student policies - Academy of Art University

SPRING 2015
STUDENT AND ACADEMIC POLICIES
+ PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES, FACULTY & ADMINISTRATORS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ACCREDITATION & MISSION STATEMENT
6
Mission Statement
Regional Accreditation
Specialized Accreditations
Kansas State Approval
Maryland State Approval
Minnesota State Approval
Non-Discrimination Statement
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
ADMISSIONS
9
Undergraduate Admissions Statement
Undergraduate Admissions Requirements
Proof of High School Graduation
Graduate Admissions Requirements
English as a Second Language Graduate Applicants
Transcript Requirements
Transfer Policies
Transcript Submission Deadline
Undergraduate Residency Requirement
Transferability
Placement & Portfolio Reviews
International Student English Placement Testing
Scheduling an Academy of Art University Placement Exam
Undergraduate Liberal Arts Placement
Placement: Written Communication
Placement: Quantitative Literacy + Math for Architecture & Landscape Architecture
Placement: Employment Communications and Practices
9
9
9
9
10
10
11
11
11
11
12
12
12
12
13
14
15
ACADEMIC CALENDAR
17
Academic Year
Academic & Events Calendar
Observed Holidays
17
17
17
FINANCIAL AID & TUITION
19
Financial Aid
Financial Aid Award letters
19
19
1
School ID Number
Tuition Rates
Fees
Billing Information
Payment Information
Methods of Payment
Installment Plan
Refunds
Refund Policies
Percentage of Refundable Tuition/Fee Charges
Financial Aid: Return of Title IV Funds
Financial Aid: Refunds
19
19
20
21
21
21
21
22
22
22
23
23
ACADEMIC POLICIES
25
Curriculum Changes
Declaring a Major
Changing Majors
Changing Degree Programs
Graduation Planning
Graduation Declaration
Undergraduate Grade Levels
Course Numbering
Credit Hours
Credit Hour Policy
Credit Hour Calculations
Enrollment Status
Grade Point Average (GPA)
Minimum GPA Requirement
Graduation Honors
President’s Honor Roll
Academic Standing
Academic Probation Policies
Dismissal
Request for Readmission After Dismissal
Readmission After Dismissal
25
25
25
25
26
28
28
28
28
29
30
30
30
31
31
31
32
33
33
33
33
FINANCIAL AID & SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) POLICIES
35
Financial Aid: Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Requirement
Financial Aid: Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Standings
Financial Aid: Minimum GPA Requirement
Financial Aid: Minimum Completion Rate Requirement
Financial Aid: Maximum Time Frame Requirement
Financial Aid: Enrollment Status
Financial Aid: Satisfactory Progress Appeal
35
35
36
37
38
38
39
REGISTRATION & COURSE ENROLLMENT POLICIES
41
Registration
Enrollment Agreement
Re-entry
Add Procedures
Add Procedures After the tuition Deadline
Administrative Add/Drop Policy
Drop Procedures
Drop & Withdrawal Policies
Withdrawal
Administrative Withdrawal
Involuntary Withdrawal
Internships for Academic Credit
41
41
41
42
43
43
43
43
45
45
46
46
STUDENT SUPPORT
48
Accommodations for Students with Disabilities
Academy Resource Center (ARC)
Student Academic Support
ARC Tutoring & Training
48
48
49
49
2
Classroom Services
ESL Support Program and Online Language Support
Writing Lab and Online Writing Lab (OWL)
Speaking Lab and Online Speaking Lab
Midpoint Review Workshops (Graduate Students Only)
Library
Career & Entrepreneurial Services
49
49
49
49
49
49
50
ATTENDANCE POLICIES
52
Attendance
Model Attendance Policy
Excused Absences
Late Submission of Projects/Assignments
Attendance Corrections
52
52
52
53
53
GRADING POLICIES
55
Grading Criteria
Grading Standards
Minimum Grade Requirements
Semester Grading Periods
Course Repetitions
Grade Exclusion
Grades of Incomplete
Student Appeal for Grade Change
Student Appeal OF “WF” Grade
55
55
56
56
56
57
57
58
59
STUDENT RECORD POLICIES
61
University Records
Transcript Request
Notice of Rights Under FERPA
61
61
61
STUDENT POLICIES
64
Student Rights, Responsibilities & Expectations
Use of Student Likenesses and/or Images
Collection of Student Artwork
Student Identification Badge
Dress Code
Campus Security Safety Report
Student Appeals and Grievances
64
64
64
64
65
65
65
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT POLICIES
68
International Nonimmigrant Students
Immigration Status
On-Campus Presence
F1 Immigration Regulations and Resources
MaintaInting F1 Status
Traveling In-Between Semesters
Leave of Absence
Process for an Approved Leave of Absence
Return from Leave of Absence
Employment
Health Insurance
Requesting a Letter of Verification / Support
68
68
68
68
68
69
70
70
70
71
73
73
GRADUATE STUDENT POLICIES
75
Graduate Midpoint Review
Final Thesis Project Redirection
Directed Study
75
75
75
3
Graduate Final Review
STUDIO spaces and gallery exhibitions
Reinstatement
75
76
76
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
78
Guidelines
Prohibited Conduct
Definitions and Description of Key Terms
Statement on Academic Freedom and Academic Responsibility
Academic Honesty
Plagiarism
Cheating
Interpretations of Regulations
Focus of the Proceedings
Violations of Law and Disciplinary Regulations
Harassment
78
79
80
80
81
81
81
82
82
82
82
UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURE
84
Guidelines
Process
Sanctions
Appeals Process
84
84
84
84
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
86
Board of Directors
86
ADMINISTRATORS
87
Key Administrators
87
FACULTY INFORMATION
90
School of Acting Full-Time Faculty
School of Advertising Full-Time Faculty
School of Animation & Visual Effects Full-Time Faculty
School of Architecture Full-Time Faculty
School of Art Education Full-Time Faculty
School of Art History Full-Time Faculty
School of Fashion Full-Time Faculty
School of Fine Art Full-Time Faculty
School of Game Development Full-Time Faculty
School of Graphic Design Full-Time Faculty
School of Illustration Full-Time Faculty
School of Industrial Design Full-Time Faculty
School of Interior Architecture & Design Full-Time Faculty
School of Jewelry & Metal Arts Full-Time Faculty
School of Landscape Architecture Full-Time Faculty
School of Motion Pictures & Television Full-Time Faculty
School of Multimedia Communications Full-Time Faculty
School of Music Production & Sound Design for Visual Media Full-Time Faculty
School of Photography Full-Time Faculty
School of Visual Development Full-Time Faculty
School of Web Design & New Media Full-Time Faculty
School of Writing for Film, Television & Digital Media Full-Time Faculty
Support Department: Academy Resource Center
Support Department: English For Art Purposes Full-Time Faculty
Support Department: Foundations Full-Time Faculty
Support Department: Liberal Arts Full-Time Faculty
90
91
92
98
101
102
104
111
116
118
121
124
125
127
127
128
131
133
134
137
138
140
140
141
148
151
UNIVERSITY LEARNING OUTCOMES
157
4
PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
School of Acting
School of Advertising
School of Animation & Visual Effects
School of Architecture
School of Art Education
School of Art History
School of Fashion
School of Fine Art
School of Game Development
School of Graphic Design
School of Illustration
School of Industrial Design
School of Interior Architecture & Design
School of Jewelry & Metal Arts
School of Landscape Architecture
School of Motion Pictures & Television
School of Multimedia Communications
School of Music Production & Sound Design for Visual Media
School of Photography
School of Visual Development
School of Web Design & New Media
School of Writing for Film, Television & Digital Media
Support Department: Foundations
Support Department: Liberal Arts
CAMPUS AND FACILITIES
Our Campus
Facilities
School of Acting
School of Advertising
School of Animation & Visual Effects
School of Architecture
School of Art Education
School of Art History
School of Fashion
School of Fine Art
School of Game Development
School of Graphic Design
School of Illustration
School of Industrial Design
School of Interior Architecture & Design
School of Jewelry & Metal Arts
School of Landscape Architecture
School of Motion Pictures & Television
School of Multimedia Communications
School of Music Production & Sound Design for Visual Media
School of Photography
School of Visual Development
School of Web Design & New Media
School of Writing for Film, Television & Digital Media
Support Department: Liberal Arts
158
158
158
158
158
158
158
158
159
159
159
159
159
159
159
159
160
160
160
160
160
160
160
160
160
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
162
163
163
163
163
163
163
163
163
163
163
SPRING 2015 COURSE FEES & PREREQUSITES
165
INDEX
233
5
ACCREDITATION & MISSION STATEMENT
MISSION STATEMENT
The Academy of Art University prepares aspiring professionals in the fields of design, communication and the arts by
delivering excellent undergraduate and graduate degrees and certificate and portfolio development programs.
To achieve its mission the Academy of Art University:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
maintains an inclusive admissions policy for all persons who meet basic requirements for admission and instruction
and who want to obtain higher learning in a wide spectrum of disciplines in art and design;
teaches a disciplined approach to the study of art and design that encourages students to develop their own styles
that blend their talents, technical skills and creative aspirations with professional knowledge;
enlists a dedicated and very able full-time and part-time faculty of career artists, designers and scholars who are
professionals and whose success as educators comes from their ability to teach students through the wisdom and
skill they have amassed through years of experience and study;
operates in an urban context so that academic programs can draw upon and contribute to the cultural wealth of
those communities that are served;
provides a creative environment that is at once supportive and challenging and underpinned by excellent
personalized teaching and support services that address the needs of students of diverse ages and backgrounds;
offers an undergraduate general education program designed to stimulate development of critical thinking, and
communications skills, and to encourage emerging artists to draw upon a variety of disciplines to look at issues from
multiple perspectives and to cultivate the ability to function as educated global citizens;
manages in an ethical and efficient manner and administers the finances in a prudent fashion; and
fosters optimum quality in all aspects of programs and services.
REGIONAL ACCREDITATION
WSCUC Accreditation
Academy of Art University is regionally accredited by the WASC Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC),
one of the seven regional associations that accredit public and private colleges and schools in the United States.
WSCUC is located at 985 Atlantic Avenue #100, Alameda, CA, 94501. Tel. 510.748.9001.
WSCUC Accreditation for Online Programs
Both onsite and online degree programs at Academy of Art University are accredited by WASC Senior College and
University Commission (WSCUC). The following degree programs are not currently offered online: AA, BFA and MFA in
Acting, and the BS in Game Programming.
SPECIALIZED ACCREDITATIONS
CTC Accreditation
California Commission on Teacher Credentialing Accreditation
The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) is an agency in the Executive Branch of California State
Government. The major purpose of the agency is to serve as a state standards board for educator preparation for the
public schools of California, the licensing and credentialing of professional educators in the State, the enforcement of
professional practices of educators, and the discipline of credential holders in the State of California. CTC accredits the
Academy of Art University’s Single Subject Art Teaching Credential Program. They are located at 1900 Capitol Avenue,
Sacramento, CA 95811. Tel: 916-322-6253.
NOTE: The online Art Teaching Credential requires fieldwork assignments in observing and teaching art to pupils in local
Bay Area public schools.
CIDA Accreditation
Council for Interior Design Accreditation
The Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) is an independent, non-profit accrediting organization for interior
design education programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. The BFA Interior Architecture
& Design and the MFA Interior Architecture & Design programs are both accredited by The Council for Interior Design
Accreditation. The Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) is located at 206 Grandville Avenue, Suite 350, Grand
Rapids, MI 49503-4014. Tel. 616.458.0400.
6
NAAB Accreditation
The National Architectural Accrediting Board
In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as
a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to
accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of
Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A degree program may be granted a 6-year, 3year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.
Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate
degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional
education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.
The Academy of Art University, Department of Architecture offers the following NAAB-accredited programs:
•
•
M.Arch (pre-professional degree + 63 graduate credits)
M.Arch (non-pre-professional degree + 87 graduate credits)
Next accreditation visit for all programs: 2021
The NAAB grants candidacy status to new programs that have developed viable plans for achieving initial accreditation.
Candidacy status indicates that a program should be accredited within 6 years of achieving candidacy, if its plan is
properly implemented. In order to meet the education requirement set forth by the National Council of Architectural
Registration Boards, an applicant for an NCARB Certificate must hold a professional degree in architecture from a
program accredited by the NAAB; the degree must have been awarded not more than two years prior to initial
accreditation. However, meeting the education requirement for the NCARB Certificate may not be equivalent to meeting
the education requirement for registration in a specific jurisdiction. Please contact NCARB for more information.
Academy of Art University, School of Architecture was granted candidacy for the following professional degree program
in architecture:
•
B.Arch. (162 undergraduate credits): 2012
Next visit for continuation of candidacy: 2014
Projected year of initial accreditation: 2015
NASAD Accreditation
National Association of Schools of Art and Design
The National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) is the national accrediting agency for art and design and
art and design-related disciplines. The Academy of Art University is accredited by the National Association of Schools of
Art and Design (NASAD) to offer degrees of Associate of Arts, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Master of Fine
Arts, Master of Arts, and Certificates. All Academy of Art University AA, BA, BFA, MA, MFA and Art Teaching Credential
programs are accredited by NASAD except for the programs offered by these schools: School of Acting, School of
Architecture, School of Landscape Architecture, School of Multimedia Communications, School of Music Production &
Sound Design for Visual Media, School of Writing for Film, Television & Digital Media, and also the BS in Game
programming offered by the School of Game Development. The National Association of Schools of Art and Design
(NASAD) is located at 11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21, Reston, VA, 20190. Tel. 703.437.0700
KANSAS STATE APPROVAL
Academy of Art University is approved by the Kansas Board of Regents to offer OL instruction to Kansas Residents.
MARYLAND STATE APPROVAL
The Academy of Art University is registered with the Maryland Higher Education Commission located at 6 N. Liberty
Street, 10th floor, Baltimore, MD 21201- 410-767-3298.
MINNESOTA STATE APPROVAL
Stephens Institute dba/Academy of Art University is registered as a private institution with the Minnesota Office of Higher
Education pursuant to sections 136A.61 to 136.71. Registration is not an endorsement of the institution. Credits earned
at the institution may not transfer to all other institutions
NON-DISCRIMINATION STATEMENT
Academy of Art University admits students of any race, color, age, religion, and national or ethnic origin to all rights,
privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. The Academy does
not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, gender, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or national or ethnic origin
in administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, and other school- administered programs.
7
Back to Table of Contents
8
ADMISSIONS
UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS STATEMENT
Academy of Art University maintains an inclusive admissions policy for all undergraduate programs. Academy of Art
University was built on the educational philosophy that all students interested in studying art and design deserve the
opportunity to do so. Previous experience with art and design is not required for admission, and students of all skill levels
are encouraged to apply. Academy of Art University offers foundations courses that provide students with the core art
and design skills they will need to succeed. It is our belief that all students willing to make the appropriate commitment
have the ability to learn professional-level skills.
UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
Academy of Art University requires all undergraduate students to have a high school diploma or a General Education
Diploma (GED).
PROOF OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION
Academy of Art University accepts the following as proof of high school graduation:
•
•
•
•
•
Official, sealed copy of high school transcript or GED
Official, sealed copy of a completed Bachelor's degree transcript
Signed Home School Program Certification form and transcripts
California High School Proficiency Exam (CHSPE) Letter
Signed Proof of High School Equivalency Declaration Form*
Official transcripts or proof of high school graduation must be received before the end of the first semester.
*The High School Equivalency Declaration Form may be used only after reasonable efforts have been made to obtain
official transcripts. Supporting documentation of efforts made to obtain transcripts must be submitted with the form.
The undergraduate student application and instructions can be found at www.academyart.edu.
The undergraduate international student application and special instructions for international students can be found at
www.academyart.edu.
GRADUATE ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
Academy of Art University requires graduate applicants to demonstrate their ability and intent to complete an Art
Teaching Credential, a Master of Arts (MA), Master of Fine Art (MFA) or Master of Architecture program (M.Arch).
Students may register for graduate classes after being admitted into a Credential program, a Master of Arts, Master of
Fine Arts or Master of Architecture program.
The graduate student application and instructions can be found at www.academyart.edu.
The international graduate student application and special instructions for international students can be found at
www.academyart.edu.
After submitting the application form and application fee, graduate applicants must submit the following additional
requirements:
•
•
Statement of Intent
One page essay explaining personal goals for graduate school or essay related to a topic as required by the
Department
Résumé
Describe educational and professional experience.
9
•
•
Official College Transcripts
Transcripts must be official, issued by the attended institution and show completion of an undergraduate degree.
Academy of Art University accepts electronic submission of official transcripts. Students sending an official
electronic transcript should have it directed to the following email address: [email protected] Additional
documentation may be required for students applying to the School of Architecture.
Portfolio/Reel (for class placement in the graduate program)
A body of work representing the chosen discipline is required. A description list is recommended to accompany
portfolios/reels for the review process. All pieces must be labeled with the title, size, medium, date of completion
and full, proper name of the applicant. For collaborative works, explain the role in the creative process.
NOTE: Additional materials may be required by the department. Please check with Graduate Admissions for the most
updated requirements.
Upon receiving all application requirements, the department will review and will recommend that the student be
accepted, not accepted or required to enroll for preparatory coursework. Students required to take preparatory
coursework must satisfactorily complete all required preparatory classes before being admitted into the graduate
program.
NOTE: Registration for the appropriate classes is based on the skills demonstrated in the portfolio/reel. Applicants
should contact an admissions representative for details on portfolio/reel submission, including content and format
requirements. Digital portfolios or reels are preferred. Admissions representative will provide details.
NOTE: Academy of Art University may reject any applicant whose records indicate inadequate preparation and/or
interest for its programs. An applicant who has been denied admission will not be allowed to register for classes.
Portfolio/Reel Return Policy
Applicants are encouraged to submit all materials in digital format. For hard copy portfolios, applicants must make
arrangements to pick up their portfolios or reels in person or to have them returned via US Postal Service. Only
portfolios/reels with prepaid return postage will be returned via US Postal Service. Portfolios or reels that are unclaimed
or returned due to incorrect address or inadequate postage will be retained on campus for approximately 90 days.
Although every precaution is taken to protect portfolios and reels, Academy of Art University cannot be held responsible
for loss or damage of portfolios or reels either in transit or on campus for review.
Note: Students applying to the M.ARCH program must submit their transcripts to www.eres.com for evaluation.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE GRADUATE APPLICANTS
English as a Second Language students applying to a Graduate program must provide an English translation of any
copy/written material presented as part of the portfolio/reel.
TRANSCRIPT REQUIREMENTS
Submission Address
Send official transcripts to:
Office of the Registrar
79 New Montgomery Street, B75
San Francisco, California 94105
Transcripts must be:
Sealed and mailed, or electronically transmitted, to Academy of Art University by the issuing institution. Academy of
Art University accepts electronic submission of official transcripts. Students sending an official electronic transcript
should have it directed to the following email address: [email protected] Academy of Art University is
also a member of the National Student Clearinghouse Electronic Transcript Exchange Registry and can accept
transcripts directly from other member organizations.
• Submitted by the end of the student’s first semester at Academy of Art University
•
International Transcripts
Transcripts issued by schools outside the United States must be translated and/or notarized by a certified educational
credential evaluation service such as www.eres.com or www.wes.org (these agencies charge a fee and are not affiliated
with Academy of Art University).
10
TRANSFER POLICIES
•
•
•
•
•
•
Only an official transcript may be used to apply transfer credit to the student’s record at Academy of Art University.
Transfer evaluations are based on the current transfer policies during the student’s semester of admission and will be
binding for the student’s entire matriculation at Academy of Art University. Subsequent evaluations are not permitted unless
the student changes his or her degree program (e.g. from an Associate of Arts degree to a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree).
Coursework from accredited post-secondary institutions will be considered for transfer if it carries the equivalent credit,
prerequisites, content, and level of instruction. Remedial or pre-college courses are not eligible for transfer.
Coursework presented for transfer must be successfully completed with a letter grade of "C" or above or a grade of “Pass” in
a Pass/Fail course.
Units completed at another institution after the student has started a degree program at Academy of Art University will not
be considered for transfer.
The deadline for submission of all official transcripts is prior to the end of the student’s first degree seeking semester.
Courses may only be transferred from transcripts received by the deadline.
Undergraduate Degrees
Liberal Arts courses: All degree programs have unique Liberal Arts requirements. Courses that cannot be applied
toward a degree will not be transferred. Major courses: A portfolio review is required to determine if courses may be
transferred toward the major.
Second Bachelor’s Degrees
Students who have completed a bachelor’s degree and are seeking a second bachelor’s degree may have 50% of the
required units transferred based on a department’s predetermined agreement. Major courses may be waived based on
portfolio review. NOTE: Not all departments offer a predetermined transfer agreement. Speak with an Admissions
Representative for details.
Students who have completed a bachelor’s degree and are seeking an associate of arts degree may have 18 units
transferred based on a department’s predetermined agreement. Major courses may be waived based on portfolio
review. A maximum of 50% of total units may be transferred based on a portfolio and transcript review. NOTE: Not
all departments offer a predetermined transfer agreement. Speak with an Admissions Representative for details.
Graduate Degrees
A maximum of 6 transfer units from another graduate program may be transferred towards degree requirements.
Re-Entry Students
Student programs that are incomplete and have not had registration activity in a two year period will be inactivated.
Transcripts received in the student’s first semester may be re-evaluated based on current graduation requirements.
For details, review the Re-Entry polices.
TRANSCRIPT SUBMISSION DEADLINE
Upon enrollment in a degree-seeking program at Academy of Art University, all official transcripts must be received
prior to the end of the student’s first semester. Transfer evaluations are conducted during the student’s first
semester and are considered final. Transfer credit will not be awarded after the end of the student’s first semester.
Any appeals must be presented to Admissions Transfer Office by the end of the first semester.
