April 2014 - Salisbury University

HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
PLEASE DO NOT PRINT THIS.
The Biology and Environment (Biology 502)
Graduate Students took a trip to the
Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural
History to tour the Entomology, Mammalogy, and
Invertebrate Zoology wings. See more photos
from their trip on pages 10–11.
Shown right: Andrew McGowan (M.S. student
in Applied Biology) holding a preserved scorpion.
Photo by Krispen Laird.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lyle Cook, Junior Dual Degree major (Biological Sciences/ Environmental Science) was accepted into
the summer REU program at Shannon Point Marine Center in Anacortes, WA. He also received word
that he was selected out of 200 applicants for the summer undergraduate internship position at Oregon
Health & Science University's Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in Portland. He has
accepted the position at Shannon Point.
Megan Bock has been awarded a Sea Grant REU internship at Horn Point Laboratory for summer 2014.
She will be working with Dr. Mike Roman on a project involving zooplankton and dissolved oxygen
levels in the Chesapeake Bay.
TriBeta Inductees
Maria Abraham, Rubab Ahmad, Tolani Akindele, Kelsey Allen, Ann Ascot, Brittany Barnhart, Krystal
Donaldson, Kelsey Gabert, Chase Gardner, Stephanos Gozali, Taylor Groginski, Sara Hammer,
Christopher Haviland, Nicole Hodiak, Julia Howser, Ashley Jones, Rachel Keuls, Kathleen Kila, Ashley
Kobisk, Andrea Korell, Kyle Kowalczyk, Corrine Link, Marie Lockard, Samantha Lucas, Shelby
Mackey, Megan Millen, Caitlin Minton, Erin Osipowich, Joseph Perucci, Zachary Rathbun, Emma Rice,
Brittney Rogers, Dana Short, Patrick Simons, Adam Smith, Saidat Sola-Rufai, Selene Sparks, Alexander
Stuffer, Margaret Thomas, Mariah Thomas, Laura Thornburg, Beverly Ann Tripari Villaplana, Elizabeth
Webster, Kyle Westbrook, Tara Wyman, and Heather Yerecic
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
Salisbury University Student Research Conference
The Salisbury University Student Research Conference (SUSRC) committee announces the SUSRC on
Friday, April 25, 2014. Presentations are organized into themed sessions, ranging from molecular biology
to music composition, from education to economics. The conference culminates in a poster reception
where the Outstanding Research Mentor Award is presented to a faculty member for excellence in
guiding student research. The conference is free and the public is invited. For more information visit
http://www.salisbury.edu/susrc
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
Know the Drill
The Know the Drill Event presented by the
Undergraduate Student National Dental Association
(USNDA) Chapter at SU, took place on Saturday,
February 22, 2014 in Henson Hall. SU and UMES
pre-dental students attended the event. The guest
speaker for the event was a local dentist, Dr. Elton
Maddox Jr. (shown right), the first AfricanAmerican to graduate from the University of
Maryland School of Dentistry (UMSOD). The
program included a presentation by UMSOD
recruiter Dr. Andrea Morgan, lunch with current
UMSOD students and an informal Q&A session
with the dental students. Photo by Grant L.
Gursky.
USNDA would like to thank the Student National Dental Association (SNDA) Chapter at UMSOD and
the Health Profession Advising Program (HPAP) for helping to make the event a success.
Left to right: Arian Hamidi, Samuel Maiman, Charniece Whitaker, Syeda Jaffery, Krystal Donaldson,
Dr. Elton Maddox Jr., Dr. Andrea Morgan, Dr. Mark Frana, Dana Short, Devon Honrychs, Lindsey
Roberts and Brad Langley. Photo by Grant L. Gursky.
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
OPPORTUNITIES
Study Abroad Class in Costa Rica
Looking for a great way to spend Winter Term - 2015?
Consider registering for a Study Abroad Class in Costa Rica!
This course is designed to help both non-biology majors and
majors appreciate the biodiversity of the tropics using Costa
Rica as an example. We will visit national parks, and
research, agricultural and cultural facilities. Students will
develop or sharpen their skills of scientific observation
through guided activities and time on their own to observe.
