National Dairy Foods Research Centers Brochure 4-11-14

DAIRY RESEARCH INSTITUTE®
NATIONAL DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTERS
RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS RESOURCES
Dairy Research Centers
Applications Labs
Facilities and Equipment
Technical Training and Short Courses
Technical Assistance
®
INTRODUCTION
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DAIRY RESEARCH AND APPLICATION CENTERS SUPPORT INNOVATION
National Dairy Foods Research Centers, supported by the Dairy Research Institute®, provide
industry with dairy product and ingredient research and technical resources to help industry
innovate to address unmet consumer demand for dairy and dairy-based products. The Dairy
Research Institute leverages the expertise of the six dairy research centers and works in
partnership with major universities and government agencies.
All dairy research centers have a dairy pilot plant and other facilities for research on dairy
products, ingredients, processing and packaging. Research centers also offer technical
assistance, technical training and short courses. The dairy applications and technology
development labs assist in prototype and concept development, product and process
troubleshooting, scale-up and sensory evaluation.
For the most up-to-date information, visit www.USDairy.com/DairyResearchInstitute
For questions, contact the Dairy Technical Support Line at 800-248-8829 or
[email protected]
ABOUT THE DAIRY RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Dairy Research Institute® was established under the leadership of America’s dairy farmers with a commitment to nutrition,
product and sustainability research. The Dairy Research Institute is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization created to strengthen
the dairy industry’s access to and investment in the technical research required to drive innovation and demand for dairy
products and ingredients globally. The Institute works with and through industry, academic, government and commercial
partners to drive pre-competitive research in nutrition, products and sustainability on behalf of the Innovation Center for
U.S. Dairy®, National Dairy Council® and other partners. The Dairy Research Institute is primarily funded by the national dairy
checkoff program managed by Dairy Management Inc.™
CALIFORNIA DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
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CALIFORNIA DAIRY FOODS
RESEARCH CENTER
• Dairy Products Technology Center (DPTC)
California Polytechnic State UniversitySan Luis Obispo, CA
www.dptc.calpoly.edu
CENTER CONTACT
Cal Poly – San Luis Obispo
A. Charles Crabb, Ph.D.
Interim Director,
Dairy Products Technology Center
San Luis Obispo
805-756-6101
[email protected]
OVERVIEW
The California Dairy Foods Research Center, located at the Dairy Products Technology Center
(DPTC) at California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo, supports the dairy industry
from farm to table. The scientists, technologists and other experts work with industry to provide
innovative solutions that support the nation’s dairy industry and the global marketplace. The
California Dairy Foods Research Center conducts applied and strategic dairy research and
development in the areas of product technology and utilization, ingredient technology and
utilization, products for health enhancement, food quality and food safety. Its applications and
outreach programs facilitate innovative uses of dairy foods and ingredients by the food industry.
Facilities at DPTC are state of the art, equipped with advanced and routine analytical equipment,
dairy foods pilot plants and a commercially licensed dairy processing facility. The DPTC serves as the
focal point to draw upon expertise and resources from throughout Cal Poly and other collaborating
institutions in the packaging, engineering, business, chemistry, microbiology and other disciplines.
Adjacent to the DPTC is the university dairy farm where fresh milk is available for research and
development activities.
CALIFORNIA DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
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RESEARCH FOCUS
The California Dairy Foods Research Center offers significant expertise in and resources for
research and development involving dairy products and ingredients. Research is industry-driven and
can address the specific needs of companies in research or applications. Current research includes:
• Cheese technology (e.g., flavor, texture, yield, starter culture performance functional
properties)
• Milk, dairy ingredients and dairy products quality (sensory, functionality, composition,
physical properties manufacturing efficiency) and shelf life
• Process development (e.g., membrane and other concentration/fractionation processes,
UHT and other heat treatments, and nonthermal process evaluation)
• Product development, dairy ingredients applications (prototypes, nutritional labels) and
flavor lexicons
• Dairy nutrition and health (e.g., probiotics, bioactives, milk genomics)
• Dairy quality assurance (e.g., food safety, environmental stewardship, testing methods
development)
DAIRY INGREDIENTS APPLICATION PROGRAM
(Cal Poly State University, San Luis Obispo, CA)
This program provides technical support to manufacturers, users
and marketers of dairy protein, dairy carbohydrate, and dairy fatbased powders and concentrates [nonfat dry milk (NFDM), skim
milk powder (SMP), milk protein concentrate (MPC), whey protein
concentrate (WPC), lactose, delactosed permeate (DLP), butter
and milkfat]. It involves transfer of existing research information,
technical training, preparation of information bulletins, providing
solutions/information on technical product applications issues
and conducting targeted short-term projects to address specific
applications needs including new food and product development.
Approximately 8,000 square feet of processing area is available
in the pilot plant facilities. Applications support and specialized
analytical capabilities are also available. Sensory expertise is
available for food and beverages by QDA style descriptive testing
and affective/consumer testing with the use of Compusense® Five
or Compusense at-hand software. The plant is fully equipped
for all traditional unit operations for the manufacture of dairy
foods and ingredients and is licensed by the state of California
for commercial manufacture of dairy foods. Additionally, space
is available to accommodate specialized equipment for research
and development projects on a short-term basis. Four analytical
labs support work in the areas of microbial, physical and
chemical analyses of dairy foods and ingredients.
For additional information, visit
www.dptc.calpoly.edu/facilities.html
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CALIFORNIA DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
DAIRY PRODUCTS TECHNOLOGY CENTER
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
EQUIPMENT: – HTST — 270 to 600 gph for ice cream mix, milk, etc., and associated cold milk
separator, batch tanks, pasteurized
surge tanks, CIP systems, etc. (HTST
is a legally sealed unit by the state
of California)
–½-gal. to 1-gal. plastic federal
rotary filler
– Scholle filler for 3- to 6-gal. bags
– Microthermics UHT (direct and
indirect heating) with clean-fill hood
and aseptic homo (25 L/hr.)
– Continuous ice cream freezer (Hoyer
Frigus SF 600) (50 to 150 gal./hr.)
– Ingredient feeder (Hoyer Addus FF
2000 C2) (10 to 200 L/hr.)
– Sawvel cup filler — pint to 3.5 oz.;
35 cups/minute (pint)
– Emery Thompson batch ice cream
freezer (40 qt.)
– Egli continuous pilot-scale butter churn
(1 to 2 lbs./min.)
– PMS 30-gal./hr. HTST with two-stage
homogenizer
– Technogel 100 L/hr. continuous ice
cream freezer
– Marriott Walker rising film evaporator
(100 lbs./hr. evaporative capacity)
–
Open-water jacketed cheese vats
(Stoelting 500 gal., Stoelting 3 to
50 gal., Kusel 2 to 100 gal. with
drain table)
– 2 Universal 50-gal. specialty cheese vats
– 150-gal. Damrow Double-O enclosed
cheese vat
CONTACT: A. CHARLES CRABB, PH.D.
Interim Director
805-756-6101
[email protected]
– Blentech process cheese cooker
(50 to 100 lbs.)
– Stefan process cheese cooker
(5 lbs.)
– Suprema pasta filata system
(mixer/molder and cooker/stretcher)
– Koch vacuum packaging system
(1- to 40-lb. block)
– Miscellaneous tanks and pumps
– High-shear Silverson mixer
– 4 Groen process steam kettles
(40 to 60 gal.)
– 2 APV conical bottom swept-surface processors (100 gal.)
– Legal batch pasteurizer system
(200 gal.)
– 4-booth sensory evaluation area with test/preparation kitchen and
Compusense software system
– Controlled atmosphere cold storage
(approx. 3,000 sq. ft.)
– Cold storage (-15 to -40 F)
(approx. 200 sq. ft.)
– Spiral-wound DDS UF and RO system
(50 to 100 L/hr.)
– Niro Pilot R-12 MF/UF/RO system
(60 to 90 gal. feed/min.)
– Niro Filterlab spray dryer FLG-60
(60 lb./hr. water evaporation rate,
capable of drying milk, whey and
agglomeration)
– Small pilot-scale supercritical carbon
dioxide fluid extraction system
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CALIFORNIA DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
SUPPORTING ANALYTICAL EQUIPMENT
Fast-performance liquid chromatograph
Separation analysis and isolation of proteins
from milk, whey and dairy products
Capillary electrophoresis
Analysis of proteins, DNA and RNA
Pulsed field gel electrophoresis
DNA-based differentiation of probiotic lactic
acid bacteria
Gel electrophoresis acrylamide
Analysis of proteins and peptides: native,
denaturing, urea, gradient and twodimensional
Preparative isoelectric focusing
Isolation and characterization of proteins
Gel densitometer
Individual protein concentration determination
PCR thermal cycler
DNA characterization, bacteria identification
and determination, gene manipulation, etc.
ELISA plate reader
Multiple antibody and enzymatic assays for milk
product component analysis or microbiological
safety
Membrane transfer platform
Northern, southern and western blots of RNA,
DNA, and protein analysis and identification
Dot blot instrument
Antibody and enzyme quantification and
titration
Ultracentrifuge
Sedimentation of milk and cellular components
Phase contrast microscope
Microbiological analysis of spores
Digital imager
Quantification and record-keeping of dairy
product sample structure and composition
Pilot plant scale affinity
chromatography column
Large scale-up of laboratory affinity
chromatography procedures
Gas pycnometer, tap density,
powder flowability
Characterization of bulk density, particle
density and angle of repose
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CALIFORNIA DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
SUPPORTING ANALYTICAL EQUIPMENT
GC/MS
Flavor and other compound characterization
and identification
High-pressure liquid chromatograph (HPLC)
Protein and peptide analysis of dairy foods
Laser diffraction particle size analyzer
Particle size and particle size distribution of
dry dairy powders, emulsions and colloidal
dispersions
TX.T2 analyzer
Texture profile analysis, firmness, etc.
Formagraph
Coagulation studies
Hunter colorimeter
Whiteness, color intensity and hue, appearance
of dairy foods and ingredients
Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC)
Thermal properties of milk components
Dynamic stress rheometer
Flow properties, gel strength, viscosity
Block digestion and distillation system
Nitrogen/protein analysis
Autotitration system
Determination of buffering capacity
High-throughput nitrogen analyzer
Quantification of total milk protein, casein and
whey protein content of foods
Fourier transform infrared analysis
Milk component analysis
NOTE 1:
In addition to the specialized equipment available, DPTC routinely conducts chemical (fat,
protein, ash, total solids, pH, etc.), physical (viscosity, color, etc.) and microbiological (APC,
yeasts, molds, coliform, lactobacilli, etc.) analyses and related research, plus the development
of dairy foods and ingredients.
NOTE 2:
In addition, Cal Poly works with several entities on campus (Materials Engineering, Biological
Science and Food Science & Nutrition) for more specialized expertise, instrumentation, process
equipment, etc.
Ongoing collaboration with the Cal Poly Environmental Biotechnology Institute (Dr. Raul Cano,
director) provides access to the following capabilities:
• High-throughput DNA sequencing (gene or chromosome sequencing and species identification)
• Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis (used to determine strain relatedness of microorganisms
of significance to dairy/food industry)
• Terminal restriction fragment polymorphism (TRFP) (characterization of changes in microbial
communities)
CALIFORNIA DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
COURSES, SYMPOSIA AND EVENTS
• Annual International Symposium on Milk Genomics & Human Health: www.cdrf.org
• Annual Symposium on Advances in Dairy Product Technology — Dairy Ingredients
Symposium: www.dptc.calpoly.edu
• Annual Cheese Short Course: www.dptc.calpoly.edu
• Annual Dairy Processing 101 Short Course: www.dptc.calpoly.edu
• Annual Dairy Science and Technology Basics for the Farmstead/Artisan Cheese Maker:
www.dptc.calpoly.edu
• Annual Frozen Dairy Desserts Manufacturing Short Course: www.dptc.calpoly.edu
• Global Cheese Technology Forum
• The International Milk Genomics Consortium (IMGC) provides a collaborative and
interactive pre-competitive resource platform for researchers and research end users to
accelerate the understanding of the biological process underlying the mammalian milk
genome: www.cdrf.org
• Dairy 101: www.dptc.calpoly.edu
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CALIFORNIA DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
MATT ARNOLD
ANDREA LAUBSCHER
Research Associate
Dairy Products Technology Center
California Polytechnic State University
Research Associate
Dairy Products Technology Center
California Polytechnic State University
[email protected]
[email protected]
Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of cheese, cheese
technology.
