
8.7.20
Eli Lilly Award in Medical and Biological Engineering
The IEEE Eli Lilly Medical and Biological Engineering Award was established in 1992 and is presented for
outstanding achievement in, and contribution to, the field of medical and biological engineering. The award
was discontinued in 2000.
1993 Max Anliker, Switzerland Section – For five decades of outstanding achievements and contributions to
biological engineering.
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
8.7.21
Morris E. Leeds Award
The IEEE Morris E. Leeds Award was established in 1958 and is presented for outstanding contributions in
the field of electrical measurement. Special consideration is given to contributions made before the candidate’s
thirty-sixth birthday. The award was discontinued in 2000.
1982 Lothar Rohde, Germany Section – For contributions to the field of precise electronic measurement
equipment for very high frequencies.
8.7.22
Morris N. Liebmann Memorial Award
The IEEE Morris N. Liebmann Memorial Award was established in 1919 and is awarded for important contributions to emerging technologies recognized within recent years. This award was discontinued after the 2000
award and replaced by the IEEE Daniel E. Noble Award.
1971 Martin Ryle, UK and Ireland Section – For his contributions in applying aperture synthesis to extend
the capabilities of radio telescopes, thereby increasing man’s knowledge of the Universe.
1977 Horst H. Berger and Siegfried K. Wiedmann, Germany Section – For the invention and exploration of
the Merged Transistor Logic, MTL.
8.7.23
Jack A. Morton Award
The IEEE Jack A. Morton Award was established in 1974 and is presented for outstanding contributions in
the field of solid-state devices. This award was discontinued after the 1999 Award and replaced by the IEEE
Andrew S. Grove Award.
1982 Dov Frohman-Bentchkowsky, Israel Section – For contributions to non-volatile semiconductor memories.
8.7.24
William E. Newell Power Electronics Award
The IEEE William E. Newell Power Electronics Award was established in 2005 and is awarded for outstanding
contributions to the advancement of power electronics. The Award is sponsored by the IEEE Power Electronics
Society.
2008 Istvan Nagy, Hungary Section – For leadership in the research, development, worldwide promotion, and
university education in power electronics technology.
2012 Leo Lorenz, Germany Section – For contributions to the development of power semiconductor devices
and integrated power modules.
2013 Rik W. De Doncker, Germany Section – For contributions to the development of new components,
topologies, and controls in power electronic systems.
2014 Frede Blaabjerg, Denmark Section – For contributions to power electronics in renewable energy and
adjustable speed drives.
8.7.25
Daniel E. Noble Award for Emerging Technologies
The IEEE Daniel E. Noble Award for Emerging Technologies was established in 2000 and is awarded for
outstanding contributions to emerging technologies recognized within recent years. The Award is sponsored by
Motorola Foundation.
2007 Richard H. Friend, UK and Ireland Section, Stephen R. Forrest and Ching Tang – For pioneering contributions to the development of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs).
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A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
8.7 IEEE Technical Field Awards
8.7.26
Frederik Philips Award
The IEEE Frederik Philips Award was established in 1971 and is awarded for outstanding accomplishments in
the management of research and development resulting in effective innovation in the electrical and electronics
industry. The Award is sponsored by Philips Electronics N.V.
1971 Frederik J. (Frits) Philips, Benelux Section – For fostering management of research and development
that has been effective in the creation of numerous new products.
1982 Werner J. Kleen, Germany Section – For technical and managerial roles in the development and
manufacture of microwave tubes in Europe.
1997 Roland P.O. Huber, Benelux Section – For outstanding leadership in Pan European research collaboration
in communications networks and services.
1999 Roger J. Van Overstraeten, Benelux Section – For leadership in the creation and management of the
Interuniversity Microelectronics Center (IMEC).
2008 Gilbert J. Declerck, Benelux Section – For leadership in the creation of international R&D alliances in
semiconductor technologies.
2015 Benedetto Vigna, Switzerland Section – For leadership in conceiving, developing, and commercializing
micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS).
8.7.27
Photonics Award
The IEEE Photonics Award was established in 2002 and awarded for outstanding achievement(s) in photonics.
The award is sponsored by the IEEE Photonics Society.
2007 David Neil Payne, UK and Ireland Section – For pioneering contributions to the development and
commercialization of optical fiber-based technologies for communications, sensors, and high power applications.
2015 Philip St. John Russell, Germany Section – For pioneering contributions to the conception and realization
of photonic crystal fibers.
8.7.28
Emanuel R. Piore Award
The IEEE Emanuel R. Piore Award was established in 1976 and is presented for outstanding contributions in
the field of information processing in relation to computer science. The award is sponsored by the Piore Award
Fund.
1983 Niklaus Wirth, Switzerland Section – For creative contribution to programming language and design
methodology as exemplified by his development of the Pascal language.
2002 Brian Randell, UK and Ireland Section – For seminal contributions to and leadership in computer system
dependability research.
8.7.29
Judith A. Resnik Award
The IEEE Judith A. Resnik Award was established in 1986 and is awarded for outstanding contributions
to space engineering, within the fields of interest of the IEEE. The award is jointly sponsored by the IEEE
Aerospace and Electronic Systems, Control Systems, and Engineering in Medicine and Biology Societies. The
award was discontinued in June 2013.
1994 Johannes Dietrich, Germany Section – For development of a successful high-performance, rugged, multisensor, miniaturized robotic gripper for use in the outer space environment.
1995 Leandre Pourcelot, France Section – For application of ultrasound imaging to the measurement of cardiovascular systems during space flight.
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
8.7.30
Robotics and Automation Award
The IEEE Robotics & Automation Award was established in 2002 and awarded for outstanding contributions
to robotics and automation. The award is sponsored by the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society.
2007 Gerd Hirzinger, Germany Section – For contributions in robot mechatronics, telerobotics, man-machine
interface research, and space robotics.
8.7.31
Frank Rosenblatt Award
The IEEE Frank Rosenblatt Award was established in 2004 and awarded for outstanding contributions to
the advancement of the design, practice, techniques, or theory in biologically and linguistically motivated
computational paradigms, including but not limited to neural networks, connectionist systems, evolutionary
computation, fuzzy systems, and hybrid intelligent systems in which these paradigms are contained. The Awards
is sponsored by the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society.
2008 Teuvo Kohonen, Finland Section – For outstanding contributions to the advancement of the theory and
applications of neural networks, associative memories and the self-organizing map.
2011 Hans-Paul Schwefel, Germany Section – For pioneering contributions to evolutionary computation
through the theory and application of evolution strategies.
2015 Marco Dorigo, Benelux Section – For contributions to the foundations of swarm intelligence.
8.7.32
David Sarnoff Award
The IEEE David Sarnoff Award was established in 1959 and is presented for exceptional contributions to
electronics. The Award is sponsored by SRI International.
1974 Frederik L.J. Sangster, Benelux Section – For the invention of the integrated bucket-brigade delay line
and ingenuity in finding new realizations and applications of this principle.
1981 Cyril Hilsum, UK and Ireland Section – For contributions in the fields of III-V compound semiconductors,
solid state microwave components and display devices.
1984 Jameson D. Rigden, UK and Ireland Section, and Alan D. White – For invention of the visible light
helium-neon laser.
2005 Pierre Tournois, France Section – For pioneering contributions to pulse compression devices and the
invention of the Acousto-Optic Programmable Dispersive Filter.
8.7.33
Marie Sklodowska-Curie Award
The IEEE Marie Sklodowska-Curie Award was established in 2008 and is presented for outstanding contributions
to the field of nuclear and plasma sciences and engineering. The first presentation is scheduled for 2011. The
award is sponsored by the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society.
2012 Gennady Andreevich Mesyats, Russia Section – For founding the field of nanosecond pulsed power and
for seminal contributions to the physics of vacuum breakdown at high power levels.
2014 Brian F. Hutton, UK and Ireland Section, Malcolm Hudson and Lawrence A. Shepp – For developing
maximum-likelihood image reconstruction in emission tomography leading to its widespread and effective
use in healthcare.
8.7.34
Donald O. Pederson Award in Solid-State Circuits
The IEEE Solid-State Circuits Award was established in 1987 and is presented for outstanding contributions to
solid-state circuits. The award was renamed in 2005 in honor of Donald O. Pederson. The Award is sponsored
by the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society.
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8.7 IEEE Technical Field Awards
1996 Rudy J. Van De Plassche, Benelux Section – For pioneering contributions to the design of integrated
circuits for data conversion.
2004 Eric A. Vittoz, Switzerland Section – For pioneering contributions to low-power device modeling and
CMOS circuit design.
2007 Hugo De Man, Benelux Section – For leadership in integrated circuit design and design methodology.
2011 Willy Sansen, Benelux Section – For leadership in analog integrated circuit design.
8.7.35
Charles Proteus Steinmetz Award
The IEEE Charles Proteus Steinmetz Award was established in 1979 and is presented for exceptional contributions to the development and/or advancement of standards in electrical and electronics engineering. The Award
is sponsored by the IEEE Standards Association.
1983 William A. McAdams, Switzerland Section – For outstanding leadership in national and international
electrical and electronic standardization activities.
2007 Vic Hayes, Benelux Section – For outstanding leadership in the development and global acceptance of
IEEE 802.11 wireless local area network standards.
8.7.36
Eric E. Sumner Award
The IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award was established in 1995 and is presented for outstanding contributions to
communications technology. The Award is sponsored by Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs.
1997 Jean-Pierre Coudreuse, France Section – For fundamental contributions to broadband communications
by Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM).
2002 John Midwinter, UK and Ireland Section, and Tsuneo Nakahara – For pioneering contributions to the
physical understanding, manufacture, and deployment of optical fiber communications systems.
2003 Werner Bux and Hans R. Mueller, Switzerland Section – For contributions to the design, development
and standardization of the token-ring local area network.
2007 Amin Shokrollahi, Switzerland Section, and Michael G. Luby – For bridging mathematics, internet design
and mobile broadcasting as well as successful standardization.
2013 Siavash Alamouti, UK and Ireland Section, Vahid Tarokh and Hamid Jafarkhani – For contributions to
block signaling for multiple antennas.
8.7.37
Leon K. Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award
The IEEE Leon K. Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award was established in 1990 and is awarded for inspirational teaching of graduate students in the IEEE fields of interest. The award was renamed in 2002 in honor of
Leon K. Kirchmayer. The Award is sponsored by the Leon K. Kirchmayer Memorial Fund.
1993 Rudolf Saal, Germany Section – For inspired teaching, concerned guidance, and research supervision of
electrical engineering graduate students.
2012 Anthony G. Constantinides, UK and Ireland Section – For educating, inspiring and mentoring generations
of graduate students in digital signal processing and communications throughout the world.
8.7.38
Undergraduate Teaching Award
The IEEE Undergraduate Teaching Award was established in 1990 and is presented for inspirational teaching
of undergraduate students in the field of interest of IEEE. The Award is sponsored by the IEEE Education
Society.
No recipients in Region 8.
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
8.7.39
Nikola Tesla Award
The IEEE Nikola Tesla Award was established in 1975 and is presented for outstanding contributions to the
generation and utilization of electric power. The Award is sponsored by The Grainger Foundation and the IEEE
Power and Energy Society.
1986 Eric R. Laithwaite, UK and Ireland Section – For contributions to the development and understanding
of electric machines and especially of the linear induction motor.
1989 Dietrich R. Lambrecht, Germany Section – For leadership and contributions to advances in large turbine
generator design, construction, and application.
1991 Michel E. Poloujadoff, France Section – For contributions to the theory of electrical machinery and its
application to linear induction motors.
1996 John A. Tegopoulos, Greece Section – For pioneering contributions in electrical machine design.
2001 Stephen Williamson, UK and Ireland Section – For the development of advanced mathematical models
and computational tools for induction machine design.
2006 Konrad Reichert, Switzerland Section – For contributions to the development of numerical methods and
computer analysis and simulation of electrical machines and devices.
2008 Timothy J.E. Miller, UK and Ireland Section – For outstanding contributions to the advancement of
computer-based design and analysis of electric machines and their industrial dissemination.
2015 Ion Gheorghe Boldea, Romania Section – TBD
8.7.40
Kiyo Tomiyasu Award
The IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Award was established in 2000 and is awarded for outstanding early to mid-career
contributions to technologies holding the promise of innovative applications. The Award is sponsored by the
Kiyo Tomiyasu Fund, KDDI R&D Laboratories, IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing and Microwave Theory
and Techniques Societies.
2007 Alberto Moreira, Germany Section – For development of synthetic aperture radar concepts.
8.7.41
Vladimir K. Zworykin Award
The IEEE Vladimir K. Zworykin Award was presented for outstanding technical contributions in the field of
electronic television. The award was discontinued in 1986.
1972 Robin E. Davies, UK and Ireland Section – For his development of the field-store standards converter
which permits US colour television (NTSC) signals and those from the European (PAL) system to be
exchanged directly.
1980 Walter Bruch, Germany Section – For the development of the Phase Alternating Line (PAL) color
television system.
8.8
8.8.1
Member and Geographic Activities Board Awards
Outstanding Section Award
To recognize the excellent work of a large, medium, and small Section in the past year.
2014 Croatia Section – Outstanding Medium Section.
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8.8 Member and Geographic Activities Board Awards
8.8.2
Larry K. Wilson Transnational Award
To recognize the accomplishment judged to be the most significant and effective in fulfilling one or more of the
transnational goals and objectives of Member and Geographic Activities as related to transnational activities.
This award is made in memory of Dr. Larry K. Wilson. (One award annually.)
1983 Walther E. Proebster, Germany Section – For significant extension of activities in Region 8 and for
dedicated effort leading to the formation of the IEEE Kenya Section and AFRICON’83.
1987 Jacob Baal-Schem, Israel Section – For initiation, guidance and enhancement of the MELECON Series
of Conferences.
1989 Gordon H. (Mick) Byford, UK and Ireland Section – For creative innovation in the editing, production,
and management of the Region 8 News, thus improving communication and member service in Region 8.
1991 Robert C. Winton, UK and Ireland Section – For continuing and exemplary efforts in providing a transnational dimension to numerous IEEE activities and for unique contributions to the SC ’90 program.
2000 Maurice Papo, France Section – For significant contributions in making the IEEE an effective global
organization.
2002 Rolf Remshardt, Germany Section – For exemplary contributions in bringing the benefits of IEEE
members and colleagues throughout Europe and for effective fiscal and financial leadership within IEEE
Region 8.
2004 Hans J. Schmitt, Germany Section – For exemplary contributions in providing fiscal and financial
leadership to the geographic units within Africa, Europe, Greenland, Iceland, the Republics of the former
USSR, and the Near and Middle East.
2005 Elya B. Joffe, Israel Section – For outstanding contribution to enhancement of the transnational character
of IEEE through promotion of conferences, membership and chapter development on a regional and global
basis.
2007 Gerhard Hancke, South Africa Section – For inspiring membership development and services as a member
of several regional and technical conferences worldwide.
2009 Martin J. Bastiaans, Benelux Section – For significant contributions to the IEEE volunteer experience
and member engagement throughout the world.
2011 Roland Saam, UK and Ireland Section – For exemplary service and significant contributions over many
years, particularly developing and maintaining the distinctive IEEE Region 8 News, which fosters collaboration and engagement across three continents.
8.8.3
Innovation Award
To recognize an individual or a team whose accomplishment/project is judged to be the most innovative and
effective in fulfilling one or more of the goals and objectives of Member and Geographic Activities. (One award
annually.)
1988 B.J. Cory, UK and Ireland Section – For creative leadership in the planning and implementation of the
United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland Section Forum on Safety and Engineering Systems.
2009 Marko Delimar, Croatia Section, and Ricardo Varela Iglesias, UK and Ireland Section – For the creation,
development, and implementation of the IEEEXtreme Programming Contest.
8.8.4
Leadership Award
To recognize those individuals who have exhibited exemplary and substantive leadership of an extraordinary
nature in implementing activities which support the goals and objectives of Member and Geographic Activities
(MGA) at the local, regional, national, and/or international level. (Up to 3 awards annually.)
1999 Basil W. Osborne, UK and Ireland Section – For contributions to the successful and smooth functioning
of the Region 8 Committee in the period 1985–1999.
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
2001 Gözde Bozdagi Akar, Turkey Section – For stimulating and excellent leadership in Student Activities in
the IEEE Turkey Section, IEEE Region 8 and RAB Student Activities initiatives.
2002 Engy Mohamed Samir Foda, Egypt Section – For exemplary efforts in organizing successful 2002 IEEE
Region 8 Student Branch and GOLD Congresses.
2010 Aleksandar Szabo, Croatia Section – For his significant contributions in empowering IEEE member
involvement and development in the IEEE Croatia Section and throughout Region 8.
2013 Victor Fouad-Hanna, France Section – For distinguished leadership and outstanding contributions to
IEEE and MGA operating units at all levels, improving relationships with and between IEEE members.
8.8.5
Achievement Award
To recognize individuals or a team involved with Member and Geographic Activities and/or the Regional
network for singular achievement in the development and completion of a project(s) or activity(ies) directed to
the fulfillment of one or more of the goals and objectives of Member and Geographic Activities. This award is
designed to recognize those substantive projects or achievements of a relatively short nature (one to three years),
but which have left an undeniable imprint on the fabric of Regional operations. (Up to 6 awards annually.)
1998 Zbigniew Ciok, Poland Section – For outstanding service as Section Chairman which accelerated the
development of the IEEE in Poland and Eastern Europe.
1998 Zbigniew H. Czyz, Poland Section – For exemplary service to the IEEE Poland Section.
2001 Jaafar M. Al-Ibrahim, Saudi Arabia (East) Section – For outstanding efforts in facilitating the formation
of several new sections and the rejuvenation of inactive sections in Region 8.
2001 Ali Aydogan, Turkey Section – For their outstanding achievement in promoting and fostering growth of
IEEE membership among students in Turkey.
2001 Duncan C. Baker, South Africa Section – In recognition of outstanding effort and success in editing and
producing of the Region 8 News.
2001 Henrich Lantsberg, Russia Section – In recognition of dedicated and longstanding service to the work of
IEEE Region 8 and the Russia Section.
2002 Isaac Adeyemi Adekanye, Nigeria Section – For outstanding efforts in facilitating the rejuvenation of the
IEEE Nigeria Section and the promotion of IEEE Senior Membership.
2003 Nabil K. Al-Dabal, Saudi Arabia (East) Section – In recognition of his outstanding efforts in successfully
organizing the inaugural IEEE-Gulf Cooperation Council Electrical and Electronics Conference.
2006 Gerald Anleitner, Germany Section – For exemplary leadership skills in IEEE GOLD activities and the
creation of the GOLD-Society Pilot Program.
2006 Marko Delimar, Croatia Section – For significant contributions and energetic leadership to encourage
IEEE Student activities and participation.
2006 Rolf Remshardt, Germany Section – For outstanding strategic contributions towards establishing and
nurturing the young professional community within Region 8 and throughout IEEE.
2008 Ahmed Osama Mikkawi, Egypt Section – For his outstanding efforts in the GOLD and Women in
Engineering programs for fostering inspiration among IEEE members.
2013 Christopher James, UK and Ireland Section – For extraordinary contributions in promoting professional
and career development for IEEE student and young professional members, both nationally and internationally.
8.8.6
GOLD (Graduates of the Last Decade) Achievement Award
To recognize those substantive projects or achievements of a relatively short nature (one to three years), but
which have left an undeniable imprint on the fabric of Graduates of the Last Decade (GOLD) operations.
The award will be based on a selection that recognizes individuals or teams involved with GOLD activities
who are recognized for singular achievement in the development and completion of a project(s) or activity(ies)
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8.8 Member and Geographic Activities Board Awards
which are directed to the fulfillment of one or more of the GOLD goals and/or objectives. (Up to 6 awards
annually.)
2000 IEEE Nigeria Section Gold Committee – For revitalizing the IEEE Nigeria Section through exceptional
GOLD Activities.
2005 Saurabh Sinha, South Africa Section – For significant contributions and leadership in the South Africa
GOLD activities, for providing pre-college education exposure to high school students, involvement in
conference organization activities and GOLD activities on the Region level.
2006 Mohamed Aboud, Egypt Section – For exemplary achievements, significant contributions and leadership
in the Egypt Section GOLD activities.
2007 Tom Curtis, Tanzania Subsection – For his dedication and enthusiasm to share his technical knowledge
through the education of young students in Tanzania.
2007 Verona Wong, UK and Ireland Section – For outstanding contributions and dedication towards
membership retention by establishing GOLD activities, and exemplary leadership in the GOLD 10th
Anniversary Project.
2008 Adrian Pais, Benelux Section – For extraordinary leadership and valuable contributions to the development of the IEEE GOLDRush newsletter.
2009 George Gordon, UK and Ireland Section – For exceptional leadership and outstanding contributions to
the development of the IEEE GOLDRush Newsletter.
2009 João Figueiras, Portugal Section – For outstanding contributions to the public visibility of IEEE by
creating the “GOLD Around the World” video.
2009 Lisa Lazareck, UK and Ireland Section – For outstanding success in increasing GOLD activities within
the IEEE EMB Society.
2010 Nana Ampofo-Anti, South Africa Section – For his dedicated efforts toward the success of IEEE EPICSHigh Projects that have fostered IEEE member engagement through service to the community.
2010 Salima Kaissi, France Section – For her outstanding contributions to public visibility of IEEE by creating
and implementing the idea of establishing a global IEEE Day.
2011 David Oyedokun, South Africa Section – For inspirational leadership towards successful IEEE EPICSHigh Projects, fostering member engagement, and empowering the community.
2012 Amir Zahoor, Sweden Section – For inspirational leadership and outstanding contributions to IEEE
GOLD activities, boosting member engagement, and motivating and training volunteers.
8.8.7
2011
2012
2013
2014
8.8.8
IEEE GOLD / Young Professionals Affinity Group Hall of Fame Award
Finland Section Affinity Group, Chair: Rafal Sliz
Egypt Section Affinity Group, Chair: Mohamed Raafat
Tunisia Section Affinity Group, Chair: Habib M. Kammoun
Croatia Section Affinity Group, Chair: Tomislav Pokrajčić – For their outstanding achievements Inspiring,
Energizing, Empowering, and Engaging graduate students and young professionals in 2013.
Friend of IEEE Member and Geographic Activities Awards
To specifically recognize support provided to IEEE and its members, in support of its goals, by firms, divisions
of firms, or individuals.
2000 Eastern Mediterranean University – For active support towards the advancement of IEEE and engineering
professions.
2003 Alcatel Bell Telephone, Antwerp, Belgium – For more than 15 years of generous hospitality given to the
IEEE Benelux Section.
2004 Alcatel Bell Telephone, Antwerp, Belgium – For more than 19 years of generous hospitality and service
given to the IEEE Benelux Section. (Sustaining Friend)
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
85
8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
2004 Dubai Airport Free Zone Authority (DAFZA), United Arab Emirates – In appreciation of their efforts to
encourage IEEE activities and sponsor IEEE events in United Arab Emirates.
2006 Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa – For outstanding and continued
support of the activities of the IEEE South Africa Section to the benefit of the Southern African
community.
2006 University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa – For outstanding and continued support of the activities
of the IEEE South Africa Section to the benefit of the Southern African community.
2006 University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa – For outstanding and continued support of the
activities of the IEEE South Africa Section to the benefit of the Southern African community.
2008 Saudi Council of Engineers, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia – For providing its meeting facilities and other
resources for IEEE Western Saudi Arabia Section meetings and functions, and providing support to
the Section in organizing and conducting joint training courses.
8.9
Educational Activities Board Awards
IEEE Educational Activities Board Awards recognize and honor individuals and companies for major contributions to engineering and technical education.
8.9.1
Meritorious Achievement in Accreditation Activities
Recognizes IEEE members for efforts to foster the maintenance and improvement of education through the
process of accreditation of engineering, engineering technology, computer science programs, and applied science
programs.
2011 Roderick Arthur Harker, South Africa Section – For accreditation activities in South African education
and impacting accreditation activities worldwide.
8.9.2
Meritorious Achievement in Continuing Education
Recognizes IEEE members for the dedicated contribution to the design, delivery, and support of continuing
education courses and programs in the fields of interest to IEEE members.
2008 Kurt Richter, Austria Section – For outstanding contributions, as a teacher and organizer, to continuing
education services for IEEE members in countries of Region 8.
2012 Margaretha Eriksson, Sweden Section – For exceptional leadership in organizing and delivering practical
leadership and management training to young entrepreneurs, IEEE students and Graduates of the Last
Decade.
8.9.3
Meritorious Achievement in Informal Education
Recognizes IEEE members who volunteer in informal education settings for the benefit of teachers, students,
parents of students, and the public. These volunteers will have served in advisory, educational or fiduciary
positions and used their professional background to enhance understanding and involvement in fields of interest
of IEEE by users of the informal education system.
2009 Nicolaas Beute, South Africa Section – For exceptional leadership in pioneering, organizing and managing
the IEEE Teacher-in-Service Program in South Africa.
8.9.4
Pre-University Education
Recognizes current pre-university classroom teachers who have inspired an appreciation and understanding of
mathematics, science and technology, and the engineering process in students and have encouraged students to
pursue technical careers.
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8.9 Educational Activities Board Awards
2002 Christine Wutte, Austria Section (Pre-College Educator Award) – For teaching physics and mathematics
for 33 years in the Gymnasium und ORG der Ursulinen Graz and for inspiring young women students
to pursue scientific and engineering careers.
2009 Helena Jeanetta Coetzee, South Africa Section – For creating opportunities for the engagement of South
African pre-university students in science and engineering projects nationally and internationally.
2011 Donovan Duffield, South Africa Section – For inspiring students in South Africa and instilling their
passion for science and technology.
2012 Sérgio Ramos, Portugal Section – For promoting the active involvement of students in science, technology
and engineering, and motivating them to pursue technical careers.
2013 Jerina Angeline Chunga, South Africa Section – For decades of passionate teaching experience and
positive impact made on lives of young children, inspiring them with creative thinking and instilling in
them a strong sense of self belief.
8.9.5
Major Educational Innovation
Recognizes IEEE members who have distinguished themselves for outstanding educational innovation in a field
of interest of the IEEE.
1994 Claude J. M. Gueguen and Bernard Robinet, France Section, and Jacques Neirynck, Switzerland Section
– For work leading to the creation of the Institut Eurecom.
2007 Jan Van der Spiegel, Benelux Section – For innovative efforts in promoting undergraduate research and
creating robust opportunities for undergraduate students to enrich their education through integrative
research experiences.
8.9.6
Meritorious Service to IEEE EAB
Recognizes IEEE members who are past members of the EAB or current or past members of EAB Committees
(other than currently serving on ARC) for outstanding and sustained service to the aims and objectives of the
IEEE Educational Activities Board.
2012 Saurabh Sinha, South Africa Section – For spearheading the incorporation of the Engineering Projects
in Community Service program in IEEE’s educational activities and expanding the program globally.
8.9.7
Employer Professional Development
Recognizes organizations employing IEEE members for contributions to employee continuing education and
professional development.
1998 Turk Elektrik, Turkey Section – For outstanding contributions to employee continuing education and
professional development.
2003 Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia (East) Section – For outstanding contributions to employee continuing
education and professional development through effective integration of diverse technologies to meet the
need of rapid modernization of engineering technologies.
8.9.8
Section Professional Development
Recognizes an IEEE section for major contributions to the professional development of its members through the
provision of outstanding products, services and support in the areas of life-long learning, continuing education
and professional development.
2011 IEEE South Africa Section – For supporting the professional development of its members by creating a
customized IEEE continuing education portal, organizing major IEEE technical conferences, and utilizing
IEEE’s Distinguished Lecturer Program.
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
8.9.9
EAB Vice President’s Recognition Award
2010 Simon Haykin, UK and Ireland Section – For fundamental contributions to research and education in
Adaptive Signal Processing and Learning Systems, applications in radars and communications techniques,
and worldwide impact on education and training of electronics engineers.
2012 Yves Meyer, France Section – For fundamental contributions to wavelets including the foundations for a
proper mathematical framework and for influencing generations of students and researchers.
8.10
Joint Awards Established with National Societies
The purpose of National Society Agreements is to encourage cooperation, and coordinated joint activities
between the country’s National Society, and the local countries’ IEEE section. One of the cooperative activities
has been the establishment of joint awards between the National Society and IEEE.
8.10.1
France – SEE/IEEE Joint Brillouin-Glavieux Award
The SEE/IEEE Joint Brillouin-Glavieux Award was established in 2007 and is presented annually. The BrillouinGlavieux Award has been created to promote the interaction between fundamental research, advanced education
and effective transfer to industry in the area of technology. In even years the Brillouin award is given in the
area of physics, optics and electricity; in odd years, the Glavieux award recognizes excellence in ICT, control
theory, signal and image processing and related domains.
SEE = Société de l’Electricité, de l’Electronique, et des Technologies de l’Information et de la Communication
2008 Sébastien Bigo, SEE/IEEE Léon-Nicolas Brillouin Award recipient – For the development of multiple
Tbit/sec transmissions over several thousand kilometers of optical fibers.
2009 Catherine Douillard, SEE/IEEE Alain Glavieux Award recipient – For pioneering work on turboequilization and exceptional contribution to standards, opening to a large development of consumer
graphics.
2010 Mickael Tanter, SEE/IEEE Léon-Nicolas Brillouin Award recipient – For his outstanding achievements
in acoustics and their impact in health care.
2011 Merouane Debbah, SEE/IEEE Alain Glavieux Award recipient – For outstanding achievements in Information Theory and their impact on wireless communications.
2012 Lucian Prejbeanu, SEE/IEEE Léon-Nicolas Brillouin Award recipient – For outstanding achievements in
the development of thermally-assisted magnetic memories (MRAM), from basic concepts to industrialization.