The course will also include large measures of language,
culture, art, history, and a general appreciation for Costa Rica
and her people. Included in the program: boat excursion in
Tortuguero, admission to Tortuguero National Park,
Chocolate Tour in Sarapiqui, guided tour at La Selva
Biological Station, kayaking on Lake Arenal, suspension bridge walk, zip-line tour, admission to
Monteverde Reserve and the Butterfly Garden and admission to several west coast national parks on the
Pacific Ocean. The course is limited to 20 students. Priority will be given to applications received by May
1, 2014. For information contact the instructors: Mary Roman Gunther: [email protected]
Dr. Eric Liebgold: [email protected]
2014 Summer Field Assistants Pssitions: Blue Catfish Tagging Study.
VIMS, College of William & Mary. Gloucester Point, Virginia
Position Description: Field assistants are needed in Gloucester Point, Virginia. Successful applicants will
assist in field operations from July-September 2014 (or through late August if an undergraduate student).
This is the third year of a mark-recapture study to establish a population size estimate of blue catfish, an
invasive freshwater fish able to move into estuarine habitats. In previous years, tagged fish were released
in the upper James River estuary of southeastern Virginia. This summer, successful applicants will work
as part of a 5-6 person team and will assist with recovery of tagged fish from the commercial harvest. This
will include handling fish, data recording, and equipment operation and maintenance. Field work can
involve 8-12 hour days in all weather conditions with extensive time outdoors and numerous hours in
transit to and from field sites via VIMS vehicle. Employment is contingent upon successful results from a
background check that is performed by the College prior to the start of employment. No housing or
transportation (except between VIMS and field sites) will be provided by the project. Field assistants will
be hired as temporary employees and paid on an hourly wage basis ($11.00-$12.00/hour); wages will be
based on experience.
Required Qualifications: 1. Biological sciences background with bachelor’s degree completed or in
progress and an interest or focus on fishes or fisheries preferred: 2. Must be physically able to move field
equipment and supplies (up to ~50 lbs.); 3. Experience with small machinery repair and maintenance; 4.
Must have a valid driver’s license, an acceptable driving record, and be willing to share driving
responsibilities.
Desired Qualifications: 1. Experience with boating and trailering in general and a proven ability to be
comfortable in the field and on the water in all weather conditions; 2. Ability to resist motion sickness
during extensive hours in a truck/boat; 3. Experience identifying fishes or other general taxonomic
experience. Please send a cover letter, resume, and contact information for three references to Alicia
Norris ([email protected]) by May 5, 2014.
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
FEATURED FACULTY
DR. CHRIS BRIAND
Courses taught at SU:
Introduction to Plant Biology (BIOL 212), Economic Botany (BIOL 250), Plant Morphology (BIOL 324),
Plant Anatomy (BIOL 325), Research in Biology (BIOL 415/416)
Research Interests:
I am very interested in the historical impact of humans on their environment. My research often involves
slogging through historical records (or across farm fields), of which there now is a wealth online. Thus, I
jokingly refer to myself as an armchair ecologist. I do, however, occasionally get up to get a latté from
Cool Beans and collect soil samples from cemeteries. Since coming to SU from the Université du Québec
à Montréal, I have developed a research program in Historical Ecology, with colleagues and students both
in Biology (Dr. Geleta) and Geography (Drs. Folkoff and Zaprowski), investigating the impact of
European settlement on the Delmarva Peninsula. Over the past 350 years, human activities have caused
considerable soil erosion and degradation due to deforestation, intensive agriculture, and poor if any soil
conservation practices. Small, undisturbed family cemeteries on the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland
provide us with valuable markers for assessing these changes. Continued cultivation around the
cemeteries has left many of them as isolated remnant knolls, elevated above the surrounding fields. Soil
physical and chemical properties indicated that the cemeteries were left largely undisturbed by humans.
