スクリプト

英語チップス from 英検
第7回
~Talking English with Yuji and Peter~
「普段着英語」の句動詞を身に付けよう!(続き)
Script
■Opening Message
Yuji: Hi, everybody! Welcome back to “Eigo Chips from Eiken”. Once again, I’m Yuji.
Peter: And I’m Peter! Hello, everyone! How are you doing these days? Having fun? As always,
we’re here to help you learn English. OK, Yuji, let’s get started!
Yuji: All right, here we go!
■Introduction
Peter: It’s December so you are all probably thinking about Christmas and New Year’s.
Yuji: Yes, but don’t forget to continue studying English. OK, as usual, let’s start the podcast with
a quick review.
Here’s the first one. Please translate the following Japanese sentence into English.
「このレストランの料理は最高! また戻ってきたいな。
」
Peter: The food at this restaurant is super! I want to come back here again.
Yuji: OK. And here’s the second one.
「お正月にはふるさとに帰りたい。
」
Peter: I want to go back to my hometown for “Oshogatsu.”
Peter: Remember come back means to return to the place where you are right now and go back
means to return to a place where you were before.
Yuji: Good. Now, let’s go on to the third question.
「もう一度宿題を調べて,正しいかどうか確認してください。」
Peter: Please go over your homework and make sure it’s correct.
1
Yuji: OK, next. Please translate this into English:
「皆さん,車に乗ってください。
」
Peter: Everyone, please get in the car.
Peter: OK,now, we want to pick out a few expressions from our past podcasts as well.
Yuji: Right. So please put this into English:
「早く起きるのに慣れました。」
Peter: I got used to waking up early.
Yuji:はい,「~するのに慣れる」は,get used to ~が使えますね。to 以下には名詞が来ます。
OK, let’s go to the next question.
「寿司といえば、よく食べるのですか。」
Peter: Speaking of sushi, do you eat it often?
Yuji:はい,会話の相手の話を受ける「~と言えば」は、この speaking of で表すことができまし
たね。
Yuji: OK, one more translation.
「遅刻の言い訳をしてはいけません。」
Peter: Don’t make an excuse for being late.
Yuji:はい,「言い訳をする」は、基本動詞の make に excuse を付けるんでしたね。最後の se の
発音は/s/で,動詞では/z/になります。
Yuji: How did you do this month? I’m sure you remember those tips and phrases.
Yuji:はい,ウォームアップ,いかがでしたか。「脳内の辞書」にある表現を広げるために,瞬間
通訳の練習を続けてくださいね。
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■Today’s Tips
Peter: So, Yuji, in our last podcast we said that we would talk some more about phrasal verbs this
time. So should we get started?
Yuji: I guess we should. Last time we talked about phrasal verbs that cannot be separated. For
example, verbs like run into, in the sentence, I ran into my friend at the station. This
phrasal verb, run into, is made up of two words, run and into, and these two words must
always come together.
Peter: So we can say I ran into my friend, or I ran into him, but we cannot say I ran my friend
into, or I ran him into. This is why we say the two words must always come
together—because the object of the verb (動詞の目的語) can never come in between the
words of this kind of phrasal verb.
Yuji: Now last month we mentioned that there was a second kind of phrasal verb that can be
separated. And we want to talk about that today.
Peter: So an example of a phrasal verb that can be separated is call up, meaning to call by
telephone. In this case, we can say either I called up Kentaro yesterday, or I called
Kentaro up yesterday.
So with a regular noun (名詞), we can choose to separate the words in the phrasal verb or
not to separate them. However, when we use personal pronouns (代名詞) , like me, him,
her, us, it, or them, we must separate the words. So for example, in our sentence, if we
replace Kentaro with him, we would have to say I called him up yesterday.
Yuji: OK. That’s a little complicated, so I’m going to explain this in Japanese.