2013 Jean-Christophe Baillie, SEE/IEEE Alain Glavieux Award recipient – For the design of an operating
system for autonomous robots and its wide application in the industry and the digital society.
8.10.2
Iceland – VFI/IEEE Joint Electrical Engineer of the Year Award
The VFI/IEEE Joint Electrical Engineer of the Year Award was established in 2005 and is presented biennially.
VFI = Verkfræðingafélag Íslands = Association of Chartered Engineers in Iceland
2006 Sigmar Guðbjörnsson (Sigmar Gudbjörnsson) – Iceland Electrical Engineer of 2006.
2008 Árni Benediktsson (Arni Benediktsson) – For his excellence in performance in his profession in the field
of Electrical Engineering.
2008 Þór Jes Þórisson (Thor Jes Thorisson) – For his significant contributions to the Icelandic Society in the
field of Electrical Engineering.
2010 Björgvin Guðmundsson (Björgvin Gudmundsson) – For his outstanding and innovative contributions in
the design and development of a unique new generation of medical instrumentation for sleep analysis.
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8.11 Region 8 Awards
2013 Jón Atli Benediktsson (Jon Atli Benediktsson) – For outstanding technical achievements and world-wide
recognition in the field of remote sensing, and in the research and manufacturing of medical equipment
that measures – without invasion – oxygen saturation in the veins of the eye.
8.11
Region 8 Awards
8.11.1
Region 8 (Section) Volunteer Award
The Region 8 Section Volunteer Award was first introduced in 1993, “to be presented to a member of a Regional
Section for outstandingly meritorious service to his or her Section.” It was more or less forgotten after 2000
and re-introduced as the Region 8 Volunteer Award in 2008, “with the goal of encouraging all volunteers in
the Region and of recognizing those volunteers who have made an outstanding contribution to a particular
Region 8 Section.”
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
...
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Terence H. Oxley, UK and Ireland Section
Wieslaw J. Seruga, Poland Section
Frédérique Vallée, France Section
Henrich Lantsberg, Russia Section
??
??
Soliman El-Debeiky, Egypt Section
Jacob Baal-Schem, Israel Section, and Hans Noordanus, Benelux Section
Said El-Khamy, Egypt Section, and Alexander Mikerov, Russia (Northwest) Section
Vladimir Dimcev, Republic of Macedonia Section
Michel-Henry Carpentier, France Section
Samir Shaheen, Egypt Section – In recognition of his outstanding services to the Egypt Section.
Anikó Szakál, Hungary Section – In recognition of her outstanding services to the Hungary Section.
8.11.2
Region 8 Outstanding Section Award
The Region 8 Outstanding Section Awards are being established with the goal of recognizing excellent performance by Region 8 Sections. Two awards will be presented annually:
• one for large Sections = 501 or more members (including Students)
• one for small Sections = 500 or fewer members (including Students)
as of 31st December of the past year. Each award is for outstanding success of a Section in fulfilling its goals –
in accordance with IEEE policy – by organizing technical, professional and geographic activities for the benefit
of its members and by maintaining, enhancing, and supporting the Student Branches, Chapters, and Affinity
Groups within its geographic boundaries.
2012 Iran Section
2013 Croatia Section – For delivering excellent services to its members.
8.11.3
Region 8 (Outstanding) GOLD / Young Professionals (Affinity Group) Award
To recognize GOLD / Young Professionals Affinity Groups within Region 8 for their efforts, successes and
achievements in carrying out the mission of IEEE GOLD / Young Professionals and the aims of IEEE in
Region 8 within their Section. Recognition will be given to the Affinity Group that displayed the most successful
maintenance of ongoing efforts, and the development and implementation of new programs. These activities
shall leave an important imprint on the Section and on Region 8.
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
2000
...
2009
2011
2012
2013
2014
Benelux Section, Chair: Sammy Martens
Nigeria Section, Chair: Prince Ibe
Egypt Section, Chair: Mohamed Raafat
Croatia Section, Chair: Ana Katalinić
Finland Section, Chair: Rafal Sliz
Nigeria Section
8.11.4
Region 8 GOLD / Young Professionals Exceptional Volunteer Award
To recognize a volunteer within Region 8 for his/her dedication towards the mission of IEEE GOLD /Young
Professionals. A recognition will be given to the devoted GOLD / Young Professionals member who presents
the most successful maintenance of ongoing efforts, leadership skills, and remarkable development and implementation of new ideas and programs in the previous year. These activities shall have an important impact on
the Section and on Region 8.
2013 Khaled Mokhtar, Egypt Section – For his dedication to the mission of IEEE GOLD, Leadership skills,
and remarkable development and implementation of new ideas and programs;
Andreas Neumeier, Germany Section – For his dedication to the mission of IEEE GOLD, Leadership
skills, and remarkable development and implementation of new ideas and programs;
Tomislav Pokrajčič, Croatia Section – For his dedication to the mission of IEEE GOLD, Leadership
skills, and remarkable development and implementation of new ideas and programs.
2014 Ivana Stupar, Croatia Section;
Pavlos Kleanthous, Cyprus Section;
Amgad Ibrahim, Egypt Section
8.11.5
Region 8 (Small and Large) Chapter of the Year Award
2001 Small Ukraine (West) Microwave Theory and Techniques, Electron Devices, Antennas and
Propagation, Components Packaging and Manufacturing Technology, Solid-State Circuits
(MTT/ED/AP/CPMT/SSC) Societies Joint Chapter
2001 Large UK and Ireland Power Engineering (PE) Society Chapter
2002 Small Russia (Siberia) Electron Devices, Microwave Theory and Techniques, Communications, Components Packaging and Manufacturing Technology, Solid-State Circuits (ED/MTT/COM/CPMT/SSC)
Societies Joint Chapter
2002 Large Italy Lasers and Electro-Optics (LEO) Society Chapter
2003 Small Yugoslavia Industrial Electronics, Industrial Applications, Power Electronics (IE/IA/PEL)
Societies Joint Chapter
2003 Large Germany Industrial Electronics, Industrial Applications, Power Electronics (IE/IA/PEL) Societies
Joint Chapter
2004 Small Russia Lasers and Electro-Optics (LEO) Society Chapter
2004 Large Saudi Arabia Communications (COM) Society Chapter
2005 Small Czechoslovakia Antennas and Propagation, Electron Devices, Microwave Theory and Techniques
(AP/ED/MTT) Societies Joint Chapter
2005 Large Poland Antennas and Propagation, Aerospace and Electronic Systems, Microwave Theory and
Techniques (AP/AES/MTT) Societies Joint Chapter
2006 Small Saudi Arabia Education (E) Society Chapter
2006 Large France Industrial Applications, Industrial Electronics, Power Electronics (IA/IE/PEL) Societies
Joint Chapter
2007 Small Saudi Arabia Industry Applications (IA) Society Chapter
2007 Large Italy Lasers and Electro-Optics (LEO) Society Chapter
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8.11 Region 8 Awards
2008 Small Ukraine (East) Antennas and Propagation, Nuclear and Plasma Sciences, Aerospace and
Electronic Systems, Electron Devices, Engineeri8ng in Medicine and Biology, Microwave Theory and
Techniques, Geoscience and Remote Sensing (AP/NPS/AES/ED/EMB/MTT/GRS) Societies Joint
Chapter
2008 Large Germany Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Society Chapter
2009 Small Poland Antennas and Propagation, Aerospace and Electronic Systems, Microwave Theory and
Techniques (AP/AES/MTT) Societies Joint Chapter
2009 Large Germany Industrial Electronics, Industrial Applications, Power Electronics (IE/IA/PEL) Societies
Joint Chapter
2010 Small Ukraine (East) Antennas and Propagation, Nuclear and Plasma Sciences, Aerospace and
Electronic Systems, Electron Devices, Engineeri8ng in Medicine and Biology, Microwave Theory and
Techniques, Geoscience and Remote Sensing (AP/NPS/AES/ED/EMB/MTT/GRS) Societies Joint
Chapter
2010 Large Spain Education (E) Society Chapter
2011 Small Lebanon Communications (COM) Society Chapter
2011 Large UK and Ireland Computational Intelligence (CIS) Society Chapter
2012 Small Egypt Robotics and Automation (RA) Society Chapter
2012 Large No recipient
2013 Small No recipient
2013 Large Italy Photonics (PHO) Society Chapter – For outstanding performance in demonstrating high
vitality and dynamism, by successfully implementing best practices and innovative tactics, substantially enhancing the IEEE Photonics Society’s mission, and for increasing member engagement,
bringing photonics closer to a wider audience and stimulating interaction and cross-fertilization between
researchers.
8.11.6
Region 8 Student Branch Chapter of the Year Award
This award is given to the most outstanding IEEE Student Branch Chapter in recognition of their activeness
based on quality and quantity of their meetings, programs, projects and member services. This award is to be
provided for activities in the previous calendar year.
2013 University of Sarajevo Student Branch Industry Applications (IA) Society Chapter in the Bosnia and
Herzegovina Section – For outstanding performance in organizing a variety of exceptionally successful
activities and participated in several projects that led to huge increase in interest for IEEE among
students in Sarajevo in particular and Bosnia and Herzegovina in general.
8.11.7
Larry K. Wilson Regional Student Activities Award
The purpose of this award is to recognize annually, in each Region of the IEEE, the student most responsible for
an extraordinary accomplishment associated with IEEE student activities. The value of a pattern of dedicated,
ongoing service to a branch is certainly recognized. This award is designed to reward a particular event or
product of IEEE activities.
1998
...
2002
...
2006
2007
2008
2009
Ali Shahrokni, Iran Section
Nahel M. Amirah, Egypt Section
Pablo Herrero, Spain Section
Emine Gökçe Aydal, UK and Ireland Section
Mounira Maazaoui, Tunisia Section
Zhijia Huang, UK and Ireland Section
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8 IEEE Award recipients from Region 8
2010
2011
2012
2013
C. Serkan Baydin, Turkey Section
Sinan Sabih, Qatar Section
Piotr Graca, Poland Section
Rui Miguel Costa, Portugal Section – For an extraordinary accomplishment called: IEEE IST Academic.
8.11.8
Clementina Saduwa Award
Recognizes a women engineer in Region 8 who, through their engineering and career achievements, have demonstrated noteworthy support for women in the profession and have established a benchmark of engineering
excellence.
2008
2010
2011
2012
2013
Clementina Saduwa posthumously, Nigeria Section
Elena Smotrova, Ukraine Section
Ilhem Kallel, Tunisia Section
Wejdan Abu-Elhaija, Jordan Section
Fatma-El Zahraa Abou-Chadi, Egypt Section – For her engineering and career achievements and
noteworthy support for women in the profession.
2014 Monique Jeanne Morrow, Switzerland Section – For her engineering and career achievements and
noteworthy support for women in the profession.
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9.1
Region 8 News
The Region 8 Newsletter was started by Robert C.G. Williams – at that time Region 8 Director – at his home
office in Guildford, using stencils and a hand cranked printing machine. Gordon H. (Mick) Byford lived close
to Guildford in Farnham and then further developed the newsletter production.
Region 8 News editors:
1. W.H. (Bill) Devenish (1967–1985). First issue in December 1967; roughly 4 issues per year; last issue of
this editor: Nr. 69 in May 1985. Issues 1 through 76 had the title IEEE Region 8 newsletter ; issues 77
through 85 were entitled IEEE Region Eight NEWS ; starting with issue 86, the title was IEEE Region 8
News.
2. Gordon H. (Mick) Byford (1985–1998) started with Nr. 70 in May 1985 and held the position until Nr.
122 in May 1998.
3. Duncan C. Baker (1998–2001) started with Vol. 1 Nr. 1 in August 1998 until Vol. 4 nr. 4 in November
2001.
4. Roland J. Saam (2002-2013) started with the production of Vol. 5 Nr. 1 in February 2002 until Vol. 16
Nr. 1 in April 2013.
5. Zhijia Huang took the position with the production of Vol. 16 Nr. 2 in August 2013.
Before the start of the Region 8 Newsletter, the Student Activities Chair, Paul G.A. Jespers, took the initiative
for a Region 8 Student Activity Newsletter, of which three issues appeared: in January, April, and June 1967.
André S. Vander Vorst, Secretary-Treasurer and later Vice Chair of the Student Activities Committee, was
instrumental in producing this newsletter.
From the first issue of the IEEE Region 8 Newsletter:
Message from the Director of Region 8
This is the first issue of a new publication to serve the members of Region 8 and which carries
good wishes of the President and Board of Directors.
As you will know, the IEEE is organised on a world-wide basis into ten Regions, of which
Region 8 extends over Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, with a membership of over 4000
including some 300 students organised in 11 Sections and 5 student branches.
While the members residing in Section areas have their own lines of communication, and students
have had their own Newsletter, there has so far been no Region-wide publication and it is hoped
that this Newsletter, issued two or three times a year, will fill this communication gap and enable
all members of all grades to feel that they are part of a Regional organisation.
Copies of the Newsletter will be mailed direct to all members, including students; editorial policy
is under the control of an international committee of which Jean Lebel, the immediate Past Director,
is Chairman; the Editor is Bill Devenish, who has been the Editor of the U.K.R.I. Newsletter; and
the proposed make-up will cover Institute announcements of particular interest to the Region and
Regional, Section and Student news. Not only will this inform everyone of the various sectional and
student activities, but it is hoped will also stimulate membership and the formation of new sections
and student branches within the Region.
In wishing this new publication every success, I would like to thank all those whose work has
helped to make it possible, and to close by reminding all of us that its future depends on the extent
to which it is of service to members and that this, in turn, depends on the support it receives from
each and every one of us.
Robert C.G. Williams
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Regular topics in the IEEE Region 8 newsletter include Report from the Regional Director, Institute News,
Publications and Courses, Region 8 News, Meetings in Region 8, Meetings outside Region 8, News of the
Sections, Student Activity News.
With issue 18, April/May 1972, the IEEE Region 8 newsletter changed its style and announced the acceptance
of advertisements in coming issues.
Issue numbers and publication dates of Region 8 News
year
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1998
1999
2000
2001
94
Vol.
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
2
6
Jun
10
25
45
49
53
57
61
65
?
73
77
81
85
89
93
97
?
105
109
113
117
121
1
2
3
4
1
1
1
Aug
3
7
15
18
21
26
30
34
38
42
Sep
Oct
Nov
4
8
12
16
11
14
20
24
29
33
37
41
Jul
Dec
1
5
9
13
17
19
22
27
31
35
39
46
50
54
58
62
66
70
74
78
82
86
90
94
98
102
106
110
114
?
122
2
2
2
23
28
32
36
40
43
47
51
55
59
63
67
?
?
79
83
91
95
?
103
107
111
115
119
44
48
52
56
60
64
68
?
76
80
84
87
92
96
100
104
108
112
116
120
1
3
3
3
2
4
4
4
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
?
9.1 Region 8 News
Issue numbers and publication dates of Region 8 News
year
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Vol.
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Jan
Feb
1
1
1
Mar
Apr
May
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
Jun
Jul
Aug
3
Sep
3
3
3
3
2
2
Oct
Nov
4
4
Dec
4
4
4
3
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
3
2
2
2
1
1
4
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
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3
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9.2
IEEE Milestones in Region 8
London, England Benjamin Franklin’s Work in London, 1757–1775
Dedicated 31 March 2003 – IEEE UK&RI Section
Benjamin Franklin, American electrician, printer, and diplomat, spent many years on Craven Street.
He lived at No. 7 between 1772 and 1775 and at No. 36 from 1757-1762 and again from 1764–1772.
During these years, Franklin popularized the study of electricity, performed experiments, and served as
an advisor on lightning conductors.
Como, Italy Volta’s Electrical Battery Invention, 1799
Dedicated September 1999 – IEEE North Italy Section
In 1799, Alessandro Volta developed the first electrical battery. This battery, known as the Voltaic Cell,
consisted of two plates of different metals immersed in a chemical solution. Volta’s development of the
first continuous and reproducible source of electrical current was an important step in the study of
electromagnetism and in the development of electrical equipment.
St. Petersburg, Russia Shilling’s Pioneering Contribution to Practical Telegraphy, 1828–1837
Dedicated 18 May 2009 – IEEE Russia (Northwest) Section
In this building, Shilling’s original electromagnetic telegraph is exhibited. P.L. Shilling, a Russian
scientist, successfully transmitted messages over different distances by means of an electric current’s
effect on a magnetic needle, using two signs and a telegraph dictionary for transferring letters and digits.
Shilling’s demonstrations in St. Petersburg and abroad provided an impetus to scientists in different
countries and influenced the invention of more advanced electromagnetic telegraphs.
Maynooth, Ireland Callan’s Pioneering Contributions to Electrical Science and Technology, 1836
Dedicated 5 September 2006 – IEEE UK&RI Section
Reverend Nicholas Callan (1799–1864), professor of Natural Philosophy at Saint Patrick’s College
Maynooth, contributed significantly to the understanding of electrical induction and the development
of the induction coil. He did this through a series of experiments that made the inductive transient
phenomena visibly clear. The apparatus used in these experiments was replicated in other laboratories.
London, England; Glenlair, Scotland Maxwell’s Equations, 1861–1870
Dedicated 13 August 2009 – IEEE UK&RI Section
Between 1860 and 1871, at his family home Glenlair and at King’s College London, where he was Professor
of Natural Philosophy, James Clerk Maxwell conceived and developed his unified theory of electricity,
magnetism and light. A cornerstone of classical physics, the Theory of Electromagnetism is summarized in
four key equations that now bear his name. Maxwell’s equations today underpin all modern information
and communication technologies.
County Kerry, Ireland County Kerry Transatlantic Cable Stations, 1866
Dedicated 13 July 2000 – IEEE UK&RI Section
On July 13, 1866 the Great Eastern steamed westward from Valentia, laying telegraph cable behind her.
The successful landing at Heart’s Content, Newfoundland on July 27 established a permanent electrical
communications link that altered for all time personal, commercial and political relations between people
across the Atlantic Ocean. Later, additional cables were laid from Valentia and new stations opened
at Ballinskelligs (1874) and Waterville (1884), making County Kerry a major focal point for global
communications.
County Kerry has dedicated part of their web site to this event. You can find the Milestone under
“Heritage.”
Karlsruhe, Germany First generation and experimental proof of electromagnetic waves, 1886–1888
To be dedicated 5 December 2014 – IEEE Germany Section
In this building, Heinrich Hertz first verified Maxwell’s equations and prediction of electromagnetic waves
in 1886–1888. He observed the reflection, refraction and polarization of the waves and, moreover, the
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9.2 IEEE Milestones in Region 8
equality of their velocity of propagation with the velocity of light. His 450 MHz transmitter and receiver
demonstrated the fundamentals of high-frequency technology.
Paris, France Discovery of Radioconduction by Edouard Branly, 1890
Dedicated 23 September 2010 – IEEE France Section
In this building, Edouard Branly discovered radioconduction, now called the Branly Effect. On 24
November 1890, he observed that an electromagnetic wave changes the ability of metal filings to conduct
electricity. Branly used his discovery to make a very sensitive detector called a coherer, improved versions
of which became the first practical wireless signal receivers.
St. Petersburg, Russia Popov’s Contribution to the Development of Wireless Communication, 1895
Dedicated 20 May 2005 – IEEE Russia (Northwest) Section
On 7 May 1895, A.S. Popov demonstrated the possibility of transmitting and receiving short, continuous
signals over a distance up to 64 meters by means of electromagnetic waves with the help of a special
portable device responding to electrical oscillation which was a significant contribution to the development of wireless communication.
Pontechio Marconi, Italy Marconi’s Early Experiments in Wireless Telegraphy, 1895
Dedicated 29 April 2011 – IEEE Italy Section
In this garden, after the experiments carried out between 1894 and 1895 in the “Silkworm Room” in the
attic of Villa Griffone, Guglielmo Marconi connected a grounded antenna to its transmitter. With this
apparatus the young inventor was able to transmit radiotelegraphic signals beyond a physical obstacle,
the Celestini hill, at a distance of about two kilometres. The experiment heralded the birth of the era of
wireless communication.
On this hill, during the summer of 1895, the radiotelegraphic signals sent by Guglielmo Marconi from
the garden of Villa Griffone were received. The reception was communicated to Marconi with a gunshot.
This event marked the beginning of the new era of wireless communication
Salvan, Switzerland Marconi’s Early Wireless Experiments, 1895
Dedicated 26 September 2003 – IEEE Switzerland Section
On this spot in 1895, with local assistance, Guglielmo Marconi carried out some of the first wireless
experiments. He first transmitted a signal from this “Shepherdess Stone” over a few meters and later,
following one and a half months of careful adjustments, over a distance of up to one and a half kilometers.
This was the beginning of Marconi’s pivotal involvement in wireless radio.
Šibenik, Croatia Krka-Šibenik Electric Power System, 1895
Dedicated 5 July 2013 – IEEE Croatia Section
On 28 August 1895 electricity generated at this location was transmitted to the city of Šibenik, where
six power transformers supplied a large number of street lamps. This early system of power generation,
transmission and distribution was one of the first complete multiphase alternating current systems in
the world and it remained in operation until World War I.
Rheinfelden, Germany Rheinfelden Hydroelectric Power Plant, 1898–2010
Dedicated 25 September 2014 – IEEE Germany Section
The original Rheinfelden plant was an outstanding achievement in Europe’s early large-scale generation of
hydroelectric power. It was important for its 17,000 horsepower (12,500 kilowatt) output, for pioneering
three-phase alternating current later adopted around the world, and using 50-Hertz frequency which
afterwards became standard in most countries. Gradually, Rheinfelden entered into joint operation with
other stations, from which the interconnected network of continental Europe evolved.
Capetown, South Africa First Operational Use of Wireless Telegraphy, 1899–1902
Dedicated 29 September 1999 - IEEE South Africa Section
The first use of wireless telegraphy in the field occurred during the Anglo-Boer War (1899–1902). The
British Army experimented with Marconi’s system and the British Navy successfully used it for communication among naval vessels in Delagoa Bay, prompting further development of Marconi’s wireless
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telegraph system for practical uses.
Poldhu, Cornwall, England Transmission of Transatlantic Radio Signals, 1901
Dedicated 12 December 2001 – IEEE UK&RI Section
On December 12, 1901, a radio transmission of the Morse code letter ‘S’ was broadcast from this site,
using equipment built by John Ambrose Fleming. At Signal Hill in Newfoundland, Guglielmo Marconi,
using a wire antenna kept aloft by a kite, confirmed the reception of these first transatlantic radio signals.
These experiments showed that radio signals could propagate far beyond the horizon, giving radio a new
global dimension for communications in the twentieth century.
Madrid, Spain Early Developments in Remote-Control, 1901
Dedicated 15 March 2007 – IEEE Spain Section
In 1901, the Spanish engineer, Leonardo Torres-Quevedo began the development of a system, which
he called Telekine, which was able to do “mechanical movements at a distance.” The system was a
way of testing dirigible balloons of his own creation without risking human lives. In 1902 and 1903 he
requested some patents for the system. With the Telekine, Torres-Quevedo laid down modern wireless
remote-control operation principles.
Lyngby, Denmark Poulsen-Arc Radio Transmitter, 1902
Dedicated May 1994 – IEEE Denmark Section
Valdemar Poulsen, a Danish engineer, invented an arc converter as a generator of continuous-wave radio
signals in 1902. Beginning in 1904, Poulsen used the arc for experimental radio transmission from Lyngby
to various receiving sites in Denmark and Great Britain. Poulsen-arc transmitters were used internationally until they were superseded by vacuum-tube transmitters.
Leskovac, Yugoslavia Vucje Hydroelectric Plant, 1903
Dedicated 25 June 2005 – IEEE Yugoslavia Section
The Vucje hydroelectric plant began operation in 1903. It was the first in southern Serbia and the largest
in the broader region. By transmitting alternating electric current of 50 Hz at 7000 volts – high for the
period – over a distance of 16 km, it helped to transform the regional economy. It remained in continual
use for more than a century.
London, England Fleming Valve, 1904
Dedicated 1 July 2004 – IEEE UK&RI Section
Beginning in the 1880s Professor John Ambrose Fleming of University College London investigated the
Edison effect, electrical conduction within a glass bulb from an incandescent filament to a metal plate.
In 1904 he constructed such a bulb and used it to rectify high frequency oscillations and thus detect
wireless signals. The same year Fleming patented the device, later known as the ‘Fleming valve.’
Leiden, Netherlands Discovery of Superconductivity, 1911
Dedicated 8 April 2011 – IEEE Benelux Section/IEEE Superconductivity Council
On 8 April 1911, in this building, Professor Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and his collaborators, Cornelis
Dorsman, Gerrit Jan Flim, and Gilles Holst, discovered superconductivity. They observed that the resistance of mercury approached “practically zero” as its temperature was lowered to 3 kelvins. Today,
superconductivity makes many electrical technologies possible, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging
(MRI) and high-energy particle accelerators.
Ardnacrusha, County Limerick, Ireland Shannon Scheme for the Electrification of the Irish Free State,
1929
Dedicated 29 July 2002 – IEEE UK&RI Section (IEEE Milestone and ASCE International Historic
Engineering Landmark)
The Shannon Scheme was officially opened at Parteen Weir on 22 July 1929. One of the largest engineering
projects of its day, it was successfully executed by Siemens to harness the Shannon River. It subsequently
served as a model for large-scale electrification projects worldwide. Operated by the Electricity Board of
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9.2 IEEE Milestones in Region 8
Ireland, it had an immediate impact on the social, economic and industrial development of Ireland and
continues to supply significant power beyond the end of the 20th century.
Warsaw, Poland First Breaking of Enigma Code by the Team of Polish Cipher Bureau, 1932–1939
Dedicated 5 August 2014 – IEEE Poland Section
Polish Cipher Bureau mathematicians Marian Rejewski, Jerzy Różycki and Henryk Zygalski broke the
German Enigma cipher machine codes. Working with engineers from the AVA Radio Manufacturing
Company, they built the ‘bomba’ – the first cryptanalytic machine to break Enigma codes. Their work
was a foundation of British code breaking efforts which, with later American assistance, helped end
World War II.
Bletchley Park, United Kingdom Code-breaking at Bletchley Park during World War II, 1939–1945
Dedicated 1 April 2003 – IEEE UK&RI Section
On this site during the 1939–45 World War, 12,000 men and women broke the German Lorenz and
Enigma ciphers, as well as Japanese and Italian codes and ciphers. They used innovative mathematical
analysis and were assisted by two computing machines developed here by teams led by Alan Turing: the
electro-mechanical Bombe developed with Gordon Welchman, and the electronic Colossus designed by
Tommy Flowers. These achievements greatly shortened the war, thereby saving countless lives.
London, England Invention of Holography, 1947
Dedicated 12 June 2013 – UK&RI Section
In 1947 Dennis Gabor conceived the idea of wavefront reconstruction for improving the performance
of the electron microscope. This became the basis for the invention of optical holography for threedimensional imaging but implementation required coherent light sources and had to await the emergence
of the laser some years later. Gabor was awarded the Nobel Prize for his invention in 1971.
Rehovot, Israel WEIZAC Computer, 1955
Dedicated 5 December 2006 – IEEE Israel Section
The Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, built the Weizmann Automatic Computer
(WEIZAC) during 1954–1955 with the scientific vision of Chaim Pekeris and the engineering leadership
of Gerald Estrin. The WEIZAC was based on drawings from the IAS computer at Princeton University
and built with much ingenuity. The machine was the first digital electronic computer constructed in
the Middle East and it became an indispensable scientific computing resource for many scientists and
engineers worldwide.
Oban, Scotland The First Submarine Transatlantic Telephone Cable System (TAT–1), 1956
Dedicated 24 September 2006 – IEEE UK&RI Section
Global telephone communications using submarine cables began on 25 September 1956, when the first
transatlantic undersea telephone system, TAT–1, went into service. This site is the eastern terminal of the
transatlantic cable that stretched west to Clarenville, Newfoundland. TAT–1 was a great technological
achievement providing unparalleled reliability with fragile components in hostile environments. It was
made possible through the efforts of engineers at AT&T Bell Laboratories and British Post Office. The
system operated until 1978.
Laufenburg, Switzerland Star of Laufenburg Interconnection, 1958
Dedicated 18 August 2010 – IEEE Switzerland Section
This is the original location of the electric-power interconnection of three countries: Switzerland, Germany
and France. The Union for Production and Transmission of Electricity (now UCTE) was formed to
manage this interconnection. This installation pioneered international connections, and technical and
political cooperation for European integration. UCTE coordinated one of the largest synchronously
connected power networks serving almost all of continental Europe.
Goonhilly Downs, Cornwall, England First Transatlantic Television Signal via Satellite, 1962
Dedicated July 2002 – IEEE UK&RI Section
On 11 July 1962 this site transmitted the first live television signal across the Atlantic from Europe to
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the USA, via TELSTAR. This Satellite Earth Station was designed and built by the British Post Office
Engineering Department. Known as ‘Arthur’ (of “Knights of the Round Table” fame), its open-dish design
became a model for satellite television earth stations throughout the world.
Pleumeur-Bodou, France First Transatlantic Reception of a Television Signal via Satellite, 1962
Dedicated July 2002 – IEEE France Section
On 11 July 1962 this site received the first transatlantic transmission of a TV signal from a twin station
in Andover, Maine, USA via the TELSTAR satellite. The success of TELSTAR and the earth stations,
the first built for active satellite communications, illustrated the potential of a future world-wide satellite
system to provide communications between continents.
Neuchâtel, Switzerland Pioneering Work on the Quartz Electronic Wristwatch, 1962–1967
Dedicated 28 September 2002 – IEEE Switzerland Section
A key milestone in development of the quartz electronic wristwatch in Switzerland was the creation in
1962 of the Centre Electronique Horloger of Neuchâtel. The Centre produced the first prototypes incorporating dedicated integrated circuits that set new timekeeping performance records at the International
Chronometric Competition held at this observatory in 1967. Since then quartz watches, with hundreds
of millions of units produced, became an extremely successful electronic system.