Microbial and biochemical analysis of dairy foods.
A. CHARLES CRABB, PH.D.
Interim Director
Dairy Products Technology Center
California Polytechnic State University
[email protected]
NANA Y. FARKYE, PH.D.
Professor of Dairy Science
California Polytechnic State University
[email protected]
Dairy chemistry and biochemistry, cheese technology, food
enzymology, heat-induced changes in milk and milk protein
structure-function relationships.
KRISTEN HERBAUGH
Administrative Program Assistant
Dairy Products Technology Center
California Polytechnic State University
KATY LEES
Research Assistant
Dairy Products Technology Center
California Polytechnic State University
[email protected]
Dairy ingredients applications support.
CHENCHAIAH MARELLA, PH.D.
Assistant Professor
Dairy Science and Leprino Foods Chair in Dairy Products
Technology Center, California Polytechnic State University
[email protected]
Dairy ingredient development and processing optimization
with membrane processing.
VANDNA SIKAND, PH.D.
Research Scientist
Dairy Products Technology Center
[email protected]
[email protected]
Center and programs administration.
Functional properties of dairy ingredients.
LAURIE JACOBSON
PHILLIP S. TONG, PH.D.
Outreach Specialist
Dairy Products Technology Center
California Polytechnic State University
Professor of Dairy Science
California Polytechnic State University
[email protected]
Communications and outreach programming.
RAFAEL JIMENEZ-FLORES, PH.D.
Professor of Dairy Science
Dairy Products Technology Center
California Polytechnic State University
[email protected]
Milk protein, function and quality of dairy products;
application of biotechnology to dairy; identification of dairy
products’ point of origin; characterization of milkfat globular
membrane function in binding mechanism of probiotic
bacteria.
[email protected]
Dairy Ingredients performance, applications and
technology. Science and process technology of dairy
foods systems including dairy beverages, frozen desserts,
fermented milks, cheese, and dairy spreads, training and
other continuing education as it relates to dairy foods.
SEAN VINK
Research Associate
Dairy Products Technology Center
California Polytechnic State University
[email protected]
Pilot plant operations.
MIDWEST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
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MIDWEST DAIRY FOODS
RESEARCH CENTER
www.midwestdairy.umn.edu
• University of Minnesota (St. Paul)
• South Dakota State University (Brookings)
• Iowa State University (Ames)
CENTER DIRECTOR
Lloyd Metzger, Ph.D.
Center Director
605-688-5477
[email protected]
OVERVIEW
The Midwest Dairy Foods Research Center has resources within the University of Minnesota
(St. Paul), South Dakota State University (Brookings) and Iowa State University (Ames). The dairy
center was formed to conduct research and provide support needed to increase the viability of the
U.S. dairy industry and ensure its future competitiveness. The center offers expertise in dairy foods
research for both traditional dairy products and dairy products used as an ingredient.
RESEARCH FOCUS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Improving and controlling flavor development and functionality in cheese
Improving the performance of cheese starter cultures through genetics
Adding value to milk-based products with probiotics and nutraceuticals
Improving shelf life of flavored milks
Reducing undesirable taste attributes of milk
Improving functionality and controlling flavor attributes of milk fractionation components
Developing methods for effective and profitable uses of whey
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MIDWEST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
CONTACT: RAY MILLER
Plant Manager
612-624-7776
[email protected]
FACILITIES
• Sensory Center — Zata Vickers, Director
The sensory center has two tasting suites, and each suite contains eight booths and a food
preparation area. Both suites have computerized data collection systems. Sensory center staff
routinely train and administer descriptive analysis panels, and recruit and administer consumer
taste panels.
• Flavor Research and Education Center — Devin Peterson, Director
The flavor center is a member-based facility that offers innovative flavor research solutions to the
food, flavor and fragrance industries. Research solutions include: isolation and analysis for aroma
(volatiles) and taste compounds; taste-aroma interations and flavor modulation; flavor synthesis,
flavor processing and flavor release.
• Joseph J. Warthesen Food Processing Center — Tonya Schoenfuss, Director
– Dairy Processing Equipment
– Cheese Curing Rooms (includes brining and sporulation rooms)
– Cereal milling, mixing, extrusion and baking equipment
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT:
– Agglomerator: Glatt, 3-lb. cap.
– Blue cheese needler
–Buhler twin-screw extruder with loss-in weight powder
feed and flow metered liquid injection
–Desludging centrifuge: Westfalia,
3 to 5 L/min.
– Dewheying and salting belt
–Drum dryer: Buffalovac 6-in. drums
–Dryer: Coulter, 90 lbs./hr.
–Cheddaring belt: Tetra-Scherping,
200 to 300 lbs./hr.
–Dryer: Niro, 20 lbs./hr.
–Cheese presses: vertical and horizontal with various
hoop styles
– Fluidized bed dryer
–Cheese vat: Damrow, 5,000 lbs.
–Cheese vat: Tetra-Scherping, automated, 2,500-lb. cap.
–Cheese vats: Kusel, 2,000 lbs.
–Cheese vats: Nu-Vat, 800 lbs. (2)
–Coating drum: Spray Dynamics
– Evaporator: CE Rogers, 200 lbs./min.
– Freeze dryer
– Fruit/nut feeder
– Hammermill: Fitzpatrick, 5-lb. hopper
– Homogenizers: Gaulin 30 and 125 gal./hr.
– HTST and homogenizer: APV 30 gal./hr.
–Colloid Mill
–HTST pasteurizer: Cherry-burrell,
4,000 lbs./hr.
–Curdmill: Damrow
–Microfluidizer
–Decanter: Sharples, 1 gal./min.
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MIDWEST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT
(cont.):
–Microthermics UHT System: includes
homogenizer and HEPA filtered filling
hood, 1 to 3 L/min.
–Tetra-Hoyer Frigus SF600 continuous
ice cream freezer: 120 gal./hr.
–Mix process unit (vat pasteurizer,
homogenizer and plate cooler):
50 to 100 gal.
–UF system: DDS-20, Plate and Frame,
10-L
– Pasteurizer: Cherry-Burrell, 4,000 lbs./hr.
– Process cheese cooker: Blentech, 10 lbs.
– Process cheese cooker: Damrow, 40 lbs.
– Tray dryer
– UF system: Osmonics 5 m2,
spiral-wound
– Univats: Cherry-Burrell, 50 gal.
– PTI RO/UF system multitube
–Vacuum pan evaporator: Rogers,
100 lbs.
– Ribbon blender
–Variegator
– Separator: Westfalia, 2,000 lbs./hr.
– Water activity testing
– Storage tank: Cherry-Burrell, 200 gal.
–Temperature- and humidity-controlled
environmental chamber
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MIDWEST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
CONTACT: SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY
DAIRY PLANT
HOWARD BONNEMAN
Dairy Plant Research Manager
SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY
INSTITUTE FOR DAIRY INGREDIENT
PROCESSING
CONTACT: ANIL KOMMINENI
Assistant Manager/Research Associate
605-688-5478
[email protected]
605-688-4184
DairyIngredientProcessing.com
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT: – Batch freezer: 40-qt. Emery Thompson
– Homogenizer: 7,500 lbs./hr., 3,500 psi
– Butter churns: 15 to 450 lbs.
– Centrifugal pumps
– HTST systems: 5,000 lbs./hr. and
7,500 lbs./hr.
– Cheddar mill
– Cheese block cutter (pneumatic)
– Cheese press (pneumatic)
– Cheese sealer: Sipromac
– Cheese shredder: Hobart
– Cheese vat: 2,500-lb. HCV
– Cheese vat: 2x Kusel Double-O,
500 lbs.
– Cheese vat: 1,000 lbs. fully enclosed,
double-O on load cells with pre-draw and final drain
– Cold bowl cream separator: DeLaval,
5,000 lbs./hr. and 7,500 lbs./hr. cold bowl
– Crystallization tank: 3,000 lbs.
– Drain table for HCV and 100 lbs.
Double-O
–Evaporator: multi-pass, falling film with
high concentration finisher and singlestage flesh cooler, 1,500 lbs./hr., custom built, Dahmes Equipment
– Filler: Bag-n-Box, Scholle
–Filtration systems: multi-stage, low and
high pressure
– Fruit feeder
–Homogenizer: Gaulin, 5,000 lbs./hr.,
4,000 psi
– Ice cream freezer: APV K110,
150 gal./hr.
–Likwifier: 100 gal.
– Microfiltration system: 1.7 m2, ceramic
membranes
– Nano/reverse osmosis filtration, pilot
lab, spiral wound with 3.8-in. elements
– Niro spray dryer: rotary atomizer
– Platform scales: 75 lbs. and 400 lbs.
– Positive pump for revel in ice cream
– Process cheese cooker: single-screw,
30-lb. culinary steam generator
– Process vats: 20, 50, 200, 300, 500
and 600 gal.; steam and cool
– Raw milk storage: 2 x 8,500-gal. silos
– Refrigerated and frozen storage
facilities, includes -40 F blast freezer
–Spray dryer: two-stage with vibrating fluid bed and agglomeration capacity,
custom built, Dahmes Equipment,
300 lbs./hr.
– Steam culture chest
– Ultrafiltration pilot lab, spiral-wound
with 3.8-in. elements
–Ultra/microfiltration system, 4-stage
w/mag flow meters and pressure
transducers, process 1,000 to 1,500
lbs./hr.
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MIDWEST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
CONTACT: HUI WANG
Pilot Plant Manager
515-294-3572
[email protected]
FACILITIES
•
•
•
•
•
Dry processing pilot plant
Fermentation facility
Food microbiology lab
High hydrostatic pressure processing facility
Nutrition and wellness research center
– Fitness and metabolism unit
– Meeting rooms
– Sensory evaluation unit
• Process development lab
• Product development capabilities
• Technology transfer pilot plant
and theater
• Test kitchen and sensory lab
• Wet processing pilot plant
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
A fee for use may be associated with some of the listed equipment. Please contact Stephanie Clark
or Hui Wang if you are interested in more information about equipment or services provided at
Iowa State University.
EQUIPMENT: – Acid digester: Labconco
– Cheese press
– Aroma scan
–Autoclave
– Cheese vats: jacketed stainless steel
w/agitation
– Brookfields HBYR1
– CEM Microwave Ashing System 300
– Compression and injection molding
machines
– Centrifuge: Autocrit Ultra 3
– Consistometer: Adams
– Centrifuge: Beckman J2-21
– Consistometer: Bostwick
– Centrifuge: Beckman J2-2M/E,
refrigerated
– Centrifuge: Beckman J2-HC,
high-speed
– Cold and dry storage lockers
– Extrusion systems for grain processing
– Fermentors: Benchtop, 1-, 2-, 5-, 10-L
– Fermentors: sterilizable-in-place,
15-, 50-, 100-L
– Centrifuge: Cepa Z41, continuous
– Centrifuge: Clinical
– Filtration unit: Amicaon hollow-fiber
– Centrifuge: Damon/IEC, tabletop
– Flow cytometer: Accuri C6
– Centrifuge: IEC, explosion-proof,
low-speed
– Centrifuge: International Model HN
– Centrifuge: Sorvall RC3B Plus
– Centrifuge: Swing Bucket, 4-L
– Centrivap concentrator: Labconco
–Filters
– Food extrusion
– Freeze drying
– Freezer: ultralow (-70 C)
– Refrigerator/Freezer: explosion proof, isotemp
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MIDWEST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT
(cont.):
– Gamma counter
– Photochem (oxidation potential system)
– Gas chromatography: Varian
– Plastic film and sheet extruder
– Gas chromatography-mass
spectrometry: Agilent
– Rapid Visco Analyzer
– Gel imaging cabinet
–Retorts
– Glue depositing
– Rotary evaporator and vacuum pump
–Refractometer
– High-performance liquid
chromatograph
– Screens and mixing tanks
– High-temperature short-time
pasteurizer (Microthermics)
– Spectronics XL-1500 UV Crosslinker
– SLM French Pressure Cell Press
– Homogenizer: Brinkman
– Spectrophotometer: Beckman DU 640
– Hunter Labscan XE
– Spectrophotometer: Genesys 20
– Incubator shaker: New Brunswick Sci
– Spectrophotometer: HP PDA 8452
– Instron 1122
– Spectrophotometer: Spectronic 21D
– Kettle: electric-heated with agitation,
10 gal.