Undergraduate degree seeking students who fail to submit proof of High School graduation and/or conferral of a Bachelor’s
degree by the end of their first semester will not be allowed to enroll for subsequent terms until proof of graduation has been
received by the Office of the Registrar. Graduate degree seeking students who fail to submit proof of conferral of a Bachelor’s
degree by the end of their first semester will not be allowed to enroll for subsequent terms until proof of graduation has been
received by the Office of the Registrar.
UNDERGRADUATE RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT
Students seeking a degree must complete a minimum of 50% of required units at Academy of Art University to
satisfy the undergraduate residency requirement.
TRANSFERABILITY
Students who wish to continue their education at other schools must not assume that credits earned at Academy of
Art University will be accepted by the receiving institution. It is the responsibility of the student planning to transfer to
another school to research the requirements of the selected school. Institutions of higher learning vary in the nature
and number of credits that are acceptable, and it is at the discretion of that institution to accept credits earned at
other schools.
11
PLACEMENT & PORTFOLIO REVIEWS
Students may place into a course by demonstrating necessary knowledge and skill level. Major course placement is
determined by a portfolio review conducted by the Department Director. Students who place out of a required
course will have that requirement waived but must make up the units with a substitute Academy of Art University
course which may be determined at a later date.
Detailed instructions for portfolio submissions are provided by the Admissions Office. Portfolios may be submitted
digitally. Physical portfolios of original work are also accepted. Applicants are responsible for picking up portfolios
or reels in person or to have them returned via US Postal Service. Only portfolios/reels with prepaid return postage
will be returned via US Postal Service. Portfolios or reels that are unclaimed or returned due to incorrect address or
inadequate postage will be retained on campus for approximately 90 days. Although every precaution is taken to
protect portfolios and reels, Academy of Art University cannot be held responsible for loss or damage of portfolios or
reels either in transit or on campus for review.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ENGLISH PLACEMENT TESTING
International students will receive English language placement testing during orientation, including an oral interview
with EAP (English for Art Purposes) faculty members. Academy of Art University does not require a minimum
TOEFL score for admission, but requests that applicants submit a recent score for placement purposes. TOEFL
scores are used in the event that additional placement information is needed.
Students who place into English for Art Purposes classes must complete through English for Art Purposes level 4.
Additional English courses may be required based on EAP 4 exit test results.
SCHEDULING AN ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT EXAM
Online Students: call or e-mail [email protected] for information on how to take the exam in your area.
On Campus Students: Exams are by appointment and take place on Academy of Art University campus. Contact the
Liberal Arts Department 415.618.3664 to schedule an appointment.
Upcoming English and Quantitative Placement exams on the AAU Campus:
View the exam schedule on www.academyart.edu.
UNDERGRADUATE LIBERAL ARTS PLACEMENT
Liberal Arts Program Requirements can be met in the following ways:
•
•
•
•
Take the Academy course and earn a passing grade
Transfer in a comparable course from a previous post-secondary institution
Waiver through passing score on Academy Placement Exam
Waiver through passing score on AP, IB or SAT exam
Academy of Art University recognizes the scores listed below for Liberal Arts course placement.
NOTE: Students who place out of a required course via the Academy of Art University Placement Exam, AP, IB, or
S.A.T. will have that requirement waived but must make up the units as designated by the Student Adviser.
12
PLACEMENT: WRITTEN COMMUNICATION
AAU
Academy of Art University Placement Exam
Written Communication Placement Exam
SCORE
1 or 2
3 or 4
5 or 6
PLACEMENT
Place into LA 108
Place out of LA 108 and into LA 202
Place out of both LA 108 and LA 202 and into LA 110 or LA 133
AP
Advanced Placement Exam
AP Exam in English Composition
SCORE
PLACEMENT
3 or higher
Place out of LA 108 and into LA 202
IB
International Baccalaureates Exam
Exam in English Composition
SCORE
PLACEMENT
5 or higher
Place out of LA 108 and into LA 202
S.A.T.
Scholastic Aptitude Test
SAT II (Writing Subject Test)
SCORE
PLACEMENT
660 or higher Place out of LA 108 and into LA 202
SAT I (Written) after April 1995
SCORE
PLACEMENT
590 or higher
Place out of LA 108 and into LA 202
SAT I (Written) exam before April 1995
SCORE
PLACEMENT
510 or higher
Place out of LA 108 and into LA 202
13
PLACEMENT: QUANTITATIVE LITERACY + MATH FOR ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
+ Placement: Math for Architecture & Landscape Architecture
AAU
Academy of Art University Placement Exam
Quantitative Literacy Placement Exam
SCORE
PLACEMENT
Non-ARH & Non-LAN students  Place into the Quantitative Literacy Requirement
100
ARH & LAN students  Take LA 255
to
199
Place into the Math for Environmental Design Requirement (LA 255)
A.C.T.
200
to
299
Non-ARH & Non-LAN students  Place out of the Quantitative Literacy Requirement
ARH & LAN students  Take LA 271
Place out of the Math for Environmental Design Requirement (LA 255)
Place into the Applied Math Requirement (LA 271)
300
to
399
Non-ARH & Non-LAN students  Place out of the Quantitative Literacy Requirement
ARH students  Take LA 293
Place out of the Math for Environmental Design Requirement (LA 255)
Place out of the Applied Math Requirement (LA 271)
Place into the Advanced Math Requirement (LA 293)
LAN students  Math Requirement satisfied
Place out of the Math for Environmental Design Requirement (LA 255)
Place out of the Applied Math Requirement (LA 271)
400
to
499
Non-ARH & Non-LAN students  Place out of the Quantitative Literacy Requirement
ARH & LAN students  Math Requirement satisfied
Place out of all math requirements (LA 255, LA 271, LA 293)
NOTE: Students with scores of 200 – 299 have satisfied the prerequisite for LA 271 Algebra
NOTE: Students with scores of 300-399 have satisfied the prerequisite for LA 293 Precalculus
American College Test
Completion of ACT Level I or II
SCORE
PLACEMENT
Pass
Place out of the Quantitative Literacy Requirement
Pass
Architecture Students & Landscape Architecture students place out of LA 255 and into LA 271
ACT Exam
SCORE
28 or higher
28 or higher
PLACEMENT
Place out of the Quantitative Literacy Requirement
Architecture Students & Landscape Architecture students place out of LA 255 and into LA 271
AP
Advanced Placement Exam
Calculus AB or BC or Statistics or Computer Science AB or contact the LA Department for other applicable tests
SCORE
PLACEMENT
3 or higher
Place out of the Quantitative Literacy Requirement
3 or higher
Architecture Students & Landscape Architecture students place out of LA 255 and into LA 271
IB
International Baccalaureates Exam (IB)
(IB) Exam in Mathematics
SCORE
PLACEMENT
5 or higher
Place out of the Quantitative Literacy Requirement
5 or higher
Architecture Students & Landscape Architecture students place out of LA 255 and into LA 271
S.A.T.
Scholastic Aptitude Test
SAT II Mathematics Subject Examination (Mathematics Achievement Test)
SCORE
PLACEMENT
500 or higher
Place out of the Quantitative Literacy Requirement
500 or higher
Architecture Students & Landscape Architecture students:
Place out of LA 255 and into LA 271
SAT I (Mathematics)
SCORE
PLACEMENT
600 or higher
Place out of the Quantitative Literacy Requirement
600 or higher
Architecture Students & Landscape Architecture students place out of LA 255 and into LA 271
14
PLACEMENT: ART HISTORY, HISTORICAL AWARENESS AND CULTURAL IDEAS AND INFLUENCES
AP
Advanced Placement Exam
(AP) exam in a Specific Subject Area
SCORE
PLACEMENT
3 or higher
Place out of the equivalent course
IB
International Baccalaureates Exam (IB)
(IB) Exam in a Specific Subject Area
SCORE
PLACEMENT
5 or higher
Place out of the equivalent course
PLACEMENT: EMPLOYMENT COMMUNICATIONS AND PRACTICES
Students with professional experience in their field wishing to be considered for waiver from the Employment
Communications and Practices course, LA 291 Designing Careers, should submit the following documents with a waiver
request to the Liberal Arts Office [email protected]:
Students with less than 5 years of industry
experience
Students with 5 years or more of industry
experience
Submit:
• Professional resume
• Cover or Query letter addressed to a specific party
• Unsolicited business proposal with the following
components:
_Statement of Purpose
_Background
_Procedures
_Qualification
_Request for Approval
Submit:
• Professional resume (clearly indicating 5 years or
more of industry experience)
• Cover or Query letter addressed to a specific party
• Project proposal* with the following components:
_Background/Problem Description
_Proposed Solution
_Approach
_Deliverables
_Outcome
*May be for a project completed as part of industry
experience. If citing a past project, include your role
in the project.
15
Back to Table of Contents
16
ACADEMIC CALENDAR
ACADEMIC YEAR
Academy of Art University defines its academic year as 24 semester credit units and 30 weeks.
Academy of Art University operates on a semester system and offers a 15 week Fall semester, a 15 week Spring
semester and a 7.5 week Summer semester. Summer semester classes meet twice as often in the 7.5 week term to
ensure the same meeting time as Fall and Spring semester classes.
Academy of Art University also offers 3 week intersessions in January and June. Intersession classes meet 5 days a
week for a total of 15 meetings to ensure the same meeting time as Fall and Spring semester classes.
ACADEMIC & EVENTS CALENDAR
The Academy Events Calendar and other campus information may be found at my.academyart.edu.
The following can be found on the Academy Events Calendar:
•
Term start and end dates
•
Registration dates
•
Tuition deadline
OBSERVED HOLIDAYS
Academy of Art University is closed on the following observed holidays:
•
•
•
•
•
•
New Year’s Day
Memorial Day
Independence Day
Labor Day
Thanksgiving Day (and the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving Day)
Winter Holiday
Classes that are regularly scheduled to be held on a holiday are made up. Instructors will inform students of the makeup
classes.
Dates for school closure due to holidays and Spring Recess may be found on the Academy Events Calendar.
17
Back to Table of Contents
18
FINANCIAL AID & TUITION
FINANCIAL AID
Extensive Financial Aid information and resources are available at www.academyart.edu.
Financial Aid staff is available to:
•
•
Provide information on Financial Aid resources
Assist in filing Financial Aid applications
Financial Aid programs, procedures and eligibility requirements change frequently. Students are encouraged to contact
the Financial Aid Office for current requirements.
NOTE: The Department of Education prohibits students from receiving Federal Financial Aid at different colleges for the
same academic term. For example, if a student receives the full annual Stafford loan limits for the 2012-2013 academic
year at another institution, the student cannot receive a Stafford loan for the same time period at Academy of Art
University.
NOTE: The Academy of Art University Financial Aid packet must be completed yearly and submitted to the Financial Aid
Office.
FINANCIAL AID AWARD LETTERS
Approximately 2 to 3 weeks after the FAFSA is completed and Academy of Art University Financial Aid application is
submitted, an award letter will be mailed to the student indicating what the student is eligible for, along with instructions
on how to complete the Federal Direct Student loan promissory note electronically. Signed award letters must be
returned to the Financial Aid Office or completed on the online Learning Management System (LMS). Students selected
for verification by the Department of Education must submit additional documents (required tax documents, verification
worksheet, etc.) to the Financial Aid Office.
SCHOOL ID NUMBER
The Federal School ID number (also known as a Title IV Institution Code) is assigned to each college or university for the
purposes of applying Federal Financial Aid through FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).
•
The Federal School ID number of Academy of Art University is: 007531
TUITION RATES
Tuition rates are posted on the Academy of Art University website.
Rates are based on student career.
Tuition Rates (Spring 2015)
Undergraduate
$810 per unit
Graduate Tuition & Art Teaching Credential Tuition
$910 per unit
Sample calculations (Spring 2015)
Undergraduate 3 unit course with a $50 course fee
$810 X 3 units = $2430 +$50 = $2480
Graduate 3 unit course with a $50 course fee
$910 X 3 units = $2730 + $50 = $2780
Tuition Rates (Effective Summer 2015)
Undergraduate
$835 per unit
Graduate Tuition & Art Teaching Credential Tuition
$935 per unit
Sample calculations (Effective Summer 2015)
Undergraduate 3 unit course with a $50 course fee
$835 X 3 units = $2505 +$50 = $2555
Graduate 3 unit course with a $50 course fee
$935 X 3 units = $2805 + $50 = $2855
NOTE: Refer to the online class search and registration page for course units and additional course fees.
NOTE: Tuition is the same for both on-campus and online classes.
19
FEES
Fee Description
Application Fee
Course Fees
Fee Amount
$100.00
varies by course
Drop Fee
$25.00
Food Plan
varies by plan
Installment Payment
Plan Fee
$50.00
Late Registration Fee
$50.00
Late Payment Fee
$50.00
Library Fee: Late
Return
Minimum Late Fee:
$0.25
Maximum Late Fee:
$65.00
Library Fee: Lost Book
Library Fee:
Replacement Book
Locker: Rental Fee
$65.00
Official Transcript Fee
$10.00
Registration Fee
$20.00
Replacement ID Card
Fee
$30.00
Returned Check Fee
$15.00
Student Activity Fee
$25.00
Effective Fall 2014:
$30.00
$10.00
$20.00
Tuition Deposit
$100.00
Tuition Deposit: 1st
Semester International
Student
$500.00
Fee Notes
This non-refundable fee is required to process an application.
Many courses have specific course fees. Please refer to course
details on www.catalog.academyart.edu/catalog.
NOTE: Fees may be different for on-campus sections and online
sections.
A $25.00 fee will be charged for each class dropped once the
second week of each semester begins.
NOTE: No drop fee is charged for courses dropped when there is no
refundable tuition.
NOTE: Dropping one section to add another section is considered
an add/drop and the $25.00 drop fee will apply
View plans at http://academyartdining.com.
The interest-free installment plan enables students to pay their
tuition in four separate payments and is available for Fall and Spring
semesters. A payment plan fee of $50.00 is due with the first
installment.
This fee is charged at the time of registration after the 1st week of a
semester.
This fee is charged if tuition is not paid by the due date.
$0.25 a day per Book
$0.25 a day per Picture File Envelope
$3.00 a day per Video/DVD
$1.00 a day per Sound Recording CD-ROM
$1.00 a day per Music CD
$1.00 a day per Online Course CD
$1.00 a day per Flash Drive/Jump Drive
$55.00 (or an approved replacement) plus a $10.00 processing fee.
Student must provide an approved replacement plus pay the $10.00
processing fee.
Lockers may be rented on a semester basis.
The $10 fee covers one official transcript. Additional copies ordered
at the same time cost $2.00 each. There is no fee for unofficial
transcripts.
This non-refundable fee is due at the time of registration every
semester. Once this fee is paid and registration is processed, it
cannot be applied to another semester.
NOTE: A payment of $120 ($20 Registration Fee + $100 nonrefundable tuition deposit) is required for enrollment for every
semester.
ID cards are required for entry into all AAU buildings. Replacement
cards may be acquired at the Security Office.
A $15.00 fee will be charged to the student’s account if a check is
returned due to Insufficient Funds.
Covers various services provided on-campus. This includes
services from the Academic Resource Center, some special events
and bus services. Students taking one or more courses on-campus
are charged this fee whether or not they avail themselves of the
services. This fee is waived for students taking all courses online.
This non-refundable deposit is due at the time of registration every
semester. The $100.00 will be credited towards tuition for the
specific term. Once this fee is paid and registration is processed, it
cannot be applied to another semester.
NOTE: A payment of $120 ($20 Registration Fee + $100 nonrefundable tuition deposit) is required for enrollment for every
semester.
This non-refundable deposit is due with the International Student
application. The $500.00 will be credited towards tuition for the first
semester.
20
BILLING INFORMATION
•
•
•
•
Tuition is charged on a per-unit basis
Students pay for the number of units enrolled each semester
Students are required to pay application and registration fees, as well as specified additional course fees
Tuition is due on the Saturday prior to the first day of classes each semester
PAYMENT INFORMATION
th
Tuition is due the Saturday prior to the start of a semester. For example, if the term begins on Thursday, September 6 ,
st
then tuition is due on Saturday, September 1 . The deadline is applicable regardless of the date the student first attends
class. Students enrolling after the tuition deadline must pay tuition in full or show proof of Financial Aid coverage at the
time of registration.
NOTE: Tuition for intersession terms is due at the time of registration.
NOTE: Tuition due dates are published on the Academy Events Calendar.
METHODS OF PAYMENT
Academy of Art University accepts the following methods of payment:
Credit Card
Payments can be made 24 hours a day using Visa, MasterCard or Discover Card by logging into the online Learning
Management System (LMS).
Cash
Cash payments may be made at the Accounts Receivable Department building during normal business.
Check
Checks are accepted at the Accounts Receivable Office or by mail.
Make checks payable to:
Academy of Art University
Send checks to:
Academy of Art University
PO Box 742864
Los Angeles, CA 90074-2864
NOTE: The student ID# must be printed on the check for identification purposes
INSTALLMENT PLAN
Academy of Art University provides a convenient 4-month interest free Installment Plan for Spring and Fall semesters. A
mandatory Installment Plan contract must be must completed to take advantage of this option. Students may apply
online for the Installment Plan through Student Self-Service.
Installment Plan Terms and Conditions
Academy of Art University does require that payments be made in a timely manner by the due dates specified on the
installment plan contract. Non-payment by specified dates may result in a full balance becoming due or ineligibility to
utilize the installment plan option in future terms.
Payments must be received on or before the required due dates. Failure to meet due dates may result in late fees,
cancellation of the installment plan and/or courses being administratively dropped.
An Accounts Receivable representative may be contacted at (415)618-6429 for any account related questions or
concerns.
21
REFUNDS
All refund payments will be mailed within 30 days of the date of cancellation, withdrawal, involuntary withdrawal or
completion of a Refund Request Form (obtained from the Student Adviser).
Checks will be mailed to the student’s home address maintained by Academy Art University. Students are responsible to
keeping their address(es) up-to-date through their online Learning Management System (LMS) account or notifying their
Student Adviser of any address changes.
Refunds for students who receive financial aid will be first paid to the financial aid source according to a distribution
formula established pursuant to federal regulations.
REFUND POLICIES
Refund for Cancellation or Withdrawal Prior to the Start of Instruction
A refund of all charges less a $120 fee will be sent to students who withdraw from the semester prior to the first day of
instruction.
NOTE: The one-time International Student Deposit Fee is non-refundable.
Refund for Cancellation or Withdrawal After the Start of Instruction: Weeks 1 – 4
Students withdrawing from school or dropping a course after the start of instruction and before the fifth week (fourth for
Summer term) of the period of enrollment will receive a refund for the unused portion of tuition and other refundable
charges paid. Refunds will be calculated on the basis of the last actual week of attendance. Refunds will be paid within
30 days of the date of withdrawal.
No Refund for Cancellation or Withdrawal After the Start of Instruction: Weeks 5 - 15
There will be no refund after attendance during the fifth week (fourth for Summer term) of the period of enrollment. The
period of enrollment is the semester (Fall, Spring, Summer) the student is currently attending.
PERCENTAGE OF REFUNDABLE TUITION/FEE CHARGES
Withdrawal During:
FALL/SPRING
Week 1
100%
Week 2
75%
Week 3
50%
Week 4
25%
Week 5 +
0%
Withdrawal During:
SUMMER
Week 1
100%
Week 2
50%
Week 3
25%
Week 4+
0%
Withdrawal During:
INTERSESSION
Day 1
100%
Day 2
75%
Day 3
50%
Day 4
25%
Day 5 +
0%
Sample Refund Calculations
For an undergraduate student who is enrolled during the Fall or Spring term that consists of fifteen weeks of instruction,
st
nd
rd
th
th
and withdraws or is withdrawn during the 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 or 5 week of instruction, the refund would be as follows:
(Spring 2015)
Weeks Attended
1
2
3
4
5
Refund Percentage
100%
75%
50%
25%
0%
Tuition/Fees Paid
$2430.00
$2430.00
$2430.00
$2430.00
$2430.00
Refund
$2430.00
$1822.50
$1215.00
$ 607.50
No Refund
Refund Percentage
100%
75%
50%
25%
0%
Tuition/Fees Paid
$2505.00
$2505.00
$2505.00
$2505.00
$2505.00
Refund
$2405.00
$1878.75
$1202.50
$ 626.25
No Refund
(Fall 2015)
Weeks Attended
1
2
3
4
5
Review Drop & Withdrawal Polices for an explanation of administrative grades associated with dropped courses.
22
FINANCIAL AID: RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS
The Higher Education Amendments of 1998, Public Law 105-244, changed the way financial aid funds are paid toward a
student’s education and handled when a recipient of financial aid withdraws from school. The new requirements
(effective for students receiving Title IV Federal Financial Aid who withdraw from school on or after October 7, 2000) are
used to determine the amount of Title IV Financial Aid a student has earned when he or she withdraws from school. For
more information, come by the Financial Aid Office and pick up a copy of the form titled “Treatment of Title IV aid when a
Student Withdraws” or go to:
www.academyart.edu > Disclosures > Treatment of Title IV Aid When a Student Withdraws
FINANCIAL AID: REFUNDS
Students who have paid tuition with any source of financial aid will be refunded based on a distribution formula
established by federal regulations.
Required refunds are made in the following sequence:
1. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans
2. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans
3. Federal Graduate Plus Loans
4. Federal Parent Plus Loans
5. Federal Pell Grants
6. Federal SEOG
7. Other Federal, State and Private financial assistance
8. Student
NOTE: If a credit balance exists after all Federal programs have been properly refunded it will first be applied to any
Academy of Art University scholarships including Athletic, Summer Portfolio and VA Yellow Ribbon Scholarships.