Yuji: はい,前回は句動詞(Phrasal verb)の中で,run into のように句動詞の間に目的語を取ら
ない種類を取り上げました。今月はもうひとつの種類,句動詞の間に目的語を取る句動詞
を取り上げます。
その例として最初にあげたのが,
「電話をする」という意味の call up です。
「健太郎に電話
をする。」という場合,call up Kentaro,もしくは call Kentaro up と,句動詞の最後に「健
太郎」という目的語を置くパターンと,句動詞の間に「健太郎」を入れるパターンとが考
えられます。この場合,どちらのパターンでも意味上の違いはありません。
しかしながら,
「健太郎」という名前がすでに出ていて,話している人の間で「健太郎」と
いう情報が分かっているときには,英語では「健太郎」を繰り返さずに,代名詞で置き換
えるのが原則です。つまり,句動詞が me, him, her, us, it, them などの代名詞を目的語に取
るときには,それらを句動詞の間に入れて,call him up というのが普通なのです。
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Peter: Great. So why don’t we give more examples of separable phrasal verbs now? And we’ll
begin with two common ones, take off and put on. The basic meanings of these phrasal
verbs are related to clothes, shoes, hats, rings and, things like that.
It is perfectly OK to say, for example, In Japan, we take our shoes off before we go into
someone’s house, and we put them on when we leave. But we could also say: In Japan we
take off our shoes before we go into someone’s house, and we put them on when we
leave.
So as we discussed before, we have the option of saying. We take our shoes off, or We take
off our shoes. And we should be clear: there is absolutely NO difference between those two
sentences in ANY way.
But when you use pronouns, it is different. Like I said before, we must separate the words.
Yuji, I think it will be easier to explain the basic meaning of put on and take off as well as
the usage of this kind of phrasal verb in Japanese.
Yuji: No problem, Peter. ということで,例を見てみましょう。最初は take off,put on です。両
方とも服,靴など身に付けるものに関係していています。take off は「~を脱ぐ」
、put on
は「~を着る」という意味で、皆さんにはおなじみですね。
ポイントは,先ほど述べたことの繰り返しになりますが,In Japan, we take our shoes off
before we go into someone’s house, and we put them on when we leave. という例文で明ら
かのように,家に上がる前に靴を脱ぐというのは take our shoes off でも take off our shoes
のどちらでも大丈夫で,意味に差異はありません。
でも例文の後半にある「靴を履く」という部分では,一度,話しに出て来た shoes を繰り返
さないために代名詞 them が使われ,ここは put on them とは言わずに,put them on と動
詞と副詞の間に代名詞の them を入れるのが普通なのです。
Peter: OK. Now there are two issues related to put on and its Japanese equivalents that we need
to mention. The first issue can be difficult for English speakers learning Japanese, and the
second issue can be difficult for Japanese speakers learning English.
Yuji: The first difference is that, as I said just now, in Japanese we have different words that
mean put on depending on what kind of clothing, or things you are putting on. For example,
the Japanese sentence “シャツを着なさい” would be translated in English as “Put on a
shirt,” and the Japanese sentence “帽子をかぶりなさい” would be translated in English as
“Put on a hat.” So even though we use two different verbs in Japanese, in English we only
use put on.
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Peter: The second difference is that the English verbs put on and wear are different. In English,
the verb put on is a dynamic verb (動態動詞) , which means that it describes an action,
but the verb wear is a stative verb (状態動詞), which means it describes a condition or
state. So the sentence I put on a t-shirt means that you took a t-shirt and pulled it over
your head. And the sentence I’m wearing a t-shirt is the situation that results after you
put your t-shirt on.
Yuji: I think we better take another break for a Japanese explanation , Peter.
はい,put on/take off に関連して 2 点ほど補足です。最初の点は日本人英語学習者というよ
りは,外国語として日本語を学んでいる人に関係するポイントです。日本語では着たり,
脱いだりするものに応じて,動詞が変わる場合があるということです。
put on だけでも,「(服など)を着る,ズボンなどをはく,帽子などをかぶる,眼鏡などを
かける,ネクタイなどをする,香水などをつける」と,それぞれの目的語に応じた動詞が
必要です。
同じように take off も,
「
(服など)を脱ぐ,帽子などを取る,眼鏡などをはずす」のように,
put on ほどではありませんが,やはり動詞が変化します。Peter が苦労するのもうなずけま
す。
もう 1 点の方は日本人が間違いやすいポイントです。それは put on は「動態」,つまり着る
という行動(action)を表し、着ているという「状態」は wear という動詞で表すというこ
とです。I put on a t-shirt. はTシャツに首を通して,それを身に付けるという動作を表現
し,I’m wearing a t-shirt. は今,着ていることを表現するのです。
Yuji: OK, I guess we’d better go quickly from here because of time. Next, we want to talk about
the phrasal verb: pick up, which means “(車で)迎えに行く” in Japanese.
