TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION: DISCIPLINARY IMPACTS

IMISCOE RESEARCH GROUP TRANSMIG - TRANSNATIONAL PRACTICES IN MIGRATION,
Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM) and
Department of Global Political Studies (GPS), Malmö University
welcome you to the conference
TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION: DISCIPLINARY IMPACTS
29-30 January 2015 at MIM and GPS, Malmö University, Citadellsvägen 7, Malmö
ORGANISED IN THE FRAMES OF GPS RESEARCH DAYS
in collaboration with
Migration, Urbanisation and Societal Change (MUSA) PhD programme, Malmö University and
Centre for Advanced Migration Studies (AMIS), University of Copenhagen
CONVENED BY
Maja Povrzanović Frykman, Professor of Ethnology, GPS
and
Ingrid Jerve Ramsøy, PhD Candidate, MIM/GPS
Malmö University
Programme updated on 28 Jan, 17.30
THURSDAY, 29 JANUARY 2015
PLENARY PANEL 1 - ROOM 125
9.30 – 10.00
Welcome by MAGNUS ERICSON, Head of Department, GPS, PIETER BEVELANDER, Director of MIM and
MAJA POVRZANOVIĆ FRYKMAN, Coordinator of TRANSMIG
10.00 – 12.00
Keynote speech by NINA GLICK SCHILLER:
The Transnational Migration Paradigm in the Current Conjuncture: Reflections on Boundaries and Disciplines
Keynote speech by THOMAS FAIST:
From Transnationalism to the Global Social Question
Discussion between the keynote speakers, joined by the audience, moderated by Maja Povrzanović Frykman
12.00 – 13.00 lunch for all registered participants (room 525)
13.00 – 13.30
KATHY BURRELL: Crossing National Borders and Disciplinary Boundaries: History, Geography and Transnational
Migration
13.30 – 14.00
RUSSELL KING: Geography and the Spatialities, Temporalities and Materialities of Transnationalism
14.00 – 14.30
MARIE SANDBERG: The Ontological Politics of Borders
14.30 – 15.00
MARTA VILAR ROSALES: Atlantic Crossings: Materiality, Movement and Policies of Belonging
15.00 – 15.30 coffee break
15.30 – 16.00
ÖSTEN WAHLBECK: Sociology and Ethnic Economies: Some Reflections on the Use and Usefulness of a
Transnational Perspective
16.00 – 16.30
SYNNØVE BENDIXSEN: Transnational Perspectives on the Living Conditions of Irregular Migrants:
Possibilities and Limitations
16.30 – 17.00
GUNHILD ODDEN: Researching Transnational Migration. French and Norwegian Perspectives
18.30 – 20.30 CONFERENCE DINNER
for all registered participants (conference venue, ground floor),
kindly hosted by Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM)
FRIDAY, 30 JANUARY 2015
PANEL 1 – ROOM 305
(parallel to Panel 2)
Discussants: Thomas Faist and Maja Povrzanović Frykman
9.00 – 9.30
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LISE PAULSEN GALAL & SARA LEI SPARRE: From Community and Minority to Transnational Studies: the
Example of Middle Eastern Christians in Europe
9.30 – 10.00
INGA SCHWARZ: Agency in Transnational Migration: Who Shapes Categorizations and Practices of Mobility?