23
Back to Table of Contents
24
ACADEMIC POLICIES
CURRICULUM CHANGES
Changes in industry standards and trends may necessitate changes to the curriculum. Students may choose to take
advantage of curriculum changes providing the changes do not require additional courses or require the student to enroll
in additional semesters. Students with questions regarding the applicability of changes in curriculum requirements should
make an appointment with a Student Adviser for a program evaluation.
Academy of Art University reserves the right to change, amend, or modify program content, equipment, staff or materials
and organization as necessary at any time.
NOTE: The graduation requirements in effect at the time of the student's initial enrollment in a particular program are
those that must be met for awarding of a degree or certificate. Students may be required to satisfy changes in
departmental requirements or prerequisites provided that the changes do not result in additional semesters or courses to
complete degree requirements.
DECLARING A MAJOR
Undergraduate students may begin seeking a degree without first declaring a major. A Declaration of Major form may be
obtained from the Student Services Office.
NOTE: Entry into a major is subject to the Department Director’s approval. A Department Director may reject any request
based on the student’s academic records.
CHANGING MAJORS
Students may change their major after review by both the exiting and receiving department. Due to the unique industry
standards and program outcomes of each major, it is possible that courses taken under one major may not apply to the
next major. The student should first meet with a Student Adviser for a program evaluation to understand which courses
will apply to the new major. Once the student has approval to exit the first major the student may seek admittance to the
new department. Courses may be substituted if the department determines that appropriate skills are evident in a
portfolio of work.
NOTE: Entry into a major is subject to the Department Director’s approval. A Department Director may reject any request
based on the student’s academic records.
NOTE: Changing majors may result in completed courses not counting toward the new major.
CHANGING DEGREE PROGRAMS
Students wishing to change their academic program must first contact their Student Adviser for a preliminary program
evaluation. Advisers will explain how courses already completed will be applied to the new program.
NOTE: Students follow the degree requirements in place at the time that the student first declares degree seeking status.
NOTE: Changing programs may result in completed courses not counting toward the new program.
NOTE: Courses may be substituted if the department determines that appropriate skills are evident in a portfolio of work.
NOTE: A change from a graduate program to an undergraduate program requires the approval of the Executive Director
of Graduate Services & Administration and a completed application for the new program.
NOTE: A change from an undergraduate program to a graduate program requires the approval of the Executive Director
of Graduate Services & Administration and a completed application for the new program. The student must fulfill the
graduate school application requirements.
25
Undergraduate Students
Undergraduate students wishing to transfer from one academic program to another must obtain the appropriate form
from their Student Adviser. This includes changing from non-degree Personal Enrichment status to Associates or
Bachelor’s degree seeking status.
Undergraduate Student Examples
Non-degree Personal Enrichment student declares Bachelors of Fine Arts degree status: Student must satisfy the
Bachelors of Fine Art degree requirements in effect at the time the student declares Bachelors of Fine Art degree status.
Associates of Art degree seeking student declares Bachelors of Fine Art degree status: Student must satisfy the
Bachelors of Fine Art degree requirements in effect at the time the student declares Associates of Art degree status.
Bachelors of Fine Art degree seeking student declares Associates of Art degree status: Student must satisfy the
Associates of Art degree requirements in effect at the time the student declared Bachelors of Fine Art degree status.
Graduate Students
Graduate students wishing to transfer from one academic program to another must obtain the appropriate form from their
Student Adviser, submit portfolio for review and obtain approval from the Department Directors and the Executive
Director of Graduate Services & Administration.
GRADUATION PLANNING
Students are encouraged to meet with their Student Adviser to map out a personalized graduation plan.
In making plans, students should consider the following:
Graduation plans vary by individual degree progress
Student Adviser approval is required for course loads exceeding 12 units for Fall and Spring semesters and
exceeding 6 units for Summer semesters
•
•
Graduation Plans
Academy of Art University allows flexibility with the rate in which students choose to progress though their degree
requirements. The below samples illustrate some common plans. These samples are based on successful completion
of units that apply toward graduation requirements. To achieve target plans, students should keep on track with units
listed, which may result in a final semester with fewer units and a part-time enrollment status. In addition to Fall and
Spring semesters, students may choose to take courses in the Summer semesters or intersessions to keep on track with
their graduation goals.
Sample Completion Plans
Associate of Arts Degree (AA)
66 Unit Program
Plan
2 Year Plan
2.5 Year Plan
3 Year Plan
3+ Years
60 Unit Program
Number of units to complete
per year
33
27
24
Part-time students: See
Student Adviser for an
individualized plan.
Bachelor’s Degree (BA, BFA or BS)
132 Unit Program
Number of units to complete
Plan
per year
4 Year Plan
33
4.5 Year Plan
30
5 Year Plan
27
5.5 Year Plan
24
6+ Years
Part-time students: See
Student Adviser for an
individualized plan.
Plan
2 Year Plan
2.5 Year Plan
3 Year Plan
3+ Years
Number of units to complete per
year
30
24
21
Part-time students: See
Student Adviser for an
individualized plan.
120 Unit Program
Plan
4 Year Plan
4.5 Year Plan
5 Year Plan
5+ Years
Number of units to complete per
year
30
27
24
Part-time students: See Student
Adviser for an individualized plan.
26
Bachelor Architecture Degree (B.Arch*)
162 Unit Program
Plan
Number of units to complete per year
5 Year Plan
33
5.5 Year Plan
30
6 Year Plan
27
6.75 Year Plan
24
7+ Years
Part-time students: See Student Adviser for an individualized plan.
* The Academy of Art University Bachelor Architecture Degree (B.Arch) is currently in Candidacy Status.
Art Teaching Credential
33 Unit Program
Plan
1 Year Plan
1.5 Year Plan
2 Year Plan
2 + Years
Number of units to complete per year
33
21
19
Part-time students: See Student Adviser for an individualized plan.
Master of Arts Degree (MA)
42 Unit Program
Plan
1.5 Year Plan
2 Year Plan
2.5 Year Plan
3+ Years
36-39 Unit Program
Number of units to complete
per year
30
21
18
Part-time students: See
Student Adviser for an
individualized plan.
Master of Fine Arts Degree (MFA)
78 Unit Program
Plan
3 Year Plan
3.5 Year Plan
4 Year Plan
4.5+ Years
Number of units to complete
per year
27
24
21
Part-time students: See
Student Adviser for an
individualized plan.
Plan
1.5 Year Plan
2 Year Plan
2.5 Year Plan
3+ Years
Number of units to complete per
year
27
24
18
Part-time students: See
Student Adviser for an
individualized plan.
60-63 Unit Program
Plan
2.5 Year Plan
3 Year Plan
3.5 Year Plan
4+ Years
Number of units to complete per
year
27
21
18
Part-time students: See
Student Adviser for an
individualized plan.
Master of Architecture Degree (M.Arch)
87 Unit Program
Plan
Number of units to complete per year
3.5 Year Plan
27
4 Year Plan
24
4.5 Year Plan
21
5+ Years
Part-time students: See Student Adviser for individualized plan.
27
GRADUATION DECLARATION
Students must declare their final semester to participate in the Graduation Ceremony and to have their diplomas
scheduled for processing. Information regarding the appropriate timeframe, deadlines and specific department
requirements can be found on the Graduation & Commencement page at my.academyart.edu.
UNDERGRADUATE GRADE LEVELS
Semester Units Completed
0-29
30-59
60-89
90+
Grade Level
Grade Level 1
Grade Level 2
Grade Level 3
Grade Level 4
Status
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
COURSE NUMBERING
Course numbers are typically arranged to show level of difficulty. The skills acquired from one course are the
prerequisites for necessary skill level for subsequent courses.
Course Numbers
100-299
300-499
500
501-599
600-899
900
Course Level
Lower Division Courses
Upper Division Courses
Internship
Professional Development
Graduate Courses
Graduate Internship
CREDIT HOURS
Credit Hours Definition
Academy of Art University uses the semester credit hour as the unit of measurement for the combination of in-class
learning time and out-of-class coursework expectations. The number of credit hours assigned to a course quantitatively
reflects the learning outcomes expected, the mode of instruction, the amount of time spent in class and the amount of
outside preparatory coursework expected for the course. Departments are responsible for submitting course approval
requests and conducting periodic reviews that include detailed descriptions of how unit value is justified.
Methods of Learning
Example methods of learning:
Critique
Demonstration
Discussion
Idea proposal
In-Class
Instructor-guided fieldtrip
Instructor-led skill development
Lecture
Peer review
Presentation
Project coordination
Project requirements
Reading
Analysis and improvement
Hands-on practice
Writing
Idea development
Out-of-Class Coursework
Fieldwork
Project execution
Subject study
Project Journal
Presentation preparation
Collaboration
Problem solving
Research
28
CREDIT HOUR POLICY
A unit credit hour is defined as a class meeting for 50 minutes per week in a 15 week semester. A class offered in a term
of less than 15 weeks contains the same contact hours, preparation time, content and requirements as the same course
offered over a 15-week semester.
Class Mode: Lecture/Demonstration
One credit hour is associated with a class meeting for one hour per week. Each hour of class time requires a minimum
of two hours of preparation or other out-of-class coursework. Lecture class time includes: lectures, demonstrations,
media presentations and group discussions.
Class Mode: Studio (6 hour/week courses)
One credit hour is associated with a class meeting for 2 hours per week. Each hour of class time requires a minimum of
one hour of preparation or other out-of-class coursework. Studio class time includes demonstrations, presentations,
problem solving, instructor-led skill development and critique.
Class Mode: Foundations
Foundations courses include both studio work and lecture components. A typical class session includes one hour of
lecture and four hours of instructor-led studio work. One credit hour is associated with one hour of lecture and two credit
hours are associated with four hours of in-class studio time. Each five hours of class time requires a minimum of four
hours of preparation or other out-of-class coursework. Foundations class time includes lecture, demonstrations,
instructor-led skill development and critique.
Class Mode: Online
One credit hour is associated with one hour of class time per week in a 15 week semester. Each hour of class time
requires a minimum of two hours of preparation or other out-of-class coursework. Online class time refers to the time in
which students are logged in and engaged in reading course content, watching demonstrations and media presentations,
taking quizzes and participating in discussions.
Class Mode: Study Abroad
One credit hour is associated with each two hour class meeting. Each hour of class time requires a minimum of two
hours of preparation or other out-of-class coursework. Lecture class time includes: lectures, demonstrations, media
presentations and group discussions.
•
•
On a 15 day trip students are in lecture/class approximately 6 hour per day for 13 days = 78 hours of contact time
On a 21 day trip students are in lecture/class approximately 6 hour per day for 18 days = 108 hours of contact time
Class Mode: Internship
One credit hour is associated with three hours of supervised internship work per week in a 15 week semester. Internshipfor-credit consists of supervised, professional work experience in which students actively apply the concepts and
methods gained through their academic disciplines.
Class Mode: Thesis Forum (Graduate Programs Only)
Thesis Forum classes contain both on-campus and online components. Graduate students will meet with the directed
study adviser for one hour a week and attend the online forum for two hours a week. One credit hour is associated with
one hour of directed study adviser meeting time. In this hybrid course, one credit hour is also associated with one hour
of online class time. Each hour of Thesis Forum class time requires a minimum of two hours of preparation or other outof-class coursework. Directed study adviser contact time includes critique and discussions. Online forum class time
refers to the time in which students are logged in and engaged in reading course content, participating in discussions
and peer review.
Class Mode: Group Directed Study (Graduate Programs Only)
One credit hour is associated with a class meeting for one hour per week in a 15 week semester. Each hour of class
time requires a minimum of two hours of preparation or other out-of-class coursework. Group Directed Study class time
includes critique, peer review and group discussions.
Expectations
Based on the above standards students should expect an average minimum of nine hours of combined class and
coursework time for a three unit course. Some weeks may have more out-of-class work and some may have less.
NOTE: Most courses will exceed the minimum out-of-class coursework hours.
NOTE: Advanced courses may have significantly higher expectations for out-of-class coursework.
29
CREDIT HOUR CALCULATIONS
Example calculations of credit hours based on weekly expectations in a 15 week semester:
Class Mode
In-Class Hours
Out-of-Class Coursework
Hours
Lecture
3
6
Studio
6
3
Architecture Studio
12
12
Foundations
5
4
Group Directed Study
3
6
(graduate programs only)
Internship
9
Not Applicable
Online
3
6
Thesis Forum
3
6
(graduate programs only)
Credit Hours
[units earned]
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
3
ENROLLMENT STATUS
Enrollment status is a factor of consideration for insurance, financial aid, international student visas or to compete in
intercollegiate athletics. Financial Aid may be available to part-time students. Full-time status is required for international
student visa requirements or to compete in intercollegiate athletics. Many insurance policies require full-time status for
coverage. Refer to personal insurance policies for enrollment status requirements.
Undergraduate students must carry a minimum study load of 12 units per semester to be considered as full-time
students. Graduate students must carry a minimum study load of 9 units to be considered as full-time students.
Fall, Spring and Summer Semester Enrollment Status
Units
12 or more
9
6
Undergraduate
Enrollment Status
Full-Time
Student
3/4 Time
Status
1/2 Time
Student
Graduate
Enrollment Status
Full-Time
Student
Full-Time
Student
1/2 Time
Student
3
Less than
1 / 2 Time
Student
Less than
1 / 2 Time
Student
NOTE: Enrollment in more than 12 units (minimum full-time for undergraduate students) is subject to academic
performance and Student Adviser approval.
NOTE: Enrollment in more than 6 units (1/2 time) in a summer semester is subject to academic performance and
Student Adviser approval.
GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA)
GPA is calculated by taking the number of grade points a student earned divided by the total number of units taken.
Semester GPA is calculated only using the units and grade points of one semester. Semester GPA indicates semester
academic progress and is used to determine the President’s Honor Roll.
Cumulative GPA is calculated using all units attempted at Academy of Art University for a career, regardless of the units
applicability to a degree program. Cumulative GPA is used to determine Academic Status, Graduation Eligibility and
Graduation Honors.
NOTE: The cumulative GPA is calculated using all units attempted at Academy of Art University for a career, regardless
of the units applicability to a degree program. Review Minimum Grade Requirements in the Grading Policies for
applicability of a grade towards a degree.
NOTE: Courses with a grade of “I” (incomplete grades) are considered “in-progress” and will be factored into the GPA
and completion rate when the permanent grade is assigned.
NOTE: Academy of Art University has two student career tracks: Undergraduate and Graduate. In cases where a
student does both undergraduate and graduate work at Academy of Art University, units taken for the first
(undergraduate) career will not be a factor in calculating GPA for the second (graduate) career.
30
MINIMUM GPA REQUIREMENT
Students must meet these minimums to maintain Good Standing.
Associate of Arts Degree (AA)
Units Earned
Minimum GPA
0-15 units
1.7
16-30 units
1.85
31+ units
2.0
Certificate (CERT)
Units Earned
Minimum GPA
0-30 units
1.7
31-60 units
1.85
61+ units
2.0
Bachelor’s Degree (BA, BFA or BS)
Units Earned
0-30 units
Minimum GPA
1.7
31-60 units
1.85
61+ units
2.0
Art Teaching Credential (ATC)
Units Earned
Minimum GPA
10-33 units
3.0
0-9 units
2.7
Master’s Degree (MA, MFA or M.Arch)
Units Earned
0-30 units
Minimum GPA
2.0
31-60 units
2.0
61+ units
2.0
NOTES
•
•
•
Students must achieve a final overall cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in order to receive their degree.
Art Teaching Credential students must achieve a final overall cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 in
order to receive their credential.
These minimums are a factor in determining Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid.
GRADUATION HONORS
Summa cum Laude: A student who has achieved a 4.00 grade point average.
Magna cum Laude: A student who has achieved an overall grade point average of 3.9 to 3.99.
Cum Laude: A student who has achieved an overall grade point average of 3.7 to 3.89.
Some students will graduate with appreciation from their departments for contributions to the school which have greatly
benefited their fellow students and Academy of Art University. These students are selected by their Department Directors
on a case-by-case basis.
PRESIDENT’S HONOR ROLL
Undergraduate or Graduate students who are registered for 12 units and maintain a 3.7 grade point average are
considered for the President’s Honor Roll.
31
ACADEMIC STANDING
Academic Standing determines a student’s ability to continue with enrollment. Academic Standing is calculated when
final grades are posted for a Fall, Spring or Summer semester and the student record is updated with one of the
following statuses:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Good Standing: The cumulative record meets the minimum Grade Point Average (GPA) requirement.
Academic Probation: The cumulative record fails to meet the minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA)
requirement and results in a probationary semester.
Extended Academic Probation: The cumulative record fails to meet the minimum cumulative grade point average
(GPA) following a semester of Academic Probation and results in an Extended Academic Probation status. Extended
Academic Probation will continue if the student’s semester GPA is 2.0 or higher, but the cumulative GPA is below the
required minimum required GPA.
Academic Dismissal: The semester record fails to meet a 2.0 semester GPA after a semester of Extended Academic
Probation and results in Academic Dismissal.
NOTE: Academic standing is calculated using the GPA based on the official grades posted for that semester. Repeating
a course under the Course Repetition policy does not revise academic standing.
Academic Standing
Definition & Conditions
Good Standing
Student cumulative record meets the minimum Grade Point Average (GPA) requirement.
Academic Probation
Student record does not meet the minimum cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) requirement
after the first semester or a semester with “Good Standing”.
•
•
•
Extended Academic
Probation
ATHLETIC students on Academic Probation are not eligible to compete.
UNDERGRADUATE FRESHMEN students with less than 30 completed units are
required to take LA 151 First Year Seminar for Academic Success. Failure to enroll and
attend LA 151 will result in immediate Academic Dismissal.
Student record continues to not meet the minimum cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA)
requirement.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Academic Dismissal
Students on Academic Probation are subject to enrollment conditions as outlined in the
Academic Probation Policy.
Students will be placed on Extended Academic Probation following a semester of
academic probation if their cumulative GPA does not meet minimum standards.
Extended Academic Probation will continue if the student’s semester GPA is 2.0 or
higher, but the cumulative GPA is below the required minimum required GPA.
Extended Academic Probation will not continue if the student’s semester GPA is below
2.0. Failure to meet a 2.0 semester GPA after a semester of Extended Academic
Probation will result in Academic Dismissal.
Students who are granted re-entry after dismissal are considered to be on Extended
Academic Probation.
Students on Extended Academic Probation are subject to enrollment conditions as
outlined in the Academic Probation Policy.
FINANCIAL AID students on Extended Academic Probation are not eligible for
Financial Aid. See Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements.
ATHLETIC students on Extended Academic Probation are not eligible to compete.
Student semester record fails to meet minimum 2.0 Grade Point Average (GPA) after an
Extended Academic Probation semester.
•
The student’s record is deactivated and the student may not enroll in courses.
32
ACADEMIC PROBATION POLICIES
During the time a student is classified as being in Academic Probation, the following enrollment conditions apply:
•
•
•
•
•
•
The student may not use online Learning Management System (LMS) enroll, add or drop courses. All
registration activity must be approved by a Student Adviser.
The student may not enroll for a future semester until final grades have posted for all enrolled courses.
If enrolled for a future semester, the student’s scheduled is subject to administrative changes. The student may
be dropped from ineligible courses due to failed prerequisites. Required courses may be added to the student’s
schedule in place of administratively dropped courses.
UNDERGRADUATE FRESHMEN students with less than 30 completed units are required to take LA 151 First
Year Seminar for Academic Success. Failure to enroll and attend LA 151 will result in immediate Academic
Dismissal.
ATHLETIC students on Academic Probation are not eligible to compete.
FINANCIAL AID students on Extended Academic Probation are not eligible for Financial Aid. See Financial Aid
Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements.
DISMISSAL
If a student’s cumulative GPA does not meet the required minimum standards after an Extended Academic Probation
semester, the student will be dismissed from the University. The student’s record will become inactive and a notation of
“Academic Dismissal” will be noted on the transcript.
REQUEST FOR READMISSION AFTER DISMISSAL
If a student is dismissed, the student may apply for reinstatement by submitting a letter giving reasons for his/her
academic record and requesting that re-admission be granted. A final decision will be reached by the Grievance
Committee. Students who have been dismissed for lack of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) may apply for readmission in the same program of study after waiting a period of one 15 week semester.
Send letters to:
Grievance Committee
Academy of Art University
79 New Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
READMISSION AFTER DISMISSAL
Students granted reinstatement may be enrolled for a probationary period upon re-entry. If a student’s semester GPA
falls below 2.0 during this probationary period, the student will be permanently dismissed from the University. Students
with an Academic Standing of Permanent Dismissal may not petition the Grievance Committee for readmission.
With respect to financial aid, a student must complete that evaluation period, meet the cumulative GPA minimum
requirement, and meet the required completion rate minimums before financial aid awards will be made. This procedure
applies only to dismissals caused by the lack of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) and only when the student is reentering the same curriculum. It does not apply to voluntary withdrawals.
33
Back to Table of Contents
34
FINANCIAL AID & SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC
PROGRESS (SAP) POLICIES
FINANCIAL AID: SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) REQUIREMENT
Students must achieve Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) toward their degree in order to maintain eligibility for most types
of financial aid. To maintain SAP students must meet the following three components:
•
•
•
Minimum grade-point average
Minimum completion rate
Maximum timeframe
Satisfactory Academic Progress is evaluated at the end of each term for which the student is in attendance. Students who do
not earn their degree within the maximum timeframe become ineligible for financial aid as soon as they reach the specified
maximum timeframe for their program of study. Students who do not meet the minimum grade-point average and minimum
completion rate requirements are given one term of financial aid warning. Failure to meet the grade-point average and
completion rate requirements at the end of the warning term will result in loss of federal financial aid.
A student placed on Financial Aid warning may receive financial aid, but if the student fails to achieve the required minimum
cumulative grade point average and required completion rate at the end of the next evaluation period, the student will be
withdrawn or placed in the extended enrollment program. Students in extended enrollment are not eligible for financial aid.
