Teaching 4-7 year olds Social Thinking

Michelle Garcia Winner January 30, 2015 Colorado Springs, Co Teaching 4-7 year olds Social
Thinking – The Incredible
Flexible You Curriculum and
Storybooks
The Incredible Flexible You, Vol 1
Michelle Garcia Winner M.A., CCC-SLP
Volume 1 Curriculum, 5 Story books and Music CD;
Volume 2 is due out in fall 2015
Extensive research review leads to cogniKve behavioral teachings based on the evidence. ro
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Lessons based on developmental research-­‐ he
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Co-authors:
Ryan Hendrix M.S., CCC-SLP
Kari Zweber Palmer M.A., CCC-SLP
Nancy Tarshis M.A., M.S., CCC-SLP
Copyright 2012 Social Thinking Publishing Hendrix, Palmer, Tarshis, Winner
Shaky
Developmental
foundations
Social Thinking Vocabulary
Volume One
Five core lessons
Thinking Thoughts and Feeling Feelings
The Group Plan
Thinking With Your Eyes
Body in the Group
Whole Body Listening*
*Original Concept by Suzanne Truesdale
Copyright 2015 Think Social Publishing, Inc www.socialthinking.com 1 Michelle Garcia Winner January 30, 2015 Colorado Springs, Co Some lessons based on core
concepts:
Think with Your Eyes Open your eyes, take a look
Look real carefully
Is that a grin, over my chin?
Think with your eyes and see
It’s all in one place, right here
on my face
And if you look at me
You might find a frown,
or a smile upside down
Think with your eyes, you’ll see
When you’re looking at me
I know you’re thinkin’ of me
Think with your eyes and see!
Body in the Group
•  Structured Activity: Freeze!
•  Start music and have a dance party!
•  Pause the song briefly throughout and
have the children FREEZE.
•  Discuss the physical presence of
everyone:
–  Is it still a group or are there kids all over
the room?
–  Whose body is still in the group?
–  Who danced out?
Copyright 2015 Think Social Publishing, Inc www.socialthinking.com Volume 2 addresses issues
related to teaching social
complexity/executive functioning
1.  Expected –Unexpected behavior
and hidden rules
2.  Smart guess – Wacky guess
3.  Stuck thinking verses flexible
thinking
4.  Problem solving
5.  Sharing an imagination
2 Michelle Garcia Winner January 30, 2015 Colorado Springs, Co At the end of each set of lessons
we all want kids to use the
concepts in pretend play.
However, many of our kids
cannot play well with peers.
How to solve for this problem!?
What is Shared Collaborative
Imaginative Play?
•  Elaborated, ever-evolving
play scenarios that
happen across time and
space
•  Players shift and adapt to
changing roles and
themes
•  Players monitor their own
and others participation
in order to keep it moving
smoothly
Two Year Olds
Are some kinds of play better than
others for social learning?
Shared Collaborative Imaginative Play
(SCIP)
How do kids get
to SCIP?
Baby and Early Toddler Play
How big is baby?
Peekaboo
This is the way the ladies
ride…
Telephones, vacuums and
dishes…
Three Year Olds
•  Play becomes more complex
•  Abstract thought emerges: Imagination
•  Pretending with familiar objects
•  Parallel play is turning into cooperative
•  Parallel play
•  Sharing an imagination emerges
•  Taking a role-becoming a familiar
character
•  Developing a sense of self and expectations
of others
•  Materials don’t have to look real
Copyright 2015 Think Social Publishing, Inc www.socialthinking.com play
3 Michelle Garcia Winner January 30, 2015 Colorado Springs, Co Early Pre-school (3.5)
Increased social skill
with peers
Problem-solving
Perspective-taking
Four Year Olds
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
Collaborative scripts
Negotiating with peers
Increased pretense/fantasy
Problem solving real problems
Increasing self-regulation
Making friends
Play and Narratives
The play and academic connection
•  Play scenarios have a story structure
•  Kids with social learning challenges don’t
intuit that structure.
•  Story structure à reading comprehension
•  Metalinguistic awareness
•  We have to pre-load it for
–  (thinking and talking about language)
them!
•  Increased ability to share complex ideas
“One of the things we’ve learned is that
when children engage in pretend play,
have imaginary friends, or explore
alternative worlds, they are learning
what people are like, how people think,
and the kinds of things people do”
-Dr. Alison Gopnick
Copyright 2015 Think Social Publishing, Inc www.socialthinking.com Shared collaborative imaginative play (SCIP) and
structured, well-thought out
social lessons and experiences, are key to
promoting the growth of the social mind
in all children.
4 Michelle Garcia Winner January 30, 2015 Colorado Springs, Co This kind of play is important for all
kids and it seems so simple ….
Why is it so hard for our kids?
Successful play requires
processing multiple pieces
of information simultaneously
For some kids it is.
Eye tracking research
How do we think about attention?
Object oriented attention
Focus point is more on objects than
people
When greater than 68% of viewing time of
toddlers as young as 14 months was spent
fixated on geometric objects, 100% of the
participants were diagnosed with Autism.
Social Attention
Focus on people within a complex social
landscape.
How do we study social attention?
•  The truth is, we don’t yet know
•  Atypical object interest and object use
teach us something about when it goes off
course
•  Still, we don’t exactly know HOW it goes
right
Copyright 2015 Think Social Publishing, Inc www.socialthinking.com Pierce, K., Conant, D., Hazin, R., Desmond, J., & Stone
A preference for geometric patterns early in life as a risk factor for autism.
Archives of General Psychiatry. 68 (1):101-9, 2011
How do we define social attention
in a social landscape?
