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Nurse seeks to change hospice market
OHH expands
wound care offering
photo by Mike Lee
photo by Mike Lee
Debra Moore, RN, clinical director of Oklahoma Hospice Care (left) and Jennifer Forrester,
RT, community relations director, are trying to change how hospice is delivered in the
metro.
Debra Moore, RN, didn’t
sleep much the night before.
Her new job as clinical
director of Oklahoma Hospice
Care is a daunting one and
keeps her busy.
But the award-winning
nurse wouldn’t trade it for the
world.
“I feel like I make a
difference,” she said, just a few
hours removed from sitting up
most of the night with a dying
patient and their family.
Moore became Oklahoma
Hospice Care clinical director
near the end of 2014, accepting
a staff of more than 10.
BY-IKE,EE3TAFF7RITER
“She’s just an amazing,
charismatic
leader,”
says
Jennifer
Forrester,
RT,
community relations director.
“People want to follow her
and she takes ownership and
the magnitude of responsibility
for that position.”
Moore was the gem
Oklahoma Hospice Care had
been looking for.
And Moore is
a firm believer that
Oklahoma Hospice
Care is poised for
expansion. Oklahoma
Hospice Care has
offices in Oklahoma
City and Shawnee
with
a
radius
stretching 50 miles
When it comes to wound care in Central Oklahoma, Elaine
Soter, MD, CWS is a well-known commodity.
That’s why the physician-owned Oklahoma Heart Hospital
decided it was high time to put Soter’s reputation and expertise
to work for its vascular patients.
The Oklahoma Heart Hospital Wound Center opened for
patient care earlier this month.
The new state-of-the-art facility opened its doors at 530 SW
80th Street in Oklahoma City, under the guidance of Soter, who
serves as OHH Wound Center Medical Director.
The new wound center brings the community treatment
and protocols to treat chronic wounds including hyperbaric
oxygen therapy, negative pressure therapies, bioengineered
tissues and biosynthetics. Patients may also have the opportunity
to participate in clinical trials and multicenter studies.
“More than 8 million people in the U.S. suffer from chronic
wounds of which healing has been impeded by such diseases
and conditions as diabetes, obesity, aging and the late effects
of radiation therapy,” Soter said. “With the prevalence of both
diabetes and obesity in Oklahoma, specialty treatment centers
like ours are a great addition to the medical landscape.”
A member of the Healogics network, the wound center
employs a rigorous scientific approach to explore, test, find and
develop the clinically proven methods and technologies which
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BY-IKE,EE
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Dr. Elaine Soter (right) and Denise Caram, MHA, have
joined with Oklahoma Heart Hospital to help patients with
diabetes.
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from each office.
She floats the idea of one day
having an inpatient hospital.
She’s never been one that dares to
dream.
“Here I get the best of both
worlds,” Moore said. “I still get to
teach about oncology and I get to
take care of patients because I’m not a
behind-the-desk clinical director. I feel
like the only way you’re going to lead
something is if you have your hands
on it and know what’s going on.”
Oklahoma Hospice Care is a
Christian-principled
organization
specializing in caring for their patients
and the patient’s families wherever
they call home through personalized
plans of care developed with input
from the family physician, the hospice
physician, the patient, the patient’s
family and the members of the hospice
interdisciplinary team.
Community Relations Representative
Tori Aldridge sums up the task at
hand nicely.
“Families invite us into their lives at
their most vulnerable point,” Aldridge
said. “We get one opportunity to take
&EBRUARY
a tragic situation and make it bearable,
even good. We aren’t there to focus on
a person’s death. Instead, we focus on
the remainder of their life.”
“We don’t speed up their disease
process and we don’t slow it down. We
go at their pace and do our best to
minimize the surprises. The diagnosis
and prognosis have been the most
paramount surprises in their lives.”
Moore is a native of Oklahoma
City. She obtained her nursing degree
from Oklahoma City Community
College in 1999. She began her nursing
career at Presbyterian Hospital in the
Med Surgery/Neurological Center and
served as RN charge nurse.
Moore spent the next chapter
of her career at Midwest Regional
Hospital where during her tenure she
worked as an oncology certified RN,
manager of the Outpatient Oncology
Center and finally director of inpatient
and outpatient services.
She received the Nursing Award of
Excellence in 2008 and the Spirit of
Transformation Award in 2011 from the
Oklahoma Hospital Association. She
has also been an Ambassador for the
United Way and served many years as
team captain for the American Cancer
Society’s Relay for Life.
