yvas meetings chapter meeting monday, february 16

Mission: Building on the tradition of special interest in birds, Yellowstone Valley Audubon Society is organized to promote enjoyment and protection of the natural environment through education, activism, and conservation of bird habitat.
VOLUME 45, NUMBER 2
FEBRUARY 2015
CHAPTER MEETING MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16
“FROM CRISIS TO STRENGTH”
RAISING AWARENESS OF THE HEALTH
AND SAFETY STATUS OF LOCAL BIRDS
YVAS will present a panel of experts to discuss the state of health and safety of local birds. As
we build habitats and attract birds to our feeders and bird baths, it is important to be aware of the
major causes of bird mortality in Montana. We invite you to bring your experience and ideas
about health and safety of local birds to discuss with our panel. None of the problems being considered are unique to specific settings. Invasive fish and snails are not limited just to places like
Rattlesnake Reservoir. Power lines run through many Montana landscapes. Oil spills, in general, can
result in loss of habitat and wildlife as seen with the Exxon Valdez, the Exxon Yellowstone River
spill, and the current one near Glendive. Unsafe bird houses, feeders, fences and gift item gadgets
have tempted birders for generations.
Presentations will begin with a summary of the avian die-offs caused by the fluke-trematode-faucet
snail vector. Following will be discussions on bird fatalities due to power lines, and possible solutions;
oil spills and the removal of oil from feathers; tips to keep your bird feeder and bird houses safe; and
bird rescue photographs by Jeanette Tasey.
Addressing the above issues will be Bruce Kania of Floating Island International; Jim Hansen and Megan O’Reilly with MT Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Barbara Callahan with International
Birdlife; Corey Freeman, director of the bird rehabilitation center in Roundup; Sheila
McKay owner of WJH Bird Resources; and Jeanette Tasey, who is experienced in bird
rehabilitation, a well-known photographer and YVAS chairperson for Raptor Transport.
For information on bird/animal demobilization classes, contact Sheila at 406-652-7175.
YVAS MEETINGS
All YVAS Meetings are at Mayflower Congregational Church, corner of Rehberg Lane and Poly Drive, Billings,
MT unless otherwise noted. The public is welcome, there is no admission fee and ample free parking is available.
Monday, February 9, 6:00pm: Board of Directors Meeting
Monday, February 16, 7:00pm: Chapter Meeting
We will hold a YVAS fundraiser dinner at 5:30, before the Chapter meeting. Dinner donation: $6. Lois Dalton has generously volunteered to coordinate. Please contact her at
656-3656, or [email protected], before Friday, February 13 to make reservations and
tell her what you will bring.
THIS FLYER IS PUBLISHED ON SFI CERTIFIED PRODUCT
We’re on the web! yvaudubon.org
PAGE 2
VOLUME 45, NUMBER 2
BOARD OF DIRECTORS UPDATES
BEGINNING MARCH 1, 2015 YVAS FLYERS ARE GOING ELECTRONIC!
If you are a member of the National Audubon Society, but not a member of our local Chapter, the
‘Yellowstone Valley Audubon Society’ (YVAS), you will no longer receive a paper Flyer by mail. If
you wish to continue receiving the Flyer, you need to send your name and email address to Joel, our
membership secretary, at [email protected], and we will email the Flyer to you. Please consider becoming a dues-paying member of YVAS and supporting the YVAS Audubon Chapter’s local conservation, education,
and birding efforts. The application form can be found on page 7. YVAS members continue to have the choice of a paper Flyer or a digital one. Again, if you prefer an electronic copy, send your name and email address to Joel at
[email protected], and you will receive your Flyer by email.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Hosts Trenay Hart and Deidre
Loftus serve Sue Weinreis at
the pre-Chapter meeting dinner
The pre-meeting dinners, sponsored by individual YVAS members, are a long and popular
tradition for our Chapter. The meals are always delicious and the company is the best. The
dinners, intended as fund raisers, also offer members a chance to catch up with old friends
and meet new ones. The Board is looking for volunteers or groups of volunteers to host
some pre-meeting dinners this spring so we can continue this valued tradition. The dinner
hosts are responsible for providing the main course and coordinating what others will bring
for the meal. If you (and a friend?) would be able to volunteer to host a dinner, please
contact Board Member Sue Weinreis 855-4181, [email protected]
The Yellowstone Valley Audubon Society (YVAS) is pleased to announce a $1,000Conservation Grant
award to the Montana Peregrine Institute in Arlee, Mt., in support of the “Montana Peregrine Falcon Survey”. The Survey studies Peregrine Falcon productivity at 41 selected Montana sites, three of which
(Valley Cr., Rapids, and Sacrifice Cliff) are located on the Yellowstone between Columbus and Billings.