Peter: For example, My mother is going to pick up my brother at his school and then pick me up
at the station. We could also say the first part of that as, My mother is going to pick my
brother up at his school and there would be no difference. But we cannot say, My mother
is going to pick up me. Remember, with separable phrasal verbs, personal pronouns (代名
詞) must always come in between.
Yuji: OK. The next separable phrasal verb that we want to talk about is look over.
Peter: Look over means examine or check. For example, Look over your test carefully after you
finish. We can also say, Look your test over carefully after you finish. Or even, After you
finish your test, look it over carefully.
Yuji: Now last month we talked about the phrasal verb go over, as in the sentence, Go over your
notes when you study for the test. As we can see from this sentence, the meaning of go
over and look over are very much the same.
5
Peter: In fact, the only real difference between the two verbs is that look over is separable and go
over is not.
Yuji: OK. Next, we’d like to discuss the phrasal verbs hand in and turn in.
Peter: Yes, the verbs hand in and turn in can have similar meanings and can be used in the same
way. With the meaning that we are talking about, they have the Japanese meaning of “提
出する.” For example, we can say, We need to hand in our summer projects tomorrow, or
We need to turn in our summer projects tomorrow.
Again, there is absolutely NO difference in the meaning of these two sentences. We can
also say, We need to hand our summer projects in tomorrow or We need to turn our
summer projects in tomorrow.
Yuji: Great. The next phrasal verb we’d like to explain is try out.
Peter: Try out means test. For example, I tried out that new computer game last night or I tried
that new computer game out last night. Try out is similar in meaning to try. For example,
you can try out a new restaurant, or you can try a new restaurant.
However, the usage of try out is not exactly the same as try. You can try a new food, but
you cannot try out a new food.
This is why it is important to go beyond trying to learn a language just by studying it. As
you improve, you must begin to use the language more, and you must begin to do different
things with it so that you can get a deeper, fuller understanding of it. For understanding
vocabulary, a Japanese-English or English-Japanese Dictionary is a very important tool to
have and to use.
But it can’t give you all the answers. Much of the vocabulary information that you
ultimately need can only come from using English in real life.
Yuji: Those are excellent points, Peter, but I think I need some time to explain them in Japanese.
Yuji: はい,駆け足でいくつか紹介しました。ここではポイントだけ触れることにしましょう。
まず,最初の pick up は pick(つつく)から発展してきた句動詞です。up があるので,
「拾
い上げる」という意味はイメージしやすいと思います。pick up には,この意味からさら
に,
「物を取りに行く」
「~を手に入れる」などもありますが,なんといっても「車で迎え
に行く」という意味は押さえておきましょう。車社会のアメリカでは保護者が子供を pick
up する風景はおなじみのものです。なお,日本人は「選ぶ」
(choose)という意味合いで,
「ピックアップ」というカタカナを使うことがありますが,これは和製英語で,英語では
pick out です。頭の隅に置いておいてくださいね。
6
次の look over ですが,これも look と over のそれぞれからイメージできますね。Peter は
examine, check と言い換えていますが,日本語で近い表現は「ざっと目を通す,検討する」
だと思います。
「ざっと」というのがポイントになります。例文では carefully(注意深く)
が付いていてちょっと矛盾するようですが,「注意して,それでも綿密ではなくざっと目
を通す」という感じになります。なお,この句動詞が代名詞を取るときには,Please look
the report over.と Please look over the report.の 2 つのパターンが認められています。先月
はほぼ同じ意味の go over を紹介しましたが、こちらの方は間に目的語を取ることはでき
ませんので注意してください。
次は「提出する」を表す hand in と,主に米国で同じ意味を表す turn in です。hand in は
「手を使って」,turn in は「方向を変えて」が元々の意味で,どちらとも「差し出す」と
いう行動につながります。
ただし,これらも hand in it や turn in them のように目的語を最後に持ってくることはで
きませんので,注意してください。
最後の try out ですが,元になる動詞 try には主に「務める」
「試す」「審理する」の 3.つ
の大きな意味があります。このうち,try out につながるのは 2 つ目の「試す」です。try out
には「(効果をみるために)実際に使って試す」という意味合いが含まれます。だからこ
そ,Peter が英語を実際に使ってみないと英語は身に付かないと力説をしているのですね。
Peter: Finally, I think many of you would like a rule for understanding the difference between
which phrasal verbs can be separated and which phrasal verbs cannot be separated. I’m
sorry to say, that there is no rule that can help you here.