Moore credits her mother, Anna
Rose Wilson, for instilling love and
compassion that has led her to be the
woman and nurse she is today.
With five children and two
grandchildren, Moore stays busy even
when she’s not busy at work.
She exudes happiness. It’s hard to
ever find her in a down mood. And
that’s who she looks for when she
hires.
“I was looking for caring,
compassion and someone who didn’t
mind hard work,” Moore said of the
opportunity to hire new staff when
she got the job. “I was looking for
someone to go into the home when I
couldn’t be there.
“As far as a clinical perspective
you can have all the commercials
and advertising you want but wordof-mouth and letting people see what
we do, that tells it all right there,” she
said. “We’re different because we all do
actually care and that’s why I’m glad
we handpick our people. We know the
people we have working for us.”
And that’s a comfort for both
Moore and her patients.
“I measure success by the patient
saying ‘job well done,’” Moore said.
“It’s simple. Being in this field and
probably any field it just takes common
sense. What would you want done
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for your mom? What would you want
done for your grandmother? Whatever
you would want done for them that’s
what you do for the patient.”
And sometimes that means getting
a few hours less sleep than she’s used
to, like the night before.
“I asked (the family member) if
we could have done anything else. She
said ‘Debra, you guys were amazing,’”
Moore said. “That’s what keeps us
going. I got a couple hours of sleep
last night but that’s what keeps me
going. That’s what makes me not even
care about sleep. I can wait until
Friday.”
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CAREERS
IN NURSING
A NURSE FOR ALL SEASONS: HOSPICE NURSE HAS A LOT TO GIVE
BY*AMES#OBURN7RITER0HOTOGRAPHER
Kathy Sneed has always thought
of herself as a healer, she said. A
hospice nurse definitely needs a caring
soul, Sneed said.
“I wanted to help people,” said
Sneed, RN, case manager at Life Choice
Hospice, in Oklahoma City.
“I wasn’t sure what I was going
to do in hospice,” she said. “It’s really
a different world. That’s what I was
looking for.”
Sneed has done a little bit
of about everything during her 16
year nursing career. Her background
includes working in labor and delivery,
trauma, ICU, psych, and the Oklahoma
Department of Corrections. She earned
her nursing degree at Rose State
College 16 years ago in Midwest City.
“Hospice can be very rewarding.
At times you wouldn’t think it would
be, but you get to be a little closer
with the families by being there to
help them out with their grief,” Sneed
said. “I just really enjoy helping them
through a difficult time.”
It takes a special nurse to be in
hospice, delivering the holistic care to
some of the most vulnerable moments
of a person’s lifetime, she said.
“The nursing staff here, everyone
of them is so caring,” she said. “It’s just
unbelievable. I’ve never worked with a
better group of people.”
Compassion is a hallmark of the
nursing staff. They support each other
completely, she said. If a nurse is
having a challenging time with a
patient, then the staff is ready to help,
she said.
Sometimes it may be hard to
control one’s emotions when everyone
is crying around you, she said. It’s
hard, said Sneed.
“I’ve even sat right there and
balled with them,” she explained.
Without any selfishness, a hospice
nurse must be loving with the ability
to step up to the challenge of whatever
needs to be done for a patient or
family member, she said.
Formerly SolAmor Hospice, Life
Choice changed its branding name
about two months ago, Sneed said.
The hospice offers a full spectrum
of care to touch spirit, mind and body
with the nursing staff, chaplain, social
worker, nurse aides, volunteers, and
social workers.
“I was out on a death not too long
ago,” she said. “The family was having
a hard time with it, even though they
knew it was coming. They thought
they were prepared but they really
weren’t. They picked up the phone and
called our chaplain and he was there
in 30 minutes. He was able to sit with
them and help them do that.”
Nursing seems to be in Sneed’s
blood. There is not a time she recalls
that does not include the desire of
being a nurse, she said. Growing up,
she had a lot of female cousins who
were always pretending they were
nurses and doctors at play.
“I had a good childhood. My
mother and father were very good to
us,” she said. “I have no regrets about
that, and I think I got the caring from
them, just because they were so good
at raising me.”
A collection of memories blends
with the meaningful relationships she
has found today in her hospice career.
In the beginning, being a hospice
nurse was difficult because she wanted
to fix them, she said. Sneed wanted
her patients to improve. She said it
takes time to develop the mentality
that she has done all that she can.