The farm fields surrounding the cemeteries, however, exhibited ca. 0.5 m of surface soil depletion, lower
levels of organic matter, soil carbon, total nitrogen, but higher levels of cations such as Ca and K, the
result of liming and fertilization. These results are consistent with our hypothesis that land clearance and
farming practices have considerably eroded and altered the chemistry and structure of soils on the Lower
Eastern Shore of Maryland. We have added Dr. Emmert to our team and with her students she is
investigating how soil microbial activity varies over time between cemeteries and farm fields.
Preliminary results look very promising!
Recent Publication:
Geleta SB, Briand CH, Folkoff ME, and Zaprowski BJ. 2014. Cemeteries as indicators of post-settlement
anthropogenic soil degradation on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Human Ecology (accepted).
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
About me:
I grew up in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. My Pop was a Stevedore and my Mom stayed at home and
took care of my brother and me. My older brother Bill, aka “Willy Hop”, is a landscaper and musician,
singing and playing guitar and harp in several blues bands. My Pop loves to garden and my Mom collects
cacti and other indoor plants. You can see a theme developing here. Neither of my parents went to
University let alone high school, but they encouraged me to get a good education. I kind of went
overboard and graduated from the University of Guelph (about 40 miles from Toronto) with a PhD in
Botany and then spent several years in Montréal working as a Postdoc before coming to Salisbury. My
wife, Cheryl Ann, has more university degrees than I do and is currently working as an English as a
Second Language teacher in the public school system. We don’t have kids, but we do have three
wonderful cats! In our dotage we will probably be known as the crazy cat people! Outside of work, I love
to listen to music and dream of more expensive audio components.
I am also the editor for the Salisbury University Arboretum webpage:
http://www.salisbury.edu/arboretum/
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
TRAVEL AND PRESENTATIONS
Atlantic Estuarine Research Society
On Thursday, March 27, the Atlantic Estuarine Research Society
(AERS) held its Spring Meeting at the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel
in Ocean City, MD. AERS is an organization comprising
students, scientists, managers, and educators from the states of
DE, MD, NC, NJ, PA, and VA and Washington, DC. The
meeting provided an opportunity for stakeholders and members to
discuss estuarine and coastal environmental issues and policies.
Three students and two faculty from the SU Department of
Biological Sciences attended the meeting; the students presented
the following talks and posters.
Contributed Talk
Alexander Stuffer. Stress and growth rates of Arctic charr at different growth temperatures as assessed
by changes in the activities of metabolic enzymes.
Contributed Posters
Amanda Biederman. Acute temperature change and LDH activity in the Atlantic killifish, Fundulus
heteroclitus.
Andrea Korell. Seasonal changes in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in a estuarine fish, Fundulus
heteroclitus.
Faculty Attendees: Judith Stribling and Eugene Williams.
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
CapSci14
On Saturday, March 29, the Washington Academy of
Sciences and its Affiliated Scientific Societies held
Capitol Science 2014, the sixth in a continuing series of
biennial all-Affiliate conferences. These Conferences
serve as platforms for scientific presentations, seminars,
tutorials, and talks presented by members of the
Affiliated Societies. CapSci14 was held at Marymount
University’s Ballston Campus. Eighteen members of
Salisbury University’s Student Chapter of WAS were
present along with 4 SU faculty.
Keynote Speaker. E. Eugene Williams. The fish of Iceland and climate change.
Contributed Talks
Meagan Jezek. RNA interference knockdown of the wdr-20 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans.
Alexander Stuffer. Stress and growth rates of Arctic charr at different growth temperatures as assessed
by changes in the activities of metabolic enzymes.
Michael Robben. Effect of mrck-1suppression by RNA interference on cellular oxidation defense
responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.
Zach Rathbun. Vascular dysfunction in muscular dystrophy I.
Contributed Posters
Heather Yerecic. Identification and characterization of WDR48 mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana.
Rachel Flanagan. Evaluating the effectiveness of converting a lawn mower to operate on solar energy.
Amanda Biederman. Acute temperature change and LDH activity in the Atlantic killifish, Fundulus
heteroclitus.
Katherine Murphy. Using sonar to assist the visually impaired.
Stephen Kelly. Altering growth rates and nutritional qualities of microalgal feedstock with symbiotic
bacteria.