Students may petition to have financial aid reinstated. See the Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Appeal policy for details.
FINANCIAL AID: SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) STANDINGS
In order to be considered to be making Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) toward a degree, a student must both maintain
a specified grade point average, must proceed through the course at a specific minimum pace and must not exceed the
maximum timeframe. Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is evaluated at the end of each term for which the student is in
attendance. For the purpose of determining satisfactory progress, each program is broken down into evaluation periods. An
evaluation period equals one semester.
There are 3 types of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Standings:
• SAP met
• Financial Aid Warning
• SAP not met
Satisfactory
Academic
Progress (SAP)
Standing
Definition
SAP Met
•
•
Student record demonstrates Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP).
Satisfactory Academic Progress defined by a cumulative record that meets both a minimum Grade Point
Average (GPA) and a satisfactory completion rate and does not exceed the maximum timeframe.
•
Financial Aid
Warning
Students meeting the SAP requirement may receive Financial Aid.
•
•
Student record does not demonstrate Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP).
Based on cumulative units attempted, either the GPA or completion rate does not meet minimum
standards. The student is given a one semester warning period to raise the results of cumulative units to
meet minimum standards for GPA or the completion rate.
•
Students on Academic Probation are subject to enrollment conditions as outlined in the Academic
Probation Policy.
•
SAP Not Met
A student may receive Financial Aid for a warning term.
•
•
Student has exceeded the maximum timeframe or the student record fails to demonstrate Satisfactory
Academic Progress (SAP) after a probationary semester.
The student may not receive Financial Aid.
35
FINANCIAL AID: MINIMUM GPA REQUIREMENT
In addition to the minimum completion rate and maximum timeframe requirement, students receiving federal Financial
Aid must achieve a minimum GPA.
The student’s cumulative grade point average is calculated at the end of each evaluation period (semester). If the
student has less than the cumulative GPA specified below at the end of each evaluation period, he/she will be placed on
financial aid warning for one evaluation period (semester). During the financial aid warning, the student may receive
financial aid, but if at the end of the next evaluation period (semester), if the student has not raised the GPA to the
required minimums, the student will lose Financial Aid eligibility.
Minimum GPA
The minimums shown in the chart below represent the minimum GPA required for the purpose of determining student
Financial Aid eligibility.
Associate of Arts Degree (AA)
Units Earned
Minimum GPA
0-15 units
1.7
16-30 units
1.85
31+ units
2.0
Certificate (CERT)
Units Earned
Minimum GPA
0-30 units
1.7
31-60 units
1.85
61+ units
2.0
Bachelor’s Degree (BFA or BA)
Units Earned
Minimum GPA
0-30 units
1.7
31-60 units
1.85
61+ units
2.0
Master’s Degree (MA, MFA or M.Arch)
Units Earned
0-30 units
Minimum GPA
2.0
31-60 units
2.0
61+ units
2.0
The GPA (Grade Point Average) is calculated by taking the number of grade points a student earned divided by the total
number of units taken.
Semester GPA is calculated only using the units and grade points of one semester.
Cumulative GPA is calculated using all units attempted at Academy of Art University for a career, regardless of the units
applicability to a degree program. Cumulative GPA is used to determine Academic Status, Graduation Eligibility and
Graduation Honors
NOTE: The cumulative GPA is calculated using all units attempted at Academy of Art University for a career, regardless
of the units’ applicability to a degree program. Academy of Art University has two student career tracks: Undergraduate
and Graduate. In cases where a student does both undergraduate and graduate work at Academy of Art University,
units taken for the first career will not be a factor in calculation graduate GPA for the second career.
NOTE: Courses with a grade of “I” (incomplete grades) are considered “in-progress” and will be factored into the GPA
and completion rate when the permanent grade is assigned.
NOTE: A grade of “W” (Withdrawal) is not used when calculating a student’s cumulative GPA but is used when
calculating the required completion rate if the student attends the class past the first week of school.
NOTE: A grade of “WF” (Withdrawal Failure) is used when calculating a student’s cumulative GPA and in the calculation
of the required completion rate.
NOTE: A student may repeat a course to replace the grade only if the first attempt resulted in a grade of “C-” or lower.
The grade and units earned in a second attempt will be used in the GPA calculation even if the second attempt results in
a lower grade. A student may repeat the same course only once to replace a grade. See the Grade Exclusion policy for
details regarding GPA calculations for repeated courses.
36
FINANCIAL AID: MINIMUM COMPLETION RATE REQUIREMENT
In addition to the minimum GPA requirement and maximum timeframe requirement, students receiving federal Financial
Aid must complete at least two-thirds of their attempted units.
The student’s completion rate is measured at the end of each evaluation period (semester). If the student has not
completed the required number of credits attempted to date, he/she will be placed on financial aid warning. During the
financial aid warning, the student may receive financial aid, but if at the end of the next evaluation period (semester), if
the student has not raised the completion rate to the required minimums, the student will lose Financial Aid eligibility.
Minimum Completion Rate
In order to meet the minimum completion rate, a student must successfully complete at least one half (50%) of the
cumulative credits attempted during the first two evaluation periods in attendance and at least two-thirds (66.6%) of the
cumulative credits attempted thereafter.
Minimum Completion Rate Calculations
The minimums shown in the chart below represent the minimum number of completed units required for the purpose of
determining student Financial Aid eligibility.
50% Completion Rate Semesters 1 & 2
Cumulative
Minimum Completed Units
Attempted Units
# of units
Based on 3 unit courses, the
units necessary to satisfy the
completion rate
6
3
9
6
12
6
15
9
18
9
21
12
24
12
66.6% Completion Rate Semester 3 and Beyond
Cumulative
Minimum Completed Units
Attempted Units
# of units
Based on 3 unit courses, the
units necessary to satisfy the
completion rate
12
9
15
12
18
12
21
15
24
18
27
18
30
21
Attempted Units include:
• All units for courses in which a student enrolled as of the drop deadline
• All units that a student drops or adds at any point in the semester
• All units for courses in which the student enrolled, but subsequently drops, withdraws or fails
• Transfer units from another school that are accepted by Academy Art University
• Units for repeated courses and the initial units for those courses are all included as attempted units
Completed Units include:
Undergraduate Completed Units include:
• All units completed with grades of 'D-' or better
• Transfer units from another school that are accepted by Academy Art University
Graduate Completed Units include:
• All units completed with grades of 'C' or better
• Transfer units from another school that are accepted by Academy Art University
NOTE: Courses with a grade of “I” (incomplete grades) are considered “in-progress” and will be factored into the GPA
and completion rate when the permanent grade is assigned.
NOTE: A grade of “W” (Withdrawal) is not used when calculating a student’s cumulative GPA but is used when
calculating the required completion rate if the student attends the class past the first week of school.
NOTE: A grade of “WF” (Withdrawal Failure) is used when calculating a student’s cumulative GPA and in the calculation
of the required completion rate.
NOTE: In the case of repeating a course of which the first attempt was a “D-“ or higher, when final grades are posted for
the second attempt, the first attempt will no longer count towards the cumulative units of successfully completed units. In
this case, the first attempt will count toward the cumulative number of attempted units.
NOTE: Review Minimum Grade Requirements in the Grading Policies for applicability of a grade towards a degree.
37
FINANCIAL AID: MAXIMUM TIME FRAME REQUIREMENT
In addition to the minimum GPA requirement and minimum completion rate requirement, students receiving federal
Financial Aid must be progressing toward completion of the program within a specified time frame. The Maximum Time
Frame refers to the maximum number of units a student may attempt as still be eligible for Financial Aid.
Students who do not earn their degree within the specified time frame become ineligible for financial aid as soon as they
reach the specified maximum time frame for their program of study.
Maximum Time Frame
The school’s maximum time frame equals one and one-half times the normal time frame.
Maximum Time Frame Calculations
(program units X 1.5)
The examples shown in the chart below represent minimum requirements for the degree programs listed, and the
corresponding maximum attempted credits allowed for purpose of determining student Financial Aid eligibility
Units
Maximum Units
Sample Degree Programs
Required
Allowed
Associate of Arts
66
99
Certificate
120
180
Bachelor of Architecture
162
243
Bachelor of Arts
120
180
Bachelor of Fine Arts – Art Education
120
180
Bachelor of Fine Arts
132
198
Master of Arts
39
58
Master of Fine Arts
63
95
Master of Architecture
63
95
Master of Fine Arts – Industrial Design
78
117
Master of Architecture
87
131
NOTE: Unit requirements may vary by major. Refer to departments for specific unit requirements.
NOTE: Time for an approved leave of absence will not be included in the calculation of a student’s maximum program length.
NOTE: For students who change majors, the units not counted toward the new major will not be included in the
maximum time frame requirement.
FINANCIAL AID: ENROLLMENT STATUS
Enrollment status is a factor of consideration for Financial Aid.
Undergraduate students must carry a minimum study load of 12 units per semester to be considered as full-time
students. Graduate students must carry a minimum study load of 9 units to be considered as full-time students.
Fall, Spring and Summer Semester Enrollment Status
Units
12 or more
9
Undergraduate
Full-Time
3/4 Time Status
Enrollment Status
Student
Graduate
Full-Time
Full-Time Student
Enrollment Status
Student
6
1/2 Time Student
1/2 Time Student
3
Less than
1/2 Time Student
Less than 1/2 Time
Student
FINANCIAL AID NOTE: Third Attempt Courses
A previously passed course (grade other than an “F”, “W” or “WF”) can only be repeated once in order to have the credits
for that course to be counted towards the student’s enrollment status when determining eligibility for undergraduate
federal financial aid. If a previously passed course is repeated for a third time the credits earned for that course will not
be used to determine the student’s undergraduate enrollment status for federal financial aid purposes.
38
FINANCIAL AID: SATISFACTORY PROGRESS APPEAL
A student may file an appeal based on extenuating circumstances (generally limited to an illness or personal
emergency). In such cases, the Financial Aid Committee may determine that the student is making satisfactory progress
toward his/her degree despite failure to conform to the normal time frame or minimum grade point average.
If an appeal is granted for more than one semester the student must meet all conditions of the academic plan provided
by the Financial Aid appeals committee. Students not on an academic plan will have only one semester to meet the
GPA and minimum completion rate requirements to remain eligible for financial aid.
A student may appeal the determination of satisfactory progress and the termination of financial aid by writing a letter
and providing proper documentation (i.e. letters from a doctor) as requested by the Financial Aid Appeals Committee.
Send letters to:
The Executive Vice President-Financial Aid/Compliance
Academy of Art University
79 New Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
39
Back to Table of Contents
40
REGISTRATION & COURSE ENROLLMENT
POLICIES
REGISTRATION
Students may register for courses in one of two ways:
•
•
Online Learning Management System (LMS)
With the assistance from a Student Adviser
Students may discuss courses with a student adviser over the phone, in person, through the adviser’s virtual office or via
e-mail. Students are encouraged to contact their student adviser at least once a year for a program evaluation and
discuss courses for the upcoming year. Students are encouraged to research courses using the Academy of Art
University online class search and registration page.
Refer to the Academic Calendar for registration periods.
NOTE: Enrollment in more than 12 units is subject to academic performance and Student Adviser approval.
NOTE: Enrollment in more than 6 units in a summer semester is subject to academic performance and Student Adviser
approval.
NOTE: Enrollment in more than 3 units in an intersession is subject to academic performance and Student Adviser
approval.
ENROLLMENT AGREEMENT
An Enrollment Agreement is required for initial enrollment in Academy of Art University. This agreement outlines school
policies that must be agreed upon in order to be a student. Students may view their Enrollment Agreement though their
online account at any time.
RE-ENTRY
Student programs that are incomplete and have not had registration activity in a two year period will be inactivated.
Students wishing to re-activate their programs must petition in writing for reinstatement to university.
Upon re-entry, students must request a program evaluation from a Student Adviser for a preliminary assessment of
which previously completed coursework may apply to their current program. A portfolio review may be necessary for
placement into major courses.
NOTE: The graduation requirements in effect at the time of re-entry may be required for awarding of a degree or
certificate.
NOTE: Previously completed coursework is not guaranteed to count toward a reactivated program and students may be
required to demonstrate that their current level of skill meets current program standards. Coursework may be substituted
where appropriate if the department determines that skills are evident based on a portfolio review of current work.
Re-Entry Transfer Students
• Transcripts received in the student’s first semester may be re-evaluated based on current graduation requirements.
• Transcripts received after a student’s first semester and a re-entry period of less than 5 years will not be eligible for
transfer review unless the student completed a degree program after leaving Academy Art University. Re-entry
students who completed a degree program at another institution may request a transcript review of courses taken
prior to their first re-entry term by writing a letter to the Executive Vice President of Educational Services.
• Re-entry students whose Academy of Art University records have been inactive for 5 years or more may request a
transcript review of courses taken prior to their first re-entry term by writing a letter to the Executive Vice President of
Educational Services.
• Transcripts received after a student’s first re-entry semester will not be eligible for transfer review.
41
Send Letters to:
Executive Vice President of Educational Services
Academy of Art University
79 New Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
Graduate Students
Any graduate student who has withdrawn from a graduate program or who has not taken graduate classes for two years
or more will be required to send a letter petitioning for reinstatement to the Director of Graduate Student Services.
Send letters to:
Director of Graduate Student Services
Academy of Art University
150 Hayes Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
Military Students
The following policies are in accordance with Higher Education Opportunity Act
Active duty military students called to active duty for a period of more than 30 consecutive days and returning to school
will re-enter with:
•
•
•
•
•
The same academic status (if re-enter within 5 years)
The same enrollment status* (unless changed by the student)
The same number of credits completed (if re-enter into the same program)
The same academic standing (as needed, the University will make reasonable efforts to help student become
prepared to resume where she/he left off.)
The same tuition and fee charges for the first academic year (unless military benefits have been increased).
To qualify active duty military students must:
•
•
•
•
Give notice of absence for service (oral or written) to the University Financial Aid Office within 3 years after
completing period of service.
Cannot exceed a five year length of absence
Give the school notice of his/her intent to return to school (oral or written) to the University Financial Aid Office
within 3 years after completing period of service.
Cannot have a dishonorable or bad conduct discharge
Active duty military is defined as voluntary or involuntary service in the Armed Forces, including the National Guard or
Reserve, on active duty, active duty for training, or full-time National Guard duty under Federal authority, for more than
30 consecutive days under a call or order to active duty of more than 30 consecutive days.
*Full time (12 units), Three Quarter Time (9 units), Half Time (6 units), Less than Half Time (3 units)
ADD PROCEDURES
Students may add courses and make schedule adjustments using the online Learning Management System (LMS)
throughout the registration period until the tuition deadline. Students may also add classes through with the assistance
of a Student Adviser via an in-person meeting, e-mail, or a phone call.
NOTE: Enrollment in more than 12 units is subject to academic performance and Student Adviser approval.
NOTE: Enrollment in more than 6 units in a summer semester is subject to academic performance and Student Adviser
approval.
NOTE: Enrollment in more than 3 units in an intersession is subject to academic performance and Student Adviser
approval.
42
ADD PROCEDURES AFTER THE TUITION DEADLINE
Students may add classes through the first week of school with the assistance of a Student Adviser. Students may add a
course during the second week of school, providing the second module/session has not begun. A student who wishes to
add a class must meet with, e-mail, or call a Student Adviser. If applicable, students will be charged additional tuition.
Requests to add courses must be approved by the Student Adviser and Accounts Receivable prior to processing.
ADMINISTRATIVE ADD/DROP POLICY
Academy of Art University may make adjustments to students schedules deemed necessary to maintain the student’s
enrollment status. Students may have their schedules administratively adjusted under the following circumstances:
Course cancelation: If a course is canceled and the student does not respond to outreach to select a replacement
section or course, the adviser may enroll the student in an alternate section or alternate required course.
Failed prerequisite / prerequisite not met: Students who fail to meet the prerequisites for a course may have their
schedules administratively adjusted. The course for which the prerequisite has not been met may be administratively
dropped and the prerequisite course administratively added.
Failed Self-Service enrollment attempt: If a course enrollment request is rejected due to a filled section or unmet
prerequisite, the adviser may enroll the student in an alternate section or alternate required course.
In the event that the student’s schedule has been administratively adjusted, the student will be immediately informed by
e-mail and the new schedule may be viewed in the student’s online Learning Management System (LMS) account.
Students with domestic phone numbers on file will also be contacted by phone. Students are encouraged to keep their
contact information up-to-date at all times in their online Learning Management System (LMS) account.
DROP PROCEDURES
After the start of a term, students must work with a Student Adviser to drop a course. A withdrawal is defined as
dropping all courses from a semester resulting in no enrollment for the term.
Students may make the request in person or via e-mail to the Student Adviser and the Adviser will assist the student with
the Drop or Withdrawal form. Completed forms must be approved by the student’s Student Adviser and Accounts
Receivable. Add/Drop/Withdrawal forms must then be submitted to the registration office for processing.
A $25 fee will be charged for each class dropped once the second week of each semester begins. Calculation of tuition
refunds are based on the last date of attendance in the course and the refund policy set forth on the Enrollment
Agreement signed by the student at the time of enrollment.
NOTE: Students are expected to complete the courses in which they are enrolled. Academy of Art University
discourages students from dropping a class simply because they do not expect a good final grade. A student who is
doing poorly or who wants academic assistance of any kind, at any level, is encouraged to contact the Academy
Resource Center.
DROP & WITHDRAWAL POLICIES
W and WF Grades in Fall and Spring Semesters
Students enrolled in a Spring or Fall semester who drop a course or withdraw from school, voluntarily or involuntarily, will
receive one of the following notations on their official records:
•
•
•
No notation, if a student drops or withdraws prior to the end of the first week of class instruction.
“W”, if a student drops or withdraws after the first week of class instruction but prior to the start of the eighth week of
class instruction. A “W” grade will not be counted in computing grade point averages but will count when calculating
the required completion rate if dropped after the first week of class.
“WF”, if a student drops or withdraws after attending the eighth week from the start of the term. A “WF” will be
counted the same as an “F” in computing grade point averages (GPA).
43
W and WF Grades in Summer Semesters
Students enrolled in a Summer semester who drop a course or withdraw from school, voluntarily or involuntarily, will
receive one of the following notations on their official records
• No notation, if a student drops or withdraws prior to the end of the first week of class instruction.
• “W” if a student drops or withdraws after the first week of class instruction but prior to the start of the fourth week of
class instruction. A “W” grade will not be counted in computing grade point averages but will be counting in
calculating the required completion rate if dropped after the first week of class.
• “WF”, if a student drops or withdraws after attending the fourth week of class instruction. A “WF” will be counted the
same as an “F” in computing grade point averages (GPA).
For purposes of counting weeks, the first week of class instruction begins with the first class session held at the Academy
of Art University for the particular term, regardless of holidays or actual class meetings for a particular class.
FINANCIAL AID NOTE: recipients must notify the Financial Aid Office of any schedule change affecting the total units in
which a student is enrolled for that semester.
International Students must notify the International Student Office of any schedule changes that result in a less than
Full-Time Enrollment Status.
“W” AND “WF” Definitions
15 Week/15 Module Semesters (Fall & Spring)
Last Week
of Class
Notation Explanation
Attendance
• If a student drops or withdraws after the first week of class instruction but prior to the start of the eighth week
of class instruction, a “W” will be noted on the student’s transcript.
Weeks
2–7
Weeks
8+
W
WF
• A “W” grade will not be counted in computing grade point averages.
FINANCIAL AID NOTE: A “W” grade will count as an uncompleted course when calculating the completion rate
for a course dropped after the first week of class.
NOTE: Tuition Forfeiture applies. Review Refund Polices for details.
• If a student drops or withdraws after attending the eighth week of class instruction a WF will be noted on the
student’s transcript.
• A “WF” will be counted the same as an “F” in computing grade point averages.
FINANCIAL AID NOTE: A “WF” grade will count as an uncompleted course when calculating the completion rate.
NOTE: Tuition Forfeiture applies. Review Refund Polices for details.
7.5 Week/15 Module Semesters (Summer)
Last Week
of Class
Notation Explanation
Attendance
• If a student drops or withdraws after the first week of class instruction but prior to the start of the fourth week
Weeks
2-3
Weeks
4+
W
•
of class instruction a W will be noted on the student’s transcript.
A “W” grade will not be counted in computing grade point averages.
FINANCIAL AID NOTE: A “W” grade will count as an uncompleted course when calculating the required
completion rate if dropped after the first week of class.
NOTE: Tuition Forfeiture applies. Review Refund Polices for details.
• If a student drops or withdraws after attending the fourth week of class instruction a “WF” will be noted on the
student’s transcript.
• A “WF” will be counted the same as an “F” in computing grade point averages
WF
FINANCIAL AID NOTE: A “WF” grade will count as an uncompleted course when calculating the completion rate
.
NOTE: Tuition Forfeiture applies. Review Refund Polices for details.
44
WITHDRAWAL
Students who must withdraw from Academy of Art University during the semester must do so in writing. Students may fill
out a withdrawal form in person with the assistance of their Student Adviser or send written notice of withdrawal.
Send Letters of Withdrawal to:
Executive Vice President of Enrollment Management
Academy of Art University
79 New Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94105.
Responsibility for filing a notice of withdrawal rests entirely with the student. Any money owed to Academy of Art
University is due on the official date of the withdrawal.
Applicable refund, if any, will be issued within 30 days of the effective date of withdrawal. All refunds are based upon the
amount of tuition for the courses being dropped, minus non-refundable fees, and are calculated from the last date of
attendance. Refunds will be issued on the basis of the refund policy set forth on the Enrollment Agreement signed by the
student at the time of registration.
If applicable, students may need to complete the Withdrawal process with these additional steps:
Housing: Send an email with their full name, ID number, and thorough explanation for withdrawing to
[email protected]
International Students: Check with International office for information about returning home within the correct window
of time.