“Now all you can do is make them
comfortable,” she said. “Make sure that
they pass in a comfortable way. That’s
what we do.”
During her nursing career, Sneed
has seen families grief from the
unexpected deaths of loved ones in
the ICU. This can be difficult for a
registered nurse, she said.
“Hospice teaches you to comfort
the family and try to make them
aware of what’s going on, what can
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Kathy Sneed,
RN, case
manager at
Life Choice
Hospice,
located in
Oklahoma
City.
happen, what they’re going to look
like when they die,” Sneed said. “You
prepare them for that transition. It’s
hard to watch someone die. So they do
go through a lot of physical changes
when they’re dying. If you don’t
prepare the family for that, it’s a shock
to them. So we ease them into it.”
Nurses do not always know when
death is imminent. A couple of patients
have rallied when they are thought to
be ready to pass, she said.
“Sometimes they do surprise you,”
she said.
There is a misconception that death
has to be a painful experience. It
does not, she said. Symptoms such as
gasping can be controlled, she said, so
the family members do not have to see
a lot of it and think their loved one is
suffering, Sneed said.
“A lot of times they go peacefully.
You’re just there with the family while
they pass,” Sneed said. “I think it’s
very important that we are there.”
Life Choice Hospice has a motto
that “no one dies alone.” Some people
don’t have family members, but they
do have Life Choice Hospice to be
with them.
Life Choice Hospice is not forgotten.
They have received thank you notes
and cards of appreciation from family
members who appreciate the care their
loved one received.
Everybody needs a break from
their career. When Sneed is not at
work she spends time with her family,
including three adult daughters and
six grandchildren.
“I have hobbies I like to play with.
I do a lot of sewing, quilting and
crafts,” she said. She tries not to bring
work home with her. But sometimes
she is on stand by just in case.
“I’m willing to do that. It’s not a
problem,” she said.
Life Choice Hospice serves to make
sure a dying experience is a peaceful
one with comfort, Sneed said.
The acceptance of hospice nursing
also comes with age. Many hospice
nurses are older, seasoned nurses,
Sneed said.
“I just think that is part of the
development stage of the person,”
Sneed said. “I was totally surprised
when I became a hospice nurse. it was
nothing like I thought it was.”
reintroduce the body’s innate ability
to heal. The network, comprised of
academic medical centers, hospitals
and thousands of professionals is
committed to advancing wound healing
by creating, sharing, and activating
wound prevention and care expertise.
Denise Caram, MHA, serves as
the director of the new center. She
served with Soter in the same capacity
at at the Healogics clinic at Midwest
Regional Medical Center.
Caram understands OHH’s draw
to Soter.
“Their relationship with her is so
strong that once they decided to do
a wound center they wanted her,”
Caram said. “They went after her and
that’s a tribute.”
Soter says the new clinic is
invigorating and the fact it bears the
Oklahoma Heart Hospital name is
exciting. “Oklahoma Heart has a stellar
reputation and I already work with
a good many of these physicians. It
was an opportunity for us to knit that
relationship more closely and access a
different group of patients in need,”
Soter said. “It was just an opportunity
for me to align myself with an already
well-known group of doctors that get
it. They get what our aim is.”
Oklahoma Heart Hospital serves
every county in the state of Oklahoma
with more than 60 outreach centers.
Oklahoma is No. 1 in the number
of amputations in the U.S.
Caram remembers the story of a
patient who came from Arkansas who
had originally been told his lower leg
would need to be removed.
“All they had to do was take a
toe,” Caram said. “I think that’s pretty
impressive. We’ve just not bragged
about that very much here.”
Soter knows the statistics and said
it’s an education battle as it is a
medical one.
0AGE
“I think part of it is the
traditional fatalistic attitude we have
with diabetics and the belief once a
diabetic’s foot starts to have trouble
that there is nothing they can do
and it’s a guarantee they will have
an amputation,” Soter said. “And we’ve
actually proven that that’s not quite
true and that if you put that effort
into limb salvage maybe you can
reduce the level of amputation and
maybe you can completely avoid it and
certainly you can preserve function.
“The philosophy that is traditional
if you applied it to hearts and to cancer
they would never have angioplasty,
bypass or chemo and I like to think
what we do is very much like that.”