The ability to incorporate:
Situational attention
Perspective taking
Social self-awareness
5 Michelle Garcia Winner January 30, 2015 Colorado Springs, Co Social Landscape VS Tunnel
Landscape
Social Landscape
Attention is focused on 360 degrees in a
complex social landscape (people, place,
objects, situation).
Tunnel
When attention is narrowly focused, often
on objects.
Tunnel
And, on top of all that…
we need to share our imagination
Exploring imagination
Singular
Ability to think about
things that are not real
Something that only
exists or happens in
your mind
Shared
How does this information about
social attention and the development
of shared imagination impact our
teaching?
Share an idea, so we can
create and sustain play
with contributions from
all of the play partners
The basis of play and
conversation
Copyright 2015 Think Social Publishing, Inc www.socialthinking.com 6 Michelle Garcia Winner January 30, 2015 Colorado Springs, Co It comes back to a fundamental
question
What else do we need to teach
young children when it comes to
understanding and participating
in the social experience?
We went back and thought a lot
about how hard it is to engage in
SCIP – shared collaborative
imaginative play-
…and the fact that not all children can play
together in the same way
Introducing…
The Social Thinking - GPS©
…and we decided it was time
to create a scale of social play
for 4-7 year olds.
Social Thinking GPS
Level 5
The Social Thinking –Group Play and
Problem Solving Scale
Why the Social Thinking GPS?
•  Means of observing and categorizing play
Level 4
Level 3
Level 2
•  Helps us with intervention planning and
realistic expectations
Level 1
Copyright 2015 Think Social Publishing, Inc www.socialthinking.com 7 Michelle Garcia Winner January 30, 2015 Colorado Springs, Co Social Thinking GPS
Me
Level 1
Me +
You
Level 2
ME to WE
Level 3
ME
•  Self-focused play
•  Object-oriented play
•  Singular Imagination
•  Include adults when
adults actively seek
their attention or
follow the child’s lead
WE
Level 4
What’s the difference between a ME
and a WE based player?
SCIP
Level 5
WE
•  Emerging or emerged
in their ability to
socially attend to
peers
•  Shared Imagination
•  Able to engage in peer
based play (with
differing levels of
support)
What does play look like?
What is the child focused on?
What kind of imagination?
Level 1: ME play
Level 2: ME + YOU play
What does play look like?
Play is very singular and object/action focused
Child plays alone
Briefly attends to an adult if s/he is actively
seeking child’s attention.
What is attention focused on?
Objects
Singular or Shared Imagination?
Singular
What does play look like?
Play is still quite singular but attempts to
engage the adult to play their way. With a
lot of work by the adult, the student will
briefly attend to a peer.
Copyright 2015 Think Social Publishing, Inc www.socialthinking.com What is attention focused on?
Objects and Adult
Singular or Shared Imagination?
Singular
8 Michelle Garcia Winner Level 3: ME to WE play
What does play look like?
Adult directed play with adult providing the
ideas, script, and context. Peers take a role and
enact the play within the adult structure.
What is attention focused on?
Noticing Peers but focused on Adults
Singular or Shared Imagination?
Emerging into shared
Level 5 : SCIP
What does play look like?
Shared Collaborative Imaginative
Play (SCIP)- Peers provide ideas, shift,
negotiate, and problem solve on their own.
What is attention focused on?
Peer to Peer
January 30, 2015 Colorado Springs, Co Level 4: WE play
What does play look like?
With minimal adult facilitation in the form of
props, materials and initial ideas, peers can
begin to create structured play together.
What is attention focused on?
Starting to focus on Peers with Adults
present
Singular or Shared Imagination?
Shared
Developmental Expectations
SCIP in four year olds will look
different than SCIP in six or
seven year olds
Singular or Shared Imagination?
Shared. Peers are leaders and followers.
How do we teach towards SCIP?
And remember, each student will make
progress as compared to him or herself.
We start with where they are…
Not every student will make it to fully
realized shared collaborative play.
Copyright 2015 Think Social Publishing, Inc www.socialthinking.com 9 Michelle Garcia Winner Keep in mind
January 30, 2015 Colorado Springs, Co What does play look like?
Social thinking is a languagebased approach
What is the child focused on?
Therefore we want to use it with
children who have average to
strong language and cognition
What kind of imagination?
Level 1 ME based player
Role of the adult
Adult led activity
Level of Structure
High
Fully Adult-directed
Role of the student
Imitate adult with peers nearby
Level 3 ME to WE based player
Role of the adult Adult facilitates peer
interactions with shared ideas
Level of Structure
Moderate-High
Adults direct peers to listen to each other
Role of the student
Suggest ideas
Follow ideas of peers -with adult coaching/
adult problem-solving
Copyright 2015 Think Social Publishing, Inc www.socialthinking.com Level 2 ME+YOU Based Player
Role of the adult
Adult facilitates peer interactions with
shared materials
Level of Structure
High
Fully Adult-directed
Role of the student
Notice /share materials with peers during
highly structured play
Level 4 WE based player
Role of the adult
Adult facilitates peer decision-making
Level of Structure
Fair-Moderate
Role of the Student
Suggest ideas, shift gears to incorporate
different ideas of peers
10 Michelle Garcia Winner Level 5 SCIP
Role of the adult
None, unless there is a need for higher level
problem solving
Level of Structure
Low
Role of the student
Provide ideas, shift, negotiate, problem
solve. Peers both lead and follow
interchangeably.
Copyright 2015 Think Social Publishing, Inc www.socialthinking.com January 30, 2015 Colorado Springs, Co Volume 2: coming fall of 2015!
Ryan Hendrix
[email protected]
Kari Zweber Palmer
[email protected]
Nancy Tarshis
[email protected]om
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