Geneva, Switzerland CERN Experimental Instrumentation, 1968
Dedicated 26 September 2005 – IEEE France Section, endorsed by the IEEE Switzerland Section
At CERN laboratories the invention of multiple-wire proportional chambers and drift chambers revolutionized the domain of electronic particle detectors, leading to new research on the constitution of matter.
The development of unique electrical and electronic devices made possible the major high-energy physics
experiments which have been recognized worldwide.
Cheltenham, England Invention of Public Key Cryptography, 1969–1975
Dedicated 5 October 2010 – IEEE UK&RI Section
At GCHQ, by 1975 James Ellis had proved that a symmetric secret-key system is unnecessary and
Clifford Cocks with Malcolm Williamson showed how such ‘public-key cryptography’ could be achieved.
Until then it was believed that secure communication was impossible without exchange of a secret key,
with key distribution a major impediment. With these discoveries the essential principles were known
but were kept secret until 1997.
The milestone plaque may be viewed at Goverment Communications Headquarters (GCHQ),
Cheltenham, England. The site is a secure communications station, but the main entrance area leading
to the main building from the outside is public.
Haifa, Israel Lempel-Ziv Data Compression Algorithm, 1977
Dedicated September 2004 – IEEE Israel Section
The data compression algorithm developed at this site in 1977 by Abraham Lempel and Jacob Ziv became
a basis for enabling data transmission via the internet in an efficient way. It contributed significantly in
making the internet a global communications medium.
Eindhoven, Netherlands Compact Disc Audio Player, 1979
Dedicated 6 March 2009 – IEEE Benelux Section
On 8 March 1979, N.V. Philips’ Gloeilampenfabrieken demonstrated for the international press a
Compact Disc Audio Player. The demonstration showed that it is possible by using digital optical
recording and playback to reproduce audio signals with superb stereo quality. This research at Philips
established the technical standard for digital optical recording systems.
Belgrade, Yugoslavia Special Citation: Nikola Tesla (1856–1943), Electrical Pioneer
Dedicated October 2006 – IEEE Serbia and Montenegro Section
On the 150th anniversary of his birth, the IEEE is pleased to recognize the seminal work of Nikola
Tesla in the field of electrical engineering. Among his many accomplishments, those that stand out
are his innovative contributions to the applications of polyphase current to electric power systems, his
100
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
9.2 IEEE Milestones in Region 8
pioneering work with electromagnetic waves, and his experiments with very high voltages. The Tesla
Museum in Beograd is to be commended for its successful efforts to preserve artifacts and documents
related to Tesla and to make them accessible to scholars throughout the world.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
101
9 Miscellaneous lists
9.3
Miscellaneous
• The Regional Activities Board (RAB) was established in 1969. At that time, four other boards already
existed: Awards Board, Educational Activities Board, Publications Board, and Technical Activities Board.
RAB is responsible for the geographically organized activities of the Institute, including those of the
Regions, Councils, Sections, Chapters and Student Branches.
In the beginning, it was called the Sections Committee and was chaired by the Vice-President of the
Institute. As a standing committee of the Board of Directors, the Regional Directors were members ex
officio. Meeting twice a year was not enough, however, for the Regional Directors who also often met by
themselves to discuss items. Thus, in March 1969, the Sections Committee was replaced by the Regional
Activities Board.
The newly established Board had the same, as well as expanded, duties of the Sections Committee
including: formulating and recommending policies, criteria and procedures to the Board of Directors
or Executive Committee to ensure (1) the quality of programs for members in their respective locales;
(2) constructive interaction among the locally organized IEEE units; and (3) adequate and responsible
allocation of the Institute’s volunteer and staff personnel and financial resources to support the Regions
and their sub-units.
• Plans for a Region 8 Convention started in 1969 and resulted in EUROCON 71, the meeting for Professional Growth, Lausanne, Switzerland, 18–22 October 1971.
• In the September 1971 issue of the IEEE Region 8 newsletter, names for Region 8 are solicited.
• In 1981, more than 15 years after the foundation of the Region, member dues was increased by a Regional
assessment of USD 7.00, to provide finances to maintain and increase Regional and Section activities. The
decision for this increase was reached by the Region 8 Committee only after a great deal of discussion
extending over two Committee meetings. The Committee agreed that the additional funds that will
become available to Region 8, should be used in two ways: to provide additional member benefits and to
enable the Region 8 Committee to maintain and improve cohesion and cooperation between Sections in
the Region.
• In December 1980, Dick C.J. Poortvliet was elected as the IEEE Secretary for 1981–1982. This was
the first time that a member from Regions 8, 9 or 10 was part of the IEEE Executive Committee. Other
Region 8 Directors that were elected in this position are Walter Proebster (1985), Hugo Ruechardt (1989),
Karsten Drangeid (1992), Charles Turner (1995), Maurice Papo (1999), Levent Onural (2003), and Marko
Delimar (2013).
• Pre-meetings (OpCom and appointed members) were introduced by Walter E. Proebster when he was
Director in 1981–1982.
• Starting withe the Region 8 Committee meeting in June 1982, an introduction training to new volunteers
is provided prior to the start of the meeting. The first training was done by Robert C. Winton, based on
his loose-leaf binder entitled “A Guide to the IEEE for Members of the Region 8 Committee.”
• Regional Subcommittees were introduced in 1983, to relieve the heavy work load of the Regional
Appointed Members.
• A Region 8 Student Activities Committee new style was established during the 44th Region 8 Committee
meeting in Herzlia, Israel, 24–25 March 1985. The first committee consisted of Dick C.J. Poortvliet, Chair;
André Vander Vorst, Past Chair; A.J.M. (Lex) van Gijsel and Philippe C. Siraut, Region 8 Centennial
Students (!).
• The IEEE Brussels Office was originally created through a decision by the Computer Society in 1986, to
provide a local contact point in Europe for the sale of publications, and to meet the needs of members
in the Region. Other functions included organization at events, information desks at conferences, the
interchange of material with national societies, and new membership applications. In 1991 the office
102
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
9.3 Miscellaneous
activities were widened to include services to all IEEE members, and not only the Computer Society.
(Minutes 1992.1)
From 13 December 1993 the IEEE Brussels office became a full IEEE Operations Center, handling
membership services, customer services, membership development and member queries; and eventually
also deal with membership renewals and conference services. (Minutes 1993.2)
• The 55th IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting was the first one outside Region 8. It was held in Toronto,
Canada, 2–3 October 1990, in conjunction with Sections Congress.
• A Region 8 Section Volunteer Award was established in 1994. First recipients: Terence H. Oxley (1994),
Wieslaw J. Seruga (1995), Frédérique Vallée (1996).
• The first Volunteer Training, prior to the start of the Spring Region 8 Committee meeting, was held in
Dublin in 1995.
• Robert C. Winton was made Region 8 Honorary Member at the Region 8 Committee meeting in Barcelona,
1995.
• Region 8 was the first Region to have a web page, even before IEEE. It was set up in 1995 and was hosted
at Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey, with URL
http://www.ee.bilkent.edu.tr:8080/.
• Region 8 News started a monthly electronic news bulletin in September 1998.
• The first-ever IEEE Executive Committee meeting outside the Americas took place in London, UK, 9 June
1979. The second one took place in Öhringen, Germany, 28 March 1980; the third one in Copenhagen,
Denmark, 18 June 1982.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
103
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
10
History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
Four history papers were presented at HISTELCON 2012 in Pavia, Italy, 5–7 September 2012, which are
reprinted here with permission:
1. Martin J. Bastiaans, “Researching the roots of IEEE Region 8”
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HISTELCON.2012.6487560
8 pages, not numbered.
2. Jean D. Lebel, “Setting up the basis for Region 8”
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HISTELCON.2012.6487569
3 pages, not numbered.
3. Jacob Baal-Schem, “Conferences, technical societies and development – A history of synergy”
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HISTELCON.2012.6487558
3 pages, not numbered.
4. Anthony C. Davies, “. . . Go East, Region 8, Go East . . . ”
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HISTELCON.2012.6487565
6 pages, not numbered.
The papers by Jean D. Lebel and Jacob Baal-Schem as they appear in IEEEXplore are NOT the final versions
that have been submitted to the conference organizers. The two papers that are included in this document are
the actual final versions.
104
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Martin J. Bastiaans: Researching the roots of IEEE Region 8
Researching the Roots of IEEE Region 8
Martin J. Bastiaans, IEEE Region 8 Director-Elect, Past IEEE Benelux Section Chair
Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering,
P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands
Abstract — This paper describes the preliminary steps towards
the foundation and the early history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE
Region 8. The information has been gathered mainly from the
archives of the IEEE Benelux Section.
Index Terms — IEEE History, IEEE Region 8, IRE Region 9.
I. I NTRODUCTION
All indented parts are transcriptions of documents that are
available in the IEEE Benelux Section archives or in some
other locations.
The research in the Benelux Section archives led to the
following important dates with respect to the foundation and
the early years of our Region.
• 14 February 1962 – informal meeting of the InterSectional Committee, Europe – 4 Sections: Benelux,
France, Geneva, Italy
• 6 March 1962 – sending of a petition by the Benelux
Section to the IRE Board of Directors to form a new
Region, with its territory based on the European Broadcasting Area defined in the Radio Regulations of the
International Telecommunication Union; the European
Broadcasting Area includes the Western part of the USSR
and the territories bordering on the Mediterranean; see
Fig. 1
• 24 April 1962 – approval of the new Region by the IRE
Executive Committee; see Fig. 2
• 24 May 1962 – approval of the new Region by the IRE
Board of Directors
• 6 June 1962 – inaugural meeting of the IRE Region 9
Committee – 12 attendees – 6 Sections: Benelux, Egypt
(not present), France, Geneva, Israel, Italy
• 22 October 1962 – second IRE Region 9 Committee
meeting – 7 Sections; new Section: United Kingdom &
Eire
• 8 January 1963 – re-approval by the IEEE Board of
Directors (after the merger of IRE and AIEE): renaming
of IRE Region 9 to IEEE Region 8
• 22 April 1963 – first IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting
– 8 Sections; new Section: Norway
• 1 January 1970 – Greenland was added to Region 8,
and all the countries that were partly in Region 8 (the
USSR and countries in North Africa) are now considered
to belong completely to Region 8; see Fig. 3.
• 1 January 1981 – The rest of Africa was added to
Region 8; see Fig. 4.
II. I NFORMATION TAKEN FROM THE B ENELUX S ECTION
ARCHIVES
The idea for an IRE Region Europe arose at the end of 1959
in the Benelux Section, especially on the initiative of Bruce
B. Barrow,1 at that time the Section’s first Secretary/Treasurer
(till August 1961, but remaining a member of the Section’s
Executive Committee until his returning to the USA in
summer 1962). The idea was actually brought up when Lloyd
V. Berkner, a member of the IRE Board of Directors, attended
the first (!) Benelux Section meeting on 3 October 1959. In
a subsequent letter to Lloyd Berkner dated 4 October 1959,
Bruce Barrow states:
We believe it would be very helpful to us to have
Europe (including Russia) designated as Region 9.
Boundaries might be drawn to include Egypt and
Israel Sections. Such a step would give Europe
a Regional Director, and might accelerate the
formation of other European Sections, with whom
we could effectively cooperate.
However, at that time, the IRE Board of Directors decided that
the time was not yet ripe.
One year later, the idea was brought to the attention of
the IRE President, Ronald L. McFarlan, in a letter by Bruce
Barrow, dated 17 October 1960.
Secondly, I wonder if you would care to bring up the
question of establishing Region 9 with the Board of
Directors. I know that it was discussed about a year
ago, and that the Board decided the time was not
yet ripe. Since you have left here, I have given the
question a good deal of thought, and would like to
argue that the time is now ripe, or at any rate that it
will be by the time the necessary preliminaries are
taken care of.
At the same time, in a letter to Lloyd Berkner, dated
18 October 1960, Bruce Barrow writes:
I am pushing Dr. McFarlan, quite informally, to bring
up once more the question of establishing Region 9
in Europe, so you may hear something of this in one
of your next meetings. My points in favor of such a
move are, briefly, as follows:
1) 1961 would be the year to elect the regional
director of an odd-numbered region. Even if
1 From 1958 till 1961 on leave with SHAPE Air Defence Technical
Center, The Hague, Netherlands, where he was studying improved methods
of transmitting digital data over fading radio paths; see [1, page 2].
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
105
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
the Board moved now, he would not take office
until Jan. 1962.
2) Europe has roughly 1500 IRE members, far
more than Canada had when it was given
regional status.
3) We need a region to promote the orderly development of sections in Europe. Our problems are
not the same as those of other sections.
4) The Region would be appropriate for the
coming united Europe (see editorial).2
5) We need the Educational Committee of a
region.
In his answer of 10 November 1960, Ronald McFarlan
expressed his sympathy with the idea of a ‘European Region’
and promised to discuss the issue with the IRE Executive
Committee.
Support was then sought from the Italy Section (established,
like the Benelux Section, 13 May 1959) by sending a letter
on 28 November 1960, with a positive reply on 22 December
1960, and from the Geneva Section (established 13 December
1960). There was a general feeling not to take any formal step
towards the IRE Executive Committee until a France Section
(established 17 October 1961) would have been formed. Since
this took more time than expected, the Benelux Section sent a
formal petition to the IRE Executive Committee on 3 March
1961, followed by a similar petition from the Italy Section on
16 March 1961 and one from the Geneva Section, as well. The
text of the petition reads as follows:
PETITION
To the Executive Committee of the Institute of Radio
Engineers, Inc.
From the Executive Committee of the Benelux
Section of the IRE:
WHEREAS
• there are at present more than 1500 IRE
members in western Europe, as well as three
active IRE Sections;
• we believe these members and Sections to be
entitled to direct representation by a European
member on the IRE Board of Directors;
• there is an increasing and frequently expressed
desire on the part of the European IRE members
for international meetings and opportunities for
professional contacts;
• there is similarly a desire among members in
several countries to establish new IRE Sections;
• the presence in Europe of a representative of
the IRE Board of Directors would help to
ensure that future expansion of European IRE
activities would be carried out in an orderly
2 Bruce Barrow refers to a guest editorial for the March issue of the
Transactions on Communication Systems, in which he would like to write
on the expansion of the IRE activity in Europe; see [1, page 3].
106
manner, to the benefit of both the IRE members
and the various European radio and electrical
engineering societies;
WE HEREBY PETITION
the Executive Committee of the IRE, in the name of
the Executive Committee of the Benelux Section,
• to go on record as favoring the establishment
without delay of IRE Region 9 in western
Europe;
• to draft the changes in the IRE Bylaws necessary
to effect the establishment of this Region and to
present these changes to the Board of Directors
for action at their meeting in May 1961;
• to fix the composition of a provisional Regional
Committee;
• and to authorize a meeting of this provisional
Regional Committee for April 1961 for the
purpose of nominating one or more candidates
for the office of Regional Delegate-Regional
Director as provided for in the IRE Bylaws, and
of conducting such other business as may seem
desirable.
The Hague, 3 March 1961
H. Rinia, Chairman
The Benelux Section of the IRE
B.B. Barrow, Secretary-Treasurer
The Benelux Section of the IRE
Postbus 174, The Hague, Netherlands
In the mean time, on 4 January 1961, IRE had
formed a special committee (the IRE International Activities Committee) to study the international aspects of the
IRE, which was chaired by IRE’s former president Ronald
L. McFarlan and with Herre Rinia, the first Benelux Section
Chair (until 1962), as one of its members. In March 1961, after
having received the petitions mentioned earlier, this committee
decided to visit various European countries (in particular UK,
France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany,
Switzerland, Italy) at the end of June 1961,
“. . . to find out whether local societies would
welcome such a region and, if so, to try and smooth
over any stumbling blocks and establish cooperation.”
(Quotation taken from a letter by Herre Rinia to Bruce Barrow,
dated 28 March 1961). See also a partial transcript of the letter
of 21 April 1961 by Ronald McFarlan to Bruce Barrow below:
George Bailey’s letter of April 19, 1961 to you
regarding the Executive Committee action on the
petition for the formation of Region 9 in Western
Europe has just come to my attention. Since it
was upon my recommendation that the Executive
Committee deferred action on the petition I owe you
an explanation.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Martin J. Bastiaans: Researching the roots of IEEE Region 8
Starting in London on June 19th the IRE Ad
Hoc Committee for Activities Outside Existing
Regions will visit in sequence England, France, the
Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany,
Switzerland and Italy. This committee comprises, in
addition to myself as Chairman, E. Finley Carter,
John T. Henderson, Herre Rinia and Ernst Weber.
Among the matters to be discussed will be the
formation of new IRE Sections and their areas,
Professional Group activities, relations with the
national societies of these countries, and so forth.
It has been my feeling that formation of Region 9
should await the results of the forthcoming European
discussions of this committee.
...
Let me also say, if I may, that I personally favor
the formation of a Region 9 in Western Europe after
the necessary exploratory work has been accomplished. This is one of the topics that will be high
on the agenda when we meet in June.
Unfortunately, the IRE Executive Committee was not yet
convinced of the desirability of establishing a new Region
before the end of 1961. This was caused by the upcoming
merger between IRE and AIEE, which led the IRE President
Lloyd V. Berkner to the statement in December 1961 “. . . that
this matter should be postponed until the negotiations with
AIEE are completed.” See a partial transcript of the letter of
20 December 1961 by Lloyd Berkner to Bruce Barrow below:
The idea of a quick formation of an IRE Region 9
at this time represents a great many plusses and
minuses. In the balance, it would be my judgement
that this matter should be postponed until the negotiations with AIEE are completed, since I believe it
highly probable that a new society would recognize
the need for Region 9, and it could be organized as
a part of the shift to a new society.
Prior to a meeting of the IRE International Activities
Committee in New York on 27 March 1962, Herre Rinia,
member of that committee, called for an informal meeting
in Geneva on 14 February 1962 of representatives of the
four existing IRE Sections in Europe (Benelux, France,
Geneva and Italy) and some people from countries where
the forming of a Section was foreseen: Germany (established
12 July 1963; invitation sent to Prof. W.J. Kleen, Munich)
and Sweden (established 29 March 1965; invitation sent to
Dr. C.E. Granqvist, Stockholm). One of the motions that came
out of this meeting was that the new region should consist of
all of Greater Europe (and only Greater Europe, thus explicitly
excluding such territories as South America and the Far East),
where Greater Europe is to correspond by definition to the
European Broadcasting Area, defined in the Radio Regulations
of the ITU, 1959 (Article 5, Nos. 126, 131 and 133): bounded
on the West by the Western boundary of Region 1, on the
East by the meridian 40◦ East of Greenwich and on the South
by the parallel 30◦ North so as to include the western part
Figure 1. IEEE Region 8 as defined on 8 January 1963; it was defined
exactly the same as IRE Region 9. The sketch is taken from the document
“Recommendations Regarding IEEE Regions and Districts,” prepared by
Bradley Cozzens, AIEE, and Walter E. Peterson, IRE, revised 11 July 1962 [2].
This document formed the basis for the merger of IRE and AIEE to IEEE.
The boundaries of IRE Region 9 were not changed at the time of the merger:
“IEEE Region VIII consists of IRE Region IX plus AIEE and IRE members
in the area.”
of the USSR and the territories bordering the Mediterranean,
with the exception of the parts of Arabia and Saudi-Arabia
included in this sector. In addition, Iraq is included in the
European Broadcasting Area. See Fig. 1.
A final petition to establish such a region (see below) was
then sent to the IRE Executive Committee by the Benelux
Section on 6 March 1962, and the Sections in France, Geneva
and Italy were asked to do the same.
Board of Directors of the Institute of Radio Engineers
1 East 79 Street
New York 21, N.Y.
U.S.A.
Dear Sirs,
The Executive Committee of the Benelux Section
wishes to ratify the action taken by its representatives at the meeting of the I.R.E. Intersectional
Committee, Europe, held on 14 February 1962 in
Geneva to discuss matters of interest to the European
I.R.E. Sections and to report to the I.R.E. Committee
on International Activities. It, therefore, submits the
following
PETITION.
We, the undersigned, officers and executive
Committee members of the Benelux Section of
the Institute of Radio Engineers, hereby petition
the Board of Directors of the Institute of Radio
Engineers to establish a Region that will compass
the territory of Greater Europe.
Because the purpose of such a Region would be
to provide representation of the European I.R.E.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
107
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
members on the Board of Directors and to coordinate
I.R.E. activities in Europe we request that territories
in the Far East and in South America not be included
in the new Region. We suggest that the territory of
the new Region be based on the European Broadcasting Area defined in the Radio Regulations of the
I.T.U. which area produced a definition of Europe
that has proved practical and that has been internationally agreed to for certain telecommunication
purposes. The European Broadcasting Area includes
the Western part of the U.S.S.R. and the territories
bordering on the Mediterranean.
H. Rinia, Chairman
G.J. Siezen, Secretary-Treasurer
B.B. Barrow
W. Metselaar
H.P. Williams
H.R. van Nauta Lemke
C.B. Broersma
As a result, the IRE Executive Committee approved the new
region, Region 9, on 24 April 1962, and the IRE Board of
Directors gave its final approval on 24 May 1962.
The inaugural meeting took place in Geneva on Wednesday
6 June 1962, with invitations sent to 6 Sections: Benelux,
Egypt (established 8 September 1955), France, Geneva, Israel
(established 5 October 1954) and Italy. The first meeting was
attended by 12 people: H. Rinia, G.J. Siezen, H.P. Williams,
B.B. Barrow (Benelux), J. Lebel (France), J.H. Gayer,
W. Gerber, W. Baumgarten (Geneva),
E.H. Frei (Israel), G.P. Tarchini,
V. Svelto (representing E. Gatti, Italy),
and R.L. McFarlan (IRE Headquarters);
Egypt was not represented. Herre Rinia
(see picture) was elected as Region 9
Director, and he appointed E. Gatti
as Vice Chair and J.H. Gayer as
Secretary/Treasurer. The second meeting, with UK & Eire
as a new Section (established 10 July 1962), took place on
Monday 22 October 1962, again in Geneva.
The next meeting was held on Monday 22 April 1963, being
the first meeting after the merger of IRE and AIEE to IEEE,
and the renaming of IRE Region 9 to IEEE Region 8; during
this meeting, Norway was welcomed as a new Section (established 28 March 1963). The second meeting of Region 8, with
the Federal Republic of Germany as a new Section (established
12 July 1963), was held on Monday 4 November 1963. The
third meeting took place on Monday 27 April 1964, during
which Jean D. Lebel was nominated as the next Region 8
Director (and as such elected later in 1964). The fourth meeting
was held on Monday 26 October 1964. The fifth meeting took
place on Monday 26 April 1965, with Sweden as a new Section
(established 29 March 1965). The sixth meeting was held on
Tuesday 7 September 1965. Note that all these meetings took
place at the ITU (International Telecommunication Union)
Building, Place des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.
108
III. IRE R EGION IN E UROPE – B RUCE B. BARROW
The transcript below is taken from the article “The Benelux
Section and Early IRE/IEEE Activity in Europe” by Jan
Biemond and Bruce B. Barrow, presented at the 2009 IEEE
Conference on the History of Technical Societies, Philadelphia,
PA, 5–7 August 2009. The article is available in IEEEXplore at
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HTS.2009.5337847 [3, Section III].
In 1960 the Executive Committee of the Benelux Section
had already begun to consider the idea of asking the IRE to
establish a formal “region” in Europe. The regional structure
would give the European Sections an opportunity to interact
with each other and, more importantly, would permit the
members in the region to elect a representative to the IRE
Board of Directors. The idea was discussed with senior IRE
officers, and on December 27, 1961, Barrow sent a letter
to Dr. McFarlan, then Chairman of the IRE International
Activities Committee, requesting authorization for himself
to initiate exploratory contacts with other newly founded
European sections and requesting authorization for Mr. Rinia
to convene an inter-sectional meeting to discuss IRE activity in
Europe. Such a meeting was held in Geneva on February 14,
1962, at the headquarters of the International Telecommunications Union. It was attended by representatives of the
Benelux, Geneva, Italy, and France Sections, and an IRE
member from Germany, where formation of a section was
being considered. Following this meeting, on March 6th, the
Benelux section formally petitioned the Board of Directors of
the IRE “to establish a Region that will compass the territory
of Greater Europe” and suggesting “that the territory of the
new Region be based on the European Broadcasting Area
defined in the Radio Regulations of the I.T.U. which area
produced a definition of Europe that has proved practical and
that has been internationally agreed to for certain telecommunication purposes. The European Broadcasting Area includes
the western part of the U.S.S.R. and the territories bordering
on the Mediterranean.” On Rinia’s request, the other Sections
submitted similar petitions.
On May 9,3 1962 the IRE Board of Directors gave formal
approval of Region 9, with boundaries closely following the
recommendations of the sections. Note that inclusion of the
Mediterranean area brought in the sections in Israel and Egypt.
Region 9 was born, and Rinia was appointed its first Director.
It must not be assumed that the expansion of IRE activity
into Europe took place without opposition. Although IRE
members welcomed the new opportunities for sharing information and other professional contact, a number of the
established engineering societies felt threatened. In 1948 a
“Conference of Representatives from the Engineering Societies
of Western Europe and the United States of America” had
been held in London. This conference, which became known
by the acronym EUSEC, was “of the opinion that international
cooperation between professional engineers by direct contact
between recognized national Societies is to be desired.” One
3 This
is apparently an error and should read May 24.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Martin J. Bastiaans: Researching the roots of IEEE Region 8
of their explicit recommendations was, “That the formation by
one Constituent Society of a branch in the territory of another
is undesirable except by mutual agreement.”
The engineering societies of Germany and Denmark, as well
as the IEE in the United Kingdom, all members of EUSEC,
formally expressed displeasure with the expansion of IRE
section activity in Europe. One of the aims of EUSEC was
that “no participating Society will initiate any action within
the country of another without first informing the participating
Society of that country and obtaining its co-operation.”
The IRE, in all its European activities, had sincerely sought
the cooperation of the local societies, but the idea that a
national society could veto the formation of an IRE section
was quite unacceptable, and Rinia had to engage in careful
diplomacy. With the merger pending, the situation was complicated by the fact that, although the IRE was not a participant in
EUSEC, the AIEE was. The Benelux Section objected strongly
to bringing the merged society into EUSEC, and this matter
became one of the agenda items in the merger discussions.
IV. A R EGION ’ S ‘B IRTH C ERTIFICATE ’
Figure 2 shows a copy of a message from Emily Sirjane,
IRE Office manager, to the IRE Board of Directors and Section
and Subsection Officers, which can be considered as a ‘Birth
Certificate’ of IRE Region 9. It is interesting to note that this
‘Birth Certificate’ is at the same time a ‘Birth Certificate’ of
the United Kingdom Section. The second interesting point is
that the IRE Office manager refers to the approval of a new
Region by the IRE Executive Committee (on 24 April 1962)
and not to the approval by the IRE Board of Directors (on 24
May 1962), although the memorandum itself was dated after
the Board has reached its decision. This might lead to the
conclusion that IRE considered 24 April 1962 as the date at
which the new Region was formed.
V. T HE START OF R EGION 8 AND ITS S ECTIONS –
ROBERT C. W INTON
After the merger of the IRE and the AIEE to IEEE on
1 January 1963, the IEEE Board of Directors renamed the
former IRE Region 9 into the new IEEE Region 8 on 8 January
1963. A partial transcript of “The Start of Region 8 and
its Sections” as it appeared in the “Region 8 Centennial
Review” [4] reads as follows:
Region 8 was created when the American Institute of
Electrical Engineers (AIEE) and the Institute of Radio
Engineers (IRE) merged in January 1963 (see the article “Our
First 100 Years” in this Review). However, its seeds were
planted by the IRE which, unlike the AIEE, was a transnational
society with Sections outside the U.S.A.
The IRE initially had seven Regions in the U.S.A., Canada
was Region 8, and there were no Regions in other countries,
although Sections existed. However, on 12 May 1962,4 shortly
before the merger, the IRE created Region 9 consisting of
4 This
is an error; the date should read 24 May 1962.
Figure 2.
IRE Region 9 Birth Certificate.
twelve Sections in other countries, seven of these Sections
being in Europe.5
At the time of the merger it was agreed that the IEEE
should continue the transnational concept. The IRE type of
structure was adopted, but revised: the number of Regions in
the U.S.A. was reduced from seven to six; Canada became
Region 7; Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa became
Region 8 on 8 January 1963, which is therefore the date on
which our Region was founded;6 other parts of the world were
covered by Region 9. The present Regional structure resulted
from later changes: in 1966 South America became Region 9,
with Region 10 covering other parts of the world; finally in
1981 the remainder of Africa became part of Region 8.
5 This is an error; Region 9 was restricted to Greater Europe with six IRE
Sections: Benelux, Egypt, France, Geneva, Italy, Israel. The IRE Sections
Buenos Aires, Chile, Colombia, India, Rio de Janeiro and Tokyo were located
in the ‘Rest of the World,’ i.e., outside Regions 1 through 9. The United
Kingdom Section was not founded yet.
6 This is questionable; it neglects the fact that our Region started as an IRE
Region.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
109
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
VI. IRE/AIEE M ERGER – B RUCE B. BARROW
The transcript below is taken from the article “The Benelux
Section and Early IRE/IEEE Activity in Europe” by Jan
Biemond and Bruce B. Barrow, presented at the 2009 IEEE
Conference on the History of Technical Societies, Philadelphia,
PA, 5–7 August 2009. The article is available in IEEEXplore at
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HTS.2009.5337847 [3, Section IV].
The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
was formed on January 1, 1963, by the merger of the Institute
of Radio Engineers (IRE, founded 1912) and the American
Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE, founded 1884).