(Photo: regrineleadership.com )
Yellowstone Valley Audubon Society Officers: AREA Committees and Special Assignments:
CODE 406
President: Steve Regele, 962-3115, [email protected]
Vice-President: open
Secretary: Dor othy Bar tlett, 252-0757, [email protected]
Treasurer: Pam Pipal, 245-4517, [email protected]
Board of Directors:
Donn Bartlett: 252-0757, [email protected]
Steve Linder: 380-0073, [email protected]
Sheila McKay: 652-7175, cell 694-7918,
[email protected]
Deb Regele: 962-3115, [email protected]
Marco Restani: 425-2608, [email protected]
Sue Weinreis: 855-4181, [email protected]
Nancy Wiggins: 651-0218, [email protected]
Montana’s Congressional Delegation:
Sen. Steve Daines: website: daines.senate.gov
Billings: 406-245-6822 Wash.D.C. 202-224-2651
Sen. Jon Tester: website: tester.senate.gov
Billings: 406 252-0550 Wash. D.C.: 1-866-554-4403
Rep. Ryan Zinke: website: zinke.house.gov
Billings: 406–702-1182 Wash, D.C: 202-225-3211
Audubon Adventures: Jerry Dalton, [email protected]
Bird Questions: George Mowat, 656-7467 [email protected]
or
Helen Carlson Cummins, 248-8684
Birdathon: Ruth Vanderhorst, 245-5118, [email protected]
Christmas Bird Count: Jim Court, 259-5099, C: 860-0450,
[email protected]
Conservation Chair: Steve Regele, 962-3115,
[email protected]
Editor: Nancy Wiggins, 651-0218, [email protected]
Field Trip Chair: Donn Bartlett, 252-0757, [email protected]
Hospitality: Audrey Jurovich, 656-2748
Injured Raptors: Jeanette Tasey 669-3169, [email protected]
Membership Secretary: Joel M. Bowers, 534-3672,
cell: 591-5635, [email protected]
Osprey Project: Deb Regele, 962-3115, [email protected]
Publicity: Dorothy Bartlett, 252-0757, [email protected]
Program Chair: Sheila McKay, 652-7175, [email protected]
Recycling (aluminum): Larry Handsaker, 406-855-9832
Website: Deb Regele, 962-3115, [email protected]
Meetings are held September thr ough May at Mayflower Congregational Church, corner of Poly and Rehberg, Billings, MT:
· Board Meetings are held the second Monday of each month at
6:00pm. Board Meetings are open to the entire membership.
· General Chapter Meetings are held the third Monday of each
month at 7:00pm. All meetings are open to the public.