Many
patients
treated
for
problematic wounds may be candidates
for hyperbaric oxygen therapy, a
treatment in which the patient breathes
100 percent oxygen inside a pressurized
chamber for short periods of time. This
therapy can be beneficial for treating
wounds that are difficult to heal.
Chronic wounds affect millions of
people in the U.S. and the incidence is
rising, fueled by an aging population
and increasing rates of diseases and
conditions such as diabetes, obesity, and
the late effects of radiation therapy.
Untreated, chronic wounds can
lead to diminished quality of life and
possibly amputation of the affected
limb.
Two nurses will work the clinic
with plans to add another.
The center is run by Healogics, the
nation’s largest provider of advanced
wound care services.
Using an evidence-based systematic
approach to chronic wound healing,
Healogics provides specialty wound
care for an underserved and growing
patient population through its 500
wound care centers.
Nearly 200,000 patients per year
are seen through a connected network
of centers, partner hospitals, academic
medical centers, patients and families.
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IMMUNERESPONSE
A pair of Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists has made
new findings related to blood vessel function and inflammation, key
factors in infections as well as a host of conditions from cancer to kidney
and autoimmune disease.
The findings by Lijun Xia, M.D., Ph.D., and Rodger McEver, M.D.,
could point the way to the development of new methods for preventing
and treating bacterial and viral infections.
Xia discovered a new way that lymph nodes, which act as monitors
and filters for pathogens that enter the body, respond to challenges to the
immune system.
“We found that a particular molecule called podoplanin is essential
in making lymph nodes regulate their environment so more white blood
cells, the body’s infection fighters, can come in during inflammation or
following vaccination,” said Xia, who holds the Merrick Foundation Chair
in Biomedical Research at OMRF.
“In the future, these findings may help us make vaccines more efficient
or enable us to develop new therapies to help the body fight pathogens
and infections.”
Xia also found how a common form of protein modification plays an
important role in protecting podoplanin in lymphatic vessels, which is
important for transporting immune cells.
“Using these results, we can move
toward developing therapies that help
maintain healthy vessel function during
inflammation or immune responses,”
said Xia, who published his new
findings in the journals Blood and
Nature Immunology.
Other OMRF scientists who
contributed to Xia’s research are
Yanfang Pan, Tadayuki Yago, Jianxin
Fu, Kai Song, Yuji Kondo, Brett Herzog,
Mike McDaniel and Hong Chen.
McEver, whose findings appear in the journal Science, has discovered
a new interaction involved in the body’s response to inflammation. McEver
was a contributor to the research, which was led by Andres Hidalgo from
the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares in Madrid, Spain.
“Inflammation results in the recruitment of white blood cells to a place
to combat infections or deal with injury,” said McEver, who holds OMRF’s
Alvin Chang Chair in Cardiovascular Biology. “In this new study, we were
able to show that platelets, blood cells that protect against bleeding, can
facilitate an inflammatory response in a particular way not seen until
now.”
These findings could prove beneficial in helping to reduce collateral
injuries caused by the immune system’s response to injuries or infections.
“Drs. Xia and McEver continue to do important work and are a
testament to the high caliber of research underway here at OMRF,” said
OMRF Vice President of Research Paul Kincade, Ph.D. “Research like this
takes time and dedication while opening doors to a wide range of possible
discoveries.”
Funding for Xia’s research was provided by grants P01HL085607 from
the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and GM103441 from the
National Institute of General Medical Sciences. McEver’s research was
funded by grants HL034363 and HL085607 from the National Heart, Lung
and Blood Institute. All four grants are funded by the National Institutes
of Health.
Donation will advance pediatric
research, education and clinical care
On Jan. 21, enthusiastic
college students joined together
to help make a meaningful
difference
for
Oklahoma’s
children and their efforts paid
off in a big way – more than
$40,000 was raised in one day.
The students were a part of The
University of Oklahoma Campus
Activities Council Soonerthon
(OU Dance Marathon) and
their drive was fueled with
a white-hot determination “For
The Kids.” Proceeds will support
Children’s Hospital Foundation and
its mission to improve the health of
children through the advancement
of pediatric research, education and
clinical care.
“As an affiliate of Children’s
Miracle Network Hospitals, we are
so very proud of the students
who committed themselves, for a
continuous 24 hours, to raise money
to help Oklahoma’s sick and injured
children,” said Kathy McCracken,
executive director, Children’s Hospital
Foundation.