Unfortunately, the only thing that you can do is start off by trying to memorize the
meaning of the phrasal verbs and at the same time memorize which phrasal verbs can be
separated and which phrasal verbs cannot be separated.
While I know that sounds difficult, what I CAN tell you is that every person in the world
who has ever learned English as a second language has had to do the exact same thing,
and they have all been able to do it. And there are more people in the world who speak
English as a second language than who speak it as a mother tongue. And all those people
had this problem as well.
So you CAN do it. Just remember, the more you use English, and the more willing you are
to make mistakes and learn from those mistakes, the faster you will be able to learn.
Yuji, I’m sorry to say that but I think this needs a Japanese explanation as well.
Yuji: Right you are, Peter.
はい,句動詞が難しいのは,「こういうルールがあるから,この句動詞は間に目的語を取
ることができる,これはできない」などと断言できないことにあります。確かに代名詞は
音感から間に入ることが多いのは事実ですが,例外もたくさんあるので決め手はやはりあ
りません。
したがって句動詞に出会うごとに,辞書で意味を調べ,同時に例文にあたりながら少しず
7
つ,memorize することしかないのが正直なところです。
これは,外国語としての英語を身に付けていった人々が取った方法です。時間は掛かりま
すが,英語の真髄に近づく唯一の方法でもあります。間違いを恐れずに,いやむしろどん
どん間違うほど英語を実際に使ってみて,間違いから学ぶということを繰り返しながら,
句動詞も攻めていってください。
■Words & Phrases
Yuji:はい,では,ここまでの会話の中から表現を拾って学ぶ Words & Phrases です。今月も tips
を盛り込みますね。Peter, ready?
Peter: separate [as a verb] (x2)
Yuji:「分ける」
Yuji:はい,separate は「~を分ける,区切る」という意味で,その形容詞 separate(別々の,分
かれた)はカタカナにも入っています。動詞と形容詞では後半の-rate の発音が違いますの
で,注意してください。
Peter: 動詞 separate 形容詞 separate
Peter: “This curtain separates the rooms.”
Yuji: next is …
Peter: be related to (x2)
Yuji:「~に関係のある」
Yuji:はい,related は to を伴って,be related to という形で「~に関係のある,関連がある」と
いう意味を表します。関連語の relation(関係),relationship(結び付き),さらには relative
(肉親,親類)と一緒にして押さえると,覚えやすいと思います。
Peter: The meaning of the phrasal verb put on is related to clothing.
Peter: The next word is …
Yuji: equivalent (x2)
Peter:「同じもの」
Yuji:はい,ちょっと難しい単語ですが,よく使われるので覚えておきましょう。語源を見るとラ
テン語で equi-(同じ),val(価値)ということなので,equal value「同じ価値のもの」と
理解すると良いと思います。
8
Peter: There are two issues related to the meaning of put on and its Japanese equivalents.
Yuji: The next word is …
Peter: clarify (x2)
Yuji:「~を明らかにする」
Yuji:はい,今日は難しい単語が多いですね。でも clarify は「明らかな」を意味する形容詞 clear
の動詞のひとつです。
Peter: Now that we have clarified the difference between put on and wear we should move on.
Peter: Next is …
Yuji: option (x2)
Peter:「選択肢」
Yuji:はい,これは標準装備品以外に買い手が選択できる品,ものを意味する「オプション」とい
うカタカナになっています。これは opt という動詞から来ていますが,何らかの条件のもと
で選ぶのが opt で,その名詞が option となります。
Peter: We have the option of saying it one way or the other.