PAGE 3
VOLUME 45, NUMBER 2
UPCOMING EVENTS
JUNE 5-7, 2015
WINGS ACROSS THE BIG SKY
Helena, Montana
It’s not too early to begin planning your summer activities. During winter, when birds are sparse, it’s easy to dream of
long summer days and abundant birds. You will find plenty of them in the beautiful Helena Valley and surrounding areas. Join us for Montana Audubon’s Annual Bird Festival, this year co-hosted by Last Chance Audubon Society. There
are close to 20 field trips planned for each day, guided by knowledgeable birders and naturalists familiar with the species
and their habitats in the Helena area. Here is a brief sampling of some of those trips:
Canyon Ferry WMA: This tr ip will explore mostly r ipar ian and pond -type habitats adjacent to the Missouri River
and impoundments along Canyon Ferry Wildlife Management Area. It includes grassland, shrubs, agricultural and cottonwood bottomlands. Ponds include large breeding colonies of White Pelicans and several gull species. Caspian Terns
may also be seen in one area, and Sandhill Cranes are common throughout. Many waterfowl species can be observed,
along with grassland sparrows, swallows, orioles, and many marsh birds, and other common riparian and waterassociated species.
Little Prickly Pear Creek: This tr ip will follow Little Pr ickly Pear Cr eek nor th of Helena fr om the Canyon Cr eek
store downstream most of the way to the Sieben exit on I-15. The riparian area is always within view, and willows dominate at the start of the trip, giving way to cottonwoods at the end. The trip starts in irrigated bottomlands where Bobolinks, Wilson’s Snipes, Sandhill Cranes and Wilson’s Phalaropes may be expected. Moving into the canyon, which has
shrubby and coniferous uplands, expect to see Willow and Dusky Flycatchers, Spotted Towhees, Lazuli Bunting, Gray
Catbirds, Lark Sparrows, Bullock’s Orioles and Rock Wrens. Species which have been seen here include Veery, Greentailed Towhee, Yellow-breasted Chat, Pileated and Lewis’s woodpeckers. The lower end of the trip is in a wonderful
aspen grove, where Red-tailed Hawks, Northern Flickers, Red-naped Sapsuckers, Least Flycatchers and House Wrens
may be seen.
Little Blackfoot and Minnehaha Creeks: This tr ip will begin along the Little Blackfoot River near Elliston, pr oceed up Telegraph Creek, over the Continental Divide and down into Minnehaha Creek. Extensive willow bottoms mark
the start of the trip, giving way to irrigated pastures, and then a trip through aspens and various life zones of coniferous
forests when moving over the Divide. Expect to see Willow, Dusky and Hammond’s Flycatchers; Northern Waterthrush; Song, Lincoln’s, White-crowned, and Chipping sparrows; Wilson’s, Orange-crowned and MacGillivray’s warblers are possible, as is the Cassin’s Vireo and Steller’s Jay. On top, look for Clark’s Nutcrackers, Dark-eyed Juncos,
and Mountain Bluebirds. With luck, we will see expansive fields of beargrass in full bloom. Keep watch in early March:
Festival brochures with all field trip information and schedules will be in the mail, and the online system for registration
will be active.
For more information please contact Montana Audubon Bird Festival Coordinator, Cathie Erickson, [email protected], or call (406) 443-3949.
JUNE 10–14
WING YOUR WAY TO.... Billings, Montana
The 40th annual conference of WESTERN FIELD ORNITHOLOGISTS (WFO) will be held in Montana for the first
time. Field trips will visit a variety of habitats from the high mountains (Black Rosy-Finch) to the grasslands (Sprague's
Pipits). We'll see courting McCown’s and Chestnut-collared Longspurs in their finest plumage, Upland Sandpipers and
Lark Buntings. History buffs will delight in viewing the Little Bighorn Battlefield where Custer saw his last Sharp-tailed
Grouse.
There will be workshops on field identification of sparrows (Jon Dunn) and flycatchers (Dan Casey), natural history of
owls (Denver Holt), bird sound identification (Nathan Pieplow), and more. Friday and Saturday afternoon science sessions will update you on the most current avian research from the region, and the Saturday evening banquet will feature
a keynote address by Stephen Dinsmore on Mountain Plovers. Ed Harper and Nathan Pieplow will again offer their everpopular sessions on bird ID by sight and sound.