Notable Presidents of IEEE and its founding organizations include Elihu Thomson (AIEE, 1889-1890), Alexander
Graham Bell (AIEE, 1891-1892), Charles Proteus Steinmetz
(AIEE, 1901-1902), Lee De Forest (IRE, 1930), Frederick
E. Terman (IRE, 1941), William R. Hewlett (IRE, 1954), and
Ernst Weber (IRE, 1959; IEEE, 1963).
Fundamental characteristics of the merged society were
taken from the IRE, which, unlike the AIEE, was a transnational society with sections outside the USA. At the time of
the merger it was agreed that the IEEE should continue the
transnational concept. The IRE type of structure was adopted,
but revised; the number of Regions in the USA was reduced to
six; Canada became Region 7; Europe, the Middle East, and
North Africa became Region 8. On January 8, 1963, at the
first IEEE Board meeting in New York, Rinia was appointed
first Director of IEEE Region 8 (formerly IRE Region 9).
Since no AIEE sections had existed in Europe, the section
structure of IRE Region 9 was adopted for IEEE Region 8, and
the AIEE members were automatically included in the IEEE
Sections. What follows is a short reflection on the merger, the
international policy of the IEEE and the concerns raised by
European Societies about the organization of IEEE Sections
in European countries.
A. Reflection on the merger
The major interests of the AIEE were wire communications
(telegraph and telephony), machinery, and light and power
systems. The IRE concerned mostly radio engineering, and
was formed from two smaller organizations, the Society of
Wireless and Telegraph Engineers and the Wireless Institute.
With the rise of electronics in the 1930s, electronics engineers
usually became members of the IRE, but the applications
of electron tube technology became so extensive that the
technical boundaries differentiating the IRE and the AIEE
became blurred. After World War II the two organizations
became increasingly competitive. In 1957 the IRE, with 55,500
members, was the larger organization, and it had more appeal
to students and young electrical engineers. Negotiations about
a merger started that year, and in 1961 the leadership of
both the IRE and the AIEE resolved to consolidate the two
organizations. In 1962 the IRE had 96,500 members, and the
AIEE 57,000.
In the summer of 1962, having successfully defended his
dissertation, Barrow returned to the U.S., where he had a small
110
part in the discussions that were taking place as details of
the merger were worked out. The President of the AIEE at
that time was Dr. B. Richard Teare, Dean of the College of
Engineering and Science at Carnegie Institute of Technology
(now Carnegie Mellon University). Teare had been Barrow’s
professor when Barrow was an undergraduate, and the two felt
warm mutual respect.
B. Some diplomacy
Late in September, Barrow traveled to Pittsburgh and had
an opportunity to talk at length with Dr. Teare. Following are
quotes from the letter-report that Barrow sent to Rinia. “The
central topic of our conversation, which lasted some five hours,
was international policy of the IEEE, and we concentrated
specifically on the attitudes that would be brought into the
IEEE from the AIEE. Dr. Teare emphasized that he could
not speak for the AIEE Board, nor for the 14-man committee
that is now implementing the merger. . . . He pointed out that
the non-national character of IEEE is specified in the new
constitution, and he defined ‘non-national’ as meaning that the
activities of the new society would be carried out throughout
the world, wherever IEEE members wanted such activities, and
without regard to national boundaries.”
“Dr. Teare himself has thought a good deal about questions
of international policy, partly because several of the secretaries of EUSEC societies have brought such questions to his
attention. . . . Because of these contacts with the European
societies he was very interested to hear something of our
views.”
“I talked at great length (as usual), and emphasized that
IRE relations with European societies are in general rather
good. I also pointed out that each country, and each society,
had to be considered individually, and I then said what I
could about each individual problem. I pointed out the specific
accord that had been reached with the SFER in France, and
the proposals that had been discussed with . . . the VDE in
Germany. I also told him what I knew of our difficulties and
inhospitable reception in Denmark, and of the obstacles that
certain of the EUSEC societies placed in the way of IRE
Region 9. I emphasized that EUSEC societies were not the
ones that represented the electronics profession in a number
of countries, such as Belgium and France. . . . ”
“The second point – the real point of contention – concerns
the organization of IEEE sections in European countries. . . . I
emphasized that the EUSEC societies interpreted [the EUSEC
Memorandum of Organization] to mean that they had a right to
veto activity by another society in their territory. . . . Dr. Teare
agreed with me . . . that the IEEE must retain the right
to organize sections anywhere in the world, and that IEEE
members who petition in a responsible manner to form such
sections must be able to expect an affirmative response from
the IEEE Board. The IEEE has announced its intention of
operating in the entire world, and it must be willing to support
its members, wherever they live. On this all-important and
fundamental principle, Dr. Teare agrees with us completely.
He is, however, very concerned that every effort be made to
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Martin J. Bastiaans: Researching the roots of IEEE Region 8
conciliate the various national societies, and he very much
wishes to move carefully enough, and tactfully enough, to
avoid open ruptures with the European societies.”
Rinia and other IEEE leaders did indeed move carefully and
tactfully, and relationships with the European societies have
been conciliatory. But the IEEE did not affiliate with EUSEC.
VII. T HE CREATION OF IEEE R EGION 10 AND THE
EXTENSION OF R EGION 8
IEEE Region 8 was formed (as an IEEE Region after
the IRE/AIEE merger) on 8 January 1963. At that time it
comprised Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The
‘Rest of the World’ was all Region 9 at that time, until
in 1966, Region 9 was limited to South America and the
‘Rest of the World’ became Region 10, with Shigeo Shima
as its first Director (1967–68). During its meeting on 13–
14 November 1969, the Board of Directors agreed to change
Bylaw 401.1 such that ‘Region 8 shall consist of Greenland,
Europe, U.S.S.R. and the following countries in North Africa
and the Near East: Aden Protectorate, Algeria, Bahrain, Chad,
Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon,
Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Muscat, Oman, Niger,
Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Spanish Sahara, Sudan, Syria,
Trucial Coast, Tunisia, Turkey, the United Arab Republic, and
Yemen.’ See Fig. 3. Note that ‘United Arab Republic’ was at
that time and until 1971 the official name for Egypt; between
1958 and 1961, it was the name of a union between Egypt and
Syria.
the 22 August 1980 RAB meeting, the motion to recommend
to the Board of Directors adoption of the revision of Bylaw
401.2 passed. In its subsequent meeting of 24–25 August 1980,
Vice President Larry K. Wilson (Regional Activities) moved
for (1) adoption of revised Bylaw 401.2 which would assign
the continent of Africa to Region 8, as recommended by the
Region 8 and 10 Committee and RAB, this boundary change
to become effective January 1, 1981, (2) approval to waive
the 1981 Region 8 assessment for those members involved in
the transfer from Region 10 to Region 8, and (3) approval
to include in the 1981 RAB Budget the funding of travel
expenses of the Nigeria and South Africa Section Chairmen to
attend 1981 Region 8 Committee meetings. The motion passed,
after which Bylaw 401.2 reads: “. . . Region 8 shall consist
of Africa, Europe, Greenland, Iceland, the Union of Soviet
Socialist Republics, and the Near and Middle East countries
located west of Afghanistan and Pakistan. . . . ” See Fig. 4.
Figure 4. IEEE Regions as of 1 January 1981. The sketch is taken from the
IEEE web site.
VIII. T HE PRESENT IEEE R EGION 8 S ECTIONS
The following list of 56 Sections, chronologically sorted by
their foundation date, is taken from the Region 8 web site.
Figure 3. IEEE Regions as of 1 January 1970. The sketch is taken from
IEEE Region 8 newsletter, No. 10, April 1970.
The South Africa Section (established 5 August 1977) and
the Nigeria Section (established 12 January 1978) were part of
IEEE Region 10 till 1981. At the
14 December 1979 meeting of the Regional
Activities Board, Region 8 Director Dick
C.J. Poortvliet (see picture) and Region 10
Director S.Y. King announced that Region 8
will add the continent of Africa to its
territory in 1981 and that a proposal for
revisions in the Bylaws would be presented
at the February meeting. Said proposal was accepted unanimously at the 15 February 1980 RAB meeting, pending acceptance of the concerned sections (South Africa and Nigeria). In
5-Oct-1954
8-Sep-1955
13-May-1959
13-May-1959
13-Dec-1960
17-Oct-1961
10-Jul-1962
28-Mar-1963
12-Jul-1963
29-Mar-1965
16-Apr-1968
18-Aug-1968
12-Feb-1970
17-Mar-1970
21-Jun-1971
21-Jun-1971
21-Jun-1971
1-Dec-1972
12-Jun-1973
Israel
Egypt
Benelux
Italy(a)
Switzerland(b)
France
UK & Rep of Ireland(c)
Norway
Germany(d)
Sweden
Spain
Denmark
Iran
Greece
Croatia(e)
Serbia and Montenegro(e)
Slovenia(e)
Poland
Finland
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
111
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
5-Aug-1977
12-Jan-1978
21-Dec-1979
5-Jun-1981
4-Dec-1981
19-Nov-1982
20-Jun-1987
21-Aug-1987
18-Nov-1988
18-Aug-1989
20-Feb-1990
15-Aug-1990
15-Aug-1990
21-Nov-1991
1-Aug-1992
30-Jun-1993
24-Jun-1995
14-Feb-1997
12-Nov-1999
23-Jun-2000
22-Jun-2001
15-Feb-2002
13-Feb-2003
13-Feb-2003
18-Nov-2004
18-Nov-2004
18-Nov-2004
18-Jun-2005
12-Nov-2005
18-Feb-2006
23-Jun-2006
18-Nov-2006
16-Feb-2008
21-Jun-2008
21-Jun-2008
5-Sep-2008
15-Nov-2008
South Africa(f )
Nigeria(f )
Austria
Saudi Arabia
Portugal
Kenya(g)
United Arab Emirates
Hungary
Western Saudi Arabia(h)
Turkey
Kuwait
Romania
Russia(i)
Ukraine
Czechoslovakia
Cyprus(j)
Bulgaria
Rep of Macedonia(e)
Jordan
Iceland
Bahrain
Belarus
Russia (Northwest)(i)
Russia (Siberia)(i)
Lebanon
Morocco
Qatar
Lithuania
Bosnia and Herzegovina(e)
Oman
Estonia
Malta
Latvia
Iraq
Tunisia
Ghana
Zambia
(a) The Italy Section was split into two Sections, Italy
(North) and Italy (Central & South) in May 1966; until
1988, Italy (Central & South) was called Italy (Middle
& South). The two Sections were merged again in
November 2005.
(b) The Switzerland Section was called Geneva Section until
20 September 1967.
(c) Until 1 November 1966, the UK & Rep of Ireland
Section was called the UK & Eire Section.
(d) Until 17 June 1991, the Germany Section was called the
West Germany Section (until 20 September 1967) and
Germany (West) Section (after 20 September 1967).
(e) The Yugoslavian Section was established on 21 June
1971. Following the wars in Yugoslavia, in 1992 the
Region 8 Director Kurt Richter organized a meeting with
three members of the Yugoslavian Section Executive
Committee in Graz, Austria. It was decided to form by
petitions three new Sections, as three equal successors of
112
(f )
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
the previous Yugoslavian Section: the Slovenia Section,
the Croatia Section, and the Yugoslavia Section, all
established on 1 August 1992. It was a friendly splitting
into three new Sections and in 1996 all three Sections
celebrated their 25th anniversary. In 1997 the Republic
of Macedonia Section was formed. The name Yugoslavia
became an increasing anomaly, and in 2005 it was
renamed the Serbia and Montenegro Section; the Bosnia
and Herzegovina Section was formed later that year.
The South Africa and Nigeria Section were initially
Sections of Region 10. They were assigned to Region 8
on 1 January 1981, when all of Africa was shifted from
Region 10 to Region 8.
The Kenya Section has been called the East Africa
Section for a couple of years, and was renamed Kenya
Section again in August 1990.
The Western Saudi Arabia Section started as the Jeddah
Subsection of the Saudi Arabia Section; formation date
16 February 1987. Until 15 August 1990 it was called
the Jeddah Section.
After the Russia Section (initially: Moscow Section, until
28 February 1993) was formed in 1990, membership
growth was very slow, mainly for economic reasons,
although many Chapters were formed, partly with the
aid of a financial support initiative from some IEEE
Societies, especially from Electron Devices, and who
paid for initial memberships so that Chapter formation
petitions could be created, and there were a number of
IEEE conferences held. However, Chapters in parts of
Russia remote from Moscow sometimes complained of
lack of support from their Section, and after a while
moves to provide some independence for activities in
St. Petersburg and Siberia arose. After some suggestions
to form a Russia Council were abandoned, there was
finally agreement in 1993 to form three Russia Sections,
one to be called ‘Northwest’ and one ‘Siberia’ – while
the original Russia Section retained responsibility for
all other parts of the country. Existing Chapters were
transferred to the newly formed Sections where the
location of their principal activities justified it.
The Cyprus Section started as a Subsection of the Greece
Section; formation date 18 July 1988.
R EFERENCES
[1] Bruce B. Barrow, “International Symposium on Data Transmission” and
“Why in the world in Europe?” IRE Transactions on Communication
Systems, vol. CS-9, no. 1, pp. 1–3, March 1961. The articles are available
in IEEEXplore at http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TCOM.1961.1097659 and
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TCOM.1961.1097648, respectively.
[2] Bradley Cozzens, AIEE, and Walter E. Peterson, IRE, “Recommendations
regarding IEEE Regions and Districts,” 11 July 1962.
[3] Jan Biemond and Bruce B. Barrow, “The Benelux Section and
Early IRE/IEEE Activity in Europe,” in Proceedings of the 2009
IEEE Conference on the History of Technical Societies, Philadelphia,
PA, 5–7 August 2009. The article is available in IEEEXplore at
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HTS.2009.5337847.
[4] Robert C. Winton, “The Start of Region 8 and its Sections,” in Region 8
Centennial Review, issued with the IEEE Region 8 newsletter, no. 65,
‘The first in a series of four centennial issues,’ February 1984.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Jean D. Lebel: Setting up the basis for Region 8
Setting up the Basis for Region 8
Jean D. Lebel, Former IEEE Region 8 Director
I. I NTRODUCTION
What follow are my personal recollections1 (fifty years old
and more) of IRE/IEEE activities to which I participated:
•
•
•
•
The creation of Fairfield IRE Subsection in Connecticut
The creation of IRE Sections in Switzerland and France
The creation of IEEE European Region
My term as IEEE Director (1965–66)
II. B ECOMING S TUDENT MEMBER OF IRE (I NSTITUTE OF
R ADIO E NGINEERS )
In 1949 I was still a student for my diploma of Radio
Engineer at Sup’Elec. I was often going to the library of a
French Corporation in Paris (boulevard de Breteuil). I was
reading the Proceedings of the IRE useful for my studies
(mostly synchronization problems of oscillators).
Hence as soon as I was a graduate
student at Computer Cruft Laboratory
of Harvard University (for my Master
in Applied Physics) and working at
two laboratories of MIT (Acoustic Lab
and Servomechanism Lab) as a student
paid by the MIT Division of Industrial Cooperation, I became around 1952
Student Member of the IRE.
III. A S A PPLIED P HYSICIST AT S CHLUMBERGER
(R IDGEFIELD , C ONNECTICUT )
I went regularly to Boston for NEREM (New England
Regional Electronic Meeting). I met my friends of MIT and
people trying to sell me mostly measuring equipment useful
for my job.
Around 1956 (or 57) I was offered to join the board of
the IRE Connecticut Section as Program Chairman. I invited
Dr. Ronald McFarlan as speaker. We became great friends.
During the next years I was appointed Vice Chairman.
I launched the Connector, a monthly publication of the
IRE Connecticut Section. When I became Chairman of the
Section, Dr. Ronald McFarlan was President-Elect of IRE.
He suggested that I create the Subsection of Fairfield County
within the Connecticut Section. In February 1960 my family
and I returned to Europe.
1 As it often happens, recollection of dates may be wrong; accept my
apologies for that.
Figure 1. At the banquet during a NEREM (New England Regional Electronic
Meeting); may be in 1956.
IV. I N S WITZERLAND AND F RANCE
Arrived in Switzerland in 1960, I contacted members of the
IRE. One of them, John Gayer working at the ITU (International Telecommunication Union in Geneva), was particularly
helpful.
Without any doubt it is Dr. Ronald McFarlan, with whom
I had kept in touch, who encouraged me to create the Swiss
Section of the IRE. With my Swiss friends it was easy to do
it.
That’s when Dr. Ronald McFarlan became President of the
IRE. Knowing that I was a double national of France and
Switzerland, he suggested to me to create a French Section.
The only two top members of IRE who I knew in France were
Aubert (Thomson CSF) and Jean Vieillard (Founder of ISEP,
Institut Supérieur d’Electronique de Paris). I had met them in
Connecticut at the occasion of one of their trips to America.
Immediately they advised me to contact Dr. Georges Goudet.
He and I decided to get together those IRE Members who were
also members of the SFER (Société Française des Electriciens
et Radioélectriciens: i.e., French Society of Electricians and
Radioelectricians).
Dr. Goudet mailed to my chalet in Switzerland the list of
members of the SFER. I did compare it with the directory of
the IRE. If a person belonged to the two (IRE and SFER),
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
113
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
we sent an invitation for a joint meeting with a drink in the
late afternoon. Since I had no more “pied à terre” in Paris,
that was going to take place at my folks apartment, Mr. and
Mrs. Claude Lebel, 46 Rue de Bourgogne, 75007. Over forty
came. An American member named Pernice offered to help
us.
The President of IRE (Dr. Ronald McFarlan) scheduled a
trip to Paris. After our meeting between members of both
Societies, Dr. Goudet and I arranged that Dr. McFarlan meet
with the President of the SFER, Mr. Abadie.
At this meeting the SFER accepted the creation of the
French Section of the IRE. But there was an important
condition: the meetings of the French Section of IRE should
be conducted in English. IRE accepted. The official reason was
that this opened the doors to English-language speakers (but
it also avoided any competition with the SFER).
Goudet thought that Pernice, an IRE member, American,
living in Paris, should be the first President of the French
Section of the IRE. Goudet became President-Elect and I took
the secretariat.
The “French Section of the Institute of Radio Engineers”
was born in 1961 with 300 members.
V. IEEE: I NSTITUTE OF E LECTRICAL AND E LECTRONICS
E NGINEER
The merger of the IRE (Institute of Radio Engineers) and the
AIEE (American Institute of Electrical Engineers) took place
in 1963. It is documented in Ref. [1, Section IV]; see also the
paper by Martin J. Bastiaans, “Researching the Roots of IEEE
Region 8” in these HISTELCON proceedings, Section VI.
VI. C REATION OF THE E UROPEAN R EGION
In 1961 the IRE was organized in 7 Regions (6 for the
U.S.A. and 1 in Canada). In 1962 an IRE member, a good
friend who had moved from Paris to the Netherlands, called
me a little nervous: “John, that merger between AIEE and IRE
may disturb us. We may have problems with our old idea to
have a European Region.” I assured him of the full support of
the “French Section of IRE.”
He and others have then created in 1962 the European
Region – i.e., IRE Region 9 – which is now IEEE Region 8,
see Refs. [1, Section III] and [2], and the aforementioned paper
by Martin J. Bastiaans in these proceedings, Sections III and V.
Meanwhile the “French Section of IRE” changed its name
to “French Section of IEEE.”
Ir. Rinia, of Philips, was elected for two years (1963–1964)
as the first “IEEE Director of Region 8.” He was to represent
IEEE Region 8 on the board of the IEEE.
At his suggestion I applied at the next election of the “IEEE
Region 8 Director.” Elected without difficulty, I began two
years (1965–1966) of very interesting work.
VII. IEEE BOARD MEETINGS IN N EW YORK
There was every three months an IEEE board meeting,
usually in New York. The majority of board members were
not in favour of this European Region.
114
But there were a few board members who felt it was a
unique opportunity for the development of IEEE. On the
board was the former director of the Electrical Engineering
Department of MIT, Dr. Gordon Brown. He had hired me
15 years before as a Staff Member of the MIT Division of
Industrial Cooperation.
VIII. R EGION 8 BOARD MEETINGS
Board meetings of IEEE Region 8 were held once or twice
a year. Usually the premises of ITU (International Telecommunication Union) were made available to us in their Geneva
headquarters. John Gayer and the Swiss Section have been
very helpful in those occasions.
Region 8 covered the territory of the European Broadcasting
Area extending up to Israel and Egypt. Both countries were
represented. I had to use a little tact to have them at the same
table. First I sat them at the two ends of the table. Both of
them were very cooperative and everything went smoothly.
We planned to start new Sections.
IX. V ISIT TO VARIOUS E UROPEAN S ECTIONS
It was compulsory for the Director to visit the various
Sections.
I started with the German Section; Dr. Rhode was
Chairman. The trip to Munich was very interesting, because
I used in my work the laboratory apparatus of Rhode and
Schwartz. Then I moved to northern Sections.
The Norway Section was created thanks to NIT (Norwegian
Institute of Technology). As a private pilot the flight to get
there impressed me: at low altitude we entered a fjord at the
tip of which was the landing field.
Norwegians received me with great kindness. Knowing my
interest in skiing, they had organized a weekend of skiing in
the mountains, a few tens of kilometers from Oslo; the sky
was clear blue.
Jokingly they said that the Swedes had finally decided to drive
on the right hand side of the road. To give the example, on
January 1st the Swede trucks would be the first to drive on
the right hand side of the road, whereas the cars would do it
a few months after.
So I flew after January 1st to Sweden. The Chairman of the
Swedish IEEE Section picked me up at the airport to kindly
offer me a drink at home. On reaching home, he forgot that
all vehicles recently had to drive on the right hand side. We
both were scared.
Stockholm impressed me with its granite buildings.
Uppsala University gave me the opportunity to talk about the
IEEE and its publications.
Denmark was the most crushing defeat of my visits: there
was no Section. All my efforts to get them to start one ran into
opposition from the president of some local business. Only a
few years later, after his death, one of my successors managed
to create a Danish Section of the IEEE.
In Italy there was a Section of the Po Plain. So I went to
Rome to support those who wanted a Section for the south of
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Jean D. Lebel: Setting up the basis for Region 8
Italy: it is mostly students who campaigned for the successful
creation soon after my trip.
Spain was still under Franco’s regime, which prohibited the
creation of groups such as a Section of the IEEE. In Barcelona
there were IEEE members, Students who met for conferences,
under the pretext of classes. I did encourage them in that way.
They told me to go to Madrid to see what was happening at the
Telecommunications School. Of course there was no Section.
But Hewlett-Packard had sent a huge amount of equipment. It
was stored in a basement, completely unused.
Israel, as I explained above, was part of Region 8. For my
trip there, I took my two passports: the Swiss and the French.
So I could go to an Arab country with one and to Israel with
the other. I did not have to do it.
In Jerusalem the Chairman of the Section (he created an
electronics company) offered me a stay in a hotel, 100%
Jewish. As a Christian, I felt alone in the dining room. I then
realized what it is like to be alone of its kind.
The next day, always alone, early in the morning I went out
in Jerusalem. To use my Jerusalem map which had Hebrew
characters, I compared them with the Hebrew signs of street
names.
Driving towards the Dead Sea, I went near Beer Shiva.
I stopped along fences preventing access probably to a nuclear
site. No photographs!
On the evening of the same day, the Israel IEEE Section
wanted me to see a show (in Tel Aviv). To cut the crowd I had
to be very close behind a horse. The show was a reproduction
of the recent six-day war: deafening gun fire, caterpillars of
tanks materialized by men; in short, the big show for the IEEE
Director!
I went to Turkey (American University of Ankara) where I
met with students.
X. W ELCOME TO IEEE P RESIDENTS TRAVELING TO
E UROPE
When a President of the IEEE was traveling to Europe, I had
to take care of him.
I took President Dr. Barney Oliver and his wife to the
Aiguille du Midi (3’778 m) by cable car from Chamonix. From
there we went, by another cable car, through the Glacier du
Géant. During stops we could admire beautiful crevasses and
seracs (huge blocks of ice). There was a restaurant below the
arrival in Italy at point Heilbronner (3’466 m). After lunch,
Dr. Barney Oliver suffered from lack of oxygen going up the
stairs from the restaurant.
When prominent IEEE members were traveling to
Switzerland, I flew them with a Pilatus Porter piloted by
Hermann Geiger. We landed on glaciers between 3’000 and
4’000 m.
Figure 2. Three IEEE VIPs – in front of the airplane – and myself; probably
taken in 1965.
XI. S TUDENT CONTEST
With Professor Jespers at the University of Louvain we
created the European Student Contest.
Branches of Students from various universities were born
soon after the creation of Region 8 (Europe).
Students in each branch were competing to choose a candidate
for their country: he would be sent to the European Student
Contest. The winners met for a day in a university organizing
the contest. It was a good opportunity for students from various
Sections of the IEEE to meet others. The winner of Region 8
competed with the winners of seven other Regions, another
intellectual enrichment.
After the end of my term as Director of Region 8, I have
not done much in this area.
XII. G ENTLEMEN ’ S AGREEMENT WITH THE E NGLISH
S ECTION
My successor Bob Williams (of the English section) realized
that the Director could always come from the English Section
which had a majority of votes. We concluded a gentlemen’s
agreement: this Section would not present a candidate in every
election.
R EFERENCES
[1] Jan Biemond and Bruce B. Barrow, “The Benelux Section and
Early IRE/IEEE Activity in Europe,” in Proceedings of the 2009
IEEE Conference on the History of Technical Societies, Philadelphia,
PA, 5–7 August 2009. The article is available in IEEEXplore at
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HTS.2009.5337847.
[2] Robert C. Winton, “The Start of Region 8 and its Sections,” in Region 8
Centennial Review, issued with the IEEE Region 8 newsletter, no. 65,
‘The first in a series of four centennial issues,’ February 1984.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
115
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
Conferences, Technical Societies and Development
– A History of Synergy
Dr. Jacob Baal-Schem, IEEE SLM
Tel-Aviv University, Israel
Abstract — This paper is about IEEE Region 8 Conferences,
their raison d’être and their impact on the development of Electrotechnology in Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA), which
constitute the geographical area of the Region.
The claim is that technology conferences, held by ‘learned
societies’ in different parts of Region 8, were necessary for the
technological development of the Region, in order to highlight
and discuss the problems with which technology world is coping.
In order to set up these conferences, technology experts needed
technical societies, such as IEEE, to enable – among other
activities – this facility. On the other hand, the holding of these
Conferences contributed to the technological development of the
Region and to the contact between scientists and engineers, for
the benefit of Humanity.
Thereby, IEEE Region 8 and the series of EUROCON,
MELECON, AFRICON etc. conferences had a synergetic effect
on the technological development of EMEA during the last 50
years (1960–2010). In a business application, synergy means that
teamwork will produce an overall better result than if each person
within the group were working toward the same goal individually
and it is claimed that by creating the awareness about the latest
inventions, issues and concerns of technology among technologists,
IEEE Conferences, organized by Region 8 Operating units, have
largely contributed to the technological development of EMEA
in the fields related to IEEE activities.
Index Terms — Conferences, IEEE, Technology-transfer,
Region 8.
I. I NTRODUCTION
Edison was one of a small group of men who responded to
Nathaniel S. Keith’s call for a New York meeting to organize a
society of electrical professionals to represent the United States
to foreign dignitaries who would be attending the International
Electrical Exposition the Franklin Institute was hosting in
Philadelphia that fall. They met in New York on May 13, 1884
and established the American Institute of Electrical Engineers.
The men were a cross section of the electrical experts of
the era. The first AIEE president, Norvin Green, was the
president of Western Union; the six vice presidents included
Thomas Edison, telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell,
MIT physics professor Charles Cross, two veteran telegraphers,
and an employee of equipment manufacturer Western Electric.
That fall, the new AIEE held its first technical meeting in
Philadelphia. Six papers were presented, and then published
as the first issue of the new society’s journal, the Transactions
of the AIEE.
By 1912, Radio engineering was a young profession, with
radio telegraph stations connecting ships at sea. A small group
of men representing local societies in New York and Boston
met in New York in May 1912, and led by Robert Marriott,
Alfred Goldsmith, and John V.L Hogan, formed the Institute of
116
Radio Engineers. Marriott became the first IRE president. To
a large extent, they modeled their Institute on the AIEE, with
membership grades, a journal, local sections, standards activities, and technical meetings, but there were other influences
as well. They established their journal, the Proceedings of the
IRE, along the lines of scientific journals, with papers directly
submitted and peer review, which allowed for faster publication
than AIEE’s policy that papers be presented at meetings first.
They deliberately did not include ‘American’ in their name, to
signify the transnational nature of radio. Therefore, as years
passed, new IRE sections were set up, first in the American
continent and later in the Eastern Hemisphere, beginning with
the Israel IRE Section, set up in 1954.
In 1963, AIEE and IRE merged into IEEE. As IRE had at
that time several Sections in the Eastern Hemisphere, Region 8
was founded as part of IEEE to cover Europe and the Middle
East. A few years later, Africa was included into Region 8
borders.
II. EUROCON
One of the first goals of the IEEE Region 8 Committee
was to organize technical Conferences, similar to the events
held in the US. This could be done only in cooperation
with European National Societies. As reported by Dr. Fritz
Eggiman, IEEE Chair of the First European Conference, they
successfully got the support from 13 national engineering
associations within Europe, who became ‘supporting Societies’
of EUROCON. This became the basis for the founding in
1972 of a Convention of National Societies of Electrical
Engineers of Europe (EUREL) as a non-profit organization,
as the official partner of IEEE Region 8 in organizing the
following EUROCONs. EUREL represents nowadays Member
Associations of 9 Countries in Greater Europe. Among
EUREL’s Missions, the first one was “To facilitate exchange
of information and foster a wider dissemination of scientific, technical and other information relevant to Electrical
Engineering between Members and other interested bodies.”