– Spinning disc colorimeters
– Kjeldahl: Labconco
–Stomachers
– Membrane filter system
– Texture analyzer (TAXT2)
–Microbiological incubators: regular,
refrigerated
– Toxic diet prep room and pelletor
and mixer
– Microplate reader
– Ultracentrifuge: Beckman L8M
–Microscopes, light and fluorescence
with digital-imaging capability
– UV illuminator: Fisher Biotech
– Milestone M/S Meba Micro Digest
Units
– Oven: Fisher Isotemp
– Oven: Lindberg Blue M
–PCR Cycler: Applied Biosystems, Biorad,
Finnzymes
– Penetrometers
– Spiral filter/pump
– Vacuum oven: food-grade
– Viscometers: Digital Brookfield
(YR-1; HDB, RV)
– Votary evaporator: food-grade
– Water activity meter: AquaLab
– Wet grinders
– Wire cheese block cutter
SYMPOSIA COURSES, AND EVENTS
University of Minnesota
South Dakota State University
• Artisan Cheese Making Workshop
• Cheese Judging Workshops
• Extrusion Workshop
• Micro and Ultra Filtration Workshops
• Food Chemistry Workshops
• Flavor Chemistry Workshops
• Serv Safe
• Microbiology and Engineering of
Sterilization Process
• Milk Pasteurization and Dairy Plant
Sanitation Workshops
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MIDWEST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
Researchers and nutritionists work within the dairy research program and are closely aligned with
the University of Minnesota Food Science Department, the South Dakota State University Dairy
Science Department and the Iowa State University Food Science and Human Nutrition Department,
addressing new product development and processes for dairy products and ingredients.
JAYENDRA AMAMCHARLA, PH.D.
TERRY BOYLSTON, PH.D.
Assistant Professor
Kansas State University
Associate Professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition
Iowa State University
[email protected]
[email protected]
Advanced sensing technologies for dairy and food process
monitoring, rapid and alternative methods for dairy and
food analysis (functional, chemical and microbial).
Lipid and flavor composition of foods; conjugated linoleic
acid formation in dairy products.
SANJEEV ANAND, PH.D.
Associate Professor of Dairy Microbiology,
Food Safety
South Dakota State University
[email protected]
Public health microbiology of milk and food products,
predictive microbiology, quality systems implementation,
biofilms, nutraceuticals and molecular methods in
microbiology. Bioluminescent markers and signal molecules.
LANCE BAUMGARD, PH.D.
Associate Professor; Norman Jacobson
Endowed Professor, Animal Science
Iowa State University
[email protected]
Environmental and nutritional physiology; post-absorptive
carbohydrate and lipid metabolism; bioenergetics; dairy
science and nutrition.
DONALD BEITZ, PH.D.
Distinguished Professor in Agriculture and Professor of
Animal Science and Biochemistry
Iowa State University
MARIN BOZIC, PH.D.
Assistant Professor of Dairy Foods Marketing Economics
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
Evaluate economics (demand, price analysis and market
potential) of new dairy products; elicit consumer
preferences for new dairy foods; assess feasibility of
processing investments for new product development.
BYRON BREHM-STECHER, PH.D.
Associate Professor of Food Science and
Human Nutrition
Iowa State University
[email protected]
Food safety and biosecurity; rapid molecular detection
of foodborne pathogens and spoilage organisms; flow
cytometry; biomimetics; multicomponent antimicrobial
systems.
STEPHANIE CLARK, PH.D.
Associate Professor of Food Science and Human
Nutrition; Associate Director of the Midwest Dairy Foods
Research Center
Iowa State University
[email protected]
[email protected]
Lipid metabolism; cholesterol; nutritional and genetic
control of animal food.
Applies food microbiology and chemistry approaches to
bridge the gap between dairy product sensory quality and
human health.
ANDREIA BIANCHINI, PH.D.
Research Assistant Professor
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
[email protected]
Develop strategies to reduce and prevent contamination
with mycotoxins and bacterial pathogens; HACCP;
improvements with safety and quality of dairy foods
and ingredients.
SAARI CSALLANY, PH.D.
Professor of Food Science
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
Lipids, vitamin E, oxidative enzyme systems, edible fats and
oil nutritional biochemistry, free radicals.
17
MIDWEST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
FRANCISCO DIEZ-GONZALEZ, PH.D.
THEODORE LABUZA, PH.D.
Professor of Food Science
University of Minnesota
Morse Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor
of Food Science
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
Food safety microbiology, foodborne pathogens,
preharvest control of pathogenic E. coli, bioterrorism.
CARRIE EARTHMAN, PH.D.
Associate Professor of Nutrition
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
Water activity, food stability and safety, food law, shelflife testing, glass transition phenomena, bioterrorism,
contaminants in food, time-temperature integrator tags.
BUDDHI LAMSAL, PH.D.
[email protected]
Assistant Professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition
Iowa State University
Clinical nutrition, medical nutrition therapy, body cell mass,
nutrition support and assessment for patients at risk for
wasting and gastric bypass surgery.
[email protected]
ASHRAF HASSAN, PH.D.
Associate Professor of Dairy Science
South Dakota State University
Food processing and engineering; crops utilization and
industrial value-addition through enzyme application,
fermentations and bio-based products; engineering
properties of food; structure-functional properties of
proteins, polysaccharides and food rheology.
[email protected]
PEGGY LEHTOLA
Lactic acid bacteria, fermented milks, low-fat cheeses and
exopolysaccharides.
Assistant Director of Midwest Dairy Foods Research
Center
University of Minnesota
BARAEM ISMAIL, PH.D.
[email protected]
Assistant Professor of Food Science
University of Minnesota
Assistant to the director.
[email protected]
AUBREY MENDONCA, PH.D.
Phytochemicals, protein and enzyme chemistry; improving
the functionality and bioactivity of food constituents;
soy isoflavones (chemical structure, protein association,
extractability, stability and bioavailability).
Associate Professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition
Iowa State University
STEPHANIE JUNG, PH.D.
Associate Professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition
Iowa State University
[email protected]
High-pressure treatment of foods; effects of processing
on food components (proteins and enzymes); use of
enzymes to modify protein characteristics (extractability and
functional properties).
[email protected]
Rapid detection of human pathogens in dairy foods;
development and application of natural antimicrobials to
enhance the safety and quality of dairy foods.
LLOYD METZGER, PH.D.
Professor and Alfred Chair in Dairy Education,
Director of Dairy Center
South Dakota State University
[email protected]
Structure and functional roles of cheese components
and modification of manufacturing parameters; cheese
technology; dairy products processing.
18
MIDWEST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
VIKRAM MISTRY, PH.D.
R. ROGER RUAN, PH.D.
Professor and Department Head of Dairy Science
South Dakota State University
Professor of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
[email protected]
Reduced-fat dairy products; membrane processing; process
cheese manufacture; salt whey in cheese making; cheese
making characteristics of milks from Holstein and Brown
Swiss cows.
Imaging and spectroscopy technology, shelf-life testing,
structure-function relationships of biological materials.
KASIVISWANATH
MUTHUKUMARAPPAN, PH.D.
Professor
Kansas State University
Professor of Agricultural and
Biosystems Engineering
South Dakota State University
[email protected]
Dairy rheology and microstructure; physical and functional
properties of dairy products.
DANIEL O’SULLIVAN, PH.D.
Professor of Food Science
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
Bacteriophage resistance and bacteriocin production
in lactococci, genetic regulatory circuits, genetic
fingerprinting, probiotic cultures.
HASMUKH PATEL, PH.D.
Assistant Professor of Dairy Science
South Dakota State University
[email protected]
Dairy protein ingredients, value-added ingredients, new
technologies.
DEVIN PETERSON, PH.D.
Associate Professor of Food Science
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
Flavor generation, characterization of flavor compounds and
flavor delivery in foodstuff.
KAREN SCHMIDT, PH.D.
[email protected]
Dairy protein chemistry, dairy quality and technology.
TONYA SCHOENFUSS, PH.D.
Assistant Professor of Food Science
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
How formula and manufacturing processes affect natural
and process cheeses, fermented milks and other dairy
ingredients.
BONGKOSH VARDHANABHUTI, PH.D.
Assistant Professor
University of Missouri
[email protected]
Improving functional properties of dairy proteins, understand
relationship between structure, physical properties and
functionality of proteins and mixed protein-polysaccharide
systems; develop protein and polysaccharide complexes with
enhanced functional properties.
ZATA VICKERS, PH.D.
Professor of Food Science
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
Food aromas and acceptability; sensory evaluation of food;
improved sensory and flavor techniques for fermented dairy
products.
19
MIDWEST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
TONG WANG, PH.D.
LESTER A. WILSON, PH.D.
Professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition
Iowa State University
University Professor
Iowa State University
[email protected]
[email protected]
Lipid chemistry and analysis; value-added processing and
utilization of soybeans and other oilseeds; vegetable oil
refining.
Food quality determination (instrumental and sensory
methods: color, flavor, aroma, taste, texture, viscosity and
pungency); influence of radiation on rennet activity (NASA);
food safety and quality training; influence of processing and
storage on food acceptance.
NORTHEAST DAIRY FOODS
RESEARCH CENTER
• Cornell University
http:/Ifoodscience.cornell.edu/cals/foodsci/research/
dairy-centerloveJView.dm
CENTER DIRECTORS
David M. Barbano, Ph.D.
Center Director
607-255-4122
Martin Wiedmann, Ph.D., Dr. Med. Vet.
Center Associate Director
607-254-2838
[email protected]
[email protected]
OVERVIEW
The Northeast Dairy Foods Research Center located at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., was
formed to conduct fluid milk and dairy ingredient research, provide applications and technical
support for the improvements in milk powder quality and help establish the next generation
of dairy ingredients.
The Northeast Dairy Foods Research Center also provides new learning opportunities for the
industry with short-course training in dairy food safety and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control
Points (HACCP) and dairy processing, including artisan dairy production, with certificate programs
in fluid milk processing,cheesemaking, and yogurt production.
RESEARCH FOCUS
Value Added Dairy
•
•
•
•
Physical and engineering properties of dairy ingredients
Supercritical Fluid Extrusion processing of dairy foods
Functionalization of whey protein
Technological approaches to produce longer shelf-life-concentrated micellar casein
from skim milk for ingredient use in dairy and nondairy food products
21
NORTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
Dairy Microbiology and Safety/Fluid Milk Quality
• Investigation of farm management practices associated with high sporeformers levels in raw milk
• Influence of processing parameters on bacterial outgrowth in pasteurized fluid milk
• Development molecular-based raw milk testing methods
• Dairy foods safety: intervention strategies for microbial inactivation
• Tracking and characterization of sporeformers in dairy processing systems
• Evaluation of raw milk tests for predicting pasteurized milk quality
• Extension of chocolate milk shelf life
• Determine the impact of annatto and bleaching on flavor and functionality of WPC 80
and SPC 80
Dairy Processing
• Milk protein rheology and functional properties
• Novel processing methods for the dairy industry
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
FOOD PROCESSING AND DEVELOPMENT
LABORATORY (FPDL)
CONTACT: ROBERT RALYEA
General Manager, Cornell University
607-255-7643
[email protected]
http://www.cals.cornell.edu/cals/
foodsci/research/FPDL/index.cfm
The goal of the Cornell University Food Processing and Development Laboratory (FPDL) is to create
a professional environment in which teaching, research and extension activities can be conducted in
support of the mission of the Institute of Food Science and College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
program at Cornell. As such, FPDL priorities are as follows:
• Teaching: Provide hands-on learning experiences for students enrolled in Food Science and
related curricula.
• Research: Provide a state-of-the-art facility and technical assistance for conducting food and
dairy-related research and development using Cornell’s pilot plant facilities.
– Assist in the transfer of new technology from the research program to the industry.