Registration for the conference will open in February 2015 with the exact date to be announced via a future WFO News
email. If you are NOT currently on our electronic mailing list, please send an email to [email protected], include your
full name and city and state of residence, and we’ll put you on. WFO members are able to register for our conferences at
a reduced rate and have early access to registration. If you are not currently a WFO member, you can join at westernfieldornithologists.org/join.php.
PAGE 4
VOLUME 45, NUMBER 2
FIELD TRIP NOTES
THURSDAY, JANUARY 1
YELLOWTAIL DAM AFTERBAY
It was a great beginning for 2015 birding! Raptors and Canada Geese were plentiful during the New
Year’s Day trip to Fort Smith. Rough-legged Hawks were most abundant, and there were views of
Red-tailed Hawks, Bald Eagles, a Prairie Falcon, and a Northern Harrier. Horned Larks, American
Tree Sparrow, Townsend’s Solitaire, Wild turkey, Northern Flickers, American Robins, Downy
Woodpeckers, Black-capped Chickadees, and Ring-necked Pheasants were also seen.
At Yellowtail Dam Afterbay, thousands of water fowl bobbed on the water. Mallards, Common Goldeneyes, Canada
Geese, American Coots, American Wigeons and Northern Pintails were most numerous. Other species that members of
our group saw included Barrow’s Goldeneyes, Ring-necked Ducks, Green-winged Teal, Double-crested Cormorant,
Common Mergansers, Lesser Scaups, Buffleheads, Redheads, Horned Grebes, and Pied-billed Grebes. Additional species seen at residential feeders in Ft. Smith were Gray-crowned Rosy Finch and American Goldfinch.
Thank you to George and Bernie Mowat for leading this trip that gave us views of 40 species. Submitted by Lois Dalton
SATURDAY, JANUARY 10
THE EAGLE COUNT 2015
Seven die-hard birders showed up to brave the roads and the fourteen consistent stopping points we hit from year-toyear, to perform the 2015 eagle count. We started off strong at Two Moon Park with a tally of one mature Bald Eagle
and one immature Bald. Seeing another large black bird on a pole opposite the Yellowstone River at Two Moon, Pam
got excited and drew the attention of the group with a ‘holler’, and a then a face-plant in the snow as she fell flat over a
concrete block walking towards the sighting – an American Crow! (Her red face quickly melted the snow she contacted.) Moving onward past Eagle Cliff Manor towards Cherry Creek Loop we had one of the most impressive sightings
of the day – a mature Bald just off the road in a tree only about 20 feet from our cars. We continued to consistently add
mature and immature Bald Eagles to our count along the route. At Buffalo Mirage stop, George led the way through a
part of the trail denser with snow than we had previously encountered. We got stuck! Fortunately George had two
shovels and they were quickly put to use. After lots of digging, a couple of guys in a big four wheeler appeared.
George put the ball-hitch on his vehicle and the two gents pulled us out using a tow strap.
Our final stopping point on the route was at Columbus. Many other birds that winter over were seen including a Hairy
Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, American Tree Sparrows, Rough-legged Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and waterfowl:
Common Merganser and Common Goldeneye. Lunch was (appropriately) at the Owl Café in Laurel. The temperatures
were good to us, ranging up and down from 28 to 33 degrees. Although we saw no Golden Eagles along the way, we
had an impressive tally of 11 adults and 16 immature Bald Eagles to log for our annual report to BLM. Submitted by
Pam Pipal.
NESTING MATERIALS
From Cornell Lab January eNews at birds.cornell.edu
A SNOWY OWL SEQUEL?
They're baaacck...reports of Snowy Owls are lighting up the eBird maps across
the northern United States again this winter. Is this another irruption, or an echo flight? Read the latest with analysis
from an eBird project leader at our All About Birds blog. Sign up for Snowy Alerts: with another influx of owls, eBird
is again offering a Snowy Owl Alert service that emails you whenever a new Snowy is seen.