10.00 – 10.30
JOËLLE MORET : A Reappraisal of Settled Migration through a Mobility Lens: Towards New Perspectives on
Transnational Social Fields
10.30 – 11.00 coffee break
Discussants: Russell King and Östen Wahlbeck
11.00 – 11.30
GIACOMO SOLANO & RAFFAELE VACCA: The Transnationalism of Immigrant Entrepreneurs: the Case of
Moroccans in Milan
11.30 – 12.00
RUXANDRA OANA CIOBANU, ERALBA CELA & TINEKE FOKKEMA: Research on Transnational Care, an
Attempt to Bridge the Qualitative-Quantitative Divide
PANEL 2 – ROOM 325
(parallel to Panel 1)
Discussants: Marta Vilar Rosales and Synnøve Bendixsen
9.00 – 9.30
THADDEUS NDUKWE: African Immigrants in Finland as Transnational and Translocal Actors
9.30 – 10.00
ELISA GOSSO: Migrations and Returns: Some Issues Arising from a Research on Waldensian Transnationalism
10.00 – 10.30
LUKASZ KLIMEK: Facebook as a Tool of Recruitment for Migration Research: Methods, Metrics, and Lesson
Learned
10.30 – 11.00 coffee break
Discussants: Nina Glick Schiller and Kathy Burrell
11.00 – 11.30
PEDRO CANDEIAS: The Study of Portuguese Emigrants’ Transnational Practices: Potentialities and Limitations
11.30 – 12.00
TEKALIGN AYALEW MENGISTE: Immigrant Transnationalism and Movement across Closed Borders: EthioEritreans Transnational Journey to Sweden
12.00 – 12.30
JENNY INGRIDSDOTTER: “We are a Working Kind”: an Ethnography of Transnational Postsocialist Migration to
Argentina
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12.30- 13.30 lunch for all registered participants (room 525)
PANEL 3 – ROOM 305
(parallel to Panel 4)
Discussants: Nina Glick Schiller and Marie Sandberg
14.00 – 14.30
ANASTASIA BERMUDEZ: Exploring Migrant Political Participation through the Concept of ‘Transnational
Political Capital’: the Case of Latin Americans in Spain
14.30 – 15.00
GRETE SWENSEN: Sites for Interfaith Encounters – Cemeteries as Urban Traces of Transnational Migration
15.00 – 15.30 coffee break
(Panel 4 ends at 15.00, so this is the last session of the entire conference )
Discussants: Marie Sandberg and Kathy Burrell
15.30 – 16.00
BRIGITTE SUTER: European migrants in globalising China: An ethnographic study on skilled migrants’
incorporation, transnationality and national identity in Shanghai
16.00 – 16.30
KRISTÝNA PEYCHLOVÁ: Eurostars and the rest: why use the transnational perspective when studying intra-EU
mobility of East Europeans
16.30 – 17.00
SAKURA YAMAMURA: The Transnational (Social) Space of High-skilled Transmigrants in Geographical Terms
PANEL 4 - ROOM 325
(parallel to Panel 3)
Discussants: Thomas Faist and Marta Vilar Rosales
13.30 – 14.00
CLAUDIA PARASCHIVESCU: Researching Romanians in London and Paris; When Being a Co-Ethnic Does not
Help
14.00 – 14.30
MARIA VIVAS ROMERO: Lessons from the Field: Negotiating Transnational Gender, Class and Race Positions as a
Researcher Working on Andean Domestic Workers in Brussels
14.30 – 15.00
INGRID J. RAMSØY: Empowerment through (Im)mobility? Gendered Dimensions and Affective Practices of
Reproductive Labor and Transnational Migration
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TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION: DISCIPLINARY IMPACTS
29-30 January 2015 at MIM and GPS, Malmö University
ABSTRACTS
MARIANELA BARRIOS AQUINO
PhD Candidate Sociology, Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon, marianela.aquino@ics.ulisboa.pt
POWER AND IDENTITY IN TRANSNATIONAL CONTEXTS
My research seeks to explore the relation between power and identity in transnational contexts. I have
conducted interviews with immigrants from different backgrounds and origins in Lisbon, and will present the
preliminary analysis of my data. By causing the change of social and cultural conditions, migration typically
has a profound effect on the migrants’ identities. From a symbolic interactionism perspective, I am
investigating the experience of disempowerment among the immigrants who lack the knowledge and codes of
behaviour within the host society. Furthermore, I am investigating empowerment in the processes of identity
re-negotiation and focus on the importance of transnational practices for those processes. I use tools from
Sociology, Social Psychology and Migration Studies in order to delve further into the little explored dialogue
of these disciplines regarding the relation between identity practices and power.
JUSTYNA BELL
Research Fellow, Department of Psychology, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Faculty in Wroclaw,
justyna.bell@yahoo.com
LOCALISM, TRANS-LOCALISM OR TRANSNATIONALISM? THE POSITIONING OF
SELF IN THE NARRATIVES OF POLISH MIGRANTS IN BELFAST, NORTHERN
IRELAND
Transnational theories provide useful analytical framework for examining migrants’ cross-border practice. At
the same time, migrants’ daily interactions as well as their ‘personal communities’ are positioned within
certain physical localities, shifting these practices between trans-local and transnational spheres. This article,
based on the findings of a doctoral study conducted amongst Polish migrants in Belfast, intends to contribute
to the analysis of the intertwined transnational/trans-local perspectives of migration. Migrants often tend to
refer to the local concerns affecting their everyday lives rather than nationwide affairs in the sending and
receiving contexts. Accordingly, Anne White (2011: 17) points out that, due to an increase in air routes and
the abolition of work visas for Polish people within the European Union (EU), it became possible to travel
from one regional centre to another without any pre-arrangements of visits to the embassies in the capital
cities- ‘the symbols of the nation-state’. Similarly, many Polish migrants in Belfast might never have visited
the rest of the UK, and since they sometimes had to travel to Poland through Dublin, it appeared that the
Republic of Ireland has become a more significant territorial marker in their perception than the UK as a
whole. It is commonplace that migrants arriving in new settings enter localities marked by intricate relations
and identities. This is even more evident in the context of Belfast, given the long history of ethno-sectarian
conflict in the region. Using a transnational/trans-local framework, this article will discuss the specific
position of Polish immigrants in this context.