Yuji: OK. The next word is …
Peter: absolutely (x2)
Yuji:「まったく,完全に」
Yuji: absolutely は副詞で,「まったく、完全に」さらには「絶対に」と,何かを強調していうと
きに用いられます。質問に答えて,
「まったく違います。」というときには,Absolutely not! と
いいます。
Peter: There is absolutely no difference between the two sentences.
Peter: The next word is …
Yuji: so that (x2)
Peter:「…が~できるように」
Yuji:はい,これは so that … can 動詞の形をとる相関語句で,高校になると習うと思います。Please
speak slowly so that I can follow you.(聞き取れるようにゆっくりと話をしてください。)の
ように so that 以下に,S が具体的に V できるようになるものが述べられます。会話では that
はしばしば省略されます。
Peter: You must try to use English more so that you can better understand it.
9
Peter: Next is …
Yuji: memorize (x2)
Peter:「暗記する」
Yuji:はい、これは memory(記憶)の動詞形です。memory の memor-はラテン語で、“to bring to
memory”という意味です。これは「思い起こす」となります。
Peter: You must memorize which phrasal verbs can be separated and which ones cannot be
separated.
Yuji:はい,以上,今回の Words & Phrases でした。自分のメモ帳に書き込むなどして,チャンス
を見つけて使ってみてください。それでは私たちの dialog をもう一度,聞いてください。
[*REPEAT]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Peter: So, Yuji, in our last podcast we said that we would talk some more about phrasal verbs this
time. So should we get started?
Yuji: I guess we should. Last time we talked about phrasal verbs that cannot be separated. For
example, verbs like run into, in the sentence, I ran into my friend at the station. This
phrasal verb, run into, is made up of two words, run and into, and these two words must
always come together.
Peter: So we can say I ran into my friend, or I ran into him, but we cannot say I ran my friend
into, or I ran him into. This is why we say the two words must always come
together—because the object of the verb (動詞の目的語) can never come in between the
words of this kind of phrasal verb.
Yuji: Now last month we mentioned that there was a second kind of phrasal verb that can be
separated. And we want to talk about that today.
Peter: So an example of a phrasal verb that can be separated is call up, meaning to call by
telephone. In this case, we can say either I called up Kentaro yesterday, or I called
Kentaro up yesterday.
So with a regular noun (名詞), we can choose to separate the words in the phrasal verb or
not to separate them. However, when we use personal pronouns (代名詞),like me, him,
her, us, it, or them, we must separate the words. So for example, in our sentence, if we
replace Kentaro with him, we would have to say I called him up yesterday.
Yuji: OK. That’s a little complicated, so I’m going to explain this in Japanese.
10
Peter: Great. So why don’t we give more examples of separable phrasal verbs now? And we’ll
begin with two common ones, take off and put on. The basic meanings of these phrasal
verbs are related to clothes, shoes, hats, rings and, things like that.
It is perfectly OK to say, for example, In Japan, we take our shoes off before we go into
someone’s house, and we put them on when we leave. But we could also say: In Japan we
take off our shoes before we go into someone’s house, and we put them on when we
leave.
So as we discussed before, we have the option of saying. We take our shoes off, or We take
off our shoes. And we should be clear: there is absolutely NO difference between those two
sentences in ANY way.
But when you use pronouns, it is different. Like I said before, we must separate the words.
Yuji, I think it will be easier to explain the basic meaning of put on and take off as well as
the usage of this kind of phrasal verb in Japanese.
Peter: OK. Now there are two issues related to put on and its Japanese equivalents that we need
to mention. The first issue can be difficult for English speakers learning Japanese, and the
second issue can be difficult for Japanese speakers learning English.
Yuji: The first difference is that, as I said just now, in Japanese we have different words that
mean put on depending on what kind of clothing, or things you are putting on. For example,
the Japanese sentence “シャツを着なさい” would be translated in English as “Put on a
shirt,” and the Japanese sentence “帽子をかぶりなさい” would be translated in English as
“Put on a hat.” So even though we use two different verbs in Japanese, in English we only
use put on.