The first joined activity of IEEE Region 8 and the European
national associations was to hold EUROCON 1971, the first
European Conference on Electrotechnology, at the Palais
de Beaulieu, Lausanne, Switzerland, 18–22 October 1971.
Following EUROCON Conferences were held by agreement
between IEEE Region 8 and EUREL.
Enormous technological progress was made during the
second world war. The English developed radar which would
be the forerunner of television. Progress in electronics and
computers, made during the war, provided a foundation
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Jacob Baal-Schem: Conferences, technical societies and development – A history of synergy
for further development that fundamentally transformed the
postwar world. All these tremendous developments needed a
scene for presentation to the young engineers and EUROCON
aimed to become the venue.
The subjects of EUROCON 1971 sessions included:
• Automatic timers
• Biomedical engineering
• Telecommunication
• Electric power distribution
• Electronic data processing
• Integrated circuits
The major objectives set by the convention steering
committee – as published in IEEE Spectrum of October 1970 –
were as follows: “EUROCON ’71 will provide specialist
conferences in selected areas, as well as general reviews
and discussions on the state of the art and interactions of
technologies. The conference intends to present an educational
program of in-depth treatment of advanced technologies.”
EUROCON 1971 was followed by EUROCON 1974 in
Amsterdam, and by EUROCON 1977 in Venice, where a
Special session was devoted to Communications in developing
countries, which was considered to be an important item not
only for these countries but for the future of the whole world.
Table I
T HE FIRST SERIES OF EUROCON C ONFERENCES
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
1971
1974
1977
1980
1982
1984
1986
1988
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Lausanne, Switzerland, 18–22 October
Amsterdam, Netherlands, 22–26 April
Venice, Italy, 3–6 May
Stuttgart, Germany, 24–28 March
Copenhagen, Denmark, 14–18 June
Brighton, UK, 26–28 September
Paris, France, 21–23 April
Stockholm, Sweden, 13–17 June
Electrotechnology Conference. The first edition, held in TelAviv, in presence of Israel’s President and the IEEE President
had over 1200 attendees and was followed by MELECON
1983 in Athens, MELECON 1985 in Madrid, and so on.
Table II
T HE SERIES OF MELECON C ONFERENCES
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
MELECON
1981
1983
1985
1987
1989
1991
1994
1996
1998
2000
2002
2004
2006
2008
2010
2012
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Tel-Aviv, Israel, 24–28 May
Athens, Greece,24–26 May
Madrid, Spain, 8–10 October
Rome, Italy, 24–26 March
Lisbon, Portugal, 11–13 April
Ljubljana, Yugoslavia, 22–24 May
Antalya, Turkey, 12–14 April
Bari, Italy, 13–16 May
Tel-Aviv, Israel, 18–20 May
Limassol, Cyprus, 29–31 May
Cairo, Egypt, 7–9 May
Dubvrovnik, Croatia, 12–15 May
Benalmádena (Málaga), Spain, 16–19 May
Ajaccio, Corsica, France, 5–7 May
Valletta, Malta, 25–28 April
Yasmine Hammamet, Tunisia, 25–28 March
IV. AFRICON
As Electrotechnology begun developing in Africa, an IEEE
Kenya Section was formed and the first AFRICON Conference
was held in Nairobi in 1983, to be followed by AFRICON
Conferences in Ivory Coast, Swaziland, South Africa etc. A
major problem encountered in these conferences was that
Africa was losing some of its best scientific and technical
expertise to other regions of the world as many scientists and
technician are joining the ‘brain drain’ and are leaving the
continent to work abroad. This was the reason that after the
first AFRICONs, this series of conferences continued mainly
in South Africa for some years.
Table III
T HE SERIES OF AFRICON C ONFERENCES
EUROCON 1990 was replaced by CompEuro ’90, and
EUROCON 1992, scheduled to be held in Zurich, Switzerland,
18–21 May, was canceled.
EUROCON Conferences actually fulfilled their aim “To
provide an environment conductive to the informal interaction
of engineers, scientists and technical management people.
They will be able to make professional contacts and follow
them up by attending successive conventions.”
The organizers of EUROCON 1977 already realized the
effect of the growth of communications in developing
countries, mainly meaning African countries, and a full day
of presentations and round-table discussions was devoted to
the techno-economic problems and needs for the development
of communications in these countries.
The partnership between IEEE Region 8 and EUREL was
discontinued in 1988 and the parties agreed that Region 8 can
continue to use the EUROCON brand for its meetings.
A new wave of demand for technological know-how arrived
with the fall of the Berlin wall in November 1989 and the
formation of a series of post-Soviet countries. The EUROCON
series, which had already ‘achieved’ its task of supporting
Western Europe, found here a new challenge.
III. MELECON
Table IV
T HE SECOND SERIES OF EUROCON C ONFERENCES
While Central Europe profited from the interaction provided
by these Conferences and developed technologically, a new
geographical area started blossoming technologically: the
Mediterranean Countries. This was the moment when the
IEEE Israel Section initiated MELECON, the Mediterranean
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
AFRICON
AFRICON
AFRICON
AFRICON
AFRICON
AFRICON
AFRICON
AFRICON
AFRICON
AFRICON
1983
1987
1992
1996
1999
2002
2004
2007
2009
2011
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Nairobi, Kenya, 7–9 December
Abidjan, Ivory Coast, 30 November – 2 December
Mbabane, Swaziland, 22–24 September
Stellenbosch, South Africa, 24–27 September
Cape Town, South Africa, 28 September – 1 October
George, South Africa, 2–4 October
Gaborone, Botswana, 15–17 September
Windhoek, Namibia, 26–28 September
Nairobi, Kenya, 23–25 September
Livingstone, Zambia, 13–15 September
V. EUROCON IN E ASTERN C OUNTRIES
9
10
11
12
13
14
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
EUROCON
2001
2003
2005
2007
2009
2011
–
–
–
–
–
–
Bratislava, Slovakia, 5–7 July
Ljubljana, Slovenia, 22–24 September
Belgrade, Serbia, 21–24 November
Warsaw, Poland, 9–12 September
St. Petersburg, Russia, 18–23 May
Lisbon, Portugal, 27–29 April
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
117
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
VI. I MPACTS ON T ECHNOLOGICAL D EVELOPMENT
Impacts of EUROCON
The years 1945–1975 reflect, mainly in Western Europe,
Postwar Growth and National Economic Reconstruction.
Europe saw many changes in the immediate post-war period.
In part, these changes were brought about by a prosperity that
was largely the result of a stable world order in which major
investments took place to rebuild national economies damaged
by war. In many European countries – and France is certainly
no exception here – there was an unbroken period of economic
prosperity and rising standards of living, which lasted until the
1970s. In France, the name given to this period of growth,
prosperity and abrupt social change was les trentes glorieuses,
that is to say, the thirty glorious years between 1945 and 1975,
or more accurately, between the liberation of France in 1944
until the economic downturn triggered by the oil crisis (crise
pétrolière) of 1973.
Impacts of MELECON
Founded as a State in 1948, Israel had already the Hebrew
University as well as the Technion – Israel Institute of
Technology – were studies began in 1924. The Weizmann
Institute of Science, established in 1934, built the first modern
electronic computer in the Middle-East – the WEIZAC –
during 1954–1955. These were the years when Israeli
Engineers needed the contact with worldwide technological
know-how and founded the first Section of the IRE. During the
1970s and the 1980s, Israel began developing the infrastructure
needed for research and development, and this was one of
the triggers for the initiation of the MELECON series of
Conferences.
Impacts of Eastern Countries EUROCONS
In the days before the fall of the ‘Iron Curtain,’ IEEE
activity in Eastern and Central Europe Countries was limited.
There was a Poland Section, formed in 1972 and occasional
IEEE related Conferences had taken place there. The Hungary
Section was formed in 1987 and the Region 8 Committee held
a meeting in Budapest in April 1989. After the fall of the
Berlin Wall, there was a rapid development of IEEE activity
and formation of new Sections. The IEEE Russia Section
was formed in 1990, and the formation of a Communication
Society Chapter followed, but membership growth was slow.
Between 1990 and 1992, six new IEEE Sections were formed
in Eastern Europe countries, and each, in turn, formed several
Society Chapters. These Sections and Chapters sponsored the
holding of the ‘revived’ EUROCON Conferences in Eastern
Europe countries. As the economic and technological activities
developed in these countries, IEEE membership grew and
several Region 8 Committee meetings were held in Eastern
Europe countries.
The demand for new Conferences
Similar trends are felt since the beginning of the 21th
Century on the edges of the Region 8 area. SIBIRCON
was first held in 2008 in Novosibirsk, Russia, 21–25 July,
118
followed by Irkutsk Listvyanka, Russia, 11–15 July 2010.
ENERGYCON was initiated in 2010 by the IEEE Saudi Arabia
Section; the first one took place in Manama, Bahrain, 18–
22 December, and the second one in Florence, Italy, 9–12
September 2012.
VII. T HE S YNERGY PATTERN
We can therefore draw a pattern of synergy between
Technology, Learned Societies and Conferences:
• The influx of technology into a geographical area is based
on the work of a group of scientists and engineers.
• In order to facilitate technological activities, this group
forms a National Society, and in many cases a Section of
a Transnational body such as IRE and later IEEE.
• The demand for an interchange of ideas between scientists
and engineers from different Sections is followed by the
organization of a Technical Conference.
• The participation in Technical Conferences enriches the
base of knowledge of the members of the audience and
contributes to an additional technological development of
the area.
This pattern worked well on broad based Regional Conferences, while a trial to set-up a specialized conference like
CompEuro – a joint series of Conferences organized by Region
8 and the IEEE Computer Society – did not survive its seventh
yearly edition (1987–1993).
VIII. C ONCLUSIONS
One can therefore conclude that:
• The first broad conferences in an area foster the technological development of this area, by enabling contacts
between Scientists and Technologists of the Region as
well as contacts with Prominent Scientists from other
parts of the world.
• As time goes by, specialists are migrating to ‘specialists
conferences,’ which usually are organized by Societies
(while broad conferences are organized by Sections and
Regions).
• At this stage, the Regional Conference remains a place
for making the first contact and exchanging ideas, mainly
for the young newcomers to technology.
Dr. Jacob Baal-Schem received the degrees of Bachelor of Electrical
Engineering (1959), Master in EE (1966) and Doctor of Science in Industrial
Management (1979) from the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology. After
going through the ranks of Israel Defense Forces, he served as Head of
the Technical Division of Israel Signal Corps (1973–1975) and Head of
Electronics Division of Israel Defense R&D (1975–1977). He retired as
Colonel, to join the Interdisciplinary Center for Technological Analysis and
Forecasting at Tel-Aviv University (1978–1992). From 1992 to 1997 he
was Head of the Interactive Telecommunications Program at the School of
Communications of the College of Management and Senior Lecturer at TelAviv University. He is Senior Life Member of IEEE, Member of World Future
Society, and received the IEEE Centennial Medal in 1984. In 1987 he received
the Larry K. Wilson Transnational Award for Initiation of the MELECON
Conferences. In 2000 he received the IEEE Third Millennium Medal. He
received the IEEE Region 8 Volunteer award for 2010. He enjoys Classical
Music and Traveling.
Dr. Baal-Schem was Chair of the IEEE Israel Section (1977–1981), Region
Conference Coordinator (1981–1993) and member of the IEEE Meetings
Committee (1993–2001). He is presently the Chair of the Israel Section Life
Members Group and a member of the IEEE History Committee. He initiated
the HISTELCON Conferences and co-chaired HISTELCON 2008.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Anthony C. Davies: . . . Go East, Region 8, Go East . . .
“…. Go East, Region 8, Go East …”
Anthony C Davies
Visiting Professor, Kingston University, Penrhyn Rd, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, KT1 2EE, UK and
Emeritus Professor, King’s College London, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS, UK
Abstract — The development of IEEE activity and formation of
new Sections and Chapters in Central and Eastern Europe
following the fall of the “Iron Curtain” and the dismantling of
the Berlin Wall is outlined, from the personal perspective and
experiences of the author .
Index Terms — IEEE History, IEEE Region development, IEEE
Membership.
I.
REGION 8 ACTIVITY IN EASTERN EUROPE
Of course, Region 8 (R8) did not literally expand its
boundaries after the dismantling of the Berlin Wall and the fall
of the “Iron Curtain”, and neither John Soule nor Horace
Greeley were around to rephrase their alleged quotation “Go
West, Young Man” [1]. However, the reality was a very large
increase in Chapters, Sections and active IEEE volunteer
members, including students, in the countries of Central and
Eastern Europe over the period from 1990 to 2008. IEEE
membership numbers there have not increased to the same
extent, which is especially notable in the former Soviet Union
even in locations where there are very large numbers of
engineers and scientists.
In what follows, ‘Eastern Europe’ is used to describe all
countries in the Eastern part of R8 which had Communist
governments, including the Soviet Union and the somewhat
independent ones, such as Romania and Yugoslavia.
II.
MY QUALIFICATIONS TO DESCRIBE THE EXPANSION
After many years of varied activities as an IEEE volunteer, I
became involved in the following positions:
R8 Circuits and Systems Chapter Coordinator and
Chapter Coordination Subcommittee Chair
R8 Vice President of Circuits and Systems Society
R8 Vice President, Technical Activities
R8 Director
as well as membership of the IEEE Transnational Committee
(including being its Chair).
I had been involved with
conference organization and chapter activities for some years,
but my first experience of the R8 Committee was in
Eindhoven, in Spring 1978. I was invited to be a member of a
student paper judging panel in Eindhoven, so could attend as
an observer. The R8 Committee was small enough to easily
fit around the table in the Philips Company Boardroom, and
the friendship and cooperation between the Section Chairs of
many nationalities (including Poland and Israel), left a
permanent and favourable impression upon me.
At that time, the R8 Sections were mostly in North-Western
Europe and activities were predominantly ‘managed’ from the
UK (for example, for many years, the Secretary, the Editor of
R8 News and several other senior officers were from the UK,
and held positions that were, in effect, not subject to regular
election processes).
New Bylaws adopted in 1997 provided a structure of elected
officers with generally well-defined procedures for
nominations and elections, in a pattern and structure which is
very similar today.
III.
ACADEMIC LINKS BETWEEN EAST AND WEST
A. Before the fall of the “iron curtai”
Because ‘Western’ journals were generally not available in
the ‘East’, it was usual for authors to receive reprint-request
cards from researchers and academics in the ‘Eastern’
countries, and by receiving these, from the mid 1960s, I
gained some familiarity with major universities, research
institutes and some of their members in such countries.
In 1971, I had a big involvement in planning an IEEE
international conference in London, which not only gave me
long-lasting personal links with many people working in my
research-field, but also brought me into contact with a large
contingent from Hungary among the delegates. Hardly any
others came from Eastern Europe. However shortly after, I
made my first visit to Eastern Europe, to a Summer School at
Talé in the east of Czechoslovakia, and there I met many
participants from various of the Eastern European countries,
including Russia, who were generally not allowed to visit
Western Europe.
These provided me with many personal contacts among
academics in Eastern Europe, which were strengthened by the
practice of The British Council to fund exchange-visits
between UK universities and universities and research
institutes in Eastern European countries. As a visiting
academic, and not a salesman, diplomat or spy, I could easily
meet the families of academics, form friendships, better
understand their situation and bypass some of the ‘formalities’
imposed by politics.
Photocopiers were generally not available in the ‘East’ or
were under the strict control of the ‘state’ – so the possession
of photocopies of official documents tended to confer greater
status and respect on a visitor than possession of the originals.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
119
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
From 1979, I made several visits to Hungary.
Among my ‘connections’ was one with the Dresden
Technical University, which had a formal agreement for
cooperation with the City University in London which
involved short exchange-visits of academics in each direction.
There was no IEEE involvement in this, but I saw that once
the end of the GDR (East Germany) occurred and its extreme
travel restrictions had ended, there was good scope for starting
IEEE Chapter activities and IEEE events in the area.
B. After the fall of the”iron curtain”
My links with various academics in Eastern European
countries (particularly at Dresden Technical University,
Kaunas Technical University and Budapest Technical
University) led me to expect that from 1990, there would be
many more ‘exchanges’ of academics and graduate students
and post-doctoral workers, to be a welcome addition to
research teams in UK universities. In reality, there were fewer
such visits than I expected, partly because of the relatively
high cost of living in the UK.
At an early stage, the European Commission provided funds
to enable universities in EU countries to form partnerships
with universities in Eastern Europe, with the aim of providing
curriculum updating and the provision of improved modern
laboratory equipment and facilities (the TEMPUS programme:
“Trans-European
Mobility
Scheme
for
University
Studies”[2]).
Although interesting for the academics
involved, this was not very attractive to the ‘managements’ of
UK universities, because the overheads provided with these
grants was very small, the paperwork was very labour
intensive, and at the same time, UK universities were under
new and strong financial pressures to maximize their incomes,
reduce their costs and operate in a more ‘commercial’ way.
However, for the projects which were accepted, this
provided (for the electrical, electronic and computer fields) a
good opportunity to promote and encourage IEEE activities in
Eastern Europe universities.
Prior to all this, there was a ‘tradition’ of annual joint
workshops (in the electrical circuit theory field) between the
Budapest Technical University, the Czech Technical
University (in Prague) and the Warsaw Polytechnic.
Because of my familiarity with some academics involved in
the organization of these workshops, I felt that there was an
excellent basis for applying for a TEMPUS project involving
all three institutions (with Delft University of Technology and
King’s College London as the ‘Western’ partners). We
worked on the proposal documents during the 1991 PolishCzech-Hungarian workshop on Circuit Theory at Göd, near
Budapest.
Unfortunately this attempt was not successful: we had failed
to appreciate that success required approval of the ‘Eastern
countries’ national TEMPUS offices as well as the European
Commission, e.g. success required approval by authorities in
Hungary AND Czechoslovakia AND Poland AND Brussels.
It is clear that getting approval by all of four agencies is
120
difficult and not as easy as for only two. Having learned this,
we submitted a new proposal involving only Warsaw (with
Delft and London) and this was successful.
However the added personal links established did enable me
(and others) to make ‘IEEE connections’ with events and
people in all of the above countries, and I think helped to ease
the spread of IEEE Chapters, and the IEEE financial and
publicity support for conferences and workshops. Particularly
that was the case with the Circuits and Systems (CAS) Society
subject area, because at that time, the Society had ample (and
growing) reserves and being R8 CAS Vice President helped
me to get approval to support various events in Eastern
Europe.
This included the Technical University Iaşi, in Northeastern Romania, where a CAS Chapter and a CAS student
branch were formed and an annual international symposium
‘SCS’ (Signals Circuits and Systems) was supported.
Figure 1.
Proceedings of SCS Symposium
At the same time, good links with the Polytechnic
University of Bucharest arose, and of particular note is the
remarkable success which their students have had in the
worldwide IEEE Computer Society International Design
Competition (CSIDC). Their student team came first in 2002,
second in 2003 and 2004, and third in 2005 and 2006.
The SCS symposium continues, with the 10th held at Iaşi in
June 2011, still organized by the Faculty of Electronics,
Telecommunications and Information Technology of the
Technical University Iaşi, the IEEE Romania Section & CAS
Chapter, in cooperation with the IEEE CAS Society. The two
co-chairs are one from Iaşi and one from California.
What I believe to have been the first IEEE event in the
territory of the former GDR (East Germany) was run jointly
by the UKRI CAS Chapter and Dresden Technical University.
This was a two-day international workshop, Non-linear
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Anthony C. Davies: . . . Go East, Region 8, Go East . . .
Dynamics of Electronic Systems (NDES) in summer 1993,
arising directly from my joint research activities with a
‘Chaos’ group at Dresden. It was held in Schloß Eckberg, a
magnificent location high above the River Elbe, a place which
would surely be unaffordable now. We expected it to be a
‘once only’ event, but in reality, it has continued on an annual
basis ever since, moving around the world, to Kraków in
1994, Dublin in 1995, Sevilla in 1996, Moscow in 1997,
Budapest in 1998 and, after many other venues, eventually
returning to Dresden in 2010.
The ‘rules’ of IEEE as promulgated from Piscataway do not
like Sections or Chapters arranging events outside their
geographical boundaries, and this is one example of the
inappropriateness of such rules for R8, being just one of many
international events in R8 outside the UKRI Section which
were initiated within the UKRI Section by its IEEE Chapters.
Figure 2.
Proceedings of NDES’93
IV.
IEEE IN THE EAST BEFORE 1990
The Poland Section was established in 1972, and the Poland
Section Chair was able to attend meetings of the R8
Committee.
Currencies of the Eastern Europe countries were not
generally exchangeable for US dollars or any of the Western
European currencies, and where conversion was allowed, it
was at artificially designated exchange rates, sometimes
dependent upon the class of transaction. For example,
between British Pounds and Czechoslovak Crowns, there were
two distinct rates in 1971 – one for commercial transactions at
about 1:19 and one for tourist and personal visits at about
1:38. Conference visits could be in a not-well-defined
category, which could result in uncertainties over which to
use. Commonly Western currencies could be taken into these
countries without restriction, but had to be immediately
changed to local currency, which could not be converted back
again.
Even between the Eastern European countries the
movement of their own currencies was not allowed – for
example, when travelling between Czechoslovakia and East
Germany, it was forbidden to carry any of their currency
across the border in either direction – even though it was
commonly done. While this may seem extraordinary now, it
should be remembered that such restrictions were not only in
the Communist countries. For example, until 1974, British
citizens who made trips abroad could normally take only a
strictly limited amount of foreign currency with them, and
were supposed to convert back to sterling any that they
brought back unused. It was also forbidden for them to open
or maintain foreign currency bank accounts abroad unless
there were approved business reasons for doing so.
In the case of Yugoslavia, IEEE operated a blockedcurrency account: membership dues could not be transferred
to USA, but an arrangement was made to keep the funds in
Yugoslavia. This money was then used for IEEE visitors to
the country – for example to attend conferences, in which case
the registration and hotel costs were paid from the blocked
currency account. One R8 Committee meeting was held in
Dubrovnik (in autumn 1974) to use some of the money in this
account. Internal transfers within IEEE could then be used to
‘balance’ the external accounting. The net effect, of course,
was to bypass the blocking of financial transfers out of
Yugoslavia, to the benefit of all concerned.
The Hungary Section was formed in 1987, and the R8
Committee held a meeting in Budapest in April 1989.
However, this reflected the impending political changes and
the process of liberalization which was already under way in
Hungary, and should be regarded as part of the developments
leading to the dismantling of the Berlin Wall. Notable events
of late 1989 included the opening of the Hungarian border
with Austria to East Germans wishing to travel to Western
countries, which rendered the Wall ineffective.
Although the Romania Section was not formed until 1990, it
had the status of a ‘Section in Development’ for some years
before that, during difficult times, and was visited by the R8
Director of the time, Basil Osborne’ in the mid 1980s, to try to
provide assistance.
V.
FIRST STEPS AFTER THE CURTAIN FELL
There was a campaign of the UKRI Section to supply
surplus IEEE Journals to needy universities in Eastern Europe
– for which there were successes and failures. It was not
difficult to collect large donations of unwanted journals, but
shipping them to a destination in Eastern Europe was another
matter! The cost was very high, and there was no assurance
that they would reach their destination. It is known that some
of the journals were successfully received, but in a number of
cases (for example, going to Albania) there is no information
of them ever being received. IEEE members taking a few
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
121
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
copies to conferences and giving them away was successful
but of course could have only limited impact.
A major and lasting success was an initiative primarily from
the IEEE Electron Devices Society to establish Chapters in the
Eastern European countries by paying the membership dues of
a sufficient number of people to enable a Chapter formation
petition to be signed and submitted. This practice of
subsidizing membership spread particularly among the
Societies of IEEE Divisions I and IV. It was associated with a
sequence of Region 8 Chapter Chair meetings, to which the
Chairs of these new Chapters were invited, with travel funds
provided. Generally these Chapter Chair meetings were held
at the time of a major annual conference in R8 of one of the
participating Societies, so that for an affordable small extra
cost, the Chapter Chairs could also attend the conference and
meet a huge range of participants. This provided an extra
incentive for them to attend the Chapter Chair meeting and
learn about how to run IEEE activities, etc. The Microwave
Theory and Techniques Society was very active in this
initiative and still holds such meetings.
This led to several similar Chapter Chairs meetings for other
Societies being initiated by the R8 Committee (for example,
one for Signal Processing Chapter Chairs alongside the
ICASSP in Istanbul, Turkey in June 2000).
Reimbursing expenses was often a problem in the early
years of this activity, because at that time those from Eastern
Europe generally did not have credit cards, and in some of the
countries, personal bank accounts were not allowed.
Moreover, there was a risk of payments transmitted to them
in their own countries being treated as income and taxed at a
very high rate and/or this might raise suspicions about the
source and reasons for such foreign payments. It has to be
remembered that most of these recipients had recent memories
of living in regimes where long interrogations in unpleasant
environments could be initiated for undisclosed reasons, and
so there was a strong preference for receiving expenses as
cash (preferably US dollars) handed over to them in the street
or other ‘anonymous’ places. The ‘collapse’ of local
currencies in their home countries sometimes meant that their
personal savings had effectively disappeared.
The limited funds of most of these visitors made many of
them very cautious in accepting invitations to dine in local
restaurants with other IEEE colleagues. They realized that
equal sharing of the cost of the meal might be expected, and
feared that might be unaffordable for them. Being reluctant to
admit this, they typically made some excuses such as ‘not
feeling hungry’.
The generous subsidy programme and the Chapter Chair
meetings were, in my opinion, a great success and a big
catalyst in enhancing the development of IEEE activity and
encouragement of R8 Chapter and Section formation.
The opportunities for these Chapter Chairs to travel and to
attend the conferences, etc. resulted in a number of them being
unwilling to hold elections for their successors, and in a few
cases, it was clear that they also were motivated by a wish to
122
find a well-paid job in the ‘West’ to escape from what were
often very poor salaries and working conditions in their home
country.
Whether IEEE should be proud of enabling
academics to leave their home countries and emigrate for short
or even permanent positions in Western Europe or North
America is perhaps a matter of uncertainty.
A.
The particular contributions of the R8 Committee
R8 has a Voluntary Contributions Fund (VCF) derived from
optional payments made by IEEE members at annual
membership renewal. This provides support for students and
members from low-salary countries to attend conferences in
R8. Academics from Eastern Europe were eligible because of
the generally low salaries which they received for a number of
years after the dismantling of the Berlin Wall. It thus
provided help to a number of people who could have influence
on the development of IEEE in Eastern Europe.
Many IEEE volunteers in ‘Western’ R8 had information
about and understanding of the situation in Eastern Europe,
and of the geographical, cultural and linguistic framework.
This was generally lacking among the IEEE staff in USA and
also among many senior volunteers in USA. As a result, the
R8 volunteers could provide guidance and leadership which
could not be provided from USA.
As a small example, when I was reporting in 2003 to the
IEEE Board of Directors about my activities in R8, I described
my visit to a conference in Crna Gora, where I had given an
invited presentation about IEEE. I suspected correctly that the
members of the Board would have no idea where Crna Gora
was, and also would be too shy to ask. At breakfast the
following morning, I asked the most senior member of the
IEEE staff if he knew, and the answer was ‘I suppose,
somewhere in Africa?’ Of course I had deliberately chosen to
use the name Crna Gora (rather than the “English” translation
Montenegro).
VI.
A.
PROGRESS AND SUCCESSES
Region 8 Committee meetings in the new Sections
After the changes, there was a rapid development of IEEE
activity and formation of new Sections. An R8 Committee
meeting was held in Warsaw in Spring 1991 during what were
still difficult economic times for Poland.
However, growth in membership numbers was (and still is)
slow. The economic changes meant that IEEE membership
was unaffordable for many professional engineers and
academics. Senior members of national research institutes
were often able to join using other than personal funds, but in
a few cases, they regarded IEEE membership as something of
a privilege which they were reluctant to share with junior
colleagues, feeling that would be diminish their personal
status and importance.
In support of the newly formed Sections, the R8 Committee
held many of its meetings in the Central and Eastern European
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
Anthony C. Davies: . . . Go East, Region 8, Go East . . .
areas. My election as R8 Director during this time enabled
me to encourage the choice of some of these locations.
A meeting was in Prague, Czech Republic, in 1994 then in
Berlin, Germany in 1999 in what had been East Berlin (part of
the former GDR). Following this came Budapest, Hungary in
2002, Zagreb, Croatia in 2003, Kraków, Poland in 2004,
Vilnius, Lithuania and Belgrade, Serbia in 2006, Sofia,
Bulgaria and Bucharest, Romania, in 2007, then Riga, Latvia
in 2010. At present, plans are being made to hold an R8
Committee meeting in Talinn, Estonia.
especially Electron Devices, who, as explained above, paid for
initial memberships so that Chapter formation petitions could
be created, and there were many IEEE conferences held.
However, Chapters in parts of Russia remote from Moscow
sometimes complained of lack of support from their Section,
and after a while moves to provide some independence for
activities in St. Petersburg (former Leningrad) and Siberia
arose. After some suggestions to form a Russia Council were
abandoned, there was finally agreement to form three Russia
Sections, one to be called ‘North West’ and one ‘Siberia’ –
while the original Russia Section retained responsibility for all
other parts of the country. Existing Chapters were transferred
to the newly formed Sections where the location of their
principal activities justified it.
VIII. DIFFICULTIES AND UNDERCURRENTS
Figure 3.
View from R8 Committee meeting hotel in Vilnius
Because of my prior familiarity with several of these
locations, it became customary for me to provide a ‘Travel
Guide’ for the R8 Committee meeting participants, and after a
while some people even expected me to do that for places that
I had never visited!