SYNNØVE BENDIXSEN
Post-doctoral fellow, Department of Social Anthropology and Head of IMER, Uni Research Rokkansenteret,
University of Bergen, Synnove.Bendixsen@sosantr.uib.no
TRANSNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE LIVING CONDITIONS OF IRREGULAR
MIGRANTS: POSSIBILITIES AND LIMITATIONS
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This paper aims to examine the usefulness, limitations, and challenges of the transnational migration paradigm
when studying the everyday life experiences of irregular migrants from a social anthropological perspective.
Nations Unbound (Basch, Glick Schiller, and Szanton Blanc 1994) brought migration researchers to rethink
their approaches to ethnicity, nationalism, gender, class, racialization, religion, and social welfare. What
followed was a growth of multi-disciplinary scholarship on what sometimes is called transnational studies. Yet,
in the rapid growth of studies of irregular migration in social anthropology focus has in particular been on how
the nation-state frames the living condition and well-being of this particular group of migrants, often in an
extremely suppressing and encompassing way. The nation-states borders as Etienne Balibar has pointed to is
no longer, if they ever where, only at the external territorial borders of regions or nation-states, but dispersed
throughout the territory and materializing wherever mobility happens and where individual identification
becomes relevant. There is an effort in the EU states to control migration, legal and 'illegal', by means of
internal remote-control and rights exclusion. Guiraudon and Lahav (2000) argue that all European states are
now shifting their responsibilities in the field of migration ‘up, out and down’. Van der Leun (2006) explains:
“Shifting up refers to forms of international or supranational cooperation, such as within the EU framework.
Shifting out refers to the role of private parties like airline carriers which face sanctions when they transport
people without documents”. In the field of irregular migration in social anthropological studies, there is focus
on the nation-state. What potentiality does the transnational gaze provide us with when studying irregular
migrants and their being-in-the-world? Simultaneously, what are the potential blind-spots of transnationalism
that calls for a nation-state oriented focus?
ANASTASIA BERMUDEZ
BeIPD-COFUND Post-doc Fellow, Center for Ethnic and Migration Studies (CEDEM), University of Liege,
abermudez@ulg.ac.be
EXPLORING MIGRANT POLITICAL PARTICIPATION THROUGH THE CONCEPT OF
‘TRANSNATIONAL POLITICAL CAPITAL’: THE CASE OF LATIN AMERICANS IN SPAIN
Traditional studies of migrant political participation have tended to focus on electoral and party politics
oriented towards the host society and portrayed migrants as largely apolitical. However, the transnational
approach has uncovered many other ways in which migrants become engaged politically in relation to the
home country, whether ‘formally’ (through elections, party politics) or ‘informally’ (through migrant
organisations, homeland associations, etc.). In addition, political science analyses of migrant political
participation have used the same tools applied to the general population to try and understand why migrants
become involved or not, looking at both individual (gender, class, education) and contextual (political
opportunities structure) factors. But adopting a local-transnational lens (including both political action
directed towards the home and host countries, and the links between both), allows us to uncover for instance
the importance of migrants’ ‘political capital’. These issues are explored based on research on the political
involvement of Latin American migrants in Europe (Spain and the UK) conducted over the last ten years, as
part of different projects. The main objectives of the paper are to highlight how the transnational perspective
has enriched the study of migrant political participation, and to further develop the concept of political capital
as a useful tool to study the local-transnational political engagement of migrants.
KATHY BURRELL
Senior Lecturer in Social & Cultural Geography, School of Environmental Sciences, Geography, University of
Liverpool, kburrell@liverpool.ac.uk
CROSSING NATIONAL BORDERS AND DISCIPLINARY BOUNDARIES: HISTORY,
GEOGRAPHY AND TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION
I am a transnational migration specialist who is in the unusual position of having moved from one discipline
(History) to another (Geography). In this paper I will chart this move, considering the impacts of each
discipline on my research and explaining why I made the move.
I started my academic research within a History department, interviewing European migrants who had
moved to Leicester, UK, during or after the Second World War. At this point there were three main areas to
draw on - the rich tradition of transnationally oriented writing coming out of US ethnic history asserting
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