INTRODUCING A NEW OWL CAM
Our newest Cornell Lab Bird Cam just went live—Great Horned Owls from Savannah, Georgia (thanks to partners at
Skidaway Audubon). This cam was initially planned to broadcast from an established Bald Eagle nest nearly 80 feet
above the coastal Georgia salt marshes. But last month a pair of Great Horned Owls moved into the nest. Right now the
female is incubating two eggs, which should hatch around the end of January. Don't miss your chance to get to know
these secretive denizens of the darkness as they raise owlets in the coming weeks.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 5
VOLUME 45, NUMBER 2
PAGE 5
CONSERVATION NEWS
YVAS BOOK CLUB/CONSERVATION ISSUE STUDY GROUP
Long-standing, outstanding YVAS member Jerry Dalton is offering to organize a new book club/study group for members to stay better informed about environmental and conservation issues by studying debate topic sources, both pro and
con. The group would meet monthly at a convenient location; the only cost would be for reading materials.
Suggested topics might be:


Alberta tar sands mining
Keystone XL pipeline
 Coal burning and carbon emission regulation
 Clean Water Act regulation
 Fracking
 Yellowstone River issues
 Threats to endangered birds
Possible book titles:
 Last Child in the Woods: saving our children from nature-deficit disorder by Richard Louv
 This Changes Everything: capitalism vs the climate by Naomi Klein
If you are interested, please contact Jerry Dalton by February 16, and tell him topics or book titles that interest
you, and when and where you prefer to meet. Jerry Dalton, 656-3656, [email protected]
WIND FARM PROJECT, SOUTH OF BRIDGER, MT QUESTIONED:
Development of Mud Springs Wind Development LLC: Mud Springs, Pryor Caves, and
Horse Thief Wind Projects; Bowler Flats Energy Hub LLC
The development and use of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, has much to be
desired over use of fossil fuels such as coal and oil. Nonetheless, any industrial development has consequences for our environment and for living things. Obtaining good, adequate data and using good
sense to evaluate and plan pre-and post-development situations can help avoid costly and disastrous
consequences.
The Mud Springs Wind Development LLC/John S. Husar Project (Project) west of the Pryor Mountains south of Bridger, MT has not been adequately inventoried, evaluated, or planned with respect to wildlife or environmental impacts. The Project will make a bunch of money if brought into production, but for every action there is a
reaction – this Project will affect wildlife locally, regionally, and possibly legislatively. Without good, adequate data and
study, it is hard to determine the extent and seriousness of such effects. See yvaudubon.org for more information. Submitted by YVAS President Steve Regele
NESTING MATERIALS
(CONTINUED)
From Cornell Lab January eNews at birds.cornell.edu
Take a Road Trip: The Upcoming Bir d Festivals and Events webpage makes it easy to plan your next bir ding
destination. You can look through listings by calendar or on a map, so you can start planning your road trip right from
the page.
“So You Think You Can Dance: Waterfowl Edition”: Even in the dead of winter, ducks provide some of the
first signs of spring as they begin picking mates for the upcoming breeding season. The Macaulay Library dug into the
video archives to put together this mash-up of interesting duck courtship behaviors, many of which are happening
right now on ponds and lakes.
Enter the 2015 National Audubon Photography Awards
Grab your cameras for this year’s National Audubon Photography Awards. Submit your best bird photo until February 23rd, and you could earn one of many spectacular prizes, including birding trips, high-end photo gear,
and a spot on the cover of Audubon magazine. All Chapter leaders and members are invited to participate. Submit
your best bird photo audubon.org.
PAGE 6
VOLUME 45, NUMBER 2
THE OSPREY PLATFORM
OSPREY NEST MONITORING
PROGRAM
TUESDAY, MARCH 10 THE OSPREY NEST
MONITOR ORIENTATION PROGRAM for 2015
will be presented by Marco Restani at the Billings Library, 510 N
28th Street, in the first floor Community Room. This class, offered
at no charge to interested birders, is designed for both welcomed
new volunteers and experienced Osprey nest monitors. Check-in
will begin at 5:45 pm and the program will begin at 6:00. New material will be presented this year including an overview of the Osprey’s natural history and biology. Also new this year will be the
“Osprey Field Manual” compiled by Dr. Restani to aid nest monitors as they observe and record data. Watch the March Flyer for
additional information for Osprey Nest Monitors. Contact Deb Regele at 962-3115, [email protected] with questions.