Remarkably, students originally
set a goal to raise $15,000. When
they met the goal by noon, the
students challenged themselves to
increase the amount to $25,000.
Through teamwork, registration fees,
peer-to-peer fundraising, canning on
campus and the sheer power of
social media, the students successfully
completed their 24-hour fundraising
event by raising more than double
the amount they had originally
intended to raise.
Student Kate Decuyper counts
change for Soonerthon.“It is amazing
to see the entire campus rally around
such an amazing cause. The fact
that we had raised our goal in
only 12 hours truly demonstrates
the heart and strength of the OU
community,” said Jessica Freeman,
Soonerthon Overall Chair. “Every
year I am overwhelmed with the
generosity of Soonerthon’s donors, but
today was truly something special.
The best part is we are not stopping
here. We have six more weeks left to
keep fundraising so we can make a
huge impact for Children’s Hospital
Foundation.”
All funds raised by the students
will help them to reach their
overall annual fundraising goal of
$380,000. The final amount will be
announced Mar. 7 at Soonerthon
in the Huston Huffman Center. At
that time, more than 2,000 students
will come together to celebrate their
accomplishments by spending the
entire day up on their feet dancing.
With an impassioned motto of “For
The Kids (#FTK),” the day will focus
on Children’s Hospital Foundation
Miracle Kids and lots of fun.
Children’s Hospital Foundation,
proud affiliate of Children’s Miracle
Network Hospitals, is a nonprofit 501c
(3) organization in Oklahoma striving
to improve the health of children.
Since its inception in 1983, Children’s
Hospital Foundation, through its
volunteer board and vast community
support, has funded pediatric research
and education programs including
collaborative projects with the
OU Department of Pediatrics, The
Children’s Hospital at OU Medical
Center, OU Children’s Physicians and
the University Hospitals Authority
and Trust. For more information,
contact Executive Director, Kathy
McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit
our website: www.okchf.org.
/KLAHOMAS.URSING4IMES &EBRUARY
0AGE
Crohn’s and Colitis Support Group FACEBOOK
FUNNIES - SHARED - JOIN US!
Reaches Out to Community
Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America, Oklahoma Chapter, and Dr.
Tauseef Ali, from the St. Anthony Physicians Group Gastroenterology, are
partnering together to help educate and support those who suffer from
digestive diseases. A support group open to the community, covering topics
related to IBD diagnosis, management and handling complications, meets the
first Wednesday of every month. From 5:15 p.m. to 6:15 p.m., meetings are
held in the Rapp Foundation Conference Center, located on the 4th floor of
the Saints Medical Plaza Building, 535 NW 9th Street, in Oklahoma City.
February 4, is the next meeting featuring Tauseef Ali, M.D., as he
discusses the “ABC’s of IBD.” For more information on the support group,
contact Jennifer Lester at 405-772-4367 or Tricia Mauldin at 405-919-0398.
&AITH#OMMUNITY.URSES#ONFERENCE
The conference will be held March 6, 2015 at Crossings Community Center,
10255 N Pennsylvania, Oklahoma City, OK 73120 and is hosted by Faith
Community Nurses Association (FCNA OK.)
FCNA OK is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by
the Kansas State Board of Nursing. This course offering is approved for 6.0
contact hours applicable for RN, LPN, or LMHT relicensure. Kansas State Board
of Nursing Provider Number pending.
For registration information, contact Marilyn Seiler, 405-340-0691, ext
197 or email at [email protected] or see the FCNA website:
www.fcnaok.org for a brochure and registration form.
Oklahoma’s Nursing Times
Hospice Directory
- another free service provided by Oklahoma’s Nursing Times Alpha Hospice:
7512 N Broadway Ext., suite 312
Okc, 405-463-5695 Keith Ruminer/
volunteer coordinator/chaplain
Alleve Hospice: 405-605-7787
Autumn Bridge Hospice:
405-440-2440
Cornerstone Hospice:
Vicky Herrington, Vol. Coordinator,
918-641-5192
Hometown Hospice:
Robin Boatman, Com. Relations, Broken
Arrow: 918-251-6441; Muskogee:
918-681-4440.