–Provide facilities and staff support on a fee-for-use basis to assist companies and
individuals with production and testing of product formulations provided by the client.
• Extension: Provide facilities for use in applied extension research and continuing
education programs.
22
NORTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
The facility has experienced full-time staff professionals who are able to assist in all aspects of
food product development and processing. Companies/individuals can visit our facilities and work
collaboratively with personnel, or the staff of the FPDL can process products to your specifications
and ship it to you overnight. Customized small product development runs can be conducted with
our established access to ingredients and raw materials.
The 10,000-square-foot main processing area is adjacent to our fully licensed operating dairy
plant. It houses a NYS permitted, small-scale HTST system capable of continuous pasteurization of
batches as small as 100 gallons and multiple permitted cheese vats (with associated cheddar milling
equipment, cheese press, etc.). This combination allows for scaling up of production in order to
provide a variety of products for customer demonstrations, food shows and exhibitions.
EQUIPMENT:
DRYING CAPABILITIES
–Model 1 Niro Atomizer Versatile Utility Spray Dryer —
22-kg/hr. evaporative capacity
–100SRC Virtis Freeze Dryer — 45.5 kg condenser
ice capacity
–Model GA 31 Yamato Pulvis Mini Spray Dryer —
1600-mL/hr. evaporative capacity
–Buflovak Laboratory Atmospheric Double Drum Dryer
— 8-in. drying width
EVAPORATOR
–Model Type E — Anhydro Laboratory Vacuum
Evaporator (rising film)
ICE CREAM FREEZERS
– Emery Thompson — 20-qt. batch freezer
– Technogel 80 — continuous freezer
–Armfield 25 BA Scraped Surface Processing system —
continuous freezer, 20 L/hr.
–Plate Heat Exchangers — 1 pt./min.
to 15 gal./min.
HTST/UHT PASTEURIZING EQUIPMENT
–Microthermics 25DH — 1 to 2 L/min. (HTST/UHT
indirect steam application)
VAT PASTEURIZING EQUIPMENT
–Walker Scraped Surface Cone Bottom Processor —
30 min./100 gal. max capacity
–Vat pasteurizer with VFD agitation (30 min./50 max.
capacity)
–Additional Jacketed Vats — 400-gal. vats (not
inspected for pasteurization currently) (2)
EXTRUSION TECHNOLOGY
–Wenger TX 52
MEMBRANE FILTRATION
EQUIPMENT
–Pilot scale microfiltration unit
equipped with a ceramic
membrane, with automated data
acquisition and a CO2 injection
system for minimizing membrane
fouling
–Tetra Pak M7 ceramic UTP
–GP pilot scale microfiltration
system for separation of casein
from milk serum proteins
MIXING EQUIPMENT
–Various high- and low-shear mixers
CHEESE MAKING EQUIPMENT
–Kusel A-Frame cheese press
–Kusel L/I Laboratory cottage cheese
vat
–Damrow S4-2M starter tank
–Supreme Mini Mixer Mozzarella
cheese stretcher
–300-gal. semi-automatic cheese vat
–4 Damrow 5-can open vats
–2 Kusel “Double-O” 5-can
automatic vats
GAULIN TWO STAGE HOMOGENIZERS
–42 to 1,000 gal./hr.
23
NORTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
EQUIPMENT
(cont.):
SEPARATORS/CLARIFIERS
(1,750 lbs./hr. to 13,000 lbs./hr.)
–Equipment Engineering Model 590
–DeLaval Model 340
–DeLaval Model 366
–CO2 incorporation system
–Various Membrane Systems
–Pending: Westfalia KNA 3-06-076 Clarifier (quark
separator)
DAIRY PROCESSING PLANT
PACKAGING SYSTEMS
UTILITIES
COOLERS
–Koch Multivac vacuum sealer
–Pending: Modern Packaging SR8DC Rotary Denesting, Filling, and
Heat Sealing machine for
6oz plastic containers
–Electrical, chilled water, steam
(culinary and regular), reverse
osmosis water and pressurized air
–Various walk-in coolers and wind
tunnels, temp range from -40 F
to 105 F
CONTACT: JASON HUCK
General Manager, Cornell University
607-254-4882
[email protected]
The Cornell Dairy Processing Plant (permitted by New York State Agriculture & Markets) supports
the primary teaching, research and outreach missions of the Department of Food Science, the
Cornell Institute of Food Science and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Specifically,
the Dairy contributes to undergraduate and graduate instruction in food science; to basic and
applied dairy foods research; to public service through extension programs; and as a designated
training facility for New York State Certified Milk Inspectors and New York State Department of
Agriculture and Market Inspectors. As a by-product of its mission-based functions, the Cornell Dairy
also produces fluid milk, yogurt, juice and ice cream products to be sold on the Cornell University,
Ithaca campus, to offset the total costs incurred in the equipping and operations of the dairy plant.
EQUIPMENT:
RAW MILK STORAGE
HTST SYSTEM
(W/HOMOGENIZER)
– Two silos 3,000 gallons each
–Tetra Plex plate heat exchanger
(1,200 gal./hr.)
COLD MILK SEPARATION
–Tetra Centri cold milk separator (1,200 gal./hr.)
–VTetra Alex homogenizer (1,200
gal./hr.;
3,000 psi two-stage)
–Includes 22-second legal hold tube
and 90-second extended hold tube
BATCHING
–Industrial batching system (automated or manual)
including 200-gal. blender and three batching tanks
(500, 1,000 and 1,500 gallons)
24
NORTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
EQUIPMENT
(cont.):
OTHER CAPABILITIES
PASTEURIZED STORAGE TANKS
FLUID MILK/JUICE FILLING
–Two 12-valve rotary bottle fillers (Federal) with coding
and labeling capabilities
–Three 2,000-gal. silos, one 1,000-gal. silo and one
500-gal. tank (all jacketed with ice water cooling)
–Ice cream manufacture and
packaging
–Yogurt manufacture and packaging
»» 8 oz. (25 to 50 cpm)
»» Squat quart, half gallon and gallon (25 to 35
cpm)
–Bag-n-Box (1- to 5-gal. dispenser bags)
DAIRY PROCESSING LABORATORY
The Dairy Processing Laboratory research focus areas include Food Safety Engineering and Food
Quality. Research in the area of Food Safety Engineering focuses on the development of new and
improved processing methods able to reduce the microbial load in food systems, of current interest
being membrane separation and Pulsed Light treatment. The Food Quality component of research
aims at elucidating the intermolecular interactions and structural transformations that occur during
processing of dairy and complex foods, and using this understanding to improve their quality and
functionality.
EQUIPMENT: –Strain-controlled Advanced Rheometric
Expansion System (ARES) (TA Instruments)
–Zeta potential and particle size analysis
instrumentation (Brookhaven Inc.)
–Thermal analysis system (DSC and TGA,
Seiko Instruments)
–Pulsed Light treatment unit (Xenon Corp.)
–Incubators
–Colorimeter
–Basic equipment for physical, chemical and
microbiological analyses
–Pilot scale, automated microfiltration unit
equipped with ceramic membranes
MILK QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
The laboratories and staff of the MQIP are involved in a variety of applied research projects related
to the quality and safety of milk and dairy products. A number of research projects are conducted
in collaboration with the Cornell Food Science Department Food Safety Laboratory. Results from
these research projects are rapidly communicated to the dairy industry, resulting in immediate
improvements for the industry. This team is available to solve dairy quality and food safety issues
using a farm-to-table approach.
EQUIPMENT: – Autoplate 4000
– Q-Count
25
NORTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
FOOD SAFETY LABORATORY AND LABORATORY FOR MOLECULAR TYPING
Research in Food Safety Laboratory focuses on the pathogenesis of foodborne diseases, pre- and
postharvest food safety and on improving our understanding of the transmission of foodborne bacterial
pathogens from farm animals and from foods to humans. A better understanding of the transmission
pathways of foodborne pathogens is necessary to design better strategies to prevent and control human
disease. Both basic and applied research in the laboratory is targeted toward developing the scientific
knowledge necessary to improve our ability to prevent foodborne diseases.
EQUIPMENT: –RiboPrinter — Microbial
Characterization System
–Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer, REP-PCR Based
Microbial Characterization
–Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE)
— Genetic Fingerprinting
–Illumina — Full Genome Sequencing
(Life Sciences Core Laboratory)
–PCR and Sequence Based
Characterization (16S, rpoB, etc.)
–ABI Prism — Real Time PCR
Detection System
DAIRY FOODS ENGINEERING LABORATORY
The Dairy Foods Engineering Laboratory is engaged in research on experimental and theoretical
aspects of bioseparation processes, high pressure extrusion with supercritical fluids, physical and
engineering properties of biomaterials and novel food processing technologies. A major longterm goal is to develop new and improved unit operations for value-added processing of food and
biomaterials. Derivative goals include new techniques for measurement and control of processes
and properties for industrial applications.
EQUIPMENT: –Supercritical fluid sterilization systems for
–Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer
and Brookfield viscometers
COURSES, SYMPOSIA AND EVENTS
• New York State Association for
Food Protection Annual Conference
• Fluid Milk Processing for Quality &
Safety
• Membrane/Separation Technology
& Evaporator/Dryer in Dairy Foods
Processing Workshop
http://foodscience.cornell.edu/cals/
foodsci/extension/extension-calendar.cfm
liquid and solid foods
•
•
•
•
•
•
HTST Pasteurizer Workshop (2 times per year)
Vat Pasteurizer/Cheese Grading Workshop
Cultured Dairy Products Workshop
Certified Milk Inspectors School
Dairy Laboratory Workshop
New York State Cheese Manufacturers
Annual Conference
26
NORTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
DAVID M. BARBANO, PH.D.
Professor
Cornell University
[email protected]
Membrane filtration of milk, improvement of chemical
analysis methods for milk and dairy products, Fourier
transform mid-infrared milk analysis — development of
models to measure the fatty acid composition of milk,
impact of milk somatic cell count on dairy product quality
and yield. Methods for production of robust calibration
samples for milk analysis. Microfiltration for bacteria
and spore removal. Strategies to improve the safety of
farmstead raw milk cheese.
KATHRYN J. BOOR, PH.D.
Dean/Professor
Cornell University
[email protected]
Bacterial response and adaptation to environmental
stresses; bacterial virulence; physiology and genetic
characteristics of pathogenic bacteria; and dairy
microbiology. Dr. Boor collaborates with the department’s
Food Safety Laboratory (FSL) and the Milk Quality
Improvement Program (MQIP). Scientists in the FSL conduct
basic and applied research in microbial food safety using
the tools of molecular biology and microbiology. Scientists
in the MQIP focus on identification and elimination of
spoilage microbes in dairy food systems. Work in progress
focuses on the genetics and physiology of foodborne
bacterial pathogens and spoilage organisms, including
Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus spp. and related sporeforming bacteria.
MACKENZIE BROWN
Projects & Resources Support Technician
Cornell University
[email protected]
Food Processing Development Lab.
KIMBERLY R. BUKOWSKI
Extension Support Specialist
Cornell University
[email protected]
607-254-3313
Dairy Foods Extension/Dairy Certificate Program,
with focus on marketing, development and refinement of
extension training courses. Contribute to the development
of the Dairy Industry in NYS. Offer SQF, HACCP and
Food Safety consulting and training to the Industry.
NANCY CAREY
Research Support Specialist I
Cornell University
[email protected]
Data management and sensory analysis.
JASON R. HUCK, M.S.
General Manager, Dairy Operations
Cornell University
[email protected]
Dairy processing plant operations.
27
NORTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
JANENE LUCIA
Extension Support Specialist
Cornell University
[email protected]
Dairy Foods Extension/Dairy Certificate Program; training/
short course coordination and management; certificate
program management.
NICOLE H. MARTIN
Research Support Specialist II
Cornell University
STEVEN C. MURPHY, M.P.S.
Senior Extension Associate
Cornell University
[email protected]
Dairy Foods Extension — dairy product quality and safety;
milk shelf life; dairy laboratory programs; HACCP training
and implementation.
ROBERT D. RALYEA, M.S.
[email protected]
Senior Extension Associate
Cornell University
Dairy microbiology. Research focus on dairy product
spoilage and safety throughout the dairy production and
processing continuum, with particular interest in dairy
product testing.