FINANCIAL AID NOTE: call the Financial Aid Office at 415-618-6190 and notify the Financial Aid Office of withdrawal.
A follow up email to their specific financial adviser is recommended.
ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWAL
Students who fail to follow formal drop or withdrawal procedures may be administratively withdrawn from courses if they
fail to attend classes for three consecutive weeks. Students are advised that they are still required to complete the formal
procedures set forth above if they wish to drop a course or withdraw from school. Although failure to attend may
ultimately result in a withdrawal from a course, it could have serious adverse consequences on a student’s permanent
scholastic record. Many times students may avoid adverse consequences by meeting with their Student Adviser prior to
dropping a course or withdrawing from school. Additionally, failure to follow the rules and procedures of Academy of Art
University is grounds for academic discipline, including dismissal from Academy of Art University.
Students who are having unusual difficulties or find themselves in circumstances where they are unable to attend
courses should contact their Student Adviser or the Academy Resource Center at the earliest possible time to avoid
academic sanctions. In most instances, students will be contacted prior to any administrative withdrawal action. Students
should ensure that Academy of Art University has their accurate local address and phone number on file.
Students who feel they have been administratively withdrawn from a course or courses in error should complete an Add
Form and must meet with their Student Adviser. Students are responsible for promptly reviewing final semester grades
when received. A student will only be permitted to petition for a change of grade during the semester immediately
following the completion of course work for the questioned grade.
45
INVOLUNTARY WITHDRAWAL
Academy of Art University may withdraw a student under any of the following circumstances.
•
•
•
•
•
Student fails to attend classes for three consecutive weeks.
Student fails to reconcile accounts in a timely manner.
Student fails to comply with the policies, rules and standards of Academy of Art University.
Student fails to register for classes before attendance; auditing a class is grounds for dismissal.
Student exhibits behavior that is deemed unbecoming of a college student.
Academy of Art University reserves the right to withdraw any student whose conduct reflects discredit on the professional
or ethical standards of Academy of Art University. Students who are involuntarily withdrawn will receive a pro-rata refund
for the unused portion of tuition and other refundable charges paid. Refunds will be calculated on the basis of the last
actual date of attendance. Refunds will be paid within 30 days of the date of involuntary withdrawal by Academy of Art
University. Students should refer to the Academy of Art University’s policies regarding dropping or withdrawing from
courses as listed in this Schedule under “Add/Drop Procedures.”
INTERNSHIPS FOR ACADEMIC CREDIT
Academy of Art University supports students who take an active role in securing internships for academic credit.
Students are encouraged to research internship opportunities through contacts with faculty and academic directors, as
well as through the multiple resources available through Career Services online.
http://my.academyart.edu/studentresources/career_resources.html
In order to receive academic credit for internships, students must submit an official internship application and meet the
following eligibility criteria:
•
•
•
Degree-seeking candidate 3.0 GPA or higher
A Senior or high-level Junior with at least 90 units completed
or
A MA/MFA/M.Arch. candidate who has passed Midpoint Review and commenced Directed Study
Department Director Approval
Official internship applications must be approved in advance through the student’s academic department. Copies of the
Official Internship Policy and application packet can be accessed through Student Advisers.
International Students may take an internship for credit within the United States. Please contact the International Student
Services Office for details.
46
Back to Table of Contents
47
STUDENT SUPPORT
ACCOMMODATIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Academy of Art University provides reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students who require
accommodations are encouraged to request them prior to the start of a semester, but can do so at any time.
Requests for accommodations are considered individually and determined in accordance with state and federal laws.
Students are responsible for articulating their accommodation needs and submitting documentation that meets the
university's eligibility criteria. To obtain eligibility criteria and request accommodations, students may contact Classroom
Services at 415.618.3775 or [email protected] Classroom Services is located in
the Academy Resource Center, 79 New Montgomery Street, room 356.
The Executive Vice President of Educational Services & International Admissions/Services, Sue Rowley, serves as
Academy of Art University’s Coordinator for compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title VI of the
Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. For further information, contact Ms. Rowley
at 800.544.2787 or 415.274.2222.
A student may appeal the determination of disability-related services or accommodations to the Grievance Committee.
Send letters to:
Grievance Committee
79 New Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
ACADEMY RESOURCE CENTER (ARC)
The Academy Resource Center (ARC) offers free, group tutoring to all Academy of Art University students, both
undergraduate and graduate, for all majors and courses, in the form of On-Campus and Online Labs, which provide
individualized attention from experienced tutors to small groups of students. Students may be referred—or seek tutoring
themselves—through Student Academic Support (SAS) at the ARC, and academic coaches will assist students by
referring them to the appropriate educational support options.
On-Campus Labs
Most On-Campus Labs take place in the Computer Lab (Room 311) or Drawing Studio (Room 313) at 79 New
Montgomery, 3rd Floor. Labs which require special facilities or equipment, as well as those taking place on evenings or
weekends, may be scheduled in other buildings.
Students sign up for a 50-minute appointment with an on-campus tutor using TutorTrac online at
https://tutortrac.academyart.edu. (Firefox is the recommended web browser.)
Online Labs
Online Labs provide all AAU students with live, real-time support with an experienced and knowledgeable tutor via online
chat, video, screen sharing, file sharing, and conference call capability.
Students access Online Labs through Adobe Connect by clicking on the corresponding link in the Online Lab schedule
during the appointed day and time. All scheduled times are Pacific Standard Time (PST).
Students are encouraged to take advantage of these free services to help them with their classes and assignments;
however, they should also make regular use of other support options, including Department Workshops, to avoid falling
behind. All tutoring is provided by current faculty, alumni, and technical staff. ARC Tutoring should not be regarded as a
substitute for attending class and is effective only in conjunction with continued, regular weekly attendance and full
participation in class.
48
STUDENT ACADEMIC SUPPORT
Academic coaches can help students with organizing and planning their semester. Coaches work with students to
improve their study skills (time management, project planning, etc.). Coaches also connect students looking for
additional support to campus and community resources. One-on-one coaching is available to both on campus and
online students. Students can schedule appointments, drop-in or text ARC.
ARC TUTORING & TRAINING
ARC Training & Tutoring offers small group tutoring through Online Clinics and On-Campus Labs.
Students may sign up for up to three 50-minute tutoring appointments per week using TutorTrac online. Instructions for
using TutorTrac are also available online at arc.academyart.edu. All tutoring is provided by current faculty, alumni, and
technical staff.
CLASSROOM SERVICES
Classroom Services facilitates accommodations and equal access for students with disabilities.
ESL SUPPORT PROGRAM AND ONLINE LANGUAGE SUPPORT
In-class language support is provided for international students in designated sections. Weekly study groups are open to
all students.
WRITING LAB AND ONLINE WRITING LAB (OWL)
Assistance is available for writing assignments.
SPEAKING LAB AND ONLINE SPEAKING LAB
Assistance is offered for oral presentation critique and pronunciation practice. The Speaking Lab also arranges
conversation groups for international students.
MIDPOINT REVIEW WORKSHOPS (GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY)
On campus workshops and online or on campus individualized help are provided to graduate students working on written
proposals and oral presentations for midpoint and final reviews.
LIBRARY
The Academy of Art University Library is located on the 6th floor of the 180 New Montgomery building. To meet the
diverse needs of our undergraduate and graduate programs the library has a well curated and diverse collection that
supports the university’s art and design curriculum.
The library’s collection is focused on the visual and technical arts and houses over 50,000 volumes. The resources in the
library include print and electronic materials. The library’s periodical collection includes over 275 current subscriptions as
well as an extensive collection of bound back issues that are of significant research value in the field of art and design.
Our online resources include 18 databases that offer access to hundreds of thousands of full text articles, eBooks, and
digital images. We have a digital image library (LUNA) that houses over 275,000 digital images. The online resources
are delivered though our dynamic website that provides access to the online catalog, subject guides created by Academy
of Art librarians, as well as other instructional guides and tutorials. Please see our "Collections" page for a detailed
description of the library’s special collections and holdings.
The Academy of Art Library has a long history of being a "no-shush" zone. Students are encouraged to work together to
exchange ideas and inspiration. To facilitate this we offer a vibrant atmosphere where artists can conduct visual
research, collaborate, learn, and create. The Library maintains this synergistic environment with group study space, a
15-seat theater available for classes, clubs, and directed study, and several visual resource areas where students can
practice hands-on techniques learned in the classroom.
49
CAREER & ENTREPRENEURIAL SERVICES
Academy of Art University is committed to providing all registered students, graduates, and alumni access to Academy of
Art University's Career & Entrepreneurial Development resources. Academy of Art University cannot guarantee
employment for students after graduation and encourages students to make every effort to utilize the resources
provided.
Career & Entrepreneurial Development offers more information on the Career & Entrepreneurial Services web page.
50
Back to Table of Contents
51
ATTENDANCE POLICIES
ATTENDANCE
Students are expected to attend all class periods/modules of the courses for which they register. Failure to attend and participate in
a class will reflect negatively on the student’s performance. Final grades will reflect this policy. Students may be administratively
dropped from classes due to excessive absences.
In-class participation is important not only to the individual student, but also to the class as a whole. Because class participation may
be a factor in grading, instructors may use absence, tardiness, or early departure as de facto evidence of nonparticipation. Students
who miss an exam due to an excused or unexcused absence will be penalized according to the individual instructor’s grading policy.
Attendance: On-Campus Courses
Attendance requires arriving on time and staying for the entire class session.
Attendance: Online courses
Attendance requires logging into the class home page during the period indicated for each module and being engaged in an
academically related activity in at least one of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Having an electronic communication with the instructor about an academic matter
Participating in an online discussion board
Submitting or completing an assignment
Completing an examination or quiz
Answering a question
Participating in a study group
NOTE: Students may log into the class at any time of day.
NOTE: Course work and participation must be completed in accordance of module deadlines. Students are expected to read all
module pages, complete all quizzes and participate in the course discussion with multiple postings/entries.
MODEL ATTENDANCE POLICY
Academy of Art University has developed a Model Attendance Policy. Most classes follow these policies; however, department and
instructor policies may differ from the model policies.
Class attendance is required. Each course requires that the student be present at, and participate in every class session. Failure to
attend classes, tardy arrivals and early departures will be reflected in final grades as follows:
•
•
•
Four late arrivals may drop the final grade by one letter grade (“B” to “C”, “C” to “D”...)
Three unexcused absences may result in a final grade of “F”.
Three consecutive absences may result in a final grade of “F” or being dropped from the class.
EXCUSED ABSENCES
Excused absences are at the discretion of the instructor. Absences are excused on the following grounds only: illness, injury or
other medical necessity accompanied by a doctor’s note; death in the student’s family.
There is no substitution for information or demonstrations missed due to an absence. Students who miss a project deadline, presentation
or exam due to an excused or unexcused absence will be penalized according to the individual instructor’s grading policy.
On-campus courses: An excused absence and the acceptance of late work are determined by the instructor.
Online courses: An excused absence must be approved by the instructor and communicated to the Cyber Campus Department in
a timely fashion.
NOTE: Excused absences are not recorded on the attendance roster. Student attendance is only marked as either present or absent.
NOTE: An excused absence does not alter the deadline for assignments or projects.
NOTE: Personal computer or Internet connection related problems do not qualify as an excused absence. Regardless of technical
difficulties, it is the student’s responsibility to find alternate computer access to participate in the discussions and complete quizzes
and assignments on time.
Make-Up Work
Students should discuss make-up work with their instructor or Department Director.
52
LATE SUBMISSION OF PROJECTS/ASSIGNMENTS
Assignments and projects have deadlines to which students must adhere. Failure to submit an assignment or complete a project on
time may be reflected in the grade for that assignment/project. Any work that is not submitted as due may be marked with a grade of
“F” or marked down by one letter grade (“B” to “C”, “C” to “D”...) for each week that it is late.
ATTENDANCE CORRECTIONS
In the event that an inaccurate attendance status has been placed on the student record, the student must request a correction
from the instructor before the end of the semester. The instructor will work with the appropriate department Administrative
Assistant to submit an attendance correction form if there is an error.
DEADLINE: Attendance corrections must be submitted prior to the end of the semester. Attendance records in place at the
end of a semester are considered final and may not be changed.
NOTE: Should a student decide to discontinue a course, an official drop form should be filed as soon as the student has made
that decision to remove the student’s name from the attendance roster for the remainder of the semester. Review the drop
policy for details on the drop procedure.
53
Back to Table of Contents
54
GRADING POLICIES
GRADING CRITERIA
Students are evaluated in terms of the Course Learning Outcomes which are published on the syllabus for each course.
Students may access syllabi for in-progress courses electronically using online resources at online.academyart.edu.
This resource is available for both on campus and online courses.
Final grades will reflect the quality of the student's performance relative to the Course Learning Outcomes.
GRADING STANDARDS
Course Grades
Coursework is evaluated according to the following grading scale:
Grade
Standard
Grade Points toward GPA
A
Exceptional
4.0 grade points
AExcellent
3.7 grade points
B+
Very Good
3.3 grade points
B
Good
3.0 grade points
BCompetent
2.7 grade points
C+
Above Average
2.3 grade points
C
Average
2.0 grade points
CBelow Average
1.7 grade points
D+
Marginal
1.3 grade points
D
Weak
1.0 grade points
DMinimal Achievement
0.7 grade points
F
Failing
0 grade points
Withdrawal Fail
th
WF
[after 8 week]
0 grade points
th
[after 4 week in summer]
Non-Credit Grade Indications
Grade
Interpretation
I
IP
P
T
Incomplete
In Progress
Pass
Transfer
Grade Points
[Not factored into GPA]
0 grade points
0 grade points
0 grade points
0 grade points
Administrative Grades
Grade
Interpretation
AW
W
WD
NR
Attendance Withdrawal
Withdrawal
Retro-withdrawal
No Grade Reported
Grade Points
[Not factored into GPA]
0 grade points
0 grade points
0 grade points
0 grade points
55
MINIMUM GRADE REQUIREMENTS
Minimum grade requirements for a course to be able to count toward a degree are as follows:
•
•
•
Graduate students must achieve a "C" or better in all Graduate level coursework.
Undergraduate students must achieve a "C-" or better in all Undergraduate major courses and required studio
courses. Students with start terms of Spring 2013 and beyond must also achieve a "C-" or better in LA 108
Composition for the Artist.
Undergraduate Architecture students (with a start term of Summer 2012 and beyond) must achieve a "C-" or better
in the following Liberal Art courses: LA 219 History of Architecture 1, LA 249 History of Architecture 2, LA 293
Precalculus*, LA 292 Programming and Culture, LA 296 Physics for Architects, LA 319 History of Architecture 3, and
LA 449 Urban Design Theory.
*Architecture Students must achieve a C- or higher in LA 255 College Math or have an appropriate placement score
to enroll in LA 293 Precalculus.
NOTE: Grades of "I" (Incomplete Grades) will be given credit only when they are converted to a Letter Grade.
NOTE: Grades of "F" are computed as zero (0) points toward the Grade Point Average.
SEMESTER GRADING PERIODS
All courses report midterm and final grades. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters also report two progress
grades. Courses offered in Summer and Intersession do not report progress grades.
Students may access grades online using online resources at online.academyart.edu. This resource is available for both
on campus and online courses.
Specific dates for midterm and final grading periods can be found on the academic calendar.
Progress Grades
Progress grades are intended to give students a clear view of where they rank academically so that they know how they
are progressing in class and if they need to improve their academic performance.
Spring and Fall semesters: All courses report progress grades in Modules 4 and 11.
Summer semesters, Winter intersessions and Summer intersessions: no progress grades are reported.
Mid-Semester Grades
Instructors issue midterm grades to assess student performance during the first half of the semester.
All terms: All courses report mid-semester grades after module 7.
Final Grades
All terms: All courses report final grades after module 15.
Official Grades
Official grades are typically posted two weeks after the end of the semester. Dates can be found on the academic calendar.
COURSE REPETITIONS
A course may count only once toward the major. A student may repeat a course to replace the grade only if the first
attempt resulted in a grade of “C-” or lower. The grade and units earned in the second attempt will be used in the GPA
calculation even if the second attempt results in a lower grade. See the Grade Exclusion Policy for details regarding
repetition of a course with a first attempt of “C-” or lower.
FINANCIAL AID NOTES:
•
Credits attempted from both courses will be used in the calculation of the required completion rate.
•
A grade of “W” (Withdrawal) is not used when calculating a student’s cumulative GPA but is used when calculating
the required completion rate if the student attends the class past the first week of school.
•
A grade of “WF” (Withdrawal Failure) is used when calculating a student’s cumulative GPA and in the calculation of
the required completion rate.
•
A previously passed course (grade other than an F, W or WF) can only be repeated once in order to have the credits
for that course to be counted towards the student’s enrollment status when determining eligibility for undergraduate
federal financial aid. If a previously passed course is repeated for a third attempt the credits earned for that course
will not be used to determine the student’s enrollment status for federal financial aid purposes.
56
Example: A student is enrolled in 6 units. 3 of those units are for a previously passed course which is being
repeated for a third time and therefore cannot count towards enrollment status when calculating Financial Aid
eligibility. The remaining 3 units will be considered as an Enrollment Status of Less Than Half-Time. Students with
a Less Than Half -Time Enrollment Status are not eligible to receive Federal Student Loans.
GRADE EXCLUSION
A student may repeat a course to replace the grade if the first attempt resulted in a grade of C- or lower. The grade and
units earned in the second attempt will be used in the GPA (Grade Point Average) calculation even if the second attempt
results in a lower grade.
Grade Exclusion Policies
•
Grade Exclusion is only applied to a course for which the first attempt final grade was a C-, D+, D, D-, F, or WF.
•
GPA will be recalculated after the final grade of the second attempt is posted by the Registrar.
•
Academic standing is calculated based on the final GPA for a semester and will not be recalculated after a grade
exclusion.
•
Additional repeats of a course after grade forgiveness has been applied will be averaged with other course grades
for the purposes of calculating the GPA.
•
All earned grades, including the excluded “C-“, “D” or “F” grades, remain on the student’s academic record and will
be listed on the student transcript.
•
Units for both the first and subsequent attempts will be factored in for the purpose of calculating the student’s
completion rate.
•
Repeating a course for the purpose of Grade Exclusion is subject to course availability.
•
Excluded courses cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements.
GRADES OF INCOMPLETE
A student who is unable to finish the final assignment due to extenuating circumstances may request a grade of
incomplete for a course. An incomplete is an option only if the student has been making satisfactory progress in the
course and all other work is up-to-date with only the final project to be completed. Students will be required to
demonstrate that they are unable to complete the required final class assignment due to circumstances beyond the
student’s control such as a personal emergency or an illness.
Deadline: Students must submit a Petition for a Grade of Incomplete form to the relevant instructor and Department
Director prior the end of the term. Requests made after the term of the enrolled course has ended will not be
considered. There are no options for retroactive grades of incomplete.
NOTE: If approved, the student must submit a completed Request for Final Grade Change form prior to the start of the
following semester. Failure to submit a Request for Final Grade Change form by the deadline will result in a failing final
grade.
NOTE: Authorization for an Incomplete is not guaranteed and approval will depend on the circumstances leading to the
request.
FINANCIAL AID NOTE: Courses with a grade of incomplete are considered “in-progress” and will be factored into the
GPA and completion rate when the permanent grade is assigned.
Grade of Incomplete Procedure:
1. Request
Student obtains the Petition for Grade of Incomplete form (on campus courses) or the instructions (online
classes) from the relevant academic department
2. Documentation
Student submits documentation that demonstrates that he/she is unable to complete the final class assignment
to circumstances beyond the student’s control
3. Assignment Status Review
Student demonstrates that all other work is up-to-date with only the final project to be completed
4. Instructor Approval
The instructor approves the Petition for Grade of Incomplete
5. Final Work Review Arrangements
Student makes arrangements for submission of final work
NOTE: Work must be reviewed and the Request for Final Grade Change form must be received by the Office of
the Registrar prior to the Friday before the start of the next semester
On campus students: Make arrangements directly with the instructor
Online students: Contact Cyber Campus
6. Department Approval
57
NOTE: failure to obtain department approval prior to the end of the semester will void the petition
NOTE: the approved petition must be received by Office of the Registrar prior to the end of the semester
7. Request for Final Grade Procedure
Student obtains Request for Final Grade Change form (a Request for Final Grade Change form may be
obtained from the Student Adviser)
8. Review of Final Work
Student submits final work and the Request for Final Grade Change form to the instructor
9. Department Approval
Department Director reviews the Request for Final Grade Change form
10. Submission to the Office of the Registrar
The Request for Final Grade Change form is processed by the Office of the Registrar
Deadline: The Request for Final Grade Change form must be received prior to the Friday before the start of the next
semester. Example: A student who receives a grade of “I” for the Spring semester has until the Friday before the
following Summer semester to change the grade.
Failure to meet Deadline: Failure to make up the incomplete work and file a Petition for Final Grade within the time
frame will result in an automatic conversion to a final grade of “F”. A final grade that does not satisfy the prerequisites for
a subsequent course may result in an administrative drop from enrolled course and administrative enrollment into the
failed course.
NOTE: A student who has a Grade of Incomplete in a course that is a prerequisite for a subsequent course, may not
enroll in the subsequent course until the grade of Incomplete is removed or the Department Director grants permission
for enrollment.
NOTE: Incompletes only offer an extension to complete final work. Incompletes do not guarantee access to Academy of
Art University facilities or equipment to complete final projects. Students will not receive additional instruction on missed
lectures.
STUDENT APPEAL FOR GRADE CHANGE
The student has a right to appeal a final grade if the student believes that the assigned grade does not reflect the
student's performance relative to the Course Learning Outcomes.