Autumn Light Hospice:
580-252-1266
Crossroads Hospice:
Sheila Guffey, Vol. Coordinator,
405-632-9631
Carter Healthcare & Hospice:
OKC - Adam Colvin, Vol. Coordinator,
405-947-7705, ext. 134; Tulsa - Mike
Gregory, Vol. Coordinator,
918-425-4000, ext. 114
Cross Timbers Hospice:
Ardmore-800-498-0655
Davis-580-369-5335 Volunteer
Coordinator-Shelly Murray
Centennial Hospice:
Becky Johnson, Bereavement
Coordinator 405-562-1211
Chisholm Trail Hospice:
Tiffany Thorne, Vol. Coordinator,
580-251-8764
Harbor Light Hospice:
Randy Pratt, Vol. Coordinator,
1009 N Meredian, Oklahoma City, OK
73107 405-949-1200
Horizon Hospice:
LaDonna Rhodes, Vol. Coordinator,
918-473-0505
Heartland Hospice:
Shawnee: Vol. Coor. Karen Cleveland,
405-214-6442; Norman: Vol. Coor. Lisa
Veauchamp, 405-579-8565
Heavenly Hospice:
Julie Myers, Coordinator 405-701-2536
Hope Hospice:
Bartlesville: 918-333-7700, Claremore;
918-343-0777 Owasso: 918-272-3060
Interim Healthcare Hospice:
405-848-3555
Image HealthCare :
6116 S. Memorial Tulsa, Ok. 74133
(918) 622-4799
LifeSpring In-Home Care
Network:
Terry Boston, Volunteer and
Bereavement Coordinator 405-801-3768
LifeLine Hospice:
April Moon, RN Clinical Coordinator
405-222-2051
Mays Hospice Care, Inc.
OKC Metro, 405-631-3577; Shawnee,
405-273-1940
Hospice by Loving Care:
Connie McDivitt, Vol. Coordinator,
405-872-1515
McCortney Family Hospice
OKC/Norman metro 405-360-2400
Ada, 580-332-6900 Staci Elder Hensley,
volunteer coordinator
Excell Hospice:
Toni K. Cameron, Vol. Coordinator
405-631-0521
Hospice of Green Country:
Tulsa: 918-747-2273, Claremore:
918-342-1222, Sapulpa: 918-224-7403
Mercy Hospice:
Steve Pallesen, Vol. Coordinator,
405-486-8600
Faith Hospice of OKC:
Charlene Kilgore, Vol. Coordinator,
405-840-8915
Hospice of Oklahoma County
& the INTEGRIS Hospice House
Ruth Ann Frick, Vol. Coordinator,
405-848-8884
Mission Hospice L.L.C.:
2525 NW Expressway, Ste. 312
OKC, OK 73112 405-848-3779
Choice Home Health & Hospice:
405-879-3470
Freedom Hospice:
Tulsa: 918-493-4930; Claremore:
918-343-0493; Tollfree: 866-476-7425
City Hospice:
Beth Huntley, Vol. Coordinator,
405-942-8999
Frontier Hospice: Kelly Morris, Vol.
Coordinator, 405-789-2913
Comforting Hands Hospice:
Bartlesville: 918-331-0003
Full Life Hospice:
Vicki Barnhart, Vol. Coordinator,
405-418-2659
Companion Hospice:
Steve Hickey, Vol. Coordinator, Guthrie:
405-282-3980; Edmond: 405-341-9751
Good Shepherd Hospice:
4350 Will Rogers Parkway Suite 400
OKC OK 73108 405-943-0903
Compassionate Care Hospice:
Amy Legare, Bereavement/Vol.
Coordinator, 405-948-4357
Grace Hospice Foundation:
Sharon Doty, Dir of Spec. Projects Tulsa 918-744-7223
Hospice of Owasso, Inc.:
Todd A. Robertson, Dir. of Marketing,
877-274-0333
Hospice of the Cherokee:
918-458-5080
Humanity Hospice:
Kay Cole, Vol. Coordinator
405-418-2530
InFinity Care of Tulsa:
Spencer Brazeal, Vol. Director,
918-392-0800
Indian Territory Home Health &
Hospice: 1-866-279-3975
Oklahoma Hospice Care
405-418-2659 Jennifer Forrester,
Community Relations Director
One Health Home
Health in Tulsa: 918-412-7200
Palliative Hospice:
Janet Lowder, Seminole, & Sabrina
Johnson, Durant, 800-648-1655
Physician’s Choice Hospice:
Tim Clausing, Vol. Coordinator
405-936-9433
Professional Home Hospice:
Sallisaw: 877-418-1815; Muskogee:
866-683-9400; Poteau: 888-647-1378
PromiseCare Hospice:
Angela Shelton, LPN - Hospice
Coordinator, Lawton: (580) 248-1405
Quality Life Hospice:
405 486-1357
RoseRock Healthcare:
Audrey McCraw, Admin. 918-236-4866
Ross Health Care:
Glenn LeBlanc, Norman, Chickasha;
April Burrows, Enid; Vol. Coordinators,
580-213-3333
Russell Murray Hospice:
Tambi Urias, Vol. Coordinator,
405-262-3088; Kingfihser 405-375-5015;
Weatherford-580-774-2661
Seasons Hospice:
Carolyn Miller, Vol./Bereavement
Coordinator, 918-745-0222
Sequoyah Memorial Hospice:
Vernon Stone, D. Min. Chaplin, Vol.