Milk Quality Improvement Program
Food science, dairy microbiology, improved and sustainable
dairy agriculture, agroterrorism prevention.
[email protected]
CARMEN I. MORARU, PH.D.
SYED S. H. RIZVI, PH.D.
Associate Professor
Cornell University
Professor
Cornell University
[email protected]
[email protected]
Dairy Foods Engineering, Food Safety Engineering.
Specific research projects include: functionality and
processing behavior of milk protein preparations obtained
by membrane filtration, microfiltration processing for the
physical removal of microorganisms from milk, pulsed
light treatment for inactivation of microorganisms on
food (including dairy) and food contact surfaces, and
nanotechnology-based approaches for controlling microbial
attachment to food contact surfaces. The broader objective
of Carmen Moraru’s research is to develop processes
capable of delivering safe dairy foods of high quality and
nutritional value.
Physical and engineering properties of foods; bioseparation
and extrusion processes; supercritical fluid-based extraction,
sterilization, functionalization and texturization processes.
28
NORTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
MARTIN WIEDMANN, PH.D.,
DR. MED. VET.
Professor
Cornell University
[email protected]
Food Microbiology. Research focus includes: tracking and
characterization of sporeforming bacterial contaminants
through farm environments and dairy processing systems;
development of molecular-based raw milk tests for the
detection of psychrotolerant sporeforming bacteria; full
genome sequencing of psychrotolerant sporeformers;
influence of processing parameters on bacterial outgrowth
in milk; evaluation of pasteurized milk quality using
microbiological, sensory and chemical parameters;
chocolate milk shelf-life extension and other areas
concerning improvement of dairy product quality.
TRISTAN J. ZUBER
Senior Extension Associate
Cornell University
[email protected]
607/227-7398
Dairy Foods Extension w/focus in yogurt and fermented
dairy products and economic Development in NYS Dairy
Foods Processing.
SOUTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
29
SOUTHEAST DAIRY FOODS
RESEARCH CENTER
www.cals.ncsu.edu/food_science/sdfrc/sdfrc.html
• North Carolina State University (Raleigh)
• Mississippi State University (Starkville)
• Sensory Applications Laboratory
(North Carolina State University)
www.ncsu.edu/sensory
CENTER DIRECTOR
Todd Klaenhammer, Ph.D.
Center Director
919-515-4197
[email protected]
OVERVIEW
The Southeast Dairy Foods Research Center, with facilities and support at North Carolina State
University (Raleigh) and Mississippi State University (Starkville), has been operating since 1988
and actively participates in national research planning and execution on behalf of the dairy
industry and other entities. The center’s researchers work nationally on cutting-edge information
and technologies, educate future professionals for the dairy industries, and help food processors
address applications challenges and develop new products and processes using dairy products
and ingredients. The center hosts a commercial-scale dairy farm, an operational dairy plant,
a Food Rheology Laboratory, and a Sensory Applications Laboratory, conducting analytical,
qualitative and affective sensory tests and flavor chemistry analyses tailored to meet specific
needs of the food industry.
RESEARCH FOCUS
•
•
•
•
•
•
Milk protein and whey ingredient functionality
Thermal and biological processing
Extended shelf-life processing
Sensory properties and flavor chemistry of cheese and dairy ingredients
Dairy food safety
Dairy starter cultures and probiotics
30
SOUTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
SENSORY APPLICATIONS LABORATORY
The Sensory Applications Laboratory at North Carolina State University specializes in dairy sensory
and flavor chemistry analysis, including consumer testing (qualitative and quantitative), preference
mapping, instrument flavor analysis techniques (gas chromatography mass spectrometry, gas
chromatography olfactometry and HPLC) and descriptive analysis. The center maintains three
trained descriptive panels. Ongoing flavor research is primarily focused on dairy products (including
milk, cheese, milk powders, whey proteins and butter), dairy ingredients applications, and how
flavor varies with processing and storage. A specific focus is development of defined sensory
languages and the application of these languages to enhanced product understanding, links to
volatile compounds (flavor chemistry) and enhanced consumer understanding.
FOOD RHEOLOGY LABORATORY
The research objective of the Food Rheology Laboratory at North Carolina State University is
the explanation of the physical chemistry, molecular-level interactions and effect of processing
conditions within a food system, through an understanding of rheological behavior, while solving
processing and product development problems facing the food industry. Particular emphasis
is placed on evaluating rheological contributions to sensory properties of materials during oral
processing. The laboratory maintains a full complement of high-precision rheometric, viscometric
and compression/extension equipment for complete characterization of food material properties
as they relate to material structure and texture. Complementary techniques including tribology
and acoustic emission are being developed in the laboratory to expand the scope of research
capabilities with respect to food material characterization functionality.
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY
CONTACT: TODD KLAENHAMMER, PH.D.
Director, Southeast Dairy Foods
Research Center
919-515-4197
[email protected]
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT: – Cherry-Burrell EQ-3 ESL Gable-top filler
– Ice cream processing
– LiquiBox Semi-automatic Bag-n-Box
filler
– Tetra Hoyer Frigus 600 freezer
– Tetra Hoyer variegation system
– HTST system (700/350 gal./hr.)
– Feldmeier tubular ultrapasteurization
booster
– DeLaval 590 cold milk separator
– Multiple batch tanks
– Admix Rotosolver submersible mixer
– Admix FastFeed Power Induction System
– CEM SMART Trac fat/solids analysis
system
– APV Gaulin 2-stage homogenizer
– Tetra Hoyer FF 2000 ingredient feeder
– Sweetheart rotary 4-oz. cup filler
– Sawvel rotary pint cup filler
– Shrink-wrap oven
– Cheese vat — 300 gal. (automatic)
– Kusel 4MX cheese vat — 65 gal.
– Manual cheese vat — 50 gal. (jacketed)
– Cheddar mill
– Cheese hoops and presses
– Koch vacuum sealer
31
SOUTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
– VRC multicoil processor XXI
–Autoclaves
– Feldmeier tubular heat exchanger
–Rheometers
– 75-kw continuous microwave
processor
– Electrophoretic analyses:
DNA and protein
– Marlen piston pump Model 629
– Particle size analysis
– ASTEPO low-acid aseptic
Bag-n-Box filler
– DNA fingerprinting
– Kitchen preparation room
– Radio Frequency Co.
Macrowave processor
– Consumer testing booths with
Compusense
– Superspeed and ultracentrifuges
– Descriptive panel room
– Gas chromatography/mass
spectrometry (GC/MS)
– Sensory panel room
– Atomic absorption spectrophotometry
– Gas chromatography olfactometry (GCO)
– Benchtop micro- and ultrafiltration
– Visible, UV and fluorescent plate
readers
– Pilot scale ultrafiltration
– Mammalian cell culture
– High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)
– Stock retort and can sealer
– Microscopy: light, phase and fluorescent
– Anhydro pilot scale spray dryer
– Microbiological support laboratory
– Buchi benchtop spray dryer
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY
CONTACT: SAM CHANG, PH.D.
Head, Food Science, Nutrition and
Health Promotion
[email protected]
EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT: – Double-O cheese vat — 65 gal.
with stirrers
– Anderson, 2-stage homogenizer
(30 gal./hr.)
– Square cheese vat — 100 gal.,
hand-stirred
– Walts UHT unit-indirect steam-heated
(40 gal./hr.)
– Romicon ultrafiltration unit
(1,700 lbs./hr.)
– Cheese vats — 750 gal. with stirrers (2)
– Vats — 2- to 3-gal. capacity,
hand-stirred (4)
– Cultured products vat — 50 gal.,
heated and stirred
– Continuous ice cream freezer —
150 gal./hr.
– Emery Thompson batch
ice cream freezer — 5 liters
–CO2 freezing tunnel — 24 ft. long
– Anderson HTST unit
– APV spray dryer — 7 kg./hr.,
1-m diameter
– Dayton Electric steam-closing canning
machine
32
SOUTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT – Rooneys semi-automatic canning
(cont.):machine
–Spectrophotometers
–Oven
– Retort — approx. 120 1-lb. cans
– Kemotech smoking room —
4- by 5-ft. firebox
– CEM microwave moisture analyzer
– APV homogenizer — 2 stages
– Gas chromatographs (GC), GC-MS, GC-O
– HPLC, LC-MS
– Mass spectrometers (MS)
–Ultracentrifuge
– Walk-in freezer
–Cooler
– Grape crusher
– Juice processing
– Freeze dryers
– Deep-fat fryers
COURSES, SYMPOSIA AND EVENTS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Sensory and Instrumental Analysis of Dairy Flavors Short Course
FS 324 Milk and Dairy Products (Internet-based distance education course)
FS 554 Lactation, Milk and Nutrition
FNH 4143 Dairy Foods Processing
FNH 4990 Dairy Products Judging
Cheese Making Short Course
Annual Farmstead Cheese Manufacture Short Course
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
JON ALLEN, PH.D.
SAM CHANG, PH.D.
Professor of Food, Bioprocessing and
Nutrition Sciences
North Carolina State University
Head, Food Science and Health Promotion
Mississippi State University
[email protected]
Mammary gland biology and lactation; milk composition,
chemistry and functional properties; mineral and vitamin
nutrition and metabolism; food allergy; epithelial transport;
regulatory biology; nutrition education; diabetes and
obesity; glycemic index.
RODOLPHE BARRANGOU, PH.D.
Associate Professor of Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
North Carolina State University
[email protected]
CHRISTOPHER R. DAUBERT, PH.D.
Professor of Food, Bioprocessing and
Nutrition Sciences
Director of Food Rheology Laboratory
North Carolina State University
[email protected]
Process cheese structure and texture; functionality of dairy
ingredients; protein interactions in gel formation; fracture
and texture design of dairy products.
[email protected]
MARYANNE DRAKE, PH.D.
Dairy starter cultures, probiotics, and novel bacteriophage
defense systems via CRISPR.
Professor, Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences,
and Director of DMI Sensory
Applications Laboratory and NCSU Sensory
Services Center
North Carolina State University
GARY CARTWRIGHT
Dairy Enterprise System Director
North Carolina State University
[email protected]
Dairy processing, aseptic processing and packaging,
continuous-flow microwave processing.
[email protected]
Sensory perception and chemistry of dairy flavors;
understanding consumer needs, including market drivers
and segmentation.
33
SOUTHEAST DAIRY FOODS RESEARCH CENTER
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
E. ALLEN FOEGEDING, PH.D.
CAROL REILLY
William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor
Department of Food, Bioprocessing and
Nutrition Sciences
North Carolina State University
[email protected]
Program Specialist
Southeast Dairy Foods Research Center
Department of Food, Bioprocessing and
Nutrition Sciences
North Carolina State University
Whey and milk protein ingredient functionality; using dairy
proteins to design food structures with desirable properties
regarding texture and health; controlling astringent flavor
and stability in high-protein/high-acid drinks.
WES SCHILLING, PH.D.
TAEJO KIM, PH.D.
Research Assistant Professor
Department of Food Science, Nutrition and
Health Promotion
Mississippi State University
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Associate Professor, Food Chemistry and Sensory
Analysis
Department of Food Science, Nutrition and
Health Promotion
Mississippi State University
[email protected]
Food safety and molecular microbiology, rapid detection
methods, analysis and synthesis of bioactive components.
Sensory and flavor analysis of foods; consumer testing,
descriptive analysis, gas chromatography, flavor and
preference mapping.
TODD KLAENHAMMER, PH.D.
JOSIP SIMUNOVIC, PH.D.
Dairy Center Director,
Distinguished University Professor and
William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor
Department of Food, Bioprocessing and
Nutrition Sciences
North Carolina State University
[email protected]
Microbiology of starter cultures and probiotics; controlling
fermentations and understanding probiotic bacteria through
genomics.
RAMA NANNAPANENI, PH.D.
Assistant Research Professor
Department of Food Science, Nutrition and
Health Promotion
Mississippi State University
[email protected]
Food safety and molecular food microbiology with focus on
microbial stress adaptation and antimicrobial resistance; and
microbiological safety of soft process cheeses.