NOTE: A student will only be permitted to petition for a change of final grade during the semester immediately following
the completion of course work for the questioned grade.
Students are evaluated in terms of the Course Learning Outcomes which are published on the syllabus for each course.
Students may access syllabi for in-progress courses electronically online. This resource is available for both on campus
and online courses.
The course Grading Policy and Course Learning Outcomes are also accessible through the online course search and
registration page. Search for course, select on campus or online and then view the Grading Policy or Course Learning
Outcomes tab.
A student who believes he/she has been assigned an improper grade should meet with the instructor and together
review the Course Learning Outcomes and the grading used to determine the final grade. If an error is determined, then
the student may proceed with the Change of Final Grade Procedure.
Change of Final Grade Procedure:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Student obtains Request for Final Grade Change form from the academic department
Student submits the Request for Final Grade Change form to the instructor
Department Director reviews the Request for Final Grade Change form
The Request for Final Grade Change form is processed by the Office of the Registrar
If, after careful review of the grading procedures, the student is still dissatisfied with the instructor’s assessment, or if the
instructor refuses to take part in the informal process, the student may appeal to the Department Director. If there is no
satisfactory resolution with the Department Director, the student may file a Grievance.
Grievance Committee Final Grade Appeal Procedure:
Supporting documentation and a written request should be addressed to:
Grievance Committee
Academy of Art University
79 New Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
58
STUDENT APPEAL OF “WF” GRADE
A student who has received a “WF” grade due to dropping a course under extenuating circumstances may appeal the
“WF” grade to ask that the withdrawal failure be changed to withdrawal.
Students will be required to demonstrate that they were unable to complete the course due to circumstances beyond the
student’s control such as a personal emergency or an illness.
Supporting documentation and a written request should be addressed to:
Grievance Committee
Academy of Art University
79 New Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
NOTE: Authorization for a change in withdrawal notation is not guaranteed and approval will depend on the
circumstances leading to the request.
59
Back to Table of Contents
60
STUDENT RECORD POLICIES
UNIVERSITY RECORDS
Retention of Student Records
Academy of Art University maintains a thorough and accurate system for entering, storing, updating, reporting and
securing data on student records. Each student’s progress is carefully updated to ensure that an accurate and complete
record of their academic program becomes a part of their permanent record. Academy of Art University maintains all
Student Records for a period of at least five years from the last academic year of enrollment. All required documents are
noted and logged on the computer system. New student files are monitored on a monthly basis for compliance to
admission requirements.
Students are notified in writing of any discrepancies.
All student transcripts are maintained by the Office of the Registrar for at least 50 years.
Retention of Veteran Records
A written record of previous education and training of veterans and eligible persons will be maintained by Academy of Art
University.
TRANSCRIPT REQUEST
A student may obtain an official transcript of coursework taken at Academy of Art University by submitting a written
transcript request, either in person or by mail, to:
Academy of Art University
Attention: Office of the Registrar
79 New Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
The fee is $10 for the request and $2 for additional copies ordered at the same time. The student’s financial account
must be in good standing in order to request a transcript. A student should allow at least two weeks for a request to be
processed. Academic information is protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 and is released
strictly by the student’s request and authorization. Transcripts will not be released without written authorization from the
student.
Proof of identity is required when students pose questions regarding their academic files. Students have the right to look
at their files. Generally, it is recommended that students make an appointment with a Student Adviser to review their
files. If students are checking to see if Academy of Art University has received certain information, documentation, or
transcripts, the Office of the Registrar will verify receipt.
NOTICE OF RIGHTS UNDER FERPA
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education
records. These rights include:
1.
The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day Academy of Art
University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the Registrar’s Office written requests that
identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the
student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the
Registrar’s Office, the Registrar shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be
addressed.
2.
The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate,
misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA. Students may ask Academy
of Art University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the
Academy of Art University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want
changed and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If Academy of Art University decides not to amend the
record as requested by the student, Academy of Art University will notify the student of the decision and advise
the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information
regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
61
3.
The right to provide written consent before the university discloses personally identifiable information from the
student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.
The school discloses education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for
disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by
Academy of Art University in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position
(including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person serving on the board of trustees; or a
student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee. A school official also
may include a volunteer or contractor outside of Academy of Art University who performs an institutional service
of function for which the school would otherwise use its own employees and who is under the direct control of
the school with respect to the use and maintenance of personally identifiable information from education
records, such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent or a student volunteering to assist another school
official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs
to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for Academy of Art
University.
Academy of Art University may also disclose students’ education records, without the consent of the student, in
certain other circumstances, including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
4.
to comply with a judicial order or a lawfully issued subpoena;
to appropriate officials in connection with a health or safety emergency
to officials of another school, upon request, in which a student seeks or intends to enroll;
in connection with a student’s request for or receipt of financial aid, as necessary to determine the
eligibility, amount, or conditions of the financial aid, or to enforce the terms and conditions of the aid;
to certain officials of the US Department of Education, the Comptroller General, to state and local
educational authorities, in connection with certain state or federally supported education programs;
to accrediting organizations to carry out their functions;
to organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of Academy of Art University;
to US Department of Homeland Security.
Information the school has designated as “directory information.”
The right to file a complaint with the US Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Academy of Art
University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers
FERPA is:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202
FERPA permits the disclosure of designated “Directory Information” without a student’s written consent, unless a student
provides written notification to the Office of the Registrar that s/he does not want “Directory Information” released.
Academy of Art University designates the following as public or “Directory Information”: student's name, student picture,
e-mail address, degree sought, expected date of graduation, school or college, major field, periods of enrollment, full- or
part-time enrollment status, degrees and awards received and dates of conferral, the previous educational agency or
institution attended, and participation in officially recognized activities and sports.
A student who wishes to allow another person, such as a parent or guardian, to have continuous access to the student’s
educational records must make written notification to the Office of the Registrar, 79 New Montgomery Street, San
Francisco, CA 94105. Once filed, this request becomes a permanent part of the student’s record until the student
instructs Academy of Art University, in writing, to have the request removed.
62
Back to Table of Contents
63
STUDENT POLICIES
STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES & EXPECTATIONS
It is the student’s right:
• To be a member of a safe community
• To an environment that encourages learning
It is the student’s responsibility:
• To know and adhere to the Student Code of Conduct and all Academy rules and regulations
• Participate appropriately and contribute to a disruption-free learning environment
• To be respectful the faculty, peers and all members of the university and administration
• Not to interfere with other students’ learning experiences
• To keep scheduled administrative appointments and arrive promptly
• To be truthful when providing information to any campus official
• To provide campus officials with verification of identity (student ID card) if asked
Within the classroom, students are expected to:
• Demonstrate a professional approach to the learning experience
• Interact with peers and faculty members in a mature manner
• Constructively receive and act upon critiques
• Use appropriate language and actions
• Be consistent in attendance, participation and contributions to the class
• Meet weekly and final deadlines
Within the student community, students are expected to:
• Demonstrate a professional approach in communicating when participating in social media.
USE OF STUDENT LIKENESSES AND/OR IMAGES
By signing the Academy’s Enrollment Agreement, students grant permission to Academy of Art University to use any and all
student work prepared or completed for class assignments for promotional purposes, including but not limited to: catalogs,
brochures, advertisements, video promotions and exhibitions. Academy of Art University also reserves the right to use
likenesses and/or images of students for these same promotional purposes.
COLLECTION OF STUDENT ARTWORK
Academy of Art University is not responsible for student work left on Academy premises. All student work submitted must be
collected by the student within 10 working days of the end of each semester. Academy of Art University will not be held
responsible for work that has not been collected after this time has lapsed.
STUDENT IDENTIFICATION BADGE
Students must provide campus officials with verification of identity (student ID card) if asked.
Initial IDs are free and will be available during orientation or during the first two weeks of school at the Security Office.
There is a $30 replacement fee for lost cards. To obtain a replacement card, students must first make a payment of $30
(cash or check only) to the Accounts Receivable department. Students may then bring the receipt to the Security Office for a
new card.
64
DRESS CODE
Students are responsible for dressing appropriately for their on-campus course work. Polices will vary by specific shops and
work spaces. Students will be removed from workspaces when a dress code violation results in a hygiene problem or safety
hazard.
General Expectations
Students must be clothed, including footwear, at all times.
Students should wear professional attire appropriate to their chosen field when attending industry-related events.
•
•
Shop Area Expectations
Keep long hair tied back and away from moving machinery.
No open toe shoes or high heel shoes are permitted.
Clothing should cover arms and legs.
Wear appropriate eye protection (safety glasses, goggles or safety shields), respiratory protection (dust mask,
respirator, etc.) and skin protection (latex gloves, leather gloves, etc.) designed for the type of work being done.
• Remove ties, rings, watches, bracelets or other jewelry and loosely hanging objects that could get caught in moving
machinery.
• When working with open flame, wear clothing that is not highly flammable.
• Additional policies may apply. Please check with shop managers and refer to shop rules.
•
•
•
•
CAMPUS SECURITY SAFETY REPORT
The Annual Campus Safety and Fire Safety Report is filed and made available to students as required by the federal "Crime
Awareness and Campus Security Act" (Public Law 102-26). The purpose of this report is to provide faculty, staff and
students with campus safety information including crime statistics and procedures to follow to report a crime.
The report is electronically available at www.academyart.edu (click on Disclosures, then Annual Campus Safety and
Campus Fire Safety report). The campus security report may also be obtained by calling 415.618.6483. Leave your name,
telephone number, and complete mailing address and indicate that you are requesting a copy of the Academy of Art
University Annual Campus Safety and Campus Fire Safety Report.
STUDENT APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES
Academy of Art University is committed to the ideal that, in the pursuit of development, a student should be free of unfair and
improper actions on the part of any member of the academic community. If a student feels that she or he has been subject to
unjust actions or denied her or his rights, redress may be sought by filing an appeal or grievance within the framework of the
Academy of Art University’s policies and procedures, outlined below.
STEP 1
Students are encouraged to resolve concerns or complaints informally by personal contact with the individual in question.
a. Academic concerns should first be discussed with the instructor.
b. For financial concerns or complaints, the student should first contact Accounts Receivable or the
Financial Aid Office, as appropriate.
c. For complaints related to other matters, the student should seek out a faculty or staff member for assistance.
STEP 2
If a satisfactory solution cannot be arranged through Step 1:
a. For academic concerns or complaints, the student should contact their Department Director.
b. For financial concerns or complaints, the student should contact a manager within Accounts Receivable or Financial Aid.
c. For complaints related to other matters, the student should seek out a manager in the appropriate area for assistance.
STEP 3
If a satisfactory solution cannot be arranged through Step 2:
a. Student should submit a letter of grievance to:
Grievance Committee
Attn: Executive Vice President of Educational Services, Sue Rowley
Academy of Art University
79 New Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
65
The Grievance Committee shall investigate grievance claims and hold formal hearings as necessary. Formal hearings deal
primarily with serious student problems and complaints, especially those involving student discipline, allegations of
discrimination, or other improper conduct. The Grievance Committee will consider all grievances in a timely manner upon
formal written notice of a grievance and attempt to resolve them directly. All parties will be notified in writing of the Grievance
Committee’s decision within a reasonable time after the meeting date. Decisions of the Grievance Committee are final and
binding, and are not appealable internally.
Complaints will be maintained as confidentially as possible. Grievances that affect a student’s academic or financial status
must be received by the Grievance Committee one month prior to the start of the semester in order to be considered by the
Committee.
For further information concerning the grievance procedure, call the office of Executive Vice President of Educational
Services & International Admissions/Services, Sue Rowley, at 800.544.2787 or 415.274.2222.
Students may file a complaint against the school by contacting the California Office of the Attorney General at 916-322-3360
or by sending a letter to:
Attorney General’s Office
California Department of Justice
Attention Public Inquiry Unit
P.O. 944255
Sacramento, CA 94244-2550
66
Back to Table of Contents
67
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT POLICIES
INTERNATIONAL NONIMMIGRANT STUDENTS
Academy of Art University is authorized under Federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students.
IMMIGRATION STATUS
It is the responsibility of international students to maintain lawful immigration status. Students are responsible for fully
and properly complying with all laws and regulations of the United States, state and local governments.
Students with any questions about the rules and regulations should contact the International Student Services Office.
Please be advised that any information on F1 status and visa regulations and benefits is subject to change by the
Department of Homeland Security.
International Student Services Office
Academy of Art University
th
79 New Montgomery Street, 4 floor
San Francisco, CA 94105
Appointment Desk: 415-274-2208 | Fax: 415-618-6278 | E-mail: [email protected]
ON-CAMPUS PRESENCE
Federal law required F-1 visa students to maintain an “On-Campus Presence”. This includes ensuring that an accurate
local address is on file with Academy Art University at all times, maintaining required course loads, attending all class
sessions and informing the International Student Office of any major or program changes.
Attendance and Academic Performance
Students must attend and participate in their class sessions, follow the Academy of Art University code of conduct and
make academic progress. Academy of Art University reserves the right to terminate an international student’s I-20 based
on poor academic performance, attendance issues or behavioral issues.
F1 IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS AND RESOURCES
A list of websites for resources and detailed information about F1 status requirements is available on the AAU website.
Visit: AAU Home > Students > My Academy > Student Resources > International Student Resources > Immigration Info
& Updates
MAINTAINTING F1 STATUS
An F-1 student is admitted to the United States in F-1 status for a period known as “duration of status” (D/S). It is critical
that all F-1 visa students to maintain F1 status while in the U.S. Failure to maintain the terms and conditions of the
F-1 status may lead to deportation. It is the F1 student’s responsibility to maintain F1 status at all times.
To Maintain F-1 Status:
•
•
Students must be enrolled to study full-time. Undergraduate students must be registered for a minimum of 12
units, while graduate students must be registered for at least 9 units for the fall and spring semesters.
Students who fail to follow these rules will lose their F1 status. The summer semester is optional and can be taken
as a vacation period, except for new students or students who are returning after a break in their studies.
Students, who begin their program of study in the summer semester or are resuming their on campus
studies after taking a leave of absence, are required to register full-time. The full-time requirement in the
summer semester is 6 units for graduate and undergraduate students.
68
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Only one online class (3 units) will be counted towards the student's full time enrollment requirement per
semester. The summer semester is considered optional and continuing international students may take more than
one online class during the summer. This does not apply to new students and continuing international students, who
are returning after a leave of absence or continuing students, who are going to complete their degree requirements
in the summer semester. Students may take online classes during Intersession, unless student is completing all
course requirements.
Students may be authorized to enroll in less than a full course of study, if they have academic difficulties, a medical
condition, pre-requisite issues or are in their last semester. Students must receive permission from the
International Student Services Office prior to enrolling in a reduced course load or dropping below a full
course of study. Failure to receive prior permission could jeopardize the student’s F1 status.
Students must attend every class session. If a student misses three (3) or more classes, s/he may be removed
from the course and will be considered to be “Out of Status”. An “Out of Status” situation will result in the
termination of the student’s SEVIS record.
Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 (average). Students who fall below this GPA will be placed on
probation and may face academic dismissal in the following semester. International students who have been
academically dismissed for the first time will not be able to register for classes for at least one semester.
International students who have been permanently dismissed will not be able to continue their studies at the
Academy of Art University. A dismissal from school will have a negative impact on the student’s F1 status and
options should be discussed with the International Student Services Office.
Students struggling with a full-time course load, class assignments or time management are strongly encouraged to
contact the Academy Resource Center (ARC). Please be advised that a heavy workload or major change is not
grounds for dropping to part-time status or stopping to attend classes.
Any change or problem with the F1 visa or status, change of address, change of major or academic program, must
be reported to the International Services Department within 10 days of their occurrence. International students are
required to update their local US address with the Academy of Art University. To update the local US address,
students should log into their online
Any change or problem with the F1 visa or status, change of address, change of major or academic program, must
be reported to the International Services Department within 10 days of their occurrence. International students are
required to update their local US address with the Academy of Art University. To update the local US address,
students should log into the online Learning Management System (LMS) account and update the Home address or
inform the International Student Services Office via email.
International Students are required to keep a valid passport for at least 6 months into the future, unless exempt from
the passport requirement.
Students should remain in the U.S. for no longer than 60 days after completing the full course of study, unless s/he
has followed procedures for applying for practical training, moving educational levels, or transferring schools.
Students who withdraw from school before completing their course of study (authorized early withdrawal) must leave
the U.S. within 15 days. Students whose records are terminated for a status violation have no grace period
and must leave the U.S. immediately.
Off-campus employment is strictly forbidden, except for students with authorized work authorization. On-campus
employment is allowed part-time (20 hr. /week) during the spring and fall semester and full-time (40 hr. /week)
during school breaks.
TRAVELING IN-BETWEEN SEMESTERS
Students who wish to travel between semesters must enroll for the next semester prior to traveling and should have the
following documents readily available when re-entering the US:
•
•
•
rd
Valid Form I-20 with a valid travel signature on the 3 page. The travel signature should not be older than 12
months when re-entering the US.
Valid passport. The passport must be valid for at least 6 months into the future upon re-entry to the US
Valid F1 visa. If the F1 visa is expired prior to departure or going to expire prior to re-entry, international students
must apply for a new F1 visa before re-entry to the US. For more detailed information about the F1 visa renewal,
students should contact the International Student Services Office.
69
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
International students planning to take a break in their studies discontinue their studies or take all courses online, are
required to apply for a Leave of Absence in order to handle their SEVIS record accordingly. Students who apply for a
Leave of Absence must depart the US within 15 days of the date of notification of the leave of absence, the date of
withdrawing from school, or the date of school advisement.
An F1 visa student not enrolled and attending school during required semesters will have not legal status to remain in the
country and would be considered to be out of status. International students who are not planning to enroll or attend
classes during required semesters should contact the International Student Services Office to discuss their F1 visa
status and possible options.
Taking All Courses Online
F1 students planning to take all courses online may do so outside the United States. Students who are planning to
continue their studies online cannot remain in the US and must apply for a Leave of Absence so that the International
Students Services Office can handle their SEVIS record accordingly.
PROCESS FOR AN APPROVED LEAVE OF ABSENCE
Students planning to apply for a Leave of Absence before a new semester begins are required to submit the following
documents to the International Student Services Office either via email or in person:
•
•
A brief letter explaining your situation and reasons for the leave of absence. If s/he is planning to resume their on
campus studies in the future, the letter should indicate the semester s/he would like to return to attend on campus
classes. The letter should also include the complete home address (foreign country) including postal code and
phone number. The letter should also include, if the student is not planning to continue his or her studies.
A copy of the student’s flight itinerary, e-ticket or airline ticket confirming the student’s departure date.
Students returning home due to family emergency, medical or personal reasons after semester begin and class
attendance must follow the procedure outlined below:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Contact the academic advisor and International Student Services Office either in person or by email. Explain the
reason for departure and request the withdrawal from classes or a change from on campus to online courses.
Purchase departure ticket and submit a copy of the flight itinerary to the International Student Services Office.
Upon receipt of the flight itinerary the International Student Services will approve any changes to a student’s
class schedule. The departure must be within 15 days of either withdrawing from the semester or changing from
on campus to all online classes.
The International Student Services Office will work with the student, the student’s academic advisor and the
Accounts Receivable Department to ensure a timely withdrawal or change of classes.
Contact the Accounts Receivable Department regarding any questions about a possible refund.
SEVIS Termination due to “Authorized Early Withdrawal”
Upon receipt of the above mentioned documents, the International Student Services Office will terminate the student’s
SEVIS record for “authorized early withdrawal” one day after the student’s departure, which is a positive termination that
should have no negative impact on any future visa applications. The termination of the SEVIS record also means that the
current AAU I-20 is no longer valid for re-entry to the US.
NOTE: SEVP policies require that a student’s SEVIS record is terminated for “authorized early withdrawal” during the
timeframe of the leave of absence.
NOTE: The current AAU I-20 and F1 visa cannot be used for any re- entry into the country during the timeframe of the
leave of absence.
NOTE: A return flight ticket should not be purchased before a new I-20 is issued or the terminated SEVIS record has
been re-activated, unless the departure date can be changed if necessary or the departure ticket is refundable.
NOTE: A Leave of Absence hold will be placed on the student’s account and no on campus enrollment will be possible
until the returning student has either a new I-20 or the previous I-20 has been re-activated.
RETURN FROM LEAVE OF ABSENCE
Students planning to resume their on campus studies after taking a Leave of Absence should contact the International
Student Services Office via email at least 2 to 3 months before their intended return date. The email should include the
student’s full name, student ID number and semester they plan to return. The International Student Services Office will
respond with a comprehensive email, including all the necessary steps and documents, for a successful return.
70
SEVIS Re-Activation
International students who are resuming their on campus studies within 5 months of their last day of class attendance will
be eligible for a re-activation of their SEVIS record. The re-activation of the SEVIS record will be processed by the SEVIS
Helpdesk and will take approximately 2 weeks. The re-activation cannot be requested earlier than 30 days before the
new semester start date or 30 days before the planned visa renewal application. Students who qualify for the reactivation of their SEVIS record will not be able to re-enter the US until the SEVIS Helpdesk has approved the reactivation and changed the SEVIS record from “terminated” to “active”.
New SEVIS Record/ New Form I-20
International students, who are resuming their on campus studies after 5 months of their last day of class attendance, will
not be eligible for a SEVIS re-activation and must apply for a new I-20, pay the $200 SEVIS and a new F1 visa.
Per immigration regulations the F1 visa becomes automatically invalid after spending 5 consecutive months outside the
US. Students who are returning to the US within 5 months of their departure and whose F1 visa is still valid on the day
they plan to re-enter are not required applying for a new F1 visa. Students returning to the US 5 months after their
departure are required to apply for a new F1 visa. For more detailed information about this policy, please visit the US
Department of State.