The Czechoslovakia Section was formed in 1992 and despite
the split of Czechoslovakia into the Czech and Slovak
Republics, a single Section for both has been retained,
although that may not be sustainable in the long term.
A "problem" with some of the new Chapters was an
unwillingness of the initial Chapter Chairs to hold elections
and be replaced by other volunteers, resulting in some very
long-serving Chairs. This also happened with a few of the new
Sections.
In the Ukraine Section, there were strong
‘differences of opinion’ between a Chapter in the East part and
another in the West part!
Sometimes, the position of Section Chair or even Chapter
Chair was taken by a very senior person, who was unwilling to
do very much for IEEE but also unwilling to stand down and
be replaced (since there was no tradition of giving up a
position voluntarily). This could also be connected with an
unwillingness to actively recruit new IEEE members, because
the fewer their number, the more ‘important’ the Chair would
feel – e.g. his “exalted” position as an IEEE member was felt
to be a “privilege” which would be decreased by having other
members around.
IX.
Figure 4.
R8 Directors (past, present and elect) in Novosibirsk
VII. THE SPECIAL CASE OF THE RUSSIA SECTION
Russia was something of a special case – a huge country
with many locations which have extensive scientific and
engineering activity at a high level – where one might expect,
in the long term, to see many IEEE activities develop.
However after the IEEE Russia Section was formed in 1990,
membership growth was very slow, mainly for economic
reasons, although many Chapters were formed, most with the
aid of the financial support initiative from IEEE Societies,
THE BALTIC REPUBLICS
When the three Baltic Republics (Estonia, Lithuania and
Latvia) gained their independence from Russia, there was a
suggestion from the R8 Committee management to try to form
a single ‘Baltic’ IEEE Section, combining the three countries.
There was a mistaken belief that they were all rather similar,
with languages incorrectly assumed to be Slavic! It took some
persuasion to convince some senior IEEE R8 volunteers that
this was not the case, and that each of the three had a very
different language and culture.
An early step was the formation of a Chapter in Estonia,
which was affiliated with Finland since there was no Estonia
Section. I had the pleasure of announcing the formation of
this Chapter to a meeting of the R8 Committee in New
Brunswick, USA in Spring 1998. To the puzzlement of all
except the IEEE Finland Chair, I preceded my announcement
by asking the Committee to listen to some music played over
the audio system – this was a recording of the Estonian
National Anthem, to celebrate the formation of the first IEEE
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
123
10 History papers presented at HISTELCON 2012
unit in Estonia. It was immediately recognised by the Finland
Section Chair because both countries share the same tune for
their National Anthems, even though the words are quite
different. During the time of the Soviet Union, playing the
Estonian National Anthem or showing the Estonian flag were
serious offences. Some time passed before the three Baltic
countries had their own Sections, with the Latvia Section
having only recently been established (in 2008).
Figure 5.
XI.
LOCATION OF COMMITTEE AND SUBCOMMITTEE
MEETINGS
Because of a number of rather new Sections wanting to host
the R8 Committee, the R8 Committee management was glad
of opportunities to welcome these new Sections by meeting on
their territory as described in Section VI above.
The R8 Opcom meets twice per year, and comprises eight
people (Director, Director Elect, Past Director, Secretary,
Treasurer and the three Vice-Chairs), and meetings of such
smaller subcommittees were from time to time arranged in
places where a meeting of the whole R8 Committee would
have been impracticable for reasons of travel cost or visa
problems for some Section Chairs. For example, meetings of
the R8 OpCom were held in Bucharest, Dubai and Tangier.
This applies to the even smaller R8 Nominations and
Appointments (N&A) Committee, which met in Novosibirsk,
Siberia in 2006, and included visits to universities, to research
institutes in Akademgorodok and to an IEEE student branch at
Tomsk. The R8 N&A Committee also met in Sofia and
Ljubljana.
Award for Estonia Section given in Belgrade
XII. STUDENT ACTIVITIES
As mentioned in a September 1995 interview by Bob
Winton (archived at the IEEE History Center and with a link
from the R8 website), initial attempts to form a Lithuanian
Section involved Prof. Raimundas Jasinevicius, from Kaunas
University of Technology, who had established links with
universities in London, England many years before, for the
frequent exchange of junior academics, etc. Progress with
Section formation was very slow and made slower by his
absence in Denmark for six years as Lithuanian Ambassador.
The Section was finally established in 2005, based mainly in
Vilnius and followed by Estonia Section formation in 2006.
R8 has a long and successful tradition of strongly supporting
Student Activities, maintained for the new Eastern European
locations. Of particular note is the Student (and GOLD)
activity in Siberia, the Technical English programme initiated
in St. Petersburg (former Leningrad), and the 24 hour extreme
programming contests, initially in Budapest. Student branches
have been very active in some countries of the former
Yugoslavia.
X.
THE SPECIAL CASE OF YUGOSLAVIA
IEEE activities in the former Yugoslavia were another
special case. The Yugoslav Section was formed in 1971 and
became moderately active in holding conferences and in
providing IEEE volunteers.
Following the wars in Yugoslavia, the existing Yugoslav
Section was split into three with Slovenia and Croatia Sections
formed, and the residue called the Yugoslavia Section. These
three Sections were established in 1992. The newly formed
countries had established their own currencies, so that the old
Yugoslavia currency in effect lost all of its value.
Consequently the funds in the ‘blocked currency account’
(described in Section IV) were never fully used and most were
effectively lost by IEEE.
In 1997 a Macedonia Section was formed. Calling the
residue of the original Section by the name Yugoslavia
became an increasing anomaly, and in 2005, it was renamed
the Serbia and Montenegro Section. Later Bosnia and
Herzegovina formed a separate Section.
124
XIII. CONCLUSIONS
The expansion of IEEE R8 activities into the countries east
of the former ‘Iron Curtain’ can certainly be regarded as a
welcome success. It has brought personal contacts, new
opportunities and an awareness in that area of what may be
called the ‘IEEE way of doing things’. However, it may also
be regarded as disappointing in that the growth in Sections,
Chapters, Conferences, etc. has not been matched by a
corresponding growth in participating engineers as a
proportion of those present, nor in a corresponding growth in
membership numbers, and it is possible to observe some
continuation of the ‘old way of doing things’ – notable
particularly in doubtful election processes in the replacement
of IEEE office-holders (e.g. Section or Chapter Chairs serving
in the same position for very long times) – this is, however, by
no means a situation found only in the former Communist
countries of Europe.
REFERENCES
David Wallechinsky & Irving Wallace, The People's Almanac,
1981
[2] R. McCabe et al, [email protected], Education, Audiovisual and
Cultural Executive Agency, Brussels, 2010
[1]
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
A
Minutes of the meeting of the IRE Inter-Sectional Committee
MINUTES
of
Meeting
I.R.E. Inter-Sectional Committee, Europe
February 14, 1962
1. The meeting was held at the International Telecommunication Union Building, Place des
Nations, Geneva, in the office of Mr. Gerald C. Gross, Secretary-General of the I.T.U.
The following were present:
Mr. Gerald C. Gross, Chairman, Geneva Section
Dr. P.M. Lapostolle, Chairman-elect, Geneva Section
Dr. W. Gerber, Vice-Chairman-elect, Geneva Section
Mr. J.H. Gayer, Secretary-Treasurer, Geneva Section
Ir. H. Rinia, Chairman, Benelux Section
Ir. G.J. Siezen, Secretary-Treasurer, Benelux Section
Mr. B.B. Barrow, Executive Committee, Benelux Section
Dr. V. Floriani, Vice-Chairman, Italy Section
Dr. G. Tarchini, Secretary-Treasurer, Italy Section
Prof. Pierre A. Grivet, Executive Committee, France Section
Prof. W. Kleen, Germany
2. Mr. Gross opened the meeting and welcomed the members of the Committee. He then turned
the meeting over to Mr. Rinia, a member of the I.R.E. Ad Hoc Committee on International
Activities. Mr. Barrow was asked to act as Secretary of the Committee.
3. There was a discussion of I.R.E. activity in the various countries in which Sections have been
organized. Prof. Kleen discussed at some length the present situation in Germany. There is
at present some opposition to the formation of an I.R.E. Section. Some people have objected
that there are already too many societies, too many congresses, and that formation of a new
Section might cause some young German engineers to turn away from the established German
societies. Prof. Kleen believes that by the end of March it will be known whether the German
societies are at present ready to support the formation of an I.R.E. Section in Germany.
4. The discussion then turned to the question of the formation of an I.R.E. Region, or of a similar
body within the merged IRE–AIEE society. The members of the Committee were unanimous
and strongly in favor of the formation of such a region. It was moved by Mr. Barrow,
seconded by Mr. Gayer, that a Region of the merged society be established to include only
Greater Europe, specifically excluding such territories as South America and the Far East.
The motion was passed unanimously.
In the discussion of this motion, it was emphasized that a larger unit could not operate as a
whole. It was also felt that the structure proposed in Section IV of the Principles of Consolidation for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (Revision through January 31,
1962) would be unsatisfactory, even if Europe is given the status of a District within the region.
The Committee unanimously believed that nothing less than full regional status for Greater
Europe alone would be satisfactory.
5. It was moved by Mr. Gross, and seconded by Dr. Gerber, that the European Region should
consist of all of Greater Europe, where Greater Europe is to correspond by definition to the
European Broadcasting Area, defined in the Radio Regulations of the ITU, 1959 (see the
Annex attached hereto). This motion was accepted unanimously. In the discussion of this
motion, it was emphasized that this definition of the European Broadcasting Area had already
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
125
A Minutes of the meeting of the IRE Inter-Sectional Committee
been agreed upon internationally, that it therefore raised no international controversies, and
that it was a workable area for a region. It was further emphasized in the discussion that it
would be extremely regrettable if, for any reason, the numerous IRE and AIEE members in
the United Kingdom would be excluded from the European Region, especially in view of the
recent interest shown by the United Kingdom in joining the European Economic Community.
It was stressed that no decision to exclude these members could fairly be taken without their
consent in a referendum.
6. Mr. Gross then moved that Mr. Rinia be recommended for nomination as Regional Director
of the merged society, to represent the European Region, when this Region is approved. The
motion was approved by acclamation.
7. Mr. Rinia recommended that the Headquarters of a European Region, when such a Region
is established, should be located in Geneva. The recommendation was agreed to without dissent.
Respectfully submitted
Bruce B. Barrow, Secretary
(These minutes approved by the Committee before its adjournment.)
Geneva
14 February 1962.
ANNEX to Minutes of IRE Inter-Sectional Meeting, Europe, 14 Feb. 1962.
Extracts from Geneva Radio Regulations, Geneva, 1959, ITU:
• Art. 5, No. 133: The “European Broadcasting Area” is bounded on the West by the Western
boundary of Region 1, on the East by the meridian 40◦ East of Greenwich and on the South
by the parallel 30◦ North so as to include the western part of the U.S.S.R. and the territories
bordering the Mediterranean, with the exception of the parts of Arabia and Saudi-Arabia
included in this sector. In addition, Iraq is included in the European Broadcasting Area.
• Art. 5, No. 126: Region 1 includes the area limited on the East by line A . . . and on the West
by line B . . .
• Art. 5, No. 131: Line B extends from the North Pole along meridian 10◦ West of Greenwich
to its intersection with parallel 72◦ North; thence by great circle arc to the intersection of
meridian 50◦ West and parallel 40◦ North; thence by great circle arc to the intersection of
meridian 20◦ West and parallel 10◦ South; thence along meridian 20◦ West to the South Pole.
126
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
B
Birth certificate
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
127
C IEEE Regions after the merger
C
128
IEEE Regions after the merger
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
D
Invitations/agendas for the IRE Region 9 Committee meetings
The minutes of these IRE Region 9 Committee meetings are available in Appendix E, see E.1-E.2.
D.1
Towards the inaugural meeting on Wednesday 6 June 1962
D.1.1
Letter of 3 May 1962 – Ronald L. McFarlan
The preparation of an inaugural meeting started with a letter from Ronald L. McFarlan to Herre Rinia, dated
3 May 1962. The content of this letter reads as follows:
1912
IRE
1962
GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY
THE INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS
INCORPORATED
1 EAST 79 STREET
NEW YORK 21, N.Y.
LE 5 - 5100
Ir. Herre Rinia
Parklaan 24
Eindhoven, The Netherlands
May 3, 1962
Dear Ir. Rinia:
Relative to your cablegram, the Executive Committee of IRE, at its meeting of April 24, established
the European Region, comprising the area described in the petition: i.e., the European Broadcasting
Area defined in the Radio Regulations of the I.T.U. The action of the Executive Committee anticipates certain changes to implement this action of the Executive Committee by the IRE Board of
Directors at its May 24, 1962 meeting. There is no doubt in my mind that the Board will approve
these changes.
According to the IRE Bylaws, Section 301.5, “Pending installation of the first Regional Director of
a Region, the Chairman of the largest Section, numerically, shall act as Chairman pro-term of the
Regional Committee, and the Chairman pro-term shall appoint a Secretary-Treasurer pro term.”
The Section members in Europe, according to the 1961 Secretary’s Report, are as follows:
Benelux
France
Switzerland
Italy
185
168
134
395
This would mean that, according to the Bylaws, the Chairman of the Italy Section, Professor Marino,
is actually Chairman pro-term of the Regional Committee in Europe.
I should like to suggest that, in my capacity as Chairman of the International Committee, I call
a meeting of representatives from each Section in Europe for Geneva, Switzerland, on Wednesday,
June 13, at a site to be determined by yourself and your associates. At that time, I can work out
the requirements of the European Sections and set up procedures for a Regional organization which
will be strictly in accordance with IRE Bylaws. If this proposal is satisfactory, please cable me as
to the time and place, in order that I may make suitable transportation arrangements.
With best personal regards to yourself and your associates, I remain,
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
129
D Invitations/agendas for the IRE Region 9 Committee meetings
Yours truly,
cc: P.E. Haggerty, Pres., IRE
D.1.2
R.L. McFarlan
Chairman, IRE International Committee
Memorandum of 16 May 1962 – Bruce B. Barrow
The next step was the mailing of a memorandum from Bruce Barrow, dated 16 May 1962. The content of this
memorandum reads as follows:
Subject:
Date:
MEMORANDUM
Information Concerning the Formation of IRE Region 9
and the Proposed Organizational Meeting of June 6th
16 May 1962
On April 24th the Executive Committee of the IRE voted to approve the formation of a new
IRE Region, to be identified as Region 9 and to consist principally of territory in Europe. The IRE
Board of Directors are expected to vote on the question at their next meeting, which will be held
on May 24th. It is anticipated that the Board will act favorably, and therefore Dr. R.L. McFarlan,
Past President of the IRE and Chairman of the IRE Committee on International Activities, has
called an organizational meeting to inaugurate the Regional Committee of Region 9, this meeting
to be held on June 6th in Geneva.†
Arrangements for the meeting are being made in Europe by Bruce B. Barrow, whose address is
given at the end of this memorandum. All correspondence should be directed to him.
The meeting will convene at 9.00 on Wednesday morning, June 6th, in the office of Mr. Gerald
C. Gross, Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union, in the new I.T.U.
Building, Place des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.
Those desiring assistance in finding hotel accommodations may call Miss V. Jackson at the
I.T.U. Building (tel. 34.70.00, ext. 403). All who plan to attend the meeting are urged to make
hotel reservations immediately.
—
†
This announcement notwithstanding, it is to be understood that final action concerning the establishment
of Region 9 remains, as this is being written, in the hands of the Board of Directors. Should the Board
decline to establish Region 9, then the June 6th meeting will be canceled, and all who have been invited will
be informed by telegram.
THE REGIONAL COMMITTEE
In the IRE a Regional Committee consists of the following: (a) Section Representatives, who are
chosen by their Section Executive Committees; (b) the Regional Director, who is the Chairman of
the Regional Committee; (c) a few other members who are appointed by the Regional Director. All
Regional Committee members must be IRE Members, Senior Members, or Fellows.
At the organizational meeting in Geneva, Dr. McFarlan will first inaugurate the Regional
Committee, which at that point will consist only of the Section Representatives. The Committee
will then choose a Regional Director, who will then take the chair and who may then appoint a
maximum of three additional voting members (IRE Bylaw 301.6), a Chairman for the Regional
Education Committee (Bylaw 301.4), and a Vice-Chairman and a Secretary-Treasurer for the
Regional Committee (Bylaw 301.8).
Section Representatives. There are at present six active sections in the proposed Region 9.
Each of these is entitled to two representatives on the Regional Committee (Bylaw 301.3). One
130
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
D.1 Towards the inaugural meeting on Wednesday 6 June 1962
of these is the section chairman, and the other is chosen by the section executive committee from
among the group which consists of the other section officers and the past chairman who most
recently held the office of section chairman. If the regular representatives are not able to attend the
Geneva meeting, the section executive committee is authorized to appoint alternate representatives
from among its membership.
Regional Director. The Regional Director represents the region on the IRE Board of Directors.
In the normal course of events he is elected by the voting members in the region for a term of two
years, and for Region 9 this election will be held in odd-numbered years. The election to be made
by the Regional Committee in Geneva is for the unexpired portion of the current term only, i.e.
until the end of 1963.
ACTION TO BE TAKEN BY SECTIONS
Each section executive committee should inform Dr. Barrow as quickly as possible of the
following:
1. the names and addresses of its representatives to the Regional Committee (and of its alternates
for the Geneva meeting, if any);
2. the approximate date at which the section holds its annual meeting (this is important because
section representatives serve terms which extend from one annual meeting to the next);
3. any items of business that they would like to see placed on the agenda (see below).
AGENDA
When, at the meeting, organizational matters have been finished with, other items of business
that have been proposed in advance for inclusion on the agenda will be considered. Finally, items
may be introduced from the floor for discussion as time permits. The agenda as it stands on May 30th
will be mailed to all who are planning to attend the meeting.
OBSERVERS
The authorized alternates who have been so designated by section executive committees are
welcome to attend the Geneva meeting as observers even if, because of the presence of the regular
section representatives, they will not be able to vote. In addition, a number of IRE members who
come from places where there are not now active sections have been invited to attend as observers.
TERRITORY OF THE PROPOSED REGION 9
The proposed Region 9 is bounded on the west by the Atlantic Ocean, on the east by the
meridian 40◦ East, and on the south by the parallel 30◦ North. This territory is essentially the same
as that of the European Broadcasting Area defined by the I.T.U. and accepted in international law
as a definition for greater Europe.
There are six active IRE sections in this territory – Benelux, Egypt, France, Geneva, Israel,
and Italy. The territory includes approximately 2100 IRE members, with major groups distributed
geographically as follows:
Great Britain
Italy
Benelux
France
Sweden
Switzerland
Germany
559
395
208
180
173
136
117
Israel
Denmark
Spain
U.S.S.R.
Norway
Egypt
Greece
98
86
34
32
30
26
26
IRE-AIEE MERGER
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
131
D Invitations/agendas for the IRE Region 9 Committee meetings
If the proposed merger of IRE and AIEE is approved, Region 9 will be taken over into the new
society without substantial change in its organizational framework.
Please direct all correspondence concerning
the June 6th meeting in Geneva to
Dr. Bruce B. Barrow
Postbus 174
Den Haag, Nederland
(telephone 72 39 60, work)
24 12 65, home)
D.1.3
Memorandum (meeting invitation) of 30 May 1962 – Bruce B. Barrow
The next step was the mailing of a memorandum with the proposed agenda for the inaugural meeting to the
following persons:
• Italy Section
Prof. A. Marino, Chairman; Mr. Virgilio Floriani, Pres. Telletra; Mr. G.P. Tarchini, Secretary
• France Section
Mr. Joseph R. Pernice, Chairman; Mr. Georges Goudet, Vice-Chairman; Mr. Jean Lebel, Secretary
• Geneva Section
Mr. Pierre M. Lapostolle, Chairman; Mr. G.C. Gross, Secretary General; Mr. John Gayer, Secretary
• Israel Section
Chairman; Mr. H. Fischler, Secretary
• Egypt Section
Mr. H.M. Mahmoud, Chairman; Mr. El-Garhi I. El-Kashlan, Secretary
• Benelux Section
Mr. H. Rinia; Mr. E.H. Herbays; Mr. C.B. Broersma; Mr. G.J. Siezen; Dr. H.P. Williams
• Observers
Prof. W.J. Kleen (Germany); Mr. Carl E. Granqvist (Sweden); Mr. Knut Endresen (Norway); Dr. R.C.G.
Williams (England)
The content of the memorandum reads as follows:
MEMORANDUM
Date:
Subject:
May 30, 1962
Proposed agenda tor the I.R.E. Regional Committee Meeting
to be held in Geneva on June 6th, 1962.
On May 24th the Board of Directors of the I.R.E. gave its final approval to the establishment
of Region 9. This Region, therefore, now exists and the Committee meeting in Geneva will be an
official first meeting of the Regional Committee.
It is clear that much of the effort to be spent in organizing the activities of Region 9 will be
concerned with interpreting I.R.E. policies. A number of the items lifted in the agenda cannot
be finally acted upon on June 6th because the Regional Committee will not then have enough
information to permit it to act intelligently. The Committee may, however, decide whether it is
interested in pursuing the questions further; if it is so the chairman may appoint one or more
persons to report further at the time of the next meeting.
PROPOSED AGENDA
1. Remarks by Dr. McFarlan concerning the duties and responsibilities of the Regional
Committee.
132
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
D.1 Towards the inaugural meeting on Wednesday 6 June 1962
2. Nomination and election of a Regional Director for the current term which expires at the end
of 1963.
3. Appointments by the Regional Director.
4. A motion will here be introduced to accept the following items for the agenda. Changes may
be suggested at this time.
5. A discussion on I.R.E. policy towards national engineering societies operating within Region 9.
6. A discussion on I.R.E. policy regarding representation of international organizations.
7. I.R.E. activities on questions of international standardization.
8. Question: In as much as the I.R.E. is a non-political organization, is it advisable for sections
to be named after sovereign nations.
9. A discussion of possible organizational support from the I.R.E. for transatlantic charter flights
for various conventions and symposia.
10. Discussion of a possible European I.R.E. Convention.
11. The role of the Regional Education Committee.
12. Steps which might be taken to recommend Europeans for fellow grade.
13. Question: are the present membership rules applicable to Region 9, or should they be stated
differently.
14. Financial support for office expenses of the secretary of the Regional Committee.
15. Other new business.
16. Determination of date and place for the next meeting.
Dr. Bruce B. Barrow
c/o Mr. John Gayer
I.T.U. Building
Place des Nations
Geneva
Switzerland
The minutes of the inaugural meeting are available in the Appendix, see E.1.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
133
D Invitations/agendas for the IRE Region 9 Committee meetings
D.2
Towards the second meeting on Monday 22 October 1962
D.2.1
Notice – John H. Gayer
NOTICE
TO THE MEMBERS OF THE I.R.E. REGION 9 COMMITTEE
The meeting of the IRE Region 9 Committee foreseen for September 24, has been postponed
by the Region 9 Chairman, Mr. H. Rinia, until Monday, October 22. The meeting of Monday,
October 22, will be as planned in the Conference room on the fifth floor of the new ITU building,
place des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland. It is requested that all planning to attend the meeting
of September 24 be informed of its postponement promptly so that the change of date will not
inconvenience anyone.
The date has been changed as the meeting of the Executive Committee of the IRE Headquarters
will not take place in September, but during the middle of October and our Chairman wishes to
report to Region 9 Committee on the decisions of the Executive Committee. The agenda for the
meeting will be sent to you later.
John H. Gayer
Secretary
IRE Region 9
D.2.2
Meeting invitation of 8 October 1962 – John H. Gayer
Date:
Subject:
8 October, 1962
Proposed agenda for the Second IRE Region 9 Meeting
to be held at the ITU building, 5th floor at Place
des Nations, Geneva, on Monday, 22 October, 1962
beginning at 14.00 hours. (Room 531).
The first meeting of the IRE Region 9 was held on June 6, 1962. The Minutes of this meeting were
despatched to those who attended and to the Chairman and Secretary of the Sections throughout
the Region. The Committee decided that the next meeting should be held in Geneva, on Monday
22 October. The proposed agenda for this meeting is as follows:
PROPOSED AGENDA
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Approval of the agenda of the meeting.
Approval of the Minutes of the first meeting.
Report of the Regional Director of Region 9, Mr. H. Rinia.
Review of the activities of Region 9 since its creation.
Appointment of additional officers.
Program of meetings and conferences of Region 9 and Sections during 1963 and 1964.
Possible European IRE Conference.
Possible Section Symposiums.
Arrangements for transatlantic and other charter flights for group transportation.
Report from Sections of Region 9.
Report on new Sections under consideration.
Membership ru1es applicable in Region 9.
Program for Region 9: Final estimate for program of office expenses of Region 9.
Any Other Business.
Date and place of the next meeting.
John H. Gayer
Secretary
134
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
D.2 Towards the second meeting on Monday 22 October 1962
Region 9
There will be a Geneva Section meeting at 5 p.m. (17.00 hours) on the same day at CERN, Meyrin,
Geneva with a visit to the establishment and an explanation of the European Nuclear Research
Centre, to which all are cordially invited. Transport will be arranged between the ITU and CERN;
assembly point Entrance Hall of main CERN building.
The minutes of the second IRE Region 9 Committee meeting are available in the Appendix, see E.2.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
135
E Minutes of the two IRE Region 9 Committee meetings
E
Minutes of the two IRE Region 9 Committee meetings
The following are transcripts of the minutes of the two IRE Region 9 Committee meetings.
E.1
Wednesday 6 June 1962 – the inaugural meeting
The inaugural meeting was attended by 12 people: Mr. H. Rinia, Mr. G.J. Siezen, Dr. H.P. Williams,
Dr. B.B. Barrow (Benelux Section), Mr. J. Lebel (France Section), Mr. J.H. Gayer, Dr. W. Gerber,
Mr. W. Baumgarten (Geneva Section), Mr. E.H. Frei (Israel Section), Mr. G.P. Tarchini, Ing. V. Svelto (representing Prof. E. Gatti, Italy Section), and Dr. R.L. McFarlan (IRE Headquarters); the Egypt Section was not
represented.
MINUTES OF THE FIRST MEETING OF THE IRE REGION 9 COMMITTEE
HELD IN GENEVA ON JUNE 6, 1962
On April 24, 1962, the Executive Committee of the Institute of Radio Engineers voted to approve
the formation of a new IRE Section, identified as Region 9, consisting of Greater Europe, and on
May 24, 1962, approved the formation of this Section [sic]. Dr. R.L. McFarlan, Past President of the
IRE and Chairman of the IRE Committee for International Activities, was requested to convene a
meeting of representatives of the Sections concerned. This meeting was announced and Dr. McFarlan
opened the meeting at 9 a.m., Wednesday morning, June 6, in the office of Mr. Gerald C. Gross,
Secretary-General, ITU, Place des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.
The minutes of this meeting are as follows:
1. Remarks by Dr. McFarlan concerning the duties and responsibilities of the Regional
Committee.
Dr. McFarlan stressed that communications in general go from the IRE Board and its Executive
Committee to Sections, but that Sections and especially their Chairmen and Secretaries are
expected to maintain close liaison with the Regional Director.
2. Nomination and election of a Regional Director for the current term which expires at the end
of 1963.
Mr. H. Rinia was nominated by Mr. G.J. Siezen and seconded by Mr. G.P. Tarchini. There
were no other candidates. Mr. Rinia was elected by acclamation.
3. Appointments by the Regional Director.
Mr. Rinia thanked the Committee for electing him Regional Director and extended his thanks
to the Board for establishing the Region. He thereupon appointed the Vice-Chairman, Professor
E. Gatti and Secretary-Treasurer, Mr. J.H. Gayer. He advised that other appointments would
be made after consideration of the program of activities for the Region had been decided.
4. IRE policy towards national engineering societies within Region 9.
At this point, Mr. Rinia assumed the role of Chairman of the meeting and invited Dr. McFarlan
to speak. Dr. McFarlan said that the international policies of the IEEE after merger could be
expected to continue to be those now followed by IRE. He emphasized that the European
Region was in no way intended to compete with national societies and every effort would be
made to maintain the closest possible friendly collaboration with them.
5. An IRE policy regarding representation of international organizations.
There are no “IRE representatives” according to Dr. McFarlan. Invitations from outside organizations can be considered and appropriate representation should be arranged. The Regional
Director will bring to the attention of the Board, and the 8-man committee on merger, the
fact that the Regional Committee is concerned about representation on international bodies
only through USA national committees.
136
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
E.1 Wednesday 6 June 1962 – the inaugural meeting
6. IRE activities on questions of international standardization.
The following Resolution was passed unanimously:
“Inasmuch as one of the prime purposes of the IRE is the wide dissemination of technical information, and inasmuch as the IRE is becoming increasingly concerned with the international
dissemination of this information, the Regional Committee would like to call the attention
of the IRE Editorial Board and of the IRE Standards Committee to the desirability of using
abbreviations and symbols more closely in agreement with those recommended by the International Organization for Standardization.”
7. Question: Inasmuch as the IRE is a non-political organization, is it advisable for Sections to
be named after sovereign nations?
No action was taken in respect to this question. It was decided that each case should be
considered individually. Mr. Rinia stressed that he hoped that Sections would be named with
care in view of the non-political character of the Institute.
8. A discussion of possible organizational support from the IRE for transatlantic charter flights
for various conventions and symposia.
It was felt that charter flights should be organized to the extent possible. Mr. Rinia was to
bring this up at the next Executive Committee, particularly in regard to the attendance at the
IRE Convention in New York next year. It was pointed out that groups of 25 now travel at
reduced rates and that the IRE no doubt qualified for this group reduced rate. It was generally
felt that Headquarters in New York should arrange for group transportation to Europe and
that the Region or large Sections should see in which way they could organize groups for
travelling to the United States.