Research Associate Professor
Department of Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
North Carolina State University
[email protected]
Conventional and advanced aseptic processing, continuousflow microwave thermal processing, monitoring and
validation of thermal processes for high-acid and low-acid
dairy, particulate/multiphase foods and biomaterials.
KAMLESH SONI, PH.D.
Research Associate
Department of Food Science, Nutrition and
Health Promotion
Mississippi State University
[email protected]
Food safety and molecular food microbiology, Quorum
sensing molecules, microbial stress and microbiology of
fresh soft cheeses.
34
WESTERN DAIRY CENTER
WESTERN DAIRY
CENTER
• Utah State University (Logan, UT)
www.usu.edu/westcent
• Oregon State University (Corvallis, OR)
• Weber State University (Ogden, UT)
• Brigham Young University (Provo, UT)
CENTER DIRECTOR
Donald J. McMahon, Ph.D.
Center Director
435-797-3644
[email protected]
OVERVIEW
The Western Dairy Center’s primary location is Utah State University in Logan, with additional
resources available at Oregon State University (Corvallis, OR), Weber State University (Ogden,
UT), and Brigham Young Universitty (Provo, UT). These institutions have extensive expertise in
dairy processing/production, microbiology, chemistry and sensory analysis. An integral part of
the center is a newly established Dairy Technology Innovation Laboratory group of researchers
dedicated to providing innovative solutions to challenges and opportunities facing today’s dairy
processing industry.
RESEARCH FOCUS
• Utah State University
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Cheese flavor and functionality
Cheese technology
Fermented products, including cheese and yogurt
Ultra-high-temperature and extended-shelf-life fluid milk beverages
Milk protein chemistry, including coagulation, denaturation and separation
Milk fractionation and use of membrane separation in dairy foods
Anaerobic digestion of dairy processing waste
Whey protein extrusion
Application of genetics, genomics and metabolomics to lactic acid bacteria
Whey and milk utilization
Microstructure of dairy products
Sensory analysis
35
WESTERN DAIRY CENTER
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
The Gary Haight Richardson Dairy Products Laboratory at Utah State University is a complete dairy
processing facility. It operates daily to produce the dairy products used on campus. It also is used
extensively by the researchers at the Western Dairy Center, as well as by researchers from industry
for research and product development. Facilities are available on a daily basis for research, product
development, formulation, manufacture and scale-up of dairy products. The efficient operation and
flexible scheduling ensure a short turnaround time for the customers’ products.
TO ARRANGE USE OF THE PILOT
PLANT FACILITY, CONTACT:
TO ARRANGE RESEARCH
TRIALS, CONTACT:
EQUIPMENT: – Scherping horizontal cheese vats (1,500 lbs.) (2)
–Bench scale cheese vats
(30 lbs., 10 lbs.)
– Open cheese vats (500 lbs.) (3)
– Homogenizer and pasteurizer
– Tetra Pak Sterilab ultra-high temperature processor (steam injection and indirect heating)
CONTACT: DAVID IRISH
Manager, Gary Haight Richardson
Dairy Products Laboratory
435-797-2108
[email protected]
CONTACT: CARL BROTHERSEN, M.S.
Associate Director, Dairy
Technology Innovation Laboratory
435-797-3466
[email protected]
– Process cheese cooker
– Ice cream freezer, continuous
and batch
– Ultrafiltration, microfiltration,
nanofiltration and reverse osmosis
separation
– Mozzarella cooker/stretcher
–Grinder
– Vacuum packager
–
High-pressure, high-temperature
extruder
SUPPORTING
ANALYTICAL
EQUIPMENT:
–Rheometer
–Fermenters
– Texture profile analyzer
– High-performance chromatograph
–BSL2+ laboratory with necessary
equipment
–High-performance chromatograph/
mass spectrometer
– Twin-screw extruder
–Titrater
– Gas chromatograph
– Freeze dryer
– Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer
– Particle analyzer
– Capillary electrophoresis
– Light microscope
– Babcock apparatus
– Polarized light microscope
–Microtome
– Turbidity meter
– Water activity meter
– Low-intensity ultrasound
36
WESTERN DAIRY CENTER
SUPPORTING
ANALYTICAL
EQUIPMENT
(cont):
– High-intensity ultrasound
–Centrifuges
– Thermo analyzer
– Sample homogenizers
– Moisture analyzer
– Freezer (-80 C)
– Spectrophotometer UV/Vis
COURSES, SYMPOSIA AND EVENTS
• Basic Cheese Making Short Course for Industrial Cheese Makers (Utah State University)
• Advanced Cheese Making Short Course for Artisan Cheese Makers (Utah State University)
• Artisan Cheese Symposium (Utah State University)
• GMP Workshop (Utah State University)
• HACCP Workshop (Utah State University)
• Advanced Sanitation Workshop (Utah State University)
• Behavior-Based Food Safety (Utah State University)
• Statistical Process Control Workshop (Utah State University)
• Safe Quality Foods Workshop (Utah State University)
OTHER
• Consumer sensory analysis
• DNA and RNA analysis
OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
CONTACT: LISBETH GODDIK
[email protected]
RESEARCH FOCUS
• Cheese technology
• Raw milk quality
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
• Batch pasteurizer (32, 200, 300 gal.)
• Consumer sensory
• Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with SPME and autosampler
• GC X GC-TOF-MS equipped with sample preparation station unit
• MDGC
BRIGHAM YOUNG
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
• Consumer sensory
CONTACT: MICHELLE LLOYD
[email protected]
37
WESTERN DAIRY CENTER
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
DAVID BRITT, PH.D.
CONLY HANSEN, PH.D.
Assistant Professor, Biological Engineering
Utah State University
Professor, Food Engineering
Utah State University
[email protected]
[email protected]
Surface chemistry, interfacial water structure (hydration
layers) and associated surface potential of membranes and
biomaterials as related to protein absorption and biofilm
formation; lactose-hydrogels for enhanced water retention
in soil and crop yield.
Anaerobic digestion as a waste management tool for
decreasing effluent load from farms and food processing
facilities and generation of energy.
JEFF BROADBENT, PH.D.
Associate Professor, Sensory Science
Oregon State University
Professor, Dairy Microbiology
Utah State University
[email protected]
[email protected]
Mechanisms underlying perceptions of taste, smell,
and chemesthesis; flavor integration; sensory testing
methodology; applications of sensory evaluation techniques
in various aspects of dairy research.
Genomics of lactic acid bacteria, nonstarter lactic acid
bacteria in cheese; improvements in low-fat cheeses;
functionality in high-moisture cheeses; effect of oxidation
reduction potential on growth of lactic acid bacteria; use of
adjunct cultures.
CARL BROTHERSEN, M.S.
Associate Director, Western Dairy Center
Associate Director, Dairy Technology Innovation Laboratory
Utah State University
[email protected]
Chemical diffusion of molecules in cheese matrix; oxidationreduction potential in Cheddar cheese; value-added cheese.
BALASUBRAMANIAN GANESAN, PH.D.
Research Scientist
Dairy Technology Innovation Laboratory
Utah State University
JUYUN LIM, PH.D.
SYLVANA MARTINI, PH.D.
Assistant Professor, Lipids, Sensory Evaluation
Utah State University
[email protected]
Technologies for designing healthy, high-quality, fatcontaining foods for today’s consumer; fat crystallization
and phase transition theory; encapsulation; relationships
between physicochemical properties of fats and emulsions
and sensory characteristics.
DONALD J. MCMAHON, PH.D.
Director, Western Dairy Center
Director, Dairy Technology Innovation Laboratory
Professor, Dairy Food Processing
Utah State University
[email protected]
[email protected]
Genomics, metabolomics and informatics of lactic acid
bacteria.
Structure and function of casein proteins, milk coagulation,
cheese manufacture, low-fat cheese texture and flavor,
mozzarella cheese functional properties; membrane
fractionation and processing of milk and whey; ultra-hightemperature processing of milk.
LISBETH GODDIK
Professor
Oregon State University
[email protected]
Cheese technology, raw milk quality, French and artisan
cheeses.
BRIAN NUMMER, PH.D.
Assistant Professor, Extension Food Safety Specialist
Utah State University
[email protected]
Food safety manager education, retail-foodservice food
safety, small food entrepreneur food safety, home food
storage, HACCP short course.
38
WESTERN DAIRY CENTER
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
CRAIG J. OBERG, PH.D.
Regents Professor, Microbiology
Weber State University
[email protected]
Cheese starter cultures, microbiology of lactic acid bacteria,
probiotic cultures.
MICHAEL QIAN, PH.D.
Associate Professor, Food Science
Oregon State University
[email protected]
Flavor chemistry, food analysis and dairy chemistry.
Characterization of aroma compounds, and chemical
and biological generation in dairy, small fruits and wines.
Instrumental analysis of food components.
J. ANTONIO TORRES, PH.D.
Associate Professor, Food Process Engineering
Oregon State University
[email protected]
Novel and conventional applications of high-pressure
processing with emphasis on bacterial spore inactivation
mechanisms, in-line/real-time optical polarization
measurements in food systems.
MARIE WALSH, PH.D.
Associate Professor, Dairy Chemistry
Utah State University
[email protected]
KIMBERLY RASMUSSEN
Whey proteins (formulation, extrusion and production)
in snack foods and meat extenders; immobilized enzyme
reactors.
Dairy Technology Innovation Laboratory Staff Assistant
Utah State University
ROBERT WARD, PH.D.
[email protected]
Associate Professor, Bioactive Food Components
Utah State University
WALT REAM
[email protected]
Professor in Microbiology
Oregon State University
Lipid analysis and metabolism, plus novel bioactivities
associated with the milkfat globular membrane.
[email protected]
Bacterial genetics; plant-microbe interactions; genetic
recombination; DNA-protein interactions; ancient DNA.
Bacteria populations in milk during shelf-life.
ELIZABETH TOMASINO
Oregon State University
[email protected]
Chemical and sensory relationships in wine; measurement of
volatile aroma compounds using MDGC; sensory and chemical
evaluation of wine and cheese terroir; impact of brown
marmorated stinkbug (BMSB) to wine quality. Comparison and
pairing of volatile flavors in wines and cheeses.
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR
DAIRY RESEARCH
• University of Wisconsin-Madison
www.cdr.wisc.edu
CENTER DIRECTOR
John Lucey, Ph.D.
Center Director
608-262-1195
[email protected]
OVERVIEW
The Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research (CDR) is located within a licensed, operating dairy plant on
the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus and is one of the premier dairy research centers in the
world. Building on Wisconsin’s tradition as the “Dairy State,” the center explores functional, flavor and
physical properties of cheese/cheese products and other milk components used as ingredients and
as finished products. CDR research focuses on innovation, technology, and product development for
cheese, dairy ingredients, cultured products and beverages, in addition to dairy protein processing/
separation procedures, use of cheese and dairy ingredients in foods, processes involving fractionation,
concentration or drying of milk, whey and whey proteins, and technologies for product safety and
quality. More than 30 researchers and scientists are involved in conducting basic and applied dairy
research. Collectively, the CDR staff has over 250 years of food industry experience, which creates
a unique mix of academic and industry perspectives to help address any challenges facing the dairy
industry. The facilities (including a pilot plant) and equipment are extensive, allowing the center to not
only create new products, uses and processes, but also to meet the unique needs of the food industry.
Annually, the CDR provides specialized training and short courses to over 1,400 industry personnel.
RESEARCH FOCUS
• Explore and understand the functional properties of cheese, cheese products and cultured
dairy products
• Functional dairy proteins (casein alternatives, milk protein concentrate (MPC), modified
whey protein concentrate (WPC), etc.) and milk ingredients
• Dairy food safety and quality systems
• Dairy processing (membrane filtration, drying, separation, etc.)
39
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
40
CHEESE
The University of Wisconsin-Madison has a long and proud history of cheese research and outreach.
The CDR extends the art and science of cheese making into the realm of specialty cheese innovation,
as well as cheese as an ingredient. Its licensed cheese makers/scientists provide industry with training
programs, research facilities, cheese making protocols for specific end use, and leading-edge
technologies for adjusting the texture, taste and/or functionality of cheese in food applications.