NOTE: Students who are planning to apply for post-completion OPT, must be in valid F1 status for one academic year.
The academic year will begin with the start date on the I-20. Students returning after a Leave of Absence with a new I-20
should have enough classes left to complete one academic year in F1 status from the program start date on their new I20.
EMPLOYMENT
International students are eligible for on- and off-campus employment. However, like all non-immigrant categories, the
F1 category is bound by the general restriction on employment stated by the Department of Homeland Security. In order
to maintain valid F1 status, a student must not work in the US, unless the employment is specifically authorized under
the regulations.
Types of employment available to F1 students are:
•
On Campus Employment
•
Employment authorized because of severe economic hardship
•
Practical Training (curricular and optional practical training)
Each category requires the student to currently maintaining valid F1 status. A student who is out of status is not eligible
for F1 benefits, including employment. Each F1 employment category has specific eligibility requirements, and most are
also divided into subcategories. International students will find information sheet for each off campus work authorization
online and should work directly with the International Student Services Office for questions or application processing.
On Campus Employment
F1 students are generally permitted to work part-time on the premises of the school that issued their currently valid I-20,
while they are attending that school and are maintaining their F1 status. This type of employment does not require DHS
authorization or updates to a student’s SEVIS record. On campus employment is limited to 20 hours per week while
school is in session and can be full-time (up to 40 hours/ week) during official school breaks.
Off Campus Employment
International students may be authorized for off campus employment under the following circumstances:
•
Employment authorized because of severe economic hardship (EH)
•
Practical Training
o Curricular Practical Training (CPT)
o Optional Practical Training (OPT)
Any type of off campus employment must be recommended in SEVIS by the International Student Services Office. F1
students cannot begin the off campus employment until s/he received appropriate work authorization. In order to qualify
for any type of off campus employment, international students must have been in valid F1 status for at least one fullacademic year.
Economic Hardship (EH)
The economic hardship employment authorization benefit is intended to address situations where a financial need
beyond the student’s control arises due to circumstances beyond the student control after obtaining F1 status. This work
authorization is being processed and granted by USCIS. If approved, the F1 student will be able to work off campus for
12 months, or until program end date, whichever is earlier. This work authorization is limited to 20 hours per week while
school is in session and can be full-time (40 hours/ week) during official school breaks. This particular work authorization
is not employer or major specific.
71
The International Student Services Office will assist international students in assembling all the necessary application
materials and filing the application with USCIS. For more detailed information, F1 students may review the EH
Information Sheet and/or stop by at the International Student Services Office during Drop In Hours.
Curricular Practical Training (CPT)
CPT is considered short term employment that is an integral part of an established curriculum and directly related to the
student’s major area of study. It allows students to gain practical experience while in school and is authorized by the
International Office. CPT must be part-time, 20 hours per week or less during any Spring and Fall semester while
enrolled in a full course load. Consequently, any internship or short term employment must be in the SF Bay Area,
unless the internship is during the summer and student is scheduled to resume onsite classes in the following Fall
semester. CPT can be authorized full-time during the Summer semester only. Students are not permitted to engage in
any work prior to receiving their CPT authorization. Furthermore, students should not work more than the authorized
amount of hours or beyond the timeframe indicated on the I-20.
Students are eligible for CPT under the following conditions:
1) Student is enrolled in degree seeking program
2) Student has not yet completed degree
3) Student has maintained F1 status for at least 1 academic year
4) Student is registered for internship class
5) Student has an internship or short term employment offer that applies directly to major
Exceptions when students are not eligible for internship class:
1) Student has already used all available internship units
2) Student has no units that can be used for internship class
3) Student received internship offer after class registration period
4) Student has not yet achieved the required unit amount
a. UGRAD: must have completed 66 units (EAP will not be counted) to be considered
b. GRAD: must have completed 36 units (EAP will not be counted) to be considered
5) Student does not have the required GPA of 3.0
a. Student must meet all other requirements and be fairly close to required GPA to be considered
CPT Processing:
1) Academic Advisor will provide Internship Application packet to student, including Internship Application Form.
The Internship Application Form should either be For Credit or Not For Credit. When using a Not For Credit
Internship Application Form the academic advisor is required to indicate the appropriate reason on the form.
2) Student must submit required documents (Application Form and Offer Letter) to academic advisor for further
processing. The Offer Letter must include everything that is noted on the Internship Application Form
3) The International Department will review and process CPT after documents have been scanned and noted in
the Internship Database. After CPT was authorized student will receive a notification email from the
International Office.
NOTE: F1 students who engage in 12 months or more of full-time CPT become ineligible for OPT. The use of part-time
CPT does not count towards the 12 months of full-time CPT, and consequently does not impact OPT eligibility. Academy
of Art University students will not be eligible for 12 months of full-time CPT.
Optional Practical Training (OPT)
OPT is defined in the regulations as “temporary employment for practical training directly related to the student’s major
area of study.” OPT must be recommended by the International Student Services Office in SEVIS and is granted by
USCIS. F1 students must not engage in any type of paid employment before receiving the appropriate Employment
Authorization Document (EAD).
Three kinds of OPT can be identified:
•
Pre-completion OPT (while student is still enrolled in school and has not completed all degree requirements)
•
Post-completion OPT (student has completed degree and all course work towards program completion)
•
17-months extension of post-completion OPT for certain STEM degree holders (STEM degree holders at the
Academy of Art University are students majoring in a) Animation or b) New Media and Web Design).
Per immigration regulations, F1 students are eligible for a total of 12 months of OPT per higher education level. The 12
months of OPT can be split in pre- and post-completion OPT. Any time used in pre-completion OPT will be subtracted
from the total of 12 months. This means that F1 students who have been approved for 1 year part-time pre-completion
OPT, will have only 6 months of full-time post-completion OPT left after program completion. Most international students
do not use any pre-completion OPT in order to have a total of 12 months of post-completion OPT available after program
completion.
72
The International Student Services Office will assist international students in assembling all the necessary application
materials and filing their OPT application with USCIS. For more detailed information, F1 students may go to the
International Student Website to review the OPT Information Sheet and/or stop by at the International Student Services
Office during drop- in hours.
Dependents of International Students
The spouse and unmarried minor children of an F1 visa student can be admitted in F2 status to accompany the student
to the US or follow to join the student at a later date.
To qualify for F2 status, a spouse or unmarried, minor (under age 21) child must establish to the satisfaction of the
consular officer and the immigration officer at the port of entry that:
•
H/she is the spouse (marriage license) or child (birth certificate) of the F1 principal visa holder.
•
H/she has sufficient funds to cover his/her expenses.
•
H/she intends to leave the US upon the termination of the status of the principal F1 visa holder.
Individuals in F2 status may not accept employment or engage in business under any circumstances.
The F2 study is restricted in the following ways:
•
F2 children may only engage in full-time study at the K-12 level.
•
F2 spouses may not engage in full-time study
•
F2 spouses may study part-time only to the extent that study is “a vocational and recreational” in nature and does
not count towards a degree requirement, lead to a specific education or professional objective, or satisfies a prerequisite
Individuals in F2 status wishing to engage in full-time study or to pursue an educational objective/degree are required to
change their status to F1. Valid F1 status can be obtain in following two ways and the International Student Services
Office will be able to provide more detailed information:
1) Applying for a change of status from F2 to F1 by filing Form I-539 with USCIS inside the US.
2) Departing the US and applying for the F1 visa outside the US before re-entering in F1 status.
F2 dependents planning to travel outside the US must have the following documents to re-enter the US in F2 status:
•
•
•
rd
Valid Form I-20 for Dependent with a valid travel signature on the 3 page. The travel signature should not be older
than 12 months when re-entering the US.
Valid passport. The passport must be valid for at least 6 months into the future upon re-entry to the US.
Valid F2 visa.
NOTE: The F2 dependent’s status is valid only if the F1 student is in valid status.
HEALTH INSURANCE
F-1 students residing in on campus housing are required to have valid health insurance. F1 students living off campus
are strongly encouraged to obtain health insurance. Students may purchase the Academy of Art University health
insurance plan or any other health insurance policy by a different provider.
REQUESTING A LETTER OF VERIFICATION / SUPPORT
While residing in the United States, students may be required to show proof of enrollment or visa status to obtain certain
services. The International Student Services Office can provide letters to assist students with these requests. Verification
letters are typically needed for one of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Apartment Rental
California State ID/Driver’s License
Enrollment Verification (including tuition)
F1 Visa Renewal
Invitation Letter for Family/Friends
Military Deferment
Opening a Bank Account
Passport Renewal
Social Security
Tourist Visa (to another country)
To obtain a letter of Verification or Support, fill out the Letter Request Form.
73
Back to Table of Contents
74
GRADUATE STUDENT POLICIES
GRADUATE MIDPOINT REVIEW
The Midpoint Review is a formal presentation before a Review Committee where the Graduate School evaluates each
student’s eligibility for Master’s candidacy based on the following:
•
•
•
Challenge and quality of proposed Final Thesis Project
Level of critical thinking and problem solving
Development of a body of work
Midpoint Reviews are conducted over a three-week (summer) and a four-week (spring/fall) period at the beginning of
each semester. Visit the Graduate Student website to sign-up for Midpoint Review and learn more about the Graduate
School Midpoint Guidelines and Requirements. Students may begin Directed Study after the Final Thesis Project is
approved.
FINAL THESIS PROJECT REDIRECTION
If student wishes to change the direction of their proposed Final Thesis Project, he/she must file a request for redirection
prior to making any changes to their Final Thesis Project.
DIRECTED STUDY
Directed Study is the graduate student’s primary concentration as a Master’s candidate. Directed Study enables the
Master’s candidate to focus on creating and completing a Final Thesis Project. Student must have passed Midpoint
Review before starting Directed Study. Throughout the 12-18 units of Directed Study, the Master’s candidate has the
following options:
•
•
•
•
Taking a studio class for Directed Study credit [800]
Participating in Group Directed Study [801]
Participating in Thesis Forum [802]
Taking an Internship for Directed Study credit (maximum 6 units) [900]
Early or additional Directed Study (for studio or elective credit) is NOT permitted.
Directed Study Journal
Each student is required to maintain a journal documenting the educational and creative exchange with his or her
Directed Study Adviser(s). The Directed Study Journal must trace the student’s steps from Midpoint to Final Review
preparation. This journal is to be added to and maintained throughout the student’s 12 – 18 units of Directed Study. The
journal must be written and contain visual materials as required by the student’s department. Student will present his/her
Directed Study Journal to the committee members at Final Review.
GRADUATE FINAL REVIEW
The Final Review is comprised of a visual, oral, and written presentation of the Final Thesis Project. The Final Review
Committee decides on the granting of the Master’s degree. Successful completion of the Final Thesis Project and Final
Review are required in order to graduate from Master’s Programs at Academy of Art University.
Final Reviews are conducted at the end of each semester (including summer semester). The Final Review will take place
at the end of the student’s last semester. No Final Reviews are held during the intersession. Note: if Final Thesis Project
conditions have not been met within two semesters, students will need to reapply to the Graduate School and Repetition
to Graduate.
75
STUDIO SPACES AND GALLERY EXHIBITIONS
Studio Space
Where available, Academy of Art University provides on-campus studio spaces or reserved group studios for Master’s
students in several Departments within the Graduate School. Master’s students should contact their specific Department
for details and eligibility requirements.
Gallery Exhibitions
Master’s students may apply for the opportunity to hold a public exhibit of their Final Thesis Project as part of a group
show. An exhibition is a privilege and not guaranteed. Master’s students should contact their specific Department and the
Director of Galleries for details and eligibility requirements.
REINSTATEMENT
Any graduate student who has withdrawn from a Master’s program or who has not taken graduate classes for two
academic years or more is required to reapply, and send a letter petitioning for reinstatement to the Executive Director of
Graduate Services & Administration.
Send letters to:
Director of Graduate Student Services
150 Hayes Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
Returning graduate students are subject to all current curricular requirements and standards.
76
Back to Table of Contents
77
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
It is your right:
•
•
•
•
•
•
To be a member of a safe community.
To learn from infractions.
To understand the process and how the Student Code of Conduct impacts you.
To have the charges and allegations against you in writing.
To be advised during the Disciplinary Process of the specific incident/conduct being reviewed.
To be provided reasonable opportunity to present your own version and respond to the incident in question.
It is your responsibility:
•
•
•
To know and adhere to the Student Code of Conduct and all Academy of Art University rules and regulations.
To be truthful when providing information to any campus official.
To provide campus officials with verification of your identity if asked (student ID card).
In the event of Disciplinary Action, it is your responsibility:
•
•
•
To schedule and keep your administrative appointments and/or hearings. Note: a reminder notice may be sent, but
is not required. Hearings may be conducted in your absence.
To comply with all sanctions imposed in the timeframe provided.
To provide advance notice and a clear and compelling reason if you experience a scheduling conflict that prevents
you from attending a disciplinary hearing, or are not able to complete your sanctions when due. You are responsible
for following up with the appropriate University staff prior to sanction deadlines.
Appeals Process
During the appeals process the Academy of Art University reserves the right to impose sanctions.
It is your right to appeal the decision:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Of a Department Director to office of Educational services/Title Nine Coordinator.
To the Grievance Committee if additional relevant information has become available since the initial decision that is
sufficient to alter said decision.
If the incident/activity in question was not a violation of the Student Code of Conduct or any other Academy rule or
regulation.
If the administrative process violated the student's rights.
If the findings were unsubstantiated.
If the sanction or outcome was inconsistent with prescribed sanctions/outcomes for similar cases.
If additional relevant information has become available since the initial decision that is sufficient to alter said
decision.
GUIDELINES
The Student Code of Conduct is applicable to all students, undergraduate and graduate, taking coursework at Academy
of Art University. The purpose of the Student Code of Conduct is to provide guidelines for appropriate student behavior
essential to Academy of Art University community and its educational mission.
Academy of Art University expects students to display honesty, integrity, and professionalism in every aspect of their
behavior and work at the University. The University expects students to be mindful of their audience as they innovate
through their art. Students are expected to respect themselves, other members of the University community, and the
Institution itself.
Students are expected to comply with all laws and rules set forth in the Student Code of Conduct. Students are expected
to refrain from conduct that injures persons or property, impedes in any way the orderly operations of the University,
including classroom instruction, or otherwise prevents the work of its faculty, staff or students. Conduct that is
unbecoming of an Academy of Art University student and is in violation of the Code of Conduct will result in disciplinary
action, up to and including summary dismissal from the University.
78
PROHIBITED CONDUCT
Conduct that threatens the safety or security of the campus community, or substantially disrupts the functions or
operation of the University is within the jurisdiction of this Student Code of Conduct regardless of whether the conduct
occurs on or off campus.
Unacceptable conduct includes but is not limited to the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
Cheating or plagiarism in connection with an academic program at the University, see Academy Honesty Policy.
(Plagiarism may be defined as “literary theft;” i.e., the presentation and passing off as one’s own the ideas, words, or
writings of another.)
Forgery, alteration, or misuse of University documents, records, or identification or knowingly furnishing false
information to the University or any University employee.
Forgery or identity theft including but not limited to alteration or illegal usage of University documents, school
records, and/or entrance applications.
Misrepresenting or falsely using student identification including misuse of Photo ID cards or posing as another
individual.
Posing as an agent of the University.
Auditing classes or attending without full payment.
Conduct reflecting discredit on the professional ethical standards of the University.
Harassment of any kind including, but not limited to, threats and sexual harassment.
Physical abuse on or off campus property of the person or property of any member of the campus community.
Possession or usage of fireworks, explosives, dangerous chemicals or deadly weapons on University property or at
a University function.
Abusive behavior including the use of profanity directed toward University staff, faculty, students, guests or visitors.
Throwing objects toward or at University employees, students or visitors.
Obscene, lewd, or indecent behavior on campus or at a University sponsored function.
Hazing or false imprisonment.
Possessing, distributing, manufacturing, or using illegal drugs or misusing legal pharmaceutical drugs on University
property or at University sponsored student events.
Possessing, distributing, manufacturing, or using alcohol on University property or at University sponsored student
events (except as expressly permitted by law and officially approved in advance by the University Executive Office).
Defacement, vandalism, tagging or using graffiti on University buildings or property.
Engaging in arson, blocking emergency exits, or falsely activating the fire alarm system.
Breaking into or unauthorized use of any campus facility or building.
Theft of University property, or assisting in storing or knowingly using stolen University property, as well as the nonreturn of borrowed (checked-out) Academy of Art University equipment.
Misuse of the University’s computer system including hacking into University computer records, or knowingly
sending computer bugs or viruses electronically.
Falsely using parking spaces designated for persons who are disabled.
Destruction of University property, including library vandalism.
Obstruction of University buildings, building entrances, school vehicles.
Disruption of the campus educational process, administrative process, or other campus sponsored event.
Refusal to follow instructions given by University personnel that results or may result in bodily harm to oneself, other
students, faculty or staff; including but not limited to emergency evacuation and requests to disassemble and vacate
premises.
Violation of any published Academy of Art University rules and regulations now or later in effect.
Sexual violence and misconduct. The Academy of Art University prohibits any form of sexual violence on its
campus, among Academy of Art University students or at Academy of Art University functions/events. Sexual
violence includes domestic violence, dating violence, stalking incidents, or any forms of sexual assault or sexual
misconduct. All incidents must be reported to the Campus Security office at 415-618-3911 and/or to the Title Nine
Coordinator/office at 415-618-6191. A fair, confidential and prompt investigation and hearing will occur that protects
victims and promotes accountability. Possible sanctions for sexual abuse or violence may include but not be limited
to dismissal from the Academy of Art University.
79
DEFINITIONS AND DESCRIPTION OF KEY TERMS
“University,” “Campus,” and “AAU” mean Academy of Art University.
“Threat” means intent to do harm either verbally or physically, actual or implied
“Defacing,” means to disfigure or mar.
“Weapon” means firearms, including guns of any kind, firing or non-firing; knives, including switchblades, razors and
daggers; brass knuckles; metal pipes or clubs of any kind. In addition, any item used in a threatening manner.
“Obstruction” means to block, pile debris, close off or cause hazard.
“School Vehicle” means any Academy of Art University bus, van, car, or courier.
“Dangerous Chemicals” include acids, gasoline, and any other flammable materials not issued by or sanctioned by the
University for Classroom Instruction and course assignments.
“Drugs” include non-prescription medication, street narcotics, marijuana and inhalants.
“Obscene or lewd behavior” includes public sex acts, prostitution or sexual solicitation, defecation, urination, personal
bodily exposure, and nudity unless sanctioned by Academy of Art University in a classroom setting for model purposes.
“University Property” or “Campus Facility” means any University owned or leased vehicles, building, and building
contents including plumbing, office equipment, computers, software, electronics, furniture, instructional equipment as
well as artwork of current students, faculty and alumni.
“Harassment” includes, but is not limited to written, verbal, psychological or physical abuse, sexual suggestions or acts,
or false accusations.
“Hazing” is to initiate or discipline fellow students by forcing ridiculous, humiliating, or painful acts.
“Profanity” refers to derogatory gestures or words specifically directed towards students, staff, faculty, guests or visitors.
“Dating Violence” Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a
romantic or intimate nature with the victim; (1) the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the
reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the
frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. (2) For the purpose of this definition dating
violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. Dating violence does not
include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.
“Domestic Violence” refers to a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by a current or former spouse or
intimate partner of the victim. By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common. By a person who is
cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner. By a person similarly situated to a
spouse or the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence
occurred, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the
domestic or family violence laws or the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred
“Stalking” refers to engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person
to fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or suffer substantial emotional distress. For the purpose of this
definition means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through
third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveys, threatens, or communicates
to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property. Substantial emotional distress means significant mental
suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.
“Reasonable person” means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.
STATEMENT ON ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITY
Academy of Art University values the pursuit of meaningful creative expression and truthful inquiry as essential elements
of the artist and scholar’s contribution to culture and society. Academy of Art University recognizes its commitment to
upholding these pursuits in the event they should be challenged.
Academy of Art University expects all members of its community to promote free expression as appropriate to the
curriculum, while maintaining an environment conducive to learning and responsible academic behavior. Academy of Art
University’s expectations of responsible academic behavior include, but are not limited to:
•
•
Engagement in learning in a tolerant, respectful, and informed manner;
Professional behavior in all aspects of work.
Academy of Art University encourages a spirit of open inquiry as students develop their creative processes and
intellectual positions. Intellectual and imaginative openness in itself, however, cannot sustain the educational process.
80
Academy of Art University expects faculty and directors to identify teachable moments and to cultivate habitual
opportunities for learning. Faculty and administrators thus have the following responsibilities:
•
•
•
Encourage free expression as appropriate to the curriculum;
Avoid introducing material that has no relation to the course objectives;
Place imagery, words, and symbols in their context and ensure their appropriate presentation in open and closed
forums including classrooms and exhibition spaces.
Academic freedom is both a right and a responsibility—it is not a license to violate the law or the rights of others.
Academy of Art University reminds its members that they must abide by United States and California laws addressing:
•
•
•
Discrimination against any demographic category;
Harassment of any individual on any grounds;
Obscenity, incitement, and slander.
While members of the Academy of Art University community will not be disciplined for activities that are protected under
the law as free speech, they can be disciplined for sexual harassment if their activities are viewed as creating a hostile
environment for others. Academy of Art University will investigate expressions of violent intent that indicate the person
may be endangering himself or others.
Any disputes will be adjudicated through Academy of Art University’s grievance procedure. The Board of Directors and
President are ultimately charged with protecting and overseeing standards of academic freedom and responsibility at
Academy of Art University.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
The Academy of Art University community, in order to fulfill its purposes, must maintain high standards of academic
honesty and model clear standards of professional behavior for its students. All members of the Academy of Art
University community are expected to exhibit honesty in their academic work. The principle of academic honesty is
understood to include the writing of papers, reports, quizzes, and examinations, as well as the creation of art and design
work. Students are expected to participate fully in their academic studies by contributing their own ideas and
understanding to each assignment. All material submitted for credit must be original work created for a specific
assignment. Students may not resubmit work created for previous or concurrent courses taken at Academy of Art
University or any other institution unless permission is given by the instructor or department.