Yellowstone Valley Audubon Society
(YVAS) volunteers monitor and record data
at Osprey nests along the Yellowstone River
in Montana from Big Timber to Miles City.
This project began in the summer of 2009.
Volunteers adopt one or two nests early in the
spring and follow up with a visit to each nest
for 30 minutes every one to two weeks, recording dates and data including: the Ospreys’ spring arrival at the nest, nest building,
copulation, incubation, hatching of chicks,
fledging the chicks, and other interesting behavior observations. All data is submitted to
the Montana Natural Heritage Program where
it is recorded and made available to all individuals, organizations or groups.
POLES AND NESTING PLATFORMS Ospreys have a dangerous habit of building their nests on pow-
er poles. The dangling sticks and bailing twine used in building the nests cause power outages and fire. In addition to
monitoring nests, YVAS supports and fosters safe nesting pole alternatives. To date, four nesting poles have been installed by YVAS with support from local power companies and community organizations. Two more have been installed by local power companies independently, with a view towards enhancing the environment for Osprey. Last
month Beartooth Electric Co-op put up a new nesting pole and platform at the Swinging Bridge Fishing Access along
the Stillwater River, just south of Absarokee on Hwy 78. The old nest was very successful with up to four Ospreys
fledging each summer. The bad news was that the nest was built on an active power pole. When the nestlings were
banded last summer, partially burned sticks due to electrical burns were discovered in the nest.
Many, many thanks go out to all those who helped to establish the new pole and platform, including Beartooth Electric Co-op and the landowner. Yellowstone Valley Audubon Society supports and values its working relationship with
these utility companies and landowners. Without their assistance and cooperation, this important and successful Osprey protection and problem resolution would not be possible. Deb Regele, Osprey Project Chairperson
“SNOWBIRDS CALLED OSPREYS”
By Marco Restani
Last fall when I asked a friend who studies Peregrine Falcons on South
Padre Island, Texas, if he sees many Ospreys there during winter, he
replied “The place is filthy with ‘em.” No lie. If you make a map of Osprey distribution on the ebird.org website, the Texas Gulf Coast in winter lights up in deep purple, the color used to depict highest frequency of
occurrence. We have recently learned that some Ospreys banded on the
Yellowstone River as part of the YVAS Osprey Monitoring Project add even more color to the map because they also enjoy the sun and surf of coastal Texas.
Texas birders photographed two of “our” banded Ospreys alive and well in November and December,
and another was found dead in October. The birds had traveled nearly 1400 miles from their natal
nests along the Yellowstone River to their wintering areas in Texas. Ospreys spend only 4-5 months
of their annual cycle in Montana, and it is easy to forget they face challenges elsewhere during the
non-breeding season. When banded Ospreys are observed in winter, we are reminded of the immense
distances traveled and places visited by migrant birds. Although Yellowstone River Ospreys are often
“out of sight”, let’s not have them be “out of mind.”
VOLUME 45, NUMBER 2
PAGE 7
Board Member Cameron Sapp recently resigned from his position on the YVAS Board due to personal reasons and other professional responsibilities. Yellowstone Valley Audubon would like to
thank Cameron for sharing his considerable talents with us, and looks forward to working with him
in the future as circumstances allow.
RENEWAL NOTICES
The YVAS Board of Directors is trying to find a better way to alert supporting Chapter Members of
their renewal dates. The list below consists of those members up for renewal in January and February. Please use the application form below (include your email address) and submit it , along with a
check, to any Board Member or mail it to the address on the application when it is time to renew.
Please contact Membership Secretary Joel M. Bowers at 534-3672 or [email protected], with any questions.