The CDR cheese making pilot plant is located within the University of Wisconsin-Madison Dairy
Plant, a licensed, operational dairy. This setting allows for flexibility in all aspects of the cheese
making process. The facility is designed for manufacture of any retail cheese variety (fresh, cream,
cottage, hard, soft, semisoft, surface-ripened, molded and eyed), process cheese and cheese
food, plus cold pack.
CDR cheese applications staff, through consultation, pilot plant trials, applications laboratory
evaluation, and on-site trials and visits, works in a confidential manner with all entities of the
dairy industry. From dairy producers and manufacturers to ingredient suppliers and equipment
manufacturers, applications staff works with the entire cheese distribution system, including
foodservice, retail, wholesale, brokers, converters, warehouses, executive chefs and quick-service
restaurants — wherever cheese is used in food application systems. Staff members also provide
direct technical support for the end user of natural, process and cold pack cheeses, as well as
cheese in food applications.
DAIRY PROTEIN/INGREDIENTS
CDR has an extensive program focusing on dairy ingredients. Working on a confidential basis,
the program strives to meet the needs of regional and national dairy ingredient processors and
food manufacturers. These needs include process, product and applications support. The dairy
ingredient program and applications lab offer technical support for whey, buttermilk, nonfat dry
milk, permeate, whey protein concentrate (WPC), whey protein isolate (WPI), individual whey
proteins, milk protein concentrates (MPC) and isolates, milk protein fractions and native whey protein.
Services include information, training, seminars, process development, process troubleshooting,
ingredient functionality testing and prototype development. Application areas of expertise are
beverages, baked products, confections, dairy products, energy bars and prepared foods.
ANALYTICAL SERVICES
Analytical services are offered to support projects carried out at the Wisconsin Center for Dairy
Research. CDR provides comprehensive chemical and microbiological testing services and follows
EURACHEM-CITAC Guide CG-2 as quality assurance guideline of nonroutine and R&D analysis of
samples. Tests performed include crude protein, casein, true protein, milkfat, total solids, mineral
content by reference methods, enzymatic determination of lactose and galactose, protein profiles
of milk and milk products by capillary electrophoresis, cheese proteolysis and determination of
particle size analysis. Rheological tests performed include texture profiles, cheese meltability and
functional properties of milk products.
Microbiological dairy food safety and quality tests are routinely determined, including tests for
coliforms, standard plate count, plus yeast and mold. Shelf life and microbial challenge studies also
are performed.
41
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
SAFETY/QUALITY APPLICATIONS
Providing an active approach to safety and quality,
the CDR staff conduct multiple training workshops
for industry each year in addition to performing
audits of dairy facilities, solves problems for
dairy plants and reviews dairy facilities’ good
manufacturing practice (GMP) programs. CDR
staff works with facility personnel to improve their
GMP program and establish or modify an HACCP
program. Staff members also interpret government
regulations related to specific dairy products and
dairy facilities and provide technical expertise in
HACCP (including FSMA) implementation and
compliance with the Committee for the Assurance
of Wisconsin Dairy Product Safety requirements.
In addition, cheese and dairy ingredients produced
at CDR are monitored for microbial safety.
SENSORY ANALYSIS
This area designs, conducts and summarizes sensory analysis of cheese and dairy ingredients,
using modern sensory testing approaches including the use of FIZZ Networks software with trained
panelists performing a wide range of consumer and quantitative tests to meet the customers’ needs.
Evaluations include flavor, body/texture and appearance profiles, as well as cheese functionality for
shredding/slicing and cooking applications. Panels conducted range from trained to focus group,
from descriptive to consumer.
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
The CDR pilot plant facilities meet the needs of the dairy and food processing industry by offering
access to smaller-scale equipment. The small-vat new product development capability in the
cheese pilot plant helps evaluate new cheese making processes. The dairy ingredient pilot plant
has the capability to perform milk and whey processing of all types to produce beverages, yogurt,
ice cream, sauces, spreads, dips and salad dressings. In addition, the applications lab at CDR has
equipment to test the functionality of cheese as an ingredient, including a full line of foodservice
pizza ovens. CDR also can evaluate the functionality of dairy ingredients and formulate dairy
ingredients into baked products and confections. The chemical and microbiological laboratories
extend more than 5,000 square feet and offer some unique testing capabilities.
42
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR
DAIRY RESEARCH/UW-MADISON
PILOT PLANT EQUIPMENT
CONTACT: THOMAS SZALKUCKI
Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
608-262-9020
EQUIPMENT: Full cheese making manufacturing line located in a state-licensed, state-inspected,
operating dairy manufacturing facility. Natural cheese manufacturing line includes
multiple raw storage tanks, separator, homogenizer, HTST and various membranes
(RO, UF, MF) for full milk standardization based on any desired ratios or incorporation
of any ingredient before pasteurization of cheese milk. Capabilities to manufacture
any style and variety of cheeses.
–D
amrow bulk starter tank with 100-lb.
capacity
– D
R Tech single station vacuum cheese
press
–A
ccument pH meters with temperature
compensation, pH, mV, ion, conductivity
and dissolved oxygen capabilities
– Press for blocks and horns
–6
Stoelting 600-lb. cheese vats with
variable speed agitators and knives
ranging in size from ¼ in. to 1½ in.
– Kusel scale-up 5,400-lb. cheese vat
–F
our Labtronics mini cheese vats with
45-lb. capacity
–S
upreme 640 Pasta Filata mixer including
heads for balls, loaves and string
–S
toelting eyed cheese prepress with 4
separate compartments and 2 pneumatic
rams with an 80 psi maximum
– EBR curd mill
–D
amrow 2LS-12 Type H horizontal cheese
press with 2 air rams that can be adjusted
from 20 to 80 psi
–K
usel A-frame vertical cheese press with
8 air rams that can be adjusted from 5
to 40 psi
– S
tainless steel cheese forms (including
Wilson 10-, 20- and 40-lb. block,
rectangular and round perforated forms
for brick, Muenster and Havarti style
cheeses
– P
lastic cheese forms of various sizes
and shapes, including 10-lb. wheels
(both Crellin and Fromagex), 5-lb.
loaves, smaller sizes for 1-lb. Edam
balls, Camembert, ricotta and panela
baskets, etc.
– Stacked fiberglass circulating brine system
– W
arm room capabilities for eyed cheese
storage
– V
arious cold storage capabilities with
variety of temperature ranges for cheese
ripening
– Kusel portable cheese vat (450 lbs.)
– Haas dairy product aerator
– Damrow starter tank
43
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
EQUIPMENT: Full cream cheese manufacturing line. Cream cheese manufacturing line includes items listed
below, as well as equipment listed under other categories. Processing lines include cheese
vats, pumping line to collect whey and cream cheese, holding vessel, through packaging.
– Sharples DS2 cream cheese separator
– APV Gaulin 100 DJ F385J homogenizer
with 1- and 2-stage capability and a
40-lb. minimum batch size
– Scherping DJ30G swept-surface tank
with 250-lb. capacity
Cold pack and processed cheese manufacturing line. Cold pack and processed cheese
manufacturing line includes items listed below, as well as equipment listed under other
categories. Processing lines include mixing/cooking vessels, homogenization and blending.
All direct steam comes from culinary steam sources.
– Biro cheese grinder, Model 922, includes
various plate sizes
– Blentech low shear, double screw
process cheese cooker, Model CC 0025,
20-lb. capacity, direct and indirect steam
with vacuum system
– Haas-Mondomix VB continuous aerator
with 10-lb. minimum batch size
– High Shear (bowl chopper-style)
processed cheese cooker (5-lb. batch
size), direct and indirect steam, and
a vacuum system
– Pick Heater for jet cooking sauces
– Stephan cold pack cheese mixer,
10-lb. capacity
– Stephan vertical cutter/mixer with
50-lb. capacity, indirect steam only
Other various equipment used in the processing, converting and packaging of cheese:
– Sprinkman portable batch butter churn
with a 30- to 240-lb. capacity
– Urschel cheese shredder with crinkle,
feather and V-cut shredding heads
– Reiser Vemag robot 500 cheese
extruder/portioner with double screw
system aided by vacuum; includes a
variety of extrusion tubes with and
without jackets
– Lincoln Impinger oven, Model 1130,
for baking of Juustoleipä
– Multivac vacuum sealer with nitrogen
flush capability and a 40-lb. block
capacity
– Variety of portable holding tanks
*PLEASE NOTE: Additional equipment may be obtained by the CDR on a project-specific basis.
44
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
– Five spiral-wound UF- or MF-compatible
DAIRY
systems that contain multiple vessels
PROCESSING
EQUIPMENT
– One system using up to five 3.8-in.-dia.
vessels holding two elements each
– O
ne system using up to three 4.3-in.-dia.
vessels holding two elements each
– One system using one or two 8-in.-dia.
vessels holding one element each
– NF or RO operated with up to three
3.8-in.-dia. vessels, one or two elements
long
– Pilot-scale plate evaporator capable of
200 to 400 lbs. of water evaporation/hr.
– Pilot-scale spray dryer capable of 40 to
60 lbs. of water evaporation/hr.
– Stephan mixer with 40-L capability
– Homogenizer (two-stage)
– A pilot-scale butterfat separator
– Small research HTST pasteurizer
– Ion exchange chromatography
system – 10 L
– Tanks ranging from 5 to 500 gal.
– APV Gaulin homogenizer Model 125E,
2-stage with 2 gpm flow rate
– 2 Mobile Fristam pumps: one
liquid ring pump and one positive
displacement pump
– Ice cream: Emery Thompson, Taylor and
ADDITIONAL
Coldelite batch
PROCESSING
EQUIPMENT
– Taylor soft serve
– Ice cream: Tetra Pak continuous
SUPPORTING ANALYTICAL EQUIPMENT
Moisture analyzers
Total solids, moisture
Forced-air ovens
Total solids, moisture, total solids (nonfat)
pH/mV meters
pH
Balances (capable of reading to 1 mg)
Fat, nitrogen, lactose, galactose, lactates, protein
composition, acid degree value, titratable acidity, whey
(undenatured) protein number, coliforms, yeast and mold,
starter organisms, Lactococcus starter, nonstarter
lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus (hetero), standard
plate count, ash, mineral analysis, triglycerides
Immersion sonicators
Solutions, suspensions, degasification
Centrifuges (various sizes to 25,000 rpm)
Soluble nitrogen, milkfat separation
Paar Physica and Malvern Rheometers
Gelation, small deformation technology
Zeiss Epi-Fluorescence Microscope
Light and fluorescent microscopy
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
SUPPORTING ANALYTICAL EQUIPMENT
Centrifuge rotors (fixed-angle and
swing bucket)
Soluble nitrogen, milkfat separation
Microcentrifuges
Protein composition
Microwave mineralization oven
Mineral analysis
Viscometer
Viscosity
Electrophoresis tanks
Protein composition (10 to 250 kD),
protein composition (casein variants)
Electrophoresis power supplies
Protein composition (10 to 250 kD)
Capillary electrophoresis
Protein composition (10 to 250 kD)
Block digesters (6 and 20 Place)
Nitrogen content
Automated nitrogen analyzer
with autosampler
Nitrogen content
Furnaces
Ashing
Cryoscope
Freezing point depression
ALP analyzer
Alkaline phosphatase
Melt meter
Melt test
-80 C freezers
Sample preservation, starter culture storage
Low-temperature incubators
Various microbiological tests
Refrigerated circulating water baths
Sample preparation
Rotary evaporators (1 L)
Solvent evaporation
Soxhlet extractors (100 mL)
Fat extractions
Sample homogenizers
Sample preparation
Particle size analyzer (20 to 2,000 um)
with autosampler
Particle size determination
Microfluidizer
Preparation of liposomes
Multi-angle laser light scattering
detector (MALLS)
Determination of molecular weight of polymers
45
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
SUPPORTING ANALYTICAL EQUIPMENT
Inductively coupled plasma-axial
optical emission spectroscope
with autosampler
Mineral analysis
Gas chromatograph-flame ionization
detectors with autosampler and GC-MS
Fatty acid composition, triglycerides, fatty acid
sn- triglyceride positional analysis
High-performance liquid
chromatograph with autosampler
Phospholipids, carbohydrates
Evaporative light-scattering detector
Phospholipids, carbohydrates, triglycerides
Drop point analyzer
Melt point
Walk-in coolers (4 C)
Sample preservation
Commercial deli-style slicers
Melt test
Vacuum sealers
Sample preservation
Oxidative stability instrument
Accelerated oxidative stability
Chloride analyzers
Salt determination
Shaker water bath
Lactose
COURSES, SYMPOSIA AND EVENTS
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Applied Dairy Chemistry Short Course
Cleaning and Sanitation Workshop
Cheese Grading and Evaluation Short Course (two times per year)
Cheese Technology Short Course (two times per year)
Cultured Dairy Products Short Course (odd-numbered years)
Dairy and Food Plant Wastewater Short Course
Dairy HACCP Workshop
Dairy Ingredients Utilization Short Course (odd-numbered years)
Ice Cream Makers Short Course
Batch Freezer Workshop
Dairy Ingredient Manufacturing Short Course (even-numbered years)
Master Cheese Maker Short Course (Focus on specific trends and technologies in the
manufacture of various cheeses)
• Milk Pasteurization and Process Control School (two times per year)
• Process Cheese Short Course
• World of Cheese — Pasture to Plate Short Course
46
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
COURSES, SYMPOSIA AND EVENTS
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Buttermakers Short Course (every two years)
Custom company training programs for industry
CDR Industry Team Research Forum
International Cheese Technology Exposition
Wisconsin Cheese Industry Conference
COMMUNICATIONS AND OTHER RESOURCES
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The Dairy Pipeline technical newsletter (published quarterly)
Technical reviews
– Dried Dairy Ingredients
– Dairy Proteins
–Bleaching
– Fact sheets on various topics
– Cracker and Cheese Pairing Guide
– Distribution of Milk Components Between Cheese & Whey
– Membranes 101
– Membrane Configurations
– Quick Guide to Choosing the Best Type of Whey
– Manufacturing Dairy Ingredients from Milk and Whey
– Composition of Dairy Ingredients made from Milk and Whey
– Relative Milk Component Sizes in Comparison with Membrane Pore Size Ranges
– Use of Membranes for Standardizing Milk for Cheese Production
– Guide to Smoked Cheeses
– Brining Cheese, A Comprehensive Guide
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48
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
ROBERT BRADLEY, JR., PH.D.