Peter: The second difference is that the English verbs put on and wear are different. In English,
the verb put on is a dynamic verb (動態動詞) , which means that it describes an action,
but the verb wear is a stative verb (状態動詞) , which means it describes a condition or
state. So the sentence I put on a t-shirt means that you took a t-shirt and pulled it over
your head. And the sentence I’m wearing a t-shirt is the situation that results after you
put your t-shirt on.
Yuji: OK, I guess we’d better go quickly from here because of time. Next, we want to talk about
the phrasal verb: pick up, which means “(車で)迎えに行く” in Japanese.
Peter: For example, My mother is going to pick up my brother at his school and then pick me up
at the station. We could also say the first part of that as, My mother is going to pick my
brother up at his school and there would be no difference. But we cannot say, My mother
is going to pick up me. Remember, with separable phrasal verbs, personal pronouns (代名
詞) must always come in between.
11
Yuji: OK. The next separable phrasal verb that we want to talk about is look over.
Peter: Look over means examine or check. For example, Look over your test carefully after you
finish. We can also say, Look your test over carefully after you finish. Or even,After you
finish your test, look it over carefully.
Yuji: Now last month we talked about the phrasal verb go over, as in the sentence, Go over your
notes when you study for the test. As we can see from this sentence, the meaning of go
over and look over are very much the same.
Peter: In fact, the only real difference between the two verbs is that look over is separable and go
over is not.
Yuji: OK. Next, we’d like to discuss the phrasal verbs hand in and turn in.
Peter: Yes, the verbs hand in and turn in can have similar meanings and can be used in the same
way. With the meaning that we are talking about, they have the Japanese meaning of “提
出する”. For example, we can say, We need to hand in our summer projects tomorrow, or
We need to turn in our summer projects tomorrow.
Again, there is absolutely NO difference in the meaning of these two sentences. We can
also say, We need to hand our summer projects in tomorrow or We need to turn our
summer projects in tomorrow.
Yuji: Great. The next phrasal verb we’d like to explain is try out.
Peter: Try out means test. For example, I tried out that new computer game last night or I tried
that new computer game out last night. Try out is similar in meaning to try. For example,
you can try out a new restaurant, or you can try a new restaurant.
However, the usage of try out is not exactly the same as try. You can try a new food, but
you cannot try out a new food.
This is why it is important to go beyond trying to learn a language just by studying it. As
you improve, you must begin to use the language more, and you must begin to do different
things with it so that you can get a deeper, fuller understanding of it. For understanding
vocabulary, a Japanese-English or English-Japanese Dictionary is a very important tool to
have and to use.
But it can’t give you all the answers. Much of the vocabulary information that you
ultimately need can only come from using English in real life.
Peter: Finally, I think many of you would like a rule for understanding the difference between
which phrasal verbs can be separated and which phrasal verbs cannot be separated. I’m
sorry to say, that there is no rule that can help you here.
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Unfortunately, the only thing that you can do is start off by trying to memorize the
meaning of the phrasal verbs and at the same time memorize which phrasal verbs can be
separated and which phrasal verbs cannot be separated.
While I know that sounds difficult, what I CAN tell you is that every person in the world
who has ever learned English as a second language has had to do the exact same thing,
and they have all been able to do it. And there are more people in the world who speak
English as a second language than who speak it as a mother tongue. And all those people
had this problem as well.
So you CAN do it. Just remember, the more you use English, and the more willing you are
to make mistakes and learn from those mistakes, the faster you will be able to learn.
Yuji, I’m sorry to say that but I think this needs a Japanese explanation as well.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Yuji: OK, Next we’d like to give you an example to see how the separable phrasal verb pick up is
used.
英検 3 級 2014 年度 第 1 回リスニングテストからです。
(★=男性 ☆=女性)
No. 18
☆: Hi, Robert. What time will today’s meeting finish?
★: At five. Why?
☆: I have to pick up my friend at the airport at six.
★: Don’t worry. You’ll be on time.
☆☆Question: What is the woman going to do at six?
Yuji:はい,英問英答形式の問題です。
Let’s talk about the conversation.