Coordinator, 918-774-1171
Sojourn Hospice:
Tammy Harvey, Vol. Manager
918-492-8799
SolAmor Hospice:
Lisa Riggs, Vol. Coord. 405-842-0171
Sooner Hospice, LLC:
Matt Ottis, Vol. Coordinator,
405-608-0555
Tranquility Hospice:
Kelly Taylor, Volunteer Coordinator
Tulsa : 918-592-2273
Valir Hospice Care:
Dee Fairchild , Vol. Manager OKC Metro:
405.609.3636 Chandler
Shawnee/Cushing: 405.258.2333 Toll
Free: 888.901.6334
Woodard Regional Hospice
580-254-9275 Cathy Poe, RN Director
0AGE
&EBRUARY
Vicki L Mayfield, M.Ed., R.N.,
LMFT Marriage and Family
Therapy Oklahoma City
If you would like to send a
question to Vicki, email us at
[email protected]
/KLAHOMAS.URSING4IMES
Tech Trek Accepting
Nominations for Math and
Science Camp for Girls
Q. These days we are urged to “follow our passion” but
what if we really don’t know what our passion is? I
know there is something missing in my life but I don’t
know how to get started. Do you have any suggestions?
A. I found an interesting article written by Warren Berger that
you and many others might find helpful. The following 8 questions
can help you figure out where your heart lies and what you really
ought to be doing:
1. What is your tennis ball? The most successful people are
obsessed with solving an important problem, something that
matters to them. They resemble a dog chasing a tennis ball. To
increase your chances of happiness and success, find your tennis
ball - the thing that pulls you.
2. What am I doing when I feel most beautiful? This is about
identifying not only what draws you in, but also what makes you
shine. Think about the time and place when you feel most alive
- whether it’s when you’re solving a problem, creating, connecting
with someone, traveling. Find a way to do more of it.
3. What is something you believe that almost nobody agrees
with you on? “Originality is deceptively hard,” Paypal co-founder
Peter Thiel has stated. Try to find a problem or challenge no one
else is tackling, go through the open door that no one is looking
at.
4. What are your superpowers? Unpack the combination of
personality traits and aptitudes you bring effortlessly to any
situation. If we can identify our inherent character strengths and
build on them, we can lead happier, more successful lives.
5. So what did you enjoy doing at age 10? Eric Maisel, a
psychotherapist, states that the things we loved as a child are
probably still the things we love, before others started telling us
what we should do.
6. What are you willing to try now? One of the best ways
to find your purpose and passion is through experimentation. To
launch ourselves anew, we need to get out of our heads, we need
to act. “We learn who we are - in practice, not in theory - by
testing reality.
7. Looking back on your career, 20 or 30 years from now,
what do you want to say you’ve accomplished? What have you
accomplished at this point?
8. What is your sentence? The journalist and pioneering
Congresswoman Clare Booth Luce, while visiting John F. Kennedy
expressed her concern that he was trying to do too much. She told
him a great man is a sentence - meaning that a leader with a clear
and strong purpose could be summed up in a single line (e.g.,
“Abraham Lincoln preserved the union and freed the slaves.”)
Your sentence could be, “I created a program to help at risk
youth before they got into serious trouble.” What do you want
your sentence to say?
Seventy-six, seventh grade girls
from Oklahoma will have the
opportunity this summer to experience
one of two Tech Trek math and science
camps. Teacher nominations of campers
are now being accepted for Tech Trek
at SWOSU (Southwestern Oklahoma
State University) in Weatherford and
Tech Trek at TU (University of Tulsa).