MICHAEL DONATH
Professor Emeritus of Food Science
UW-Madison
Research Specialist
Center for Dairy Research
rbradle[email protected]
[email protected]
Processing and utilization of dairy foods, analytical
methods of analysis; food product development;
ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis, frozen dessert
technology, analytical methods of food analysis and dairy
foods technology; stabilization and emulsification of
food systems, environmental toxicants in food products;
independent third-party, 3A-mandated equipment
cleanliness evaluations.
Supports analytical activities for CDR; tests and studies the
microbial aspects of cheese and milk products.
KIMBERLEE (K.J.) BURRINGTON
Coordinator, Dairy Ingredients and Cultured Products
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Coordinates dairy ingredients program targeting industry
needs in the areas of whey processing/component
separation and utilization of these components in a variety
of food and beverage products. Also coordinates work on
cultured products.
CAROL CHEN
Researcher, Sensory Analysis
Center for Dairy Research
MARK ETZEL, PH.D.
Professor, Food Science (joint with Chemical Engineering)
Food Research Institute
UW-Madison
[email protected]
Food and bioprocess engineering; mass transfer and
bioseparation processes; membrane bioseparations; protein
purification; drying of foods and microorganisms.
JOANNE GAUTHIER
Associate Outreach Specialist
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Coordinates short courses, the Master Cheesemaker
courses and curriculum.
BEKAH GILLESPIE
[email protected]
Communications Specialist
Center for Dairy Research
Conducts sensory analysis of cheese; evaluations include
flavor, body/texture and appearance profiles, as well as
cheese functionality for shredding/slicing and cooking
applications; types of panels conducted range from focus
group to descriptive to consumer.
[email protected]
BÉNÉDICTE COUDÉ
Assistant Coordinator, Cheese Industry & Applications
Center for Dairy Research
Coordinates cheese making trials, including mixed milks,
involving a wide variety of natural and process cheeses;
provides information and technical support for brokers,
end users, ingredients suppliers, manufacturers and others
in the industry.
SRINIVASAN DAMODARAN, PH.D.
Professor, Food Science
UW-Madison
[email protected]
Enzyme chemistry and technology; food chemistry; protein
chemistry and technology.
Responsible for CDR publications, web content, social media
and media relations.
KATHY GLASS, PH.D.
Assistant Scientist, Microbial Sciences
Food Research Institute
UW-Madison
[email protected]
Process cheese safety; shelf-life studies with foodborne
pathogens; evaluation of product safety for new formulations.
RANI GOVINDASAMY-LUCEY, PH.D.
Senior Scientist
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Coordinates research projects within CDR. Areas of
expertise include: evaluation of texture and rheological
properties of cheese; standardization approaches for cheese
making, including cheese yield determination; design of
cheese projects/trials; determination of the coagulation
properties of cheese milk; membrane processing for
cheese making; cream cheese properties; buttermilk as an
ingredient; low-fat cheese.
49
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
VIC GRASSMAN, CEcD
BARBARA INGHAM, PH.D.
Commercialization Manager
Center for Dairy Research
Associate Professor, Food Science
UW-Madison
[email protected]
[email protected]
Contact for CDR technology commercialization, startup
support services and economic development.
Analytical methods for food analysis; microbial quality and
safety of foods; HACCP, food quality and food safety.
SUNDARAM GUNASEKARAN, PH.D.
JOHN JAEGGI
Professor, Biological Systems Engineering (joint with
Food Science)
UW-Madison
Cheese Industry and Applications Coordinator
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Determining physical properties and quality factors of
food materials and design of sensors and instrumentation
for quality evaluation of food materials nondestructively;
rheological and transport properties, structure-function
relationships; value-added food and nonfood processes of
biomaterials.
[email protected]
Coordinates cheese making trials; serves as an industry
information resource, provides technical support for
specialty cheese makers.
JOEY JAEGGI
Research Cheesemaker
Center for Dairy Research
RICHARD HARTEL, PH.D.
[email protected]
Professor, Food Science (joint with Biological Systems
Engineering)
UW-Madison
A third-generation licensed cheesemaker. Responsible for
research related to cheese.
[email protected]
LUIS JIMENEZ-MAROTO
Food engineering/processing, separations, crystallization/
particulate processes, structure-function relations.
Sensory Coordinator
Food Science/Center for Dairy Research
CARMEN HUSTON
Designs, conducts and summarizes sensory analysis of
cheese; evaluations include flavor, body/texture and
appearance profiles, as well as cheese functionality for
shredding/slicing and cooking applications; types of panels
conducted range from focus group to descriptive to
consumer.
Department Administrator
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
KRISTEN HOUCK
Research Specialist
Center for Dairy Research
MARK JOHNSON, PH.D.
[email protected]
Assistant Director
Distinguished Scientist
Center for Dairy Research
Coordinator of microbiological services; food safety.
[email protected]
SHINYA IKEDA
Coordinates CDR’s strategic and applied cheese research
program; cheese technology; manufacturing procedures
and effects on quality; technology and microbiology of
reduced-fat cheeses; enhanced ripening of cheese using
lactobacilli; and cheese defects.
Assistant Professor, Food Science
UW-Madison
[email protected]
Food structure and functionality with a focus on dairy foods;
physico-chemical properties of food biopolymer (protein,
carbohydrate polymer); food nanotechnology.
BECKY KALSCHEUER
Associate Research Specialist
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Cultured product and beverage development expertise;
also assists the Processing group with pilot plant projects.
50
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
ELISE LAMBERT
GINA MODE
Associate Research Specialist
Center for Dairy Research
Assistant Coordinator, Cheese Industry & Applications
Program
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Serves as research specialist for the commercialization
program, assisting clients with the science and technology.
SUSAN LARSON, PH.D.
Research Specialist
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Dairy ingredient applications and responsible
for the InnovateWithDairy.com website and dairy
technical-support line.
YANJIE LU, PH.D.
Associate Researcher, Lucey Lab Manager
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Supports research projects on cheese and dairy ingredients.
Lab manager for Dr. Lucey lab.
JOHN LUCEY, PH.D.
Director, Center for Dairy Research
Professor, Food Science
UW-Madison
[email protected]
Dairy chemistry/technology; physicochemical properties of
dairy products; cheese technology; rheological properties
of dairy products; milk proteins; yogurt science and
technology.
[email protected]
Coordinates cheese making trials involving a wide variety
of natural and process cheeses; provides information
and technical support for brokers, end users, ingredients
suppliers, manufacturers and others in the industry.
MIKE MOLITOR
Pilot Plant Manager
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Coordinates the center’s pilot plant use for filtration,
evaporation and spray-drying projects; serves as
department resource for equipment design and
maintenance; supports processing of dairy products,
including yield and mass balance.
KIRK PARKIN, PH.D.
Professor, Food Science
UW-Madison
[email protected]
Food chemistry and biochemistry, particularly enzymology
and bioactive phytochemicals and nutraceuticals;
identification, characterization and enrichment of health
promoting, bioactive compounds in foods; characterization
of enzymes in foods and as processing aides.
SCOTT RANKIN, PH.D.
Professor, Food Science
UW-Madison
RAY MICHELS
[email protected]
Research Cheesemaker
Center for Dairy Research
Characterization primarily of dairy food flavor with sensory
and instrumental techniques; programs and short courses in
support of the dairy foods processing industry.
[email protected]
Primarily involved in cheese making but also contributes
knowledge in the areas of buttermaking, dairy plant
management, pasteurization, chemical safety, and
equipment maintenance.
SARAH MINASIAN
Applications Lab Coordinator
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
With a culinary background, supports research and
development application projects for the CDR.
JUAN ROMERO
Researcher
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Supports analytical activities for the CDR, including
comprehensive chemical, microbiological, sensory and
rheological testing services.
51
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
PAMELA L. RUEGG,
DVM, MPVM, DABVP (Dairy Practice)
Professor, Dairy Science
UW-Madison
[email protected]
Milk quality specialist; on-farm implementation of best
management practices to improve milk quality and
safety; research interests focused on the application of
epidemiologic techniques to critical issues related to milk
quality and safety; influence of cow and farm hygiene on
milk safety and quality.
KAREN SMITH, PH.D.
Dairy Processing Technologist
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Specializes in process development, scale-up and troubleshooting;
conducts research in milk/whey separation, concentration and
drying; develops materials for industry education.
MARIANNE SMUKOWSKI
Safety and Quality Coordinator
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Serves as technical adviser to the dairy industry for safety/
quality programs, HACCP implementation and dairy
facility audits; facilitates industry/regulatory interactions;
and is technical coordinator for the Wisconsin Master
Cheesemaker® Program.
©2014 Dairy Research Institute
DEAN SOMMER
Cheese and Food Technologist
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Serves as a resource for cheese manufacturers and end
users interested in expanding the use of cheese, particularly
as an ingredient.
JAMES STEELE, PH.D.
Professor, Food Science
UW-Madison
[email protected]
Dairy microbiology; genetics and physiology of lactic acid
bacteria; cheese flavor; probiotics.
BECKY SURLES
Associate Researcher
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Responsible for analytical work, particularly for the Cheese
Applications and Research group; also involved in general
research and student training at CDR.
TOM SZALKUCKI
Senior Management Team
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
Serves as assistant to the director with specific additional
duties related to projects, contracts, reports, technical
information and CDR physical facilities.
52
WISCONSIN CENTER FOR DAIRY RESEARCH
RESEARCHERS AND STAFF
EMMA M. WATRY
WILLIAM WENDORFF, PH.D.
Research Cheesemaker
Center for Dairy Research
Emeritus Professor, Food Science
UW-Madison
[email protected]
[email protected]
Supports both the CDR Cheese Applications and Research
group as well as the CDR Processing group.
Quality and environmental concerns of the dairy industry;
sheep milk processing.
DEBRA WENDORF BOYKE
DANA WOLLE, PH.D.
Senior Outreach Specialist
Center for Dairy Research
Research Specialist
Center for Dairy Research
[email protected]
[email protected]
Manages all internal and external communications, events
and the short course/training program.
Supports applied and basic research and development
projects in both the dairy ingredients and cheese
utilization group.