Andrea Korell. Seasonal changes in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in a estuarine fish, Fundulus
heteroclitus.
Lylie Hinh. Vascular Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy II.
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
CapSci14 (cont.)
Faculty attendees. Philip Anderson, Patti Erickson, Victor Miriel, and Eugene Williams.
Student attendees. Amanda Biederman, Sarah Confrancisco, Rachel Flanagan, Abde Geleta, Alex
Grogan, Lylie Hinh, Stephen Kelly, Andrea Korell, Meagan Jezek, Samin Manizade, Sean McIntyre,
Katherine Murphy, Georgette Ndamukong, Zach Rathbun, Michael Robben, Marcus Schwarz, Alex
Stüfer, and Heather Yerecic
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
Biology Graduate students visit the National Museum of Natural History (Washington, D.C.)
Left to right: Mallory Hagadorn, Jackie Darrow, Krispen Laird, Kyle Wilhite,
Andrew McGowan, Sean McIntrye, Kelsey Mitchell, and Chelsi Rose
Perusing some Entomology Cases
Giant Ground Sloth
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
Gorilla skull donated by Diane Fossey (famous primatologist)
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
PUBLICATIONS
Liebgold, EB. 2014. The influence of social environment: Behavior of unrelated adults affect future
juvenile behaviors. Ethology 120:388-399.
Abstract
Juveniles’ behaviors are often influenced by the behaviors of conspecifics. Most experimental
studies of the influence of conspecific behavior vary the social environment by the presence or
absence of conspecifics or investigate the impact of the outcome of social encounters
(winner/loser effects) but less frequently expose individuals to variation in behavioral
phenotypes present in the social environment. Based on previous work showing that juveniles
of the salamander Plethodon cinereus are likely to interact frequently with non-parental adults, I
hypothesized that territorial adults in the social environment alter the future behaviors of
juveniles. I measured the intracohort social behaviors of juvenile salamanders collected from two
geographic areas, Michigan (MI) and Virginia (VA), before and after housing with ostensibly
territorial (VA) or non-territorial (MI) adults. There were overall effects of adult territoriality and
aggression on the behavior of juveniles. However, juveniles from populations in MI were
especially susceptible to behavioral modification. Compared with behaviors prior to being
housed with adults, MI juveniles increased investigatory and escape behaviors in juvenile–
juvenile interactions after being housed with adults that displayed territorial behaviors and
decreased investigatory and escape behaviors after being housed with non-territorial adults. This
study shows that not only is a specific behavior, territoriality of adult salamanders, a social
environment that modifies future juvenile behaviors, but the effects of social environment may
differ between populations.
ALUMNI NEWS
Christina Grossi, December 2013 Dual Degree graduate, will be working in a paid summer internship
position at the Marine Science Camp of NJ, doing water sampling, seining, kayaking, and teaching
lessons on shark conservation, among other things.
Gabriella (Gabby) David (class of 2013) is working toward a Masters degree in Therapeutic Herbalism
at the Maryland University of Integrative Health (http://www.muih.edu).
Robyn Kratenstein (class of 2005) graduated with a degree in elementary education and biology. She
went on to attend Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine and became a doctor. She is completing her
residency in Emergency Medicine at Conemaugh Memorial Hospital Level I Trauma Center in Johnstown
PA, and has accepted a position as Attending Emergency Medicine Physician at Conemaugh! “Thanks
for the amazing training, which helped me to accomplish my dream of being a doctor, so that I can help,
and heal others!”
Dr. Lee Ward (class of 1979) recently authored a book, First Generation College Students (Jossey-Bass,
2012). Lee is Director of the new 55,000 square foot University Health Center and Assistant Professor of
Integrated Science and Technology at James Madison University. He recently completed comparative
education research projects at Shandong University in China and Hiroshima University in Japan. This fall
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HENSON SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
April 2014
Newsletter
Lee will serve as Faculty Member in Residence at JMU's academic semester in London, where he will
teach Complex Systems and How They Fail.
If you have announcements to add or general comments regarding the Newsletter, please email
[email protected]
Editor: Dr. Dana L. Price
Coeditor: Dr. Ronald Gutberlet
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