9. Discussion of a possible European IRE Convention.
Consideration was given to the following:
(a) The possibility of having a Space Symposium, entitled “Electronics and Space” in the
Fall of 1963 which would be sponsored by the new Region, in collaboration with other
international organizations.
(b) That it would be desirable in the foreseeable future (perhaps 1964), to organize a European
Convention and a study should be undertaken to see what organizations would wish to
collaborate in such an undertaking and the best time and arrangements for realizing such
a project.
The Headquarters of the IRE was to be informed of these two projects of the Region and to seek
their approval and advise on organizing such large meetings, in cooperation with appropriate
IRE Professional Groups.
10. Other items discussed.
There was general discussion on:
(a) The role of the regional Education Committee;
(b) Steps which might be taken to recommend Europeans for Fellow grade;
(c) Question: Are the present membership rules applicable to Region 9, or should they be
stated differently?
(d) Financial support for office expenses of the Secretary of the Regional Committee.
11. Other business.
The other business consisted of an informal discussion on the activities of the different Sections
and how the Region could assist in the formation of new Sections in the Region.
12. Date and place for the next meeting.
It was decided that the next meeting should be held in Geneva on Monday, September 24 in
the new ITU building, Place des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
137
E Minutes of the two IRE Region 9 Committee meetings
John H. Gayer
Secretary
Region 9
138
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
E.2 Monday 22 October 1962
E.2
Monday 22 October 1962
MINUTES
of
Second Region 9 Meeting
22nd October 1962
The Second Region 9 meeting was held on October 22, 1962 at the Headquarters of the I.T.U.
in Geneva. The Agenda for this meeting is as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Approval of the agenda of the meeting.
Approval of the Minutes of the first meeting.
Report of the Regional Director of Region 9, Mr. H. Rinia
Review of the activities of Region 9 since its creation.
Appointment of additional officers.
Program of meetings and conferences of Region 9 and sections during 1963 and 1964.
Possible European IRE Conference.
Possible Section Symposiums.
Arrangements for transatlantic and other charter flights for group transportation.
Report from Sections of Region 9.
Report on new Sections under consideration.
Membership rules applicable in Region 9.
Program for Region 9: Final estimate for program of office expense of Region 9.
Any other business.
Date and place of the next meeting.
The minutes of this meeting in respect to the above items of the Agenda are as follows:
1. The Agenda as proposed was adopted.
2. The minutes of the first meeting were approved.
3. The interesting report of the Regional Director, Mr. H. Rinia was appreciated and it was
decided that action in respect to the region would be further considered in the next meeting
after the merger of IRE and AIEE.
4. The Director reviewed the activities of Region 9 since its creation and outlined the desire to
have new sections.
5. There was no further appointment of officers. The officers exist to remain in office to 1964.
6. The interesting program of meetings and conferences were reviewed and sections agreed to
advise others of their program of activities and meetings.
7. The detailed consideration of the possible European Institute Conference was postponed until
the next meeting.
8. The Section Symposium proposed by the Geneva and Paris Sections were explained.
9. There was a further discussion of the desired arrangements for transatlantic and other charter
flights for group transportation. It was decided that the Paris Section would be in the best
position to arrange for such transportation for the 1964 Convention and that Headquarters –
New York should be requested to consider making such arrangements for those in the United
States and Canada wishing to attend meetings in Europe.
10. The Chairman or representatives of the Sections in the Region gave interesting reports on the
program of activities.
11. The Chairman reported on the creation of the new section in the United Kingdom; advised
that the Swedish section would be created and expressed the efforts to have new sections in
Germany and other countries.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
139
E Minutes of the two IRE Region 9 Committee meetings
12. The membership rules applicable in Region 9 were explained and it was decided that these
should remain in force until the Region had the opportunity to further consider how these
applications could be considered on a regional basis.
13. The Director explained the desire to have two meetings of the Region during each year and
that the expenses for one representative to attend each meeting would be reimbursed, instead
of having the expenses for two representatives for the attendance of one meeting per year. It
was noted that $500 had been made available for the expenses in operation of the Secretariat
in Region 9 and this would be adequate for some time, with the expenses that are at present
being incurred.
14. Under Other Business, views of the representatives were exchanged, at which time it was agreed
that at the next meeting specific proposals in respect of various problems would be made.
15. It was decided that Regional meetings for the time being would be held in Geneva and the
next meeting would be held in April 1963, which would be timely due to the fact that the
Director would be returning from a Directors meeting in the United States. The Secretary was
requested to advise the sections as early as possible of the proposed date of the meeting and
confirm it as soon as Mr. Rinia knew the date of the Directors meeting so that it could be
conveniently scheduled after his return.
John H. Gayer
Secretary
Region 9
140
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
F
Invitations/agendas for the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
The minutes of these IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting are available in Appendix G, see G.1-G.5.
F.1
Monday 22 April 1963 – the first IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting
Date:
16th April 1963
Subject:
Proposed agenda for the First IEEE Region 8 Meeting
to be held at the ITU building, 5th floor at Place
des Nations, Geneva, on Monday, 22 April, 1963
beginning at 10.00 a.m. in Room 530.
The first meeting of IEEE Region 8 will be held on Monday, 22 April, 1963, as set out in the
note of 1 April, 1963. The minutes of the last IRE Region 9 meeting will be available on this date,
but copies will be sent as soon as possible. The proposed agenda for this meeting is as follows:
PROPOSED AGENDA
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Approval of the agenda of the meeting.
Approval of the minutes of the meeting held on 22 October 1962.
IEEE Constitution and By-laws.
Report of the Regional Director, Mr. H. Rinia.
Merger of IRE and AIEE into IEEE.
Possible symposia and conventions.
Representation at Regional Committee meetings.
Reimbursement of travel expenses for attendance at Regional Committee meetings.
New Sections.
Possibility of attempting to organize charter flights or group accommodations for the IEEE
meeting in New York next year.
11. Regional IEEE publications – organization and assistance in preparation.
12. Any Other Business.
13. Date and place of the next meeting.
John H. Gayer
Secretary
IEEE, Region 8
NOTE:
Lunch, 12.30 hrs. in U.N. Dining Room.
Refreshments courtesy Geneva Section.
The minutes of the first IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting are available in the Appendix, see G.1.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
141
F Invitations/agendas for the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
F.2
Monday 4 November 1963
INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING [sic] INC. (IEEE)
REGION 8
The next meeting of the Regional Committee will be held on Monday, November 4, 1963 at 10.00
a.m. in Room 530, Fifth floor, ITU Building (International Telecommunication Union), Place des
Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.
AGENDA
1. Opening of meeting and Minutes of previous meeting.
2. Report by the Regional Director on the last IEEE Board meeting, and especially on the new
publishing policy.
3. Is it desirable to change certain rules of IEEE for our Region?
4. The general problem of holding Section Meetings.
5. Co-operation with national societies.
6. Coming IEEE Conferences in Region 8.
7. Any other business.
8. Date and place of the next meeting.
9. Closing of meeting.
John H. Gayer
Secretary
NOTE: Any suggestions concerning the agenda should be sent as soon as possible to the following
address, together with any requests for reservations for accommodations:
John H. Gayer
Secretary, Region 8, IEEE
c/o International Frequency Registration Board
International Telecommunication Union
Place des Nations
Geneva, Switzerland
The minutes of the second IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting are available in the Appendix, see G.2.
142
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
F.3 Monday 27 April 1964
F.3
Monday 27 April 1964
THE INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC. (IEEE)
REGION 8
The next meeting of the Regional Committee will be held on Monday, April 27, 1964 at 10.00 a.m. in
Room 531, Fifth floor, ITU Building (International Telecommunication Union), Place des Nations,
Geneva, Switzerland.
AGENDA
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Opening of meeting and Minutes of previous meeting.
Report by the Regional Director.
Nomination and election of candidate(s) for the post of IEEE Director of Region 8.
EUSEC and the relations of IEEE Sections to national societies.
Possible inclusion in the Geneva Section of members in Austria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and
Yugoslavia.
The reactions of members to the new IEEE publications.
Reports of Section representatives.
Nominations for awards.
Coming IEEE conferences in Region 8.
Any other business.
Date and place of the next meeting.
Closing of meeting.
John H. Gayer
Secretary
The minutes of the third IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting are available in the Appendix, see G.3.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
143
F Invitations/agendas for the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
F.4
Monday 26 October 1964
THE INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC. (IEEE)
REGION 8
The next meeting of the Regional Committee will be held on Monday, October 26th, 1964 at 10.00
a.m. in Room 531, Fifth floor, I.T.U. Building (International Telecommunication Union), Place des
Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.
AGENDA
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Opening of meeting and Minutes of previous meeting.
Report by the Regional Director.
Result of I.E.E.E. elections.
Reports of Section Representatives.
New Sections.
Nomination for Awards.
Coming IEEE Conferences and meetings in Region 8.
Finances of Region 8.
Questions from the incoming Regional Director.
Instructions for completion of IEEE forms.
(see attached copy-letter from IEEE Section Norway)
Formation of new Sections in Europe.
(see attached copy-letter from IEEE Section Norway)
Any Other Business.
Date and place of the next meeting.
Closing of meeting.
John H. Gayer
Secretary
144
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
F.4 Monday 26 October 1964
COPY
THE INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS
Incorporated
SECTION CORRESPONDENCE
IEEE Section Norway
Box 47
Kjeller, Norway
5 October 1964
Mr. John H. Gayer
Secretary
IEEE Region 8
Box 820, ITU
1200 Geneva
Switzerland
Dear John:
I have received your notice of the Region 8 committee meeting to be held on 26 October. I would
like to propose two items for the agenda as follows.
1. Region 8 Instructions for IEEE forms
We have made up a list of Norwegian-vs-American experience and education such that a prospective
member can fill out an application in a manner that is meaningful to the IEEE in New York. Recently
two men telephoned me to ask what the American equivalent of their respective German and Swiss
education was; – I could not answer. A simple list compiled in every section would help solve such
problems. My correspondence with the IEEE in New York indicates that it is impossible for them to
put European letters on their addressograph plates. Therefore I also suggest that a list of official post
department English transliterations of European letters be tacked onto such a Region 8 instruction
form.
2. New Sections in Europe?
What can Section Norway do to help section formation in the rest of Scandinavia? Are we pushing
things (at the risk of offending national societies) if we offer help? What can be done to help section
formation in non-section countries?
Sincerely yours
M.M. Brady
Secretary-treasurer
Section Norway of the IEEE
The minutes of the fourth IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting are available in the Appendix, see G.4.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
145
F Invitations/agendas for the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
F.5
Monday 26 April 1965
THE INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC. (I.E.E.E.)
REGION 8
The next meeting of the Regional Committee will be held on Monday, April 26, 1965 at 10.00 a.m. in
Room 119, 1st floor, I.T.U. Building, (International Telecommunication Union), Place des Nations,
Geneva, Switzerland.
AGENDA
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Opening of meeting and Minutes of previous meeting.
Report by the Regional Director.
Result of I.E.E.E. Elections.
Report of Section Representatives.
Nomination for Awards.
Coming I.E.E.E. Conferences and meeting in Region 8.
Any Other Business.
Date and place of the next meeting.
Closing of meeting.
John H. Gayer
Secretary
Geneva, 23rd March, 1965
(If you require an air ticket for this travel, please let us know, as we could purchase one here and
send it to you. Of course this would be for one Officer of the Section, i.e. the Chairman, the Vice
Chairman or the Secretary, authorized to represent the Section at the Regional Meeting).
The minutes of the fifth IEEE Region 8 Committee meeting are available in the Appendix, see G.5.
146
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
F.6 Tuesday 7 September 1965
F.6
Tuesday 7 September 1965
THE INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INCORPORATED
REGION 8
From: John H. Gayer
Secretary
IEEE Region 8
ITU, IFRB
Place des Nations
1211 Geneva 20
Switzerland
IMPORTANT
To the Chairman of
IEEE Region 8 Sections.
July 15th, 1965
Dear Sir:
Plans for the visit of the Institute’s President, Dr. B. Oliver, and General Manager, D. Fink,
have firmed up. They will visit our Region during the first half of September.
Both Dr. Oliver and Mr. Fink will attend our Regional Committee Meeting during their stay in
Geneva. Consequently we have moved the previously announced date and place of the meeting to
September 7th (Tuesday) at 9.45 a.m. in room 531, 5th floor, ITU Building, in Geneva, Switzerland.
Having the Institute’s President and General Manager among us at a Regional Committee
Meeting is a rare privilege which will provide all of you with the opportunity to ask specific questions
directly to the heads of our Institute. At the same time, Dr. Oliver and Mr. Fink have expressed
their interest in seeing first hand what are the special problems facing the Sections of Europe.
We feel sure that you will want to try to personally attend this exceptional meeting.
Yours sincerely,
John H. Gayer
Secretary
IEEE, Region 8.
Jean D. Lebel
Director
IEEE Region 8.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
147
F Invitations/agendas for the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
THE INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC.
REGION 8
The next meeting of the Regional Committee (to meet Dr. Oliver and Mr. Fink) will be held on
Tuesday, September 7th, 1965 at 9.45 a.m. in Room 531, 5th floor, ITU Building (International
Telecommunication Union), Place des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.
AGENDA
1. Introduction of Section Representatives to the Institute’s President, Dr. B. Oliver, and General
Manager, D. Fink.
2. Minutes of previous meeting (April 26th, 1965).
3. Report by the Regional Director.
4. Finances of Region 8.
5. Report of Section Representatives.
6. Matters to be brought to the attention of the Henderson Committee to study how IEEE can
increase its value to the members outside the United States.
7. Questions by Section representatives to the President and/or the General Manager.
8. Date and place of next meeting.
John H. Gayer
Secretary
(IEEE Geneva Section
c/o IFRB, ITU
Place des Nations
1211 Geneva 20
Switzerland).
148
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
G
Minutes of the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
The following are transcripts of the minutes of the first IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings.
G.1
Monday 22 April 1963
REPORT ON THE FIRST MEETING OF IEEE SECTION 8 [sic]
held in Geneva on Monday April 22, 1963
The following people attended:
•
•
•
•
•
•
From
From
From
From
From
From
England (1103 members): Dr. Williams, Mr. Barton
Norway (42 members): Mr. M.M. Brady
Switzerland (193 members): Dr. Gerber
Benelux (approximately 300 members): Prof. Jespers, Mr. Broersma
Italy (approximately 200 members): Dr. Svelto
France (264 members): J.D. Lebel
The Israelian and Egyptian sections were not represented. Together, they have about 300 members.
If our figures are correct, the total membership in the region is of the order of 2200.
2. Approval of the minutes of the meeting of October 22, 1962. – The minutes, copies of which
are attached, were approved.
3. IEEE Constitution and Bylaws. – Boundaries of sections are decided in last resort by the Board
of Directors who follow the advice of section and regional directors. It is recommended that the
sections hold five meetings a year, but for a certain time, headquarters will look with indulgence
upon sections who do not hold that number of meetings. Benelux section sent invitations to
their meetings to the local engineering societies through the headquarters of those societies,
whereas Italy invite members of local societies directly. It is recommended that every section
have a section publication.
4. Report of the Region Director, Herre Rinia. – Board Meetings were held for two days in January
in New York and on April 18th in Dallas. Travel expenses to send either the Chairman, ViceChairman or Secretary of a section to the regional committee meeting two times a year were
approved at the January Board meeting.
However, section officers must bear in mind that due to the merger of IRE and AIEE, the
new engineering society is operating at a deficit of $1/2 million a year. This is due to the fact
that 60,000 members of AIEE have seen their dues of $25.00 a year reduced to the IRE dues
of $15.00 a year at the time of the merger. It is impossible to raise the dues, because IRE
would not have voted the merger if this had taken place. IEEE however, has total assets of $3
million in convertible issues (40% stocks – 60% bonds) and $4 million in buildings. In addition,
there are approximately 1,000 new members coming in each month. All together, the IEEE
now has 160,000 members of which 27,000 are students. It seems that the situation is certainly
not dramatic, but it requires that every section’s officers bear it in mind. IEEE expenses are
mostly due to mailing, and this might be reduced by elimination of duplicate mailing between
AIEE and IRE members.
Professional Groups, which are considered to be one of the major growth factors in IRE are
presently operating at a loss.
Uncle Sam, following the merger, is looking carefully into the finances of IEEE. It is interesting
to know that the sections alone hold assets of approximately $600,000.
Travel expenses for Region 8 alone would amount to about $2200 a year of which 1/3 is for
the Israel representative and 1/3 for the Cairo representative.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
149
G Minutes of the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
5. Merger of IRE and AIEE into IEEE. – Dr. Williams, Chairman of the English Section learned
by accident that Sir John Hackay had been appointed Secretary of AIEE for England. If such
a person exists within the boundaries of a section or region, it would be good to try to have
him on the section board.
6. Possible symposia and conventions. – Dr. Williams inquired about the sponsorship by the region
of the International Telemetry Conference to be held in London at the end of September. Herre
Rinia suggested that announcements of this conference should be sent to section chairmen.
If companies within the French Section would see the possibility of organizing group tours
for 10 or 20 American scientists, specialists in the telemetry field, they should report it to
Dr. Williams.
7. Representation at region committee meetings. – It was already mentioned that travel expenses
will be paid for one delegate twice a year. However, sections are encouraged to send two
delegates. Even so, there will be only one vote per section represented at the regional meeting.
The IEEE Board is made of directors at large who are elected for three years and regional
directors who hold office for two years. In order to provide a certain continuity of action, it
has been decided to replace regional directors of odd numbered regions in odd years and even
numbered regions in even years. Regional directors are nominated by the regional committee
and are afterwards elected by mail by the membership. Herre Rinia, whose term of office had
been for one year should have been replaced in 1963 if the region had remained number 9
as it was under IRE jurisdiction. But, at the time of the merger it became region 8, which
presented a “case de conscience” to Herre Rinia. Following a suggestion by Dr. Williams, in
favor of continuity, the regional committee unanimously voted to continue the term of office of
Herre Rinia until 1964.
8. Reimbursement of travel expenses. – Only tourist class transportation was approved. Expenses
should be labeled as follows: hotel, breakfast, lunch, dinner, tip, taxi, laundry, other, ticket
cost (including the ticket). The receipts should be included for Uncle Sam. When converting
from local currency into dollars, one should allow a reasonable safety margin for the exchange
rate.
9. New Sections. – Norway is the new-born section. Germany is having a difficult delivery.
Denmark and Sweden are running into serious difficulties with local engineering societies.
There are 30 members living in USSR. Maybe a USSR Section could be started, provided the
Popov Society would be allowed to have one in New York.
10. Possibility of attempting to organize charter flights or group accommodations for the IEEE
meeting in New York next year. – Because of the necessity of leaving from the same airport,
it was generally agreed that this should be left to the sections themselves. However, Professor
Jespers mentioned that members residing in Belgium would welcome the opportunity of joining
members leaving from Paris.
11. Herre Rinia would welcome news letters.
12. Other business. – As time was running short, no other business was discussed.
13. Date and place of next meeting. – Geneva, November 4, 1963.
Respectfully submitted,
J.D. Lebel
150
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
G.2 Monday 4 November 1963
G.2
Monday 4 November 1963
REPORT ON THE SECOND MEETING OF IEEE REGION 8
held in Geneva on Monday, November 4, 1963
The following people attended:
•
•
•
•
•
•
From
From
From
From
From
From
the United Kingdom and Eire: Dr. Williams, Mr. Barton
Norway: Mr. Brady
Switzerland (Geneva Section): Dr. Gerber, Mr. Gross, Mr. Gayer
Benelux: Professor Jespers, Mr. Broersma, Mr. Lulofs, Mr. Rinia
Italy: Dr. Svelto
France: Mr. Lebel
The Israelian and Egyptian sections were not represented.
2. Approval of the minutes of the meeting of April 22, 1963. These were approved after slight
correction has been made.
3. Report by the Regional Director emphasized the advantages of cooperation with existing
societies and associations by IEEE Sections and suggested that new Sections might be formed
in this way.
Reference was made to the difficulties experienced by Sections concerning membership lists. A
cable was sent to President Ernst Weber. It read as follows:
“FOR URGENT ATTENTION ERNST WEBER
STOP
EUROPEAN REGIONAL COMMITTEE
MEETING IN GENEVA TODAY SERIOUSLY ALARMED AT CONFUSION IN RECORDING SUBSCRIPTIONS FROM OUR MEMBERS AND ERRORS IN MEMBERSHIP LISTS
STOP
THIS DAMAGING
PRESTIGE IN REGION 8 AND MAY LEAD TO RESIGNATIONS INCLUDING DISTINGUISHED AND
LONG STANDING MEMBERS”
John Gayer, Secretary
4. Desirability to change certain rules of IEEE for our Region. The general feeling of those present
was that it seemed desirable to change certain rules of IEEE for our region: specific recommendations were made in order to:
(a) reduce the requirements of 15 members attending the Section meeting to 10% of the
membership for Sections having less than 150 members.
(b) reduce the number of meetings held per year to less than 5 for Sections which must operate
under a language handicap, such as the French Section which must compulsorily have all
its meetings in English.
(c) Dr. Williams of the United Kingdom Section suggested that the Section Committee
Chairman be elected instead of nominated by the Section Chairman.
(d) After further discussion, Mr. Barton, Past Vice-President of IRE, suggested that in the
European Region, many rules of IEEE could be freely interpreted provided New York
would be informed of it. However, Mr. Rinia, Regional Director, pointed out that it was
difficult to have special rules for our region since IEEE is a non-national society. It was
most important that the IEEE did not lose its identity.
Inasmuch as the operation rules for the European Region present some special problems, it
was felt to be important that our region should have, within the IEEE Executive Committee,
a permanent representative familiar with the European affairs. Mr. Rinia promised to ask
Professor Weber if he would agree to represent our Region.
5. General problems of holding Section Meetings. These remained at more or less the same level,
except in the case of the French Section which had been on probation for the year 1962 owing
to the lack of a sufficient number of meetings. The main reason for this state of affairs was given
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
151
G Minutes of the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
as the difficulty encountered in attracting a sufficient number of speakers speaking English, in
order to comply with the language requirement of holding Section meetings.
6. The cooperation with national Societies seems to be excellent at the level of each European
Section.
7. Coming IEEE conferences in Region 8. Dr. Williams reported on the International Conference
of Magnetic Recording to be held in early July 1964 in London, sponsored by the British
Institute of Radio Engineers.
8. It was agreed that the date and place of the next meeting would be announced early in 1964.
John H. Gayer
J.D. Lebel
152
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
G.3 Monday 27 April 1964
G.3
Monday 27 April 1964
REPORT ON THE THIRD MEETING OF IEEE REGION 8
held in Geneva on Monday, April 27, 1964
The following people attended:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
From Benelux: Prof. P.G.A. Jespers
From Cairo: Mr. Fathy Geith
From France: Mr. J.D. Lebel
From Geneva: Dr. W. Gerber, Prof. F. Borgnis, Mr. A.W.C. Boyle
From Italy: Professor E. Gatti
From Norway: Mr. M.M. Brady
From Federal Republic of Germany: Dr. L. Rohde
From United Kingdom of Gt. Britain and Northern Island [sic]: Mr. F.S. Barton
Director of IEEE Region 8: Ir. H. Rinia
Secretary: Mr. J.H. Gayer
1. Minutes of the meeting of November 4, 1964 [sic]. These were approved with minor
correction.
2. Report by the Regional Director. The Regional Director reviewed IEEE activities since
the last meeting. He referred to the fact that the Directors’ Meeting had considered the existing
situation of IEEE and that it was running at a loss. Of the $6 million budget, only $1.8 million
came in from dues. Expenses were high for publications, organisation of meetings, travel, etc.
It had been suggested that dues be raised and that possibly next year some dues would be
increased; printing, publications and a staff of more than 300 had to be paid. Mr. Rinia added
that there were 4600 Members of Region 8, but the total numbers accounted for were only
3000 – i.e. 1600 had “disappeared.” The statistics as available were:
Benelux
Cairo
France
Geneva
Israel
Italy
Norway
U.K.
W. Germany
290
71
258
250
121
528
59
1038
155
(67 students)
(290 believed to be the correct number)
(184 students)
(65 believed to be the correct number)
The letter from Mr. Fink of November 1, 1963 was noted and a letter of thanks was to be sent
to him.
Mr. Fathy Geith (Cairo Section) noted an increase in the number of publications, and asked
what members thought of this. A general discussion followed.
Mr. Rinia said that subscribers to Proceedings now totalled more than 56,000 and could be
roughly accounted for as follows:
Higher grades of membership:
Students:
130,000
30,000
Proceedings:
Proceedings:
46,000
4,500
In Region 8, more than 50% subscribed to Proceedings; this number comprised members and
students. It was suggested that Spectrum or Proceedings would be more suitable for students,
at least in Region 8, instead of the special student publication which was nicely made but not
very serious concerning the treatment of technical matter. The recruitment of students into
the IEEE Region 8 was slow. Many in Italy and the Benelux had even stopped membership.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
153
G Minutes of the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
Proceedings was not taken by many students although many were considering it. Since special
students’ meetings are not being held this might account for some of the lack of new student
members. The replacement of the student magazine by Spectrum was supported unanimously.
3. Nomination of candidate(s) for the post of IEEE Region 8 Director. Mr. Jean Lebel
was unanimously nominated as Regional Director of Region 8, 1964/1965 [sic]. A cable to this
effect was sent to IEEE Headquarters with background information to be furnished.
4. EUSEC and the relations of IEEE Sections to national societies. The problem was
that when IEEE was formed by the merger of IRE and AIEE, AIEE had been a national society
and as such was a member of EUSEC. Representatives of the engineering societies of Europe
and North America meet every two years, a number of which are organized in the U.S.A., the
U.K., Germany, Holland, etc. There was now conflict: should IEEE step out or not? At last
year’s meeting the President and Secretary attended on behalf of IEEE and asked questions
on future policy. It was decided that IEEE could be a member but in view of its scope and
concept and existing bylaws it was questionable whether this was appropriate.
5. Possible inclusion in the Geneva Section of members in Austria, Czechoslovakia,
Hungary and Yugoslavia. There was no objection to this matter. Norway suggested that
the same treatment for Sweden and Denmark could be made if Sections were not to be formed
there.
6. Reactions of members to the new IEEE publications (this item refers also to No. 3
above). Some representatives felt that there were now too many publications on the market and
many people did not have sufficient time to read all of them. IEEE publications should have a
new concept. Gaps in engineering knowledge could be filled from good professional publications,
or trade publications for which a practical knowledge gave appreciation. Mr. Geith said he had
written a letter to Professor J.D. Tyder, Editor of Proceedings to suggest that Proceedings
could carry research; Spectrum should keep the average engineer informed; specialized items
should be in Transactions of the professional groups. Furthermore there seemed to be a gap
vis-à-vis the practical engineering aspect.
The United Kingdom representative said that in his view these three publications were good;
Transactions was really worth reading.
The Norway and Cairo Section Representatives said it was important that all spellings be
checked and any abbreviations used be carefully considered as in their languages short forms
were misleading, for example: Röa was correct, not ROA; Ås was correct, not As. Copies of
lists of addresses should be sent to Region 8 for verification.
A copy of all publications should be sent to the Secretaries of Region 8 and 9, and each of
their Sections.
7. Reports of Section representatives. The aspects concerning the reports were:
• Germany: Joint meetings are held, discussion groups are organized, suggestions for speakers
requested.
• France: Lecture series (Wellinger and Goode), suggestions for lecturers sought, some could
possibly give talks at two or three Sections.
• Norway: Problems of correct addresses, membership growth from 42 when formed last year
to 65 now.
• Italy: Country to have two Sections this year: one for North Italy (Milan) and the other
for Central and Southern Italy.
• Geneva: International meetings have good response; Section forming professional power
group and others under consideration.
• Benelux: Trouble with receiving publications reported.
154
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
G.3 Monday 27 April 1964
• Cairo: Majority are electrical10 engineers. Have problem with payment of dues. Great
interest from students. Ways of transferring funds to be studied (especially for students).
• U.K.: Friendly co-operation exists with the Institution of Electrical Engineers, and other
organizations.
In the discussion that followed, the representative of France said that joint meetings were
being held as English speaking experts were difficult to locate; this was a common problem to
Sections of Region 8. It was suggested that a Regional newsletter would be welcomed.
8. Nominations for awards. All Sections need to have Fellows. Italy has no Fellows. The
problem exists in reference to support necessary i.e. nominations for new Fellows have to
be made by other Fellows. Assistance in this connections was necessary between Sections of
Region 8. The matter was to be tabled at the next Board meeting and the next Session of the
Fellow Committee. Other awards should be considered.
9. Coming IEEE Conferences (Region 8).
1965
1965
1965
1965
May
September
September
May
U.K.
U.K.
Germany
Geneva
Components and Material
Microwave ferrometry and plastics
World-wide communications
International television symposium (Montreux)
10. Other business. The need to suggest a representative for the Fellow Committee to replace or
assist Professor Borgnis during July, August and September was mentioned. Dr. Smith-Rose
was nominated.
Mr. Lebel suggested the creation of a Region 8 publication as discussed at the last meeting; the
publication could include an editorial promotion of IEEE, engineering interests and problems.
U.S.A. and Japanese firms would be interested in European publicity and it was therefore
suggested that such a publication would be financially sound but to find adequate staff and a
responsible editor was another question.
11. Date and place of next meeting. Monday, October 26, 1964 in Geneva.
John H. Gayer
Secretary Region 8, IEEE
10
Manually corrected to ‘electronic.’