The American Association of
University Women (AAUW) branches
from Weatherford and Tulsa, in
collaboration with SWOSU and TU, are
one of eleven sites across the United
States to conduct this national pilot
program outside of California. Last
year, forty-eight girls from across the
state participated in the second year
of Tech Trek at SWOSU. Due to
its success, Tech Trek is expanding
its program to two locations in
Oklahoma, so that more girls can
receive the opportunity to experience
Science, Technology, Engineering and
Mathematics (STEM) learning and
activities to which they may not
otherwise be exposed.
Tech Trek
is one of AAUW’s goals to increase
participation of women in math and
science.
Tech Trek is a week-long summer
math and science camp uniquely
designed for girls entering the eighth
grade during the 2015-16 school year.
Campers stay on a college campus
during the week of Tech Trek while
they learn about STEM; perform
experiments and hands-on activities;
and interact with female role models
who are already working in STEM
fields. Aside from a $50 registration
fee, the camp is provided free of
charge to Oklahoma residents.
Tech
Trek
invites
teacher
nominations of potential campers,
which are due by February 20. Tech
Trek is looking for girls across the
state of Oklahoma who are excited
by math and science; have at least
a “B” average with the potential to
excel; have not necessarily had the
opportunity for experiences like Tech
Trek; and have a high level of maturity
when interacting with peers. Current
seventh-grade girls will need to be
identified and nominated by their
middle school teachers and counselors.
After being nominated, girls will
be asked to complete a camper
application and undergo a “get-toknow-you” interview. Forty girls will
then be selected to attend Tech Trek at
SWOSU from June 7 - 13, and 36 girls
for the inaugural year of Tech Trek at
TU from June 14 - 20.
“Tech Trek is an educational and
fun way to bring girls together who
share an interest in science and math,”
states Tech Trek at SWOSU Camp
Director Lisa Appeddu. “They are
able to explore the different fields of
STEM and related careers in a positive
environment.
Tech Trek provides
the opportunity for girls to see the
benefits of expanding their education
and making a difference in the future
of Oklahoma.”
For more information about the
camps, nomination materials, volunteer
opportunities or to donate to Tech
Trek, please visit the website http:/
/techtrek-ok.aauw.net/
or
email
[email protected]
or
[email protected]
/KLAHOMAS.URSING4IMES &EBRUARY 0AGE
If you could change places with someone for a day, who would it be and why? Children’s Center Rehabilitation Hospital
“I would change places
with Angelina Jolie to
have the means to give
to charities and do
humanitarian work.”
“I would have changed
places with Whitney
Houston because I wish
that I could sing. I would
love to WOW people with
my voice.”
Each week we visit with health care
professionals throughout the Metro
‘I would trade places with
one of my patients to see
what it is like to be in
a hospital, so I can be a
better nurse.”
“It would be Charley
Boorman. Charley has
acted in a few films but
now takes adventurous
motorcycle tours all
around the world.”
Shari O’Connor, RN
Micah Puckett, RN,
PMRU Team Leader
Please Let us know Your Thoughts
Robbi Ketch, LPN
Christine Onaolapo,
RN
Email:
[email protected]
or mail to
Oklahoma’s Nursing Times
P.O. Box 239
Mustang, Ok. 73064
3PORTS!NIMAL3TAR0ROVIDES
'UYS'UIDETO2OMANCE
*USTIN4IMEFOR6ALENTINES$AY
When you think of men’s health you most likely think of medical issues,
diet and exercise, but there is another aspect of men’s health that is equally
as important and often ignored. We’re talking about matters of the heart. Not
the blood pumping organ but the epicenter of love and romance.
Morning Sports Animal radio station star Ron Benton, otherwise known
as Spinozi, and some of the other guys will be broadcasting live from
INTEGRIS Pacer Fitness Center on Monday, Feb. 2, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Spinozi wants to help guys out this Valentine’s Day by giving them
some pointers on how to have healthy relationships. He has written a book
called 12 Things A Guy Can Do To Let the Woman In His Life Know How
Amazing She Is. The book details leaving love notes, sending flowers
for no reason, preparing picnics and other thoughtful and romantic
ideas.
The event is free and open to the public. It
is being hosted by the INTEGRIS Heart Hospital,
INTEGRIS Pacer Fitness Center and INTEGRIS Men’s
Health University.
We’ll have food,
refreshments
and
plenty of giveaways.
Be sure to join us for
the fun.