RENEWALS DUE IN JANUARY
RENEWALS DUE IN FEBRUARY
Wiley Bland
Marlin Carlson
Nancy & Dale Detrick
Michael & Jeannette Erwin
Steve Evans
Larry Handsaker
Lucille Olds
Budge Parker
Peggy Schottlaender
Ruth Towe
Marilyn Wade
Please enroll me as a member of the National Audubon Society. I
understand that I will receive the Audubon Magazine and Yellowstone Valley Audubon Society Flyer. Make check payable to National Audubon Society. Renewals will be sent to you thr ough
National Audubon.
Name _____________________________________________
Address ___________________________________________
City _______________________________________________
State _______________Zip ____________________________
Email Address ______________________________________
One Year Membership
$20 One year new membership
Send this application and your check made out to
National Audubon Society to:
Yellowstone Valley Audubon Society
Attention: Membership Secretary
P.O. Box 1075
Billings, MT 59103-1075
Yellowstone Valley Audubon Society
Application for New & Renewal Membership
Please enroll me as a supporting member of Yellowstone Valley
Audubon Society. I understand I will be supporting local Chapter
activities and receiving the local newsletter. I will enjoy full family
Chapter benefits. Make check payable to Yellowstone Valley
Audubon Society for $20. If applying for a new or renewing student membership, make check for $10 and indicate academic affiliation.
Name ______________________________________________
Address ____________________________________________
City _______________________________________________
State ________________

National Audubon Society
Recruitment Code: C0ZN500Z
Application for New Membership
Lila Allen
Kathleen Anderson
Vonnie Anderson
Cindy Dickert
Deborah Mattern
Gerald Moore
Lorraine Ondov
Pam Pipal
Shelly Popp
Judy Robertson
Matthew & Kathleen Usuriello
Zip __________________________
Email Address _______________________________________
Do you want to receive the Flyer electronically?
 YES  NO
Send this application and your check to:
Yellowstone Valley Audubon Society
Attention: Membership Secretary
P.O. Box 1075
Billings, MT 59103-1075
Y E L LO W S T O NE V AL LE Y
A U D U BO N FL Y E R
Non-Profit Organization
PRST STD
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
BILLINGS,MT
PERMIT NO. 27
P.O. Box 1075
Billings, MT 59103-1075
RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED
Field Trip Calendar:
Mar 21
Sat
DUCK DAY: LEARN YOUR WATER- FOWL at
WJH 8 a.m. to noon
Apr 7
Tues
SHARP-TAILED GROUSE VIEWING.
5 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Apr 11
Sat
May 2
May 9
Sat
Sat
May 14
Thur
May 16
Sat
EXXON PONDS AND EMERALD HILLS. 8 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
OPEN
MEET AT RIVERFRONT PARK
S Billings Blvd, 1st Parking Area on right at 8 a.m.
Half Day.
MEET AT RIVERFRONT PARK at 5:30 p.m.
(See above location)
LAKE BASIN. 8 a.m.
May 19
Tues
May 23
Sat
May 3031
SatSun
STILLWATER RIVER AND WOODBINE AREAS. 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
POMPEY’S PILLAR. 7 a.m. to ear ly after noon.
BIRDATHON
Meet at Rocky Mountain College at 8 a.m. for
guidance to WJH (2753 S 56th Street W), or at
WJH between 8 and 8:30a.m. Sheila McKay and
George Mowat, leaders
Jim Court, leader. Contact 259-5099, [email protected], check the Flyer or visit
yvaudubon.org for more details.
Sack Lunch. ONE MILE WALK. Ron Kuhler
and George Mowat, leaders.
George and Bernie Mowat, leaders.
Mike Weber, leader
Sack Lunch. Mike Weber, leader.
Sack Lunch. Ruth Vanderhorst, leader.
Sack Lunch optional depending on how long we
bird in the morning. Ruth Vanderhorst, leader.
Contact Ruth Vanderhorst 245-5118,
[email protected] Check the Flyer or visit
yvaudubon.org for more details.