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
155
G Minutes of the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
G.4
Monday 26 October 1964
REPORT OF THE FOURTH MEETING OF IEEE REGION 8
held in Geneva, Monday, October 26, 1964
Present:
Ir. W. Lulofs, Benelux
Mr. Abdel-Latif I. Ahmed, Egypt
Mr. J.R. Pernice, France
Dr. R.P. Wellinger, Geneva
Mr. A.W.C. Boyle, Geneva
Dr. A. Shani, Israel
Mr. M.M. Brady, Norway
Dr. R.C.G. Williams, United Kingdom & Eire
Mr. F.S. Barton, United Kingdom & Eire
Ir. H. Rinia, Director, IEEE Region 8
Mr. J.D. Lebel, Director-elect, IEEE Region 8
Mr. J.H. Gayer, Secretary, IEEE Region 8
Excused:
Prof. Dr. F.E. Borgnis, Geneva
Dr. Dr. L. Rohde, West Germany
Dr. H.H. Burghoff, West Germany
Mr. C.B. Broersma, Benelux
Mr. J.T. Wallmark, Sweden
1. The report on the third meeting held on April 27, 1964 was approved.
2. Report by the Regional Director. Mr Rinia reviewed IEEE activities since the last meeting
and reported on the IEEE Executive Board meeting held in Chicago the previous week. Among
other matters, he mentioned that there was a great desire to have a Technical Activities
Board, which would be quite large and include representatives of all the Professional Groups.
A question was raised as to whether transportation expenses would be available for representatives of Region 8 and 9, on which no decision was taken. It was pointed out, however, that
in the future, transportation expenses would probably be available for Fellowship Committee
representatives in the future. The situation in reference to income was not encouraging and
there was general feeling that it may be necessary to raise the dues, particularly in view of
the fact that the membership fees bring in less than 50% of the revenue. The famous IRE
Headquarters at 79th Street had been sold and the entire IEEE Headquarters would soon be
housed in Lenox Hill Station. The electronic computer put in use was much larger than that
which was originally foreseen and was equipped with extensive software. The total staff of the
IEEE Headquarters, numbering 290, would possibly be reduced by 40 through the use of the
electronic computer. It was pointed out that considerable improvement in bringing records
and addresses up-to-date had been possible, and it was suggested that Members and Sections
could themselves be of help in calling attention to any further irregularities. In the future,
it was planned, at a cost of $60,000 an issue, and in addition to the revenue collected from
advertising, to send the Directory to all Members. The minimum time for the publication of an
article in “Transactions” and “Proceedings” was about four months. Letters to the Editor are
considered highly important and are published with a delay of only two weeks. The policy is
to maintain the attained goal of having the “top” electronics publications in the world. There
are about 60,000 subscribers to the Proceedings.
A question was raised as to whether it would be beneficial to publish a paper appearing in
“Proceedings” in “Transactions” as well. The answer given was that only a small number of
papers are published in “Proceedings” and an effort was made to publish different material
from that appearing in other IEEE publications. It was considered that duplication should not
be necessary. Of the 280 papers submitted to “Proceedings” 74 were accepted (40% rejected,
34% referred for publication elsewhere and 26% accepted).
156
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
G.4 Monday 26 October 1964
The Director read from an IEEE paper on publication policy and objectives – “Abstract of
Editorial Report to the Board of Directors, October 20, 1964, J.D. Ryder.” It was suggested
that a copy of this interesting paper should be sent by Headquarters to all Sections. There was
still great interest in the possibility of “Spectrum” being made available at least to European
students, instead of the Student Journal. The Director pointed out that it was at least hoped
to have “Spectrum” sent to all graduate students as an alternative publication next year, for
which an additional $ 60,000 would be required. There was general feeling within the Region 8
Sections that the Student Journal was inadequate.
3. Results of IEEE Elections. The results of the IEEE elections were not available. Ballots were
to be distributed the following week. Difficulties arose in Region 4 over the election procedure.
There was no problem concerning the election of the Director of Region 8, Jean D. Lebel being
our nominee. It would, however, be interesting to see the percentage of vote for the Region 8
Director and for President of IEEE.
4. Reports of Section Representatives.
U.K. & Eire:
Dr. Williams reported that there was no great change. The Section maintained the closest
possible collaboration with the IEE. 200 to 300 meetings are held each year, so the Section
sees no need to have separate IEEE meetings. During the last twelve months there had been
3 conferences at which IEEE participated and which were well attended and successful. The
question was raised over international conferences and whether or not they were to be sponsored
by IEEE or by a Section of IEEE. It was decided that conferences could be sponsored either
by Sections, Region 8 or IEEE as a whole. Care should be taken to schedule meetings and
conferences so that there was a minimum of conflict. In this respect, the provisional schedule
of future conferences of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, in which the IEEE would in
most cases collaborate, is set out in Annex 1. Difficulties in scheduling conferences and meetings
in order to avoid conflicts were discussed. It was pointed out that in some cases, European
meetings are very popular and, in one instance at least, a meeting in the United States had
been dropped in view of a conflict with a Region 8 Conference.
Geneva:
Dr. Wellinger reported that a lecture series on Engineering and Space held at the University,
Lausanne, had been highly successful and that well over 200 attended. Efforts were being made
to form a Power Group in Zurich, but to date no-one had shown sufficient interest to organize
the Group and schedule an organizational meeting. It was pointed out that the only conference
with which the Geneva Section IEEE would be concerned in 1965 would be the International
Television Symposium, which would be held in Montreux from 24th to 28th May.
Israel:
Dr. A. Shani reported. Only two meetings had been notified to Headquarters, but the possibility
existed for joint meetings with the AIEE. The Israeli Section wanted to publish a Journal11
in the Spring of 1965. In that way a contribution could be made to the National Convention
and to technical interest. It was not proposed to have a specialized journal, but one with wide
interest. Other interests were the possibility of coordinating with other engineering societies in
the preparation of the journal, but even so, financial assistance was required. It was pointed
out by the Director that the Israeli Section may wish to solicit help from Headquarters in
respect to publication assistance and it might be that some of their articles could be sent for
publication in the IEEE publications and that reprints could be requested for the use of the
Section. However, the problem wa a general one and, in the main, Sections would have to
arrange for financing their own publications.
11
In the corrected version, ‘a Journal’ has been replaced by ‘the proceedings of the Israel Communication Convention’.
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
157
G Minutes of the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
Norway:
Mr. M.M. Brady reported that five meetings were held and two meetings were already planned
for next year. Norway would appreciate proposals and IEEE help in arranging for speakers.
A conference is planned on the automatic control of the peaceful uses of space for June 1965.
Help is being provided by the Norwegian Section to promote the conference and to print the
proceedings. There will be a Nordic Solid State Conductors Conference from 4th to 9th January,
1965. This had proved to be a popular conference and was being held at a wonderful ski resort.
It was suggested that similar conferences might be arranged in popular and enjoyable places.
Benelux:
Ir. M. Lulofs reported that the membership of the Benelux Section had grown from 85 to
290 in 1963, and to 365 in 1964. Four independent meetings were held this year, but unfortunately, the special annual meeting had to be cancelled because of small announced attendance.
Co-operation with other organizations on holding meetings was necessary to secure sufficient
attendance. Dr. Stumpers was organizing a conference for next September.
Egypt:
Mr. Abdel-Latif reported that the membership had grown from 80 to 90 this year and it was
hoped that there may be 150 members by the end of next year. Seven meetings had been
held which were well attended – about 80 persons present. Good co-operation existed with
Egyptian Engineering Societies. The Section was very anxious to obtain one copy of all the
IEEE Headquarters publications which would have to be free-of-charge as the Section funds
were not sufficient to cover membership in all groups. Due to financial regulations, membership
in professional groups is difficult especially in view of the relatively high costs and in this respect
it was urged, as did a number of other Sections, that there be no increase of dues. Difficulties
were pointed out in connection with pending subscriptions for the library as the price was too
high, and the point was made which was supported by many Section representatives that the
cost to scientific technical libraries should be at least the same as for Members. An invitation
was extended to members of IEEE to visit Cairo, at which time meetings could perhaps be
arranged, at least with the officers, as was done on the occasion of Mr. Rinia’s visit in 1962
and Mr. Gayer’s visit in 1964. No special conferences were planned for 1965, but it was pointed
out that the Section planned to organize the International Television Symposium in 1966.
France:
Mr. J.R. Pernice reported that good co-operation existed with the French Society which has a
strong program and it was up to the Section to provide important speakers with a new message.
The existence of the Section depended on the introduction of new ideas and developments which
would be given in English when arranged by the Section. It was pointed out that the Executive
Committee when visiting Europe to assist in the organization of new Sections, had promised
support and help, and one of the first things the Section needed – and that all Sections of
Region 8 probably needed – was the IEEE Headquarters to encourage visitors coming to the
Region to organize a program of interesting papers for presentation at the different Sections.
The Section itself had no special meeting place and efforts were being made to find a convenient
place to meet, with the facilities required. Attempts need to be made to up-grade membership
and to help in nominating candidates for the grade of Fellow. This was endorsed by several
other Section representatives.
5. New Sections. The letter from Professor J.T. Wallmark was read in reference to the organization of a Swedish Section, in which it was pointed out that it was not necessary for
Headquarters IEEE to waive the requisite 50 signatures for the organization of a Section.
In general, 20 to 30 signatures for a Section, as was foreseen in Sweden, were adequate. It was
also pointed out that it was opportune to organize a Section in Madrid where an IEEE Student
158
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
G.4 Monday 26 October 1964
organization exists and actually had its own excellent publication. It is believed that Region 8
could help in the organization of the Swedish and Spanish Sections.
6. Nomination for Awards. The Director announced there would be no medal of honor this
year and that the decision had been taken in respect to the other awards and fellowships.
The procedure for proposing Fellowships was discussed and it was agreed that the Sections
themselves should make direct efforts in proposing Members for the grade of Fellow. If the
Section needed help in securing support, it was pointed out that the minimum number of
recommendations required for the presentation of a nominee should be obtained within a
Section but those could be endorsed by other Fellows in the Region in order to secure full
consideration by the Fellow Committee.
7. Coming IEEE Conferences and Meetings. The IEEE International Convention will be
held in New York, March 22–26, 1965. There was hope that some of the Members from Region 8
who would be attending might get together informally with the Director-elect, Mr. Jean Lebel,
on this occasion. The meetings and conferences to be held in Region 8 were reported on under
item 4 above.
8. Finances of Region 8. The Treasurer, Mr John H. Gayer, reported on the financial situation
of the Region. A considerable part of the grant of $500 received from IEEE Headquarters in
1962 was still available. The expenditures were:
Postage, telegram (1962)
Postage, telephone, telegram (1963)
Postage, telephone, telegram (1964)
Bank Service Charges (1962/63)
Paper, envelopes, stencils, supplies, reproduction charges
30.00 Sw.frs
93.25 Sw.frs
42.00 Sw.frs
3.80 Sw.frs
120.00 Sw.frs
——————
389.05 Sw.frs
= 92.87 USD
Balance: $500 less $92.87 = $407.13
Therefore, it had cost approximately $100 for the two years of operation (in 1962 very few
expenses were incurred). It was pointed out, however, that in future there may be additional
expenses and the requirements of Region 8 would grow and cost might be involved in respect
to various activities in the future. Accordingly, it was decided that a request should be put to
Headquarters IEEE for half of the $1.10 rebate per Member for the Members in Region 8 who
are not in a Section. In this way, the Region would have some income in the immediate future
and could undertake to assist Sections and perhaps in “non-section” areas in ways it was not
able to do at present.
9. Incoming Regional Director. Mr. Lebel raised some points concerning the importance of
bringing back into the organization Members lost in the merger. He hoped that all Sections
had now their By-laws in order. The possibility of organizing charter flights for the purpose of
attending IEEE Conventions and various meetings being held in Europe was mentioned.
10. Instructions for completion of IEEE forms. Mr. Brady of Norway reported on the
experience of the Norwegian Section in completing forms. He brought out the fact that many of
the terms used in Europe were different from those used in the United States and that Sections
could prepare a simple list of American equivalents in respect to those used in other Sections.
Mr. Brady distributed a paper on what had been done by the Norwegian Section and offered
to put together a collection of operative terms for the Region. It was accordingly decided that
each Section would send its contribution in this respect direct to Mr. Brady who would prepare
a reference document for use by the Sections and the Headquarters of IEEE. Mr. Brady asked
A short history of IRE Region 9 / IEEE Region 8
159
G Minutes of the IEEE Region 8 Committee meetings
that each Section might prepare a list similar to that made by Norway (see Annex 2) and send
it to him as soon as possible, but in any case within one month. There was a general belief that
University Admission Boards, particularly in the United States, Educational Departments of
Governments and large companies would be able to help in this respect.
11. Formation of New Sections in Europe. Mr. Brady again reported on the efforts his Section
had made to assist in the organization of the Swedish Section and raised the question in which
further way the Sections of the Region might be of help in the formation of new Sections
in areas where no Section existed. The details in reference to the formation of the Swedish
and Spanish Sections are reported on under 5 above. However, at this point it was stressed
that further efforts should be made to help in the formation of a Danish Section. With the
existing Sections’ help, addresses in the “non-Section” areas could be corrected, but in some
cases financial assistance from headquarters might have to be requested to cover the cost. The
Region 8 Committee should take this matter under further review at its next meeting.
12. Other Business. As this was the last meeting at which Mr. Rinia would preside as Director,
he outlined the work of the Committee and stressed how much he had enjoyed working with
the Sections and their representatives and considered it a great privilege to have been the first
Director. He was quite pleased with the accomplishments of the Region and thanked everyone
for their assistance. However, he felt there was much left to be done and regretted that it had
not been possible for him to visit all the Sections. He expressed appreciation to the Sections
that he had visited for their warm reception and found it a great pleasure and privilege so to
represent the IEEE. He closed by wishing all success to the future work of the Region and to
Mr. Lebel’s Directorship. He pointed out that few Members were as well qualified as Mr. Lebel
for this task, as he had experience of Sections both in Europe and in the United States.
Dr. Williams, on behalf of the Committee, expressed the great appreciation of the Region for
the work, leadership and untiring efforts of Mr. Rinia. He endorsed Mr. Rinia’s remarks that the
Region was being left in good hands. He concluded with a vote of thanks and appreciation to
Mr. Rinia, and extended to him the very best wishes for the future and noted with satisfaction
that the Committee would be seeing him at future meetings of the Region.
Mr. Lebel responded by expressing his appreciation for the kind remarks and also his personal
feelings for the responsibility of succeeding Mr. Rinia as Director of the growing Region 8. He
said he would be guided by the policies and examples set by Mr. Rinia’s high endeavour in
this undertaking. He was also pleased to note that Mr. Rinia would continue to participate in
the work of the Region for the next two years, as his advice both to the new Director and to
the Region was so important.
13. Place and date of next meeting. It was decided that the next meeting would be held
in about six months’ time and the tentative date of Monday, April 26, in Geneva was set.
However, a general desire was expressed to hold at least one of the two meetings outside
Geneva, whereupon it was decided to take the matter up with headquarters, IEEE. It was
pointed out that it would cost very little more to hold meetings in other central locations
of Europe, particularly in view of the fact that more outlying Sections were represented at
Regional meetings.
John H.Gayer
Secretary, Region 8, IEEE
13 November, 1964
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G.5 Monday 26 April 1965
G.5
Monday 26 April 1965
REPORT OF THE FIFTH MEETING OF IEEE REGION 8
held in Geneva, Monday, April 26, 1965
Present:
Mr. C.B. Broersma, Benelux Section
Prof. F.E. Borgnis, Geneva Section
Mr. A.W.C. Boyle, Geneva Section
Dr. A.I. Nizan, Israel
Mr. De Lotto Ivo, Italy Section
(for Prof. E. Gatti)
Mr. M. Eggestad, Norway Section
Mr. R.C. Winton, U.K. & Eire Section
Mr. F.S. Barton, U.K. & Eire Section
Dr. R.C.G. Williams, U.K. & Eire Section
Mr. K. Franz, Western Germany Section
Ir. H. Rinia, former Director, IEEE Region 8
Mr. J.D. Lebel, Director, IEEE Region 8
Mr. J.H. Gayer, Secretary, IEEE Region 8
Excused:
Representatives of Egypt Section
Mr. Joseph R. Pernice, France Section
Mr. R. Wellinger, Geneva Section
1. The report on the fourth meeting held on October 26, 1964 was approved with the following
correction to Page 3, 2nd paragraph, 3rd line: “. . . publish the proceedings of the Israel Communication Convention in the . . . ”
2. Report by the Regional Director. As the newly elected Director of IEEE Region 8, John
Lebel welcomed all representatives of the Sections and expressed the hope that all would
cooperate with him in carrying out the goals and programme of activities established under
the excellent chairmanship of Mr. Rinia. Mr. Lebel looked forward to the guidance of the Past
Director, whose presence at future Regional Meetings would be appreciated. The Director
outlined the success of the IEEE’s International Convention and explained the results of the
meetings held during that time. In that respect, he pointed out that the revenues from publications were reduced, that there was a slight increase in membership dues and also in publications
subscriptions. Headquarters had experienced an increase in salaries which had been offset by
the reduction of staff possible through the use of an electronic computer, The Headquarters
of the IEEE were now established in the Engineering Building, and the late headquarters of
IRE were being sold. There was a general feeling of optimism in respect to the administration
of finance, although there was an overall deficiency of 6%–7% in the income. Subscription
rates for students is being reduced from $5 to $3, and the Student Journal was being mainly
directed towards under-graduate students. For Senior and Graduate Students, it was realized
that “Spectrum” was preferred. This will in future be sent to all Senior Students during the
last six months before graduation. Graduate students and Student Members in Region 8 would
also receive “Spectrum.”
The important work of the Fellowship Committee was discussed. It was pointed out that it
was important to have a European Representative who would be able to attend, with expenses
paid, one meeting of the Fellowship Committee. It was pointed out that if a member were
recommended for Fellowship Membership and he was not elected, it was necessary for a new
application with full recommendations and justification to be resubmitted at a later date.
Fellowship application was not automatically carried over for consideration the following year.
In reference to the report of the Director, Dr. Williams – the Region 8 Fellowship Committee
representative – pointed out that IEEE, as a non-national organization, should give careful
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consideration to the awarding of Fellowships to Region 8. In this respect, he pointed out
that the nomination procedure was familiar to United States members which may not be
the case for European members. It was important for the members of Region 8 to present
their nominations in the same form, with the justification. The Region 8 representative at the
IEEE 1963 Committee stressed the important work of this Committee and the necessity for
Region 8 to be represented to present their viewpoint, as full understanding is difficult through
correspondence. The Director, in this respect, pointed out that the position of Region 8 had
been recognized, as there was 3% of Fellowship Members in Region 8 as against 1.7% for the
Institute. He pointed out that members of the Henderson Committee could help in this respect,
particulary concerning efforts to obtain Fellow Members in all Sections. He also outlined the
number of IEEE Awards given each year in which the Region 8 members should now be
interested. He stressed that this could be taken up with someone familiar with the European
scene and perhaps the matter could be discussed again with Messrs. Henderson, Weber and
other officers of IEEE who may be coming to Europe this year.
Dr. Williams stressed the importance of the IEEE throughout the world and that it was now
a confirmed non-national society. However, effort should be made to present such an image. A
number of the representatives felt that the IEEE definitely presented an American image. The
Director called attention to the March edition of the IEEE Spectrum and to the article “Spectral
Lines” which set forth the policy of IEEE in this respect. He also outlined the difficulties
with the merger and said that now with the General Manager, Donald Fink, efforts were
being made to have an effective Administration and to cater to all the members’ requirements.
Dr. Williams stressed that it was important to have someone in Europe who was a paid member
of Headquarters but who could ensure that the needs, membership requirements and interest of
the members in Region 8 were fully met. There was a need to bill members in local currency and
for a procedure to be found whereby Sections or the Regional Headquarters could operate as a
sub-office of the New York Headquarters. Mr. Gayer pointed out the administrative difficulties
of a sub-office, and stressed the importance of informing the New York office as he had found
prompt response on any queries raised with them. Mr. Rinia pointed out the desirability of
each Section being visited and hoped that Mr. Lebel would be able to do this during his term
when the officers of the Headquarters of the Institute came. Mr. Barton pointed out that the
President Mr. Barney Oliver would be coming to Europe in June. Mr. Lebel advised that the
General Manager, Donald Fink, would also be coming to Europe this Summer and expressed
the hope that he could meet with a number of the Sections, or perhaps a Regional Meeting
would be held so that they could attend. The Director advised that no doubt Mr. Weber would
also be coming over this Summer as well. The Director outlined many of the statistics that
were published in the Report of the Secretary for 1964. These statistics are not reproduced
because of their magnitude, but a copy will be sent to each Section.
3. Result of IEEE Elections. The Director advised the Committee of the results of the elections
in which there was a total of 606 ballots cast (20% of the members voting) of which 596 voted
for the President and 553 voted for Mr. Lebel’s appointment. This was considered as a firm
expression of the interest of members.
4. Report of Section representatives. The Director pointed out that there was now available
a series of publications: Section Manuals, Manuals for IEEE Professional Groups, Student
Branch Manual, and a Manual for IEEE Counselors. If Sections do not have these available,
they could request them from European Headquarters. There was general discussion of the
student interest in the IEEE wherein it was outlined that the students had great interest in
the Institute from an educational point of view and their dues had been worked out at a rate
they could afford. Students should be encouraged, but an effort should be made to ensure that
IEEE was not in competition with the National Societies. Professor Borgnis outlined his contact
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with students, and was in fact a Student Counselor. He gave advice on IEEE publications, but
could not advise them further because of his position in the Technical Institute, Zurich. He
felt it would be more beneficial to have a graduate student serve as the IEEE Educational
Counselor.
Benelux:
Membership in the Benelux Section is stable. The Section is on probation because they did
not have five meetings in 1964. It was thought a solution to this might be to report a full day’s
meeting as two meetings – morning and afternoon.
The Director said that it may be possible for the Henderson Committee to consider this matter.
Also, Sections could consider having joint meetings, as these would help to bring the IEEE into
the engineering activities of different countries and provide the necessary number of meetings
for the record, per year.
U.K. & Eire:
There have been many new developments in the U.K. & Eire Section. Mr. Barton headed the
working party which prepared the By-laws to bring the voting procedure into effect. In 1963
five meetings were held, two in 1964 and in 1965, five to six meetings would be held. The
IEEE would co-sponsor a number of meetings during the year; one was a five-day conference
on Materials and Components used in Electronics Engineering (see previous minutes) on 17–25
May. Quite a number of complaints had been received on the handling of subscriptions and
IEEE Headquarters had not replied to certain letters. Mr. Barton had written to Mr. Fink
concerning these matters and he hoped that the matter could now be put in good order. The
representatives pointed out the importance of representation of Region 8 at the Awards and
Fellowships Committees. The lack of efficient administration at Headquarters was stressed.
Italy:
The Italian representative reported that they had difficulty in organising meetings, as the
National Society was very strong and held many meetings in Italian, catering to the local
interest. There was only one meeting held last year and two this year; unfortunately attendance
was poor. They had complaints concerning answers from Headquarters. They are trying to form
two Sections in Italy – one in the North and one in the South, to be centered in Milan and
Rome respectively. At the moment, meetings are held in Milan and the creation of a Section
in Rome might stimulate greater support. A Committee has been set up to arrange for the
elections and to make proposals concerning the organisation of the Section.
Israel:
The representative pointed out that they had difficulty with formal meetings and accordingly,
not sufficient meetings had been held and the Section was therefore on probation. The organization of their Convention on Components was proceeding satisfactorily and they hoped that
a number of members from the Region would be able to attend. It was pointed out that a
number of the contributions could be published in the IEEE Transactions. The Section was
requesting two sets of all IEEE publications which they intended to display at the Convention.
Norway:
This Section now had 76 members – an increase of 30% and joint IEEE meetings were being
successfully arranged. The Convention held in February had been a great success. The attendance of the Director at this meeting was appreciated. Publication of the Norway Vector was
being resumed.
W. Germany:
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The German Section was established on May 14th, 1965 [sic], with Dr. Rohde the Chairman.
The letter of Dr. Fink on the organization of the activities was appreciated. The IEEE Section
will collaborate closely with the active National Society which has 5000–6000 members. This is
practical as there is a personal union of executives and many close contacts are assured. There
were now 180 members in the Section.
Geneva:
This Section had many successful meetings in 1964. In reporting, Past President Prof. Borgnis
said that meetings were held both in Geneva and Zurich and the plans for the future were to
hold meetings in Geneva, Zurich, Berne, Lausanne, Neuchâtel, etc. Many of the meetings held
at the Federal Institute Zurich, were jointly arranged. For this reason and due to the excellent
speakers the large attendance was accounted for. The special event of the Geneva Section would
be the collaboration in the 4th International Television Symposium which would be held from
24th to 28th May, 1965 in Montreux. Mr. Gayer pointed out that wide recognition had been
given to this Symposium and it was hoped that the IEEE, as an Institute, could collaborate
more actively in the 5th one which would be held in the Spring of 1966.
France:
The Chairman of the French Section was unfortunately not able to be present, but sent the
following written report: Six technical meetings were held in 1964 and until the present date
we have had two meetings. There are good prospects for some additional eight or ten meetings,
covering a wide field of technical subjects. All of the speakers are solicited from the United
States by the Chairman of the French Section, principally, by correspondence. The program of
the IEEE French Section, in effect, supplements that of the Société Française des Electroniciens
et Radioélectriciens, and makes available to the combined membership, additional technical
subjects and speakers which would not normally be found on the SFER programs.
5. Nominations for Awards. There were no nominations or considerations for awards. The
Secretary pointed out that the Cairo Section had forwarded two names for Fellowship awards
for which he hoped there would be sufficient support at the meeting for endorsement. Those
Fellow members present would be approached, if the Committee agreed, and asked to support
the applications and to send off the recommendations forthwith, as the deadline for submission
was very near. The Secretary also said that if Sections needed help in this respect, this should
be sought at a very early date, as it was very difficult to obtain the necessary support at the
last minute. In general, it was felt that the Section should deal with the recommendations
for Awards, and if they needed help, they should consult the Director, or other members of
the Committee with whom they were acquainted, as it was in general not appropriate for the
Regional Committee to deal with recommendations.
The Director pointed out that the Medal of Honor was not being awarded this year and it
might be that Sections wished to review the IEEE Awards that are made and send in their
nominations at the earliest possible date.
6. Forthcoming IEEE Conferences and Meetings in Region 8. The representatives of
the U.K., Israeli and Geneva Sections referred to the IEEE Conventions with which they were
collaborating, or which they were organizing. In this respect, it was considered that the Sections
which were organizing Conventions and different activities, should inform Headquarters of all
other Sections of Region 8 as early as possible in advance of their forthcoming events.
7. Other business. The Director reported that there was now an International Committee under
the Chairmanship of John Henderson, which was known as the Henderson Committee. A
meeting of this Committee was held at the March Convention which was attended by Messrs.
Rinia, Henderson, Lebel, McFarlan, Weber and Willenbrock. All Sections had been invited to
send representatives, but unfortunately not all Sections were able to do so. The Committee
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considered many of the points referred to above, including the Mailing and Membership
Subscription problems. An effort would now be made since the merger problems were now over,
to provide better service to members, and again it was pointed out that local banking services
for Sections was an important matter to consider. It was highly important that distinguished
IEEE members visiting other countries, particularly Headquarters officers, should announce
their visit in advance and let the Section Chairman or Secretary know of their availability to
speak.
Dr. Williams, Chairman of the U.K. and Eire Section, remarked that the IEEE was attempting
to be a non-national organization, but in fact it was a title only. It was operating as a national
society. He appreciated the value of visits made by IEEE Head-officers, as they needed to know
the situation and the activities of all Sections – not only those in the United States. He hoped
that the Executive Board of the IEEE could give consideration to setting up a European office
with someone familiar with European situation in charge. The Director pointed out that a
number of the Headquarters staff knew the European situation; Mr. Keyes, Assistant to the
General Manager, has a Secretary who is European. He hoped that through the further efforts
of the Headquarters of IEEE, and on specific suggestions of the members of Region 8, this
Committee and the Sections, the situation could be cleared up.
Further mention was made of the technical activities, the work of the Fellowship Committee,
the rebate to Region 8 of $1.10 or 50% thereof for Region 8 finances of members dues when
they are not a member of a Section, members lost in the merger, IEEE membership notification
cards concerning the membership, the establishment of the Swedish and Danish Sections; the
operation of the Spanish Student Group, where there was apparently not a sufficient number of
members to warrant the formation of a Spanish Section. The publications of various Sections
were circulated, at which time the hope was expressed that more European Sections would be
able to have an IEEE Bulletin or Newsletter, at least once in a while.
8. Date and place of next meeting. The Director pointed out that the next Board meeting
would be on August 26, but that the Regional Committee meeting could be held after this,
later in the Fall, according to the wishes of the Committee. The Committee decided to accept
the kind invitation of the U.K. Section to have the next meeting in London, subject to the
agreement of the Headquarters, IEEE, in respect to the additional expenses that would be
incurred.
NOTE OF THE DIRECTOR.
In view of the discussions that took place on the proposal of the IEEE President, Barney Oliver,
and the General Manager, Donald Fink to visit Europe, it was thought that the next meeting could
be held in London or Geneva and arranged at the time when they would be able to attend. The
itinerary and details of Mr. Fink’s visit have been requested in order that the date of the next
meeting can be arranged in a way that they can attend. It is possible, in view of the International Telecommunication Union’s Centenary activities that they may, on this occasion, desire to
spend considerable time in Geneva, and the next meeting would accordingly be held in Geneva in
September for their convenience, and to make it possible for maximum attendance. If this is the
case, the first meeting of 1966 could be held in London. Members of the Committee will be advised
of the date, agenda and place as soon as decided upon.
Jean D. Lebel
Director
John H.Gayer
Secretary
IEEE Region 8
29 June 1965
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