Peter: OK. So, the woman asks about the ending time of the meeting.
Yuji: Right. And then Robert asks her why she is concerned about that.
Peter: And then she explains that she has something to do at six, so that is why she is worried.
Yuji: Exactly. So listen again, and see if you can get the right answer.
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(★=男性 ☆=女性)
No. 18
☆: Hi, Robert. What time will today’s meeting finish?
★: At five. Why?
☆: I have to pick up my friend at the airport at six.
★: Don’t worry. You’ll be on time.
☆☆Question: What is the woman going to do at six?
Yuji: So, what is the correct answer, Peter?
Peter: The correct answer is: She is going to pick up her friend at the airport, or She is going to
pick her friend up at the airport. In this case, because pick up is a separable phrasal verb,
either answer is OK.
Yuji:ですね。今回も解説は要らないと思いますが,簡単に確認しておきます。pick up は「車で
人を拾う」,つまり「迎えに行く」というときの定番の句動詞でしたね。ほとんどの場合,
「約
束した時刻・場所で」という意味合いが加わります。この女性の場合,
「6 時に,空港で」と、
友達と約束をしたことが分かります。なお,ロバートが最後に言った You’ll be on time.の on
time は「時間通りに,きっかりと」という意味を表します。ここでは彼女に対して「間に合
う」と言っている訳ですね。
■Listener Mail「よろず相談コーナー」
Peter: OK, Yuji, This is the time where we would usually answer our listener mail, but again this
month we’ve had a lot that we needed to talk about and so we do not have time to answer
any questions.
Yuji: That’s really unfortunate. We really enjoy answering those questions.
Peter: I absolutely agree. And we’ve been getting some really great e-mail from everyone. Please
keep those great questions coming. And try to say something in English, even if you can’t
ask your question in English. Just like you can’t learn to play the piano without sitting in
front of a piano, or you can’t learn to swim without getting in the water, you also can’t
learn English without using it to do real things.
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■Closing Message
Yuji: All right. That’s all the time we have today.
今回の「英語チップス」のお味はいかがでしたか。
Peter: But don’t forget we’d love to hear from you. So if you have a question or a comment,
please send us an e-mail by using the “question form” or 質問フォーム on the Eiken
Podcast Website. You can access that website at www.eiken.or.jp/podcast.
Yuji: Right. 「よろず相談コーナー」は英検 Podcast の質問フォームを利用してくださいね。
繰り返します,URL は www.eiken.or.jp/podcast です。
Peter: So let us know what you’re thinking or what is difficult for you.
Yuji: ALSO take this chance to practice your self-introductions. In your e-mail, tell us in English
of course what your name is and where you’re from. Because remember …
Peter: … if you want to LEARN English …
Yuji: … you need to USE English.
Peter: So have a nice month.
Yuji: And we’ll see you next time on …
Y & P: “Eigo Chips from Eiken”!
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☆講師陣プロフィール☆
田邉 祐司 (Yuji Tanabe)
専修大学文学部英語英米文学科教授・学科長、同大学院文学研究科教授。博士(教育学)。公立高
校勤務の後、予備校、短大などを経て現職。NHK ラジオ「基礎英語 1」元講師。主な著作には、
『太郎と博士のビジュアル英単語帳』(NHK 出版)、『1 日 3 分「脱日本人英語」レッスン』(朝
日新聞出版)などがある。『Asahi Weekly』(朝日新聞社)では「ニュース英語の森を歩く
Wordsmith’s workshop」を連載中。
ブログ:「常時英心:言葉の森から」
(http://d.hatena.ne.jp/A30/)
ロンコープ ピーター(Peter Longcope)
専修大学文学部英語英米文学科および同大学院文学研究科准教授。アメリカ・ニューヨーク州に
あるコールゲート大学で学士号を取得(哲学・教育学)。その後、アイビーリーグのペンシルベニ
ア大学で修士号(TESOL)と博士号(教育言語学)を取得した。専修大学に着任する前は、京都
大学、名古屋大学に勤務。研究テーマは第二言語習得学と第二言語教育学、特に第二言語習得の
社会言語学と内容言語統合学習で、その分野での論文多数。
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