Academy of Art University addresses violations of this academic honesty policy on an individual basis. Academic
honesty violations may be grounds for suspension or dismissal.
PLAGIARISM
All art and design work, and all written work, must be the original work of the student. Any quotations, paraphrases, or
direct appropriation of imagery or ideas from source material must be properly cited according to university,
departmental, and/or instructor policy.
Any student who plagiarizes will receive a grade of “F” for that assignment, with no opportunity to do the assignment
again. All plagiarism offenses will be reported to the Department Director and to the Educational Services Office and a
notation will be indicated on the student’s transcript.
Plagiarism is a violation of the Academy of Art University’s Academic Honesty Policy and may be grounds for suspension
or dismissal from Academy of Art University. This policy constitutes an official warning to each student.
CHEATING
Cheating is defined as accepting or giving aid to another during a written exam or for a written report unless authorized
by the instructor, or accepting or giving aid to another for an individual studio project unless authorized by the instructor.
This includes representing another person’s work, as one’s own, or buying or selling written or visual work to be turned in
for a class.
Cheating also includes dependence on sources other than those specifically authorized by the instructor; possession of
tests or other materials before such materials have been distributed by the instructor, unless prior permission is granted;
failing to abide by the instructions of the instructor with respect to test-taking procedures; influencing or attempting to
influence any University official, faculty member or employee responsible for processing grades, evaluating students or
for maintaining academic records through the use of bribery, threats, or any other means of coercion in order to affect a
student’s grade or evaluation; alteration or misuse of University documents pertaining to academic records.
81
INTERPRETATIONS OF REGULATIONS
Disciplinary regulations at Academy of Art University are set forth in writing in order to give students general notice of
prohibited conduct. The regulations should be read broadly and are not designed to define misconduct in exhaustive
terms.
FOCUS OF THE PROCEEDINGS
The focus of any inquiry relating to an alleged Code violation shall be to determine if an individual is responsible or not
responsible for violating the disciplinary regulations. Formal rules of evidence shall not be applicable, nor shall deviations
from prescribed procedures necessarily invalidate a decision or proceeding.
VIOLATIONS OF LAW AND DISCIPLINARY REGULATIONS
Students may be accountable to both criminal and civil authorities and to Academy of Art University for acts that
constitute violations of the law and of this Code. Disciplinary action at Academy of Art University will normally proceed
despite any pending criminal proceedings and will not be subject to challenge on the grounds that criminal charges
involving the same incident have been dismissed or reduced.
HARASSMENT
It is the policy of Academy of Art University to promote a learning and working environment free from harassment of any
kind, including sexual harassment. Harassment is considered intolerable behavior and complaints will be investigated
and acted upon promptly. Students who have any questions regarding this policy, or who wish to complain of
harassment, or any Academy of Art University personnel who have been informed of harassment involving a student,
should contact Executive Vice President of Educational Services & International Admissions/Services, Sue Rowley at
415.274.2222. Complaints alleging harassment will be maintained as confidential and private. Any member of the
University found to have engaged in harassment may be dismissed from the University.
82
Back to Table of Contents
83
UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURE
GUIDELINES
Campus Security, the Office of Educational Services, and Department Directors, may conduct investigation or intervene
in a disciplinary incident. These bodies may elicit the guidance and support of anyone they deem necessary to
understand the scope of the alleged violation and/or to explore appropriate responses to said violation.
Student behavior found to be in violation of any published Academy of Art University policy, rule, or regulation, including
the Student Code of Conduct, will result in disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal from the department and/or
University. Disciplinary sanctions can be imposed on applicants, enrolled students, students between academic terms,
graduates awaiting degrees, and students who withdraw from school while a disciplinary matter is pending.
PROCESS
Alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct may be reported to the Department by an instructor, staff, security, or
a fellow student and this incident/behavior will be officially documented. If the matter in question constitutes a potential
violation of the Code of Conduct the student will be asked to meet with the Department Director for a Conduct Meeting.
The Department Director will conduct an investigation and determine the appropriate action to be taken. After meeting
with the Department Director the student may be found not responsible for the incident/behavior in question, Informal
action may be taken, formal action may be taken, or the student may be referred to the Office of Educational Services.
If referred to the Office of Educational Services, the Office of Educational Services will outreach to the Department
Director or Director of Campus Security and conduct a subsequent inquiry and collect any relevant supporting evidence.
After an investigation of the alleged incident/behavior, the Office of Educational Services will determine the appropriate
action to be taken. The student may be found not responsible for the incident/behavior in question or formal action may
be taken. Should formal action be taken, the student will be notified in writing of sanctions imposed.
SANCTIONS
During the disciplinary process, every attempt will be made to foster student learning through a system of appropriate
and escalating consequences. Student may be subject to the following sanctions and penalties as part of the University
disciplinary process:
•
•
•
•
Warning: Students will be placed on behavioral probation. Violation of behavioral probation will result in immediate
suspension.
Suspension: Termination of student status for a specified period of time, including an academic term or terms with
reinstatement subject to specified conditions; further violations of school policies of violation of suspension may be
cause for further disciplinary action, normally in the form of dismissal.
Dismissal: Termination of student status at the University.
Restitution: Reimbursement for damage to or misappropriation of school, University, or private property; may be
imposed exclusively or in combination with other disciplinary actions. Such reimbursement may take the form of
monetary payment or appropriate service to repair or otherwise compensate for damages. Restitution may be
imposed on any student who, either alone or through group or concerted activities, participates in causing the
damages or costs.
WARNING: Written notice to a student that continued or repeated violations of specified school policies or campus
regulations may be cause for further disciplinary action. A permanent record of the violation(s) will be retained in the
student’s file.
APPEALS PROCESS
A student has the right to appeal the decision of a Department Director to Executive Vice President of Educational
Services if:
•
Additional relevant information has become available since the initial decision that is sufficient to alter said decision.
The student will be notified in writing of the final decision.
84
Back to Table of Contents
85
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
NAME
TITLE
Dr. Nancy Houston
Chair
Dr. Elisa Stephens
President
Scott Rhude
Secretary
Christopher Blum
Director
Jason Konesco
Director
Jeff Teague
Director
Jay Vaughn
Director
Frank Vega
Director
Carolyn Wente
Director
Charlotte Yates
Director
Debra Zumwalt
Director
Dr. Bernadine Chuck Fong
Director Emeritus
Caroline Daniels
Director Emeritus
Dr. Thomas Stauffer
Director Emeritus
Anne Wilbur
Director Emeritus
86
ADMINISTRATORS
KEY ADMINISTRATORS
NAME
TITLE
Dr. Elisa Stephens
President
Alana Addison
Chief Academic Officer
Christopher Lefferts
Chief Information Officer
Rachel Lee
Chief Strategy Officer, Office of the President
Sue Rowley
Executive Vice President of Educational Services & International Admissions/Services
Kate Griffeath
Executive Vice President of Educational Support
Ray Chan
Executive Vice President of Enrollment
Martha Weeck
Executive Vice President of Finance
Joe Vollaro
Executive Vice President of Financial Aid/Compliance
Cathy Corcoran
Vice President of Accreditation Compliance/WSCUC Accreditation Liaison Officer
Serita Sangimino
Vice President of Alumni Association and Special Events
Gordon North
Vice President of Business Operations
Rebecca Delgado-Rottman
Vice President of Community and Government Relations
Cindy Cai
Vice President of Domestic Graduate Admissions & Graduate Admissions
Chris Visslailli
Vice President of Human Resources
Patrick Adsuar
Vice President of Information Technology
Joan Bergholt
Vice President of Institutional Effectiveness
Ryan Baldwin
Vice President of Online Education & Director of Online Photography
Jason Shaeffer
Vice President of Online Education Production and Development
Henry Gamel
Vice President of Undergraduate Admissions
Melissa Sydeman
Academic Vice President of Entertainment and Broadcast Media
Eileen Everett
Academic Vice President of Liberal Arts
Joyce Gomez
Executive Director of AOS
Jack Isgro
Executive Director of MPT Outreach
Jennifer Bright
Executive Director of Records Management & Registrar
Allen James
Executive Director of Transportation
Colin Preston
Athletics Director
Jim O’Hara
Director of ARC Tutoring
Rachel Platkin
Director of Assessment
87
Andrea Keklikian
Director of Classroom Services
Denise Cottin
Director of Curriculum
Christina Fernandes
Director of Domestic Undergraduate Admissions
Daniel Alonso
Director of Domestic Undergraduate Admissions
Bob McDonald
Director of English for Art Purposes
Vanessa Spang
Director of Faculty Development
Carey Nerad
Director of Finance
Margaret Hilliard
Director of Graduate Student Services
Victor Postemski
Director of Housing & Residence Life
Paula Criss
Director of Industry & Career Development
Emily Manwell
Director of Industry Relations
Jessie Eckardt
Director of Institutional Research
Anne Connors
Director of Intensive Language Courses
Sharlene Asuncion
Director of Online Academic Development
Aaron Field
Director of Online Academic Support
Chantelle Ferguson
Director of Online Language Support
Melinda Mettler
Director of Online Student Relations
Gary Weeck
Director of Operations
Toby Silver
Director of Retention & Online Academic Development
Mike Petricca
Director of Security
Robert Garcia
Director of Sports Information
Kathy Chuck
Director of Student Services
Audrey Ferrie
Library Director & Information Literacy Program Coordinator
Mark Downey
Associate Director of Financial Aid
Ngan Larnauti
Assistant Director of Financial Aid
88
Back to Table of Contents
89
FACULTY INFORMATION
SCHOOL OF ACTING FULL-TIME FACULTY
Diane Baker
Executive Director, School of Acting / Executive Producer, AAU Film Production Studio
Diane Baker’s long and illustrious career in film and TV includes working as an actress and producer with such notables
as Anthony Hopkins, Jim Carrey, Paul Newman, Gregory Peck, Martin Landau, Liam Neeson and Deborah Kerr in her
production of A Woman of Substance. The recipient of numerous honors and awards, including multiple Emmy and
Golden Globe nominations, Diane has appeared in films such as The Diary of Anne Frank, Journey to the Center of the
Earth, The Joy Luck Club, Silence of the Lambs, The Cable Guy, and is a member of the Motion Picture Academy of Arts
and Sciences and BAFTA.
Professional Background: Partial List of Film Credits: “Murder at 1600,” “Imaginary Crimes,” “The Net,” “The Cable Guy,”
“The Joy Luck Club,” ”The Silence of the Lambs,” “Courage Under Fire,” “Mirage,” “Marnie,” “The Prize,” “The Diary of
Anne Frank.” Partial List of Television Appearances: “About Sarah,” “ER,” “A Woman of Substance,” “Chicago Hope,”
“Murder, She Wrote,” “Jackie O.”
Damon Sperber
Associate Director, School of Acting
Damon K. Sperber has worked as an actor for over twenty years. A graduate of UCLA (BA in World Arts and CulturesTheater) and the American Conservatory Theater (MFA), Damon has appeared in theater, television, film, commercials
and on radio. Damon is also a proud member of the Screen Actors Guild, Actor's Equity Association and AFTRA.
In addition to acting professionally, Damon's experience working with casting directors (he's worked in New York and Los
Angeles to develop and cast talent for Broadway, off-Broadway, and regional theater) has informed his techniques for
honing the tools required of the working actor.
"The journey of the actor is a rewarding and challenging process. It requires total commitment and focus. Combined with
a meticulous attention to detail and technical proficiency, the actor must also bring honesty, integrity and a childlike
freedom to utilize and develop their imaginations fully."
Educational Background: American Conservatory Theater (MFA); UCLA (BA)
Karen Hirst
Full-Time Faculty
Karen Hirst is a comedian, actor and singer. Karen began her professional career with Second City Improvisational
Theater in Chicago as part of their touring company. She appeared on stage with Second City alumni Eugene Levy,
George Wendt, John Candy, Jim Belushi, Betty Thomas and many others.
She was a performing/teaching artist with the Wolf Trap Foundation in Washington, D. C., and coordinated their Bay
Area program. Karen conducted workshops nationally for them on the use of comedy in the classroom.
Karen has written and continues to perform her own shows in the Bay Area. Locally, Karen has performed at the Magic
Theater, The Phoenix, Spreckles Center for The Performing Arts, and many other venues.
She holds a degree in acting from MacMurray College in Jacksonville, Illinois and pursued advanced acting studies at
Circle in the Square, in New York.
Karen teaches Improvisation, Acting for Actors, Respect for Acting, and is the faculty sponsor for the Drama Club. Karen
has been with the Academy since 1996 and is a full-time faculty member.
Educational Background: MacMurray College (BA-Speech & Theater Arts)
90
SCHOOL OF ADVERTISING FULL-TIME FACULTY
Vincent Engel
Co-Director, Advertising
Vince Engel joined the Academy of Art University in June 2008 as a part-time faculty member and has worked in
advertising for nearly 20 years. He received his Bachelor's degree from Humboldt State University and has created work
for brands such as American Express, Qantas, Nike, ESPN, Subaru, Miller Brewing Company, MTV, Ubisoft, Dr.
Martens, and many more. He has received numerous awards, including two Gold Lions and two television Emmys for
work done on ESPN's NCAA Basketball "Goulet" campaign.
Educational Background: Humboldt State University (BA-American History)
Ellen Shakespeare
Co-Director, Advertising
Ellen Shakespeare is an accomplished freelance writer, and has worked with distinguished advertising agencies
including The Bomb Factory, Goodby Silverstein, Cole & Weber, and Ogilvy & Mather for clients such as Rhino Records,
Ford Motor Company, Samsung, and Avia. She conducted her undergraduate studies at Western Michigan University
and Art Center College of Design where she received respectively her Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts
degrees, and received her Master of Arts degree in English from Kent State University. Prior to joining Academy of Art
University, Ellen spent the last several years working as an Advertising Instructor at Art Center College of Design.
Educational Background: Kent State University (MA); Western Michigan University Kalamazoo (BFA); Art Center College
of Design (BFA)
Thomas Fong
Online Director, School of Advertising
Thomas Fong graduated from Art Center College of Design with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Advertising. He has
been a brand building art director and graphic designer at Hill, Holliday in Boston and Kirshenbaum Bond Senecal +
Partners in NYC. He has created traditional print advertising, 360° integrated campaigns, graphics and packaging for
clients such as Sony, Panasonic, BMW, Citibank, HBO, Starz, Wyndham Hotels and Resorts, Moët Hennessey, Disney,
Polygram, Kenneth Cole, and Nike among other notable clientele.
Educational Background: Art Center College of Design, Pasadena (BFA-Advertising)
Mark Edwards
Associate Director of Copywriting
Mark Edwards has been a successful, award-winning copywriter for more than 20 years. His work has been recognized
in shows as diverse as The One Show, the Addys, and the Direct Marketing Association's Echo Awards. His work has
appeared for some of the world's best-known brands including Aetna, AMD, Apple, Bank of New York, BMG
Entertainment, Charles Schwab, Chase Manhattan Bank, DeBeers, Dove, Dunkin' Donuts, EMI Records, Harry Winston,
Intuit, Lucent, Microsoft, Saab, Showtime, Sony, Starbucks, Sun Microsystems, Time Warner and Wells Fargo.
Educational Background: University of Texas Austin (BS-Advertising)
Cameron Maddux
Associate Director of Account Planning
An account planning superstar, Cameron's career has included stints at Haggin Marketing, JWT, and Slingshot. He
received his BA in English from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge and his MA in Advertising with a focus in
Account Planning from the University of Texas, Austin. He has helped shape brands such as Verizon, Cellular One,
Pizza Inn, Jack Daniel's, Starbucks, GM, The Department of State, The British Council, and many more.
Educational Background: University of Texas (MA-Advertising); Louisiana State University (BA-English)
James Wojtowicz
Associate Director, Art Direction and Industry Development
James Wojtowicz has worked as an Art Director across several disciplines including advertising, feature films, interactive
web development, and magazine publishing. He has developed branding campaigns alongside California lifestyle brand
specialist Mike Salisbury as well as major advertising agencies including Chiat Day, Foote Cone and Belding, Public
Interest, and Ogilvy & Mather. His client list includes Levi's, Volkswagen, Rollerblade, Los Angeles Angels, Quicksilver,
The Bill Gates Foundation, Twentieth Century Fox, and others. Jim has lectured on the creative process at the
Smithsonian/Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian design conference in NYC.
Educational Background: Art Center College of Design (BFA-Advertising)
91
Laura Lahti
Full-Time Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator, Online
Laura Lahti loves collaborating on progressive and integrated brands with those who believe in pushing clients and
pulling crowds. A Communications graduate of Boston University, she was an experiential art director at several
agencies in Boston, including Modernista! and Arnold Worldwide, before moving to San Francisco to start her freelance
career. She has created work for Cadillac, Hummer, Project (RED), Ocean Spray, Keurig, Monster.com and many more.
She currently teaches and designs online advertising courses at Academy Art University.
Educational Background: Boston University (BS-Mass Communications: Advertising)
Lance Anderson
Full-Time Faculty
Lance Anderson is a designer, art director and principal of Lance Anderson Art Direction & Design. He’s designed
identities, books, consumer products, print advertising and collateral for entertainment visionaries, museums,
restaurants, wineries and biomedical giants. His work has received numerous awards and has appeared in publications
such as Graphis, Novum and Idea magazine. If you’ve seen the poster of Indiana Jones Temple of Doom, THX Digital
Sound Systems logo or the tap handle for Gordon Biersch Brewing, you’ve seen his work. Lance joined the School of
Advertising in Fall 2011.
Educational Background: Penn State University (BA-Art)
Stephen Williams
Full-Time Faculty
Steve Williams has been working as an animator for more than 30 years for a variety of studios in the US and Canada.
He has worked on animation and visual effects for movies such as The Hunt for Red October, Eraser, Star Wars: A New
Hope, The Mask, Jurassic Park, Terminator 2, and The Abyss. In 1997 he became co-owner of Hoytyboy Pictures, a
commercial production company which worked with corporations such as Blockbuster, Capital One, Toyota, McDonalds,
and Lexus. He joined the Academy of Art University in 2010 and is currently a full time faculty member for the Advertising
department.
Roland Young
Full-Time Faculty
Roland Young has been teaching since the late 1960's and continues to inspire students and professionals alike. Roland
began his design career at Capitol/Angel Records in 1964 under the guidance of Louis Danziger. He later moved to A&M
Records as creative director where he produced some of the music industry's finest album covers and advertising
campaigns. Prior to joining Academy of Art University as a full-time professor in January 2009, Roland spent 2008 as a
professor at the National Taiwan Normal University in Taipei. Currently he is Design Consultant at Meryl Pollen Design
whose clients include Suzanne Felsen Jewelry, Rolling Greens Nurseries, and Getty Museum. He remains a Design
Consultant for Paper Design Magazine in Taipei, Taiwan.
Educational Background: Art Center (BPA-Advertising Design)
SCHOOL OF ANIMATION & VISUAL EFFECTS FULL-TIME FACULTY
Chris Armstrong
Executive Director, School of Animation
Chris Armstrong worked as an Animator and Animation Supervisor at Industrial Light & Magic for more than 10 years.
He worked on many major projects at ILM, including Star Wars Episode I, Star Wars Episode II, The Mask, and Galaxy
Quest. His work experience includes CG Supervisor, Senior CG Animator and Director on various animated concepts, as
well as layout, animation and storyboard artist on Traditional Animated projects. He is a graduate of the Animation
Program at Sheridan College.
Professional Background: ILM (Animation Supervisor / Lead Animator), Spin Productions (Designer/Director), Catapult
Productions (Senior Computer Animator/Designer), Calibre Digital Design (Designer/Director), Animation House
(Animation Artist), Nelvana Animated (Layout Assistant Animation). Partial List of Feature Films Animator/ Visual Effects:
“Synecdoche, New York,” “The Day After Tomorrow,” “The Mask,” “Mars Attack,” “Flubber,” and “Men in Black II.”
Education: Sheridan College, Certificate of Completion (Animation)
92
Tom Bertino
Graduate Director, School of Animation & Visual Effects
Tom Bertino is a renowned animator with more than three decades of experience. Tom worked at Industrial Light +
Magic for nearly 20 years and was nominated for an Academy Award and BAFTA for Best Achievement in Visual Effects
for the CG imagery he created for The Mask. He is credited with animation direction on Men in Black II, Star Wars:
Episode I, and many other films. He has also worked for Toon Disney, Nepenthe, Hanna-Barbera and Colossal Pictures
in a number of capacities.
Professional Background: Partial List of Feature Films Animation Direction: “Work in Progress” (Director), “Frankenstein”
(Co-Director), “Son of the Mask,” “Men in Black II,” “The Time Machine,” “Star Wars: Episode I,” “Flubber,” “101
Dalmatians,” “Casper,” “The Mask” (Academy Award Nominee, Best Visual Effects & British Academy Award Nominee,
Best Visual Effects),“General Cinema Trailer,” “Joe Versus the Volcano,” “Ghostbusters II,” “The Accidental Tourist.”
Work Experience: Industrial Light & Magic (1986-2005)
Charles Keagle
Director, Online Animation
Charles has been part of the Academy family since 2003. He currently lives in Los Angeles after many years in San
Francisco as the on-campus Animation Lead during that time.
A doodler since birth, Charles came to the amazing realization while at Northwestern University that adults, not kids,
created cartoons. He promptly dropped his political science major and majored in art, creating his first animated short
using only Disney's The Illusion of Life as guidance.
His first job in animation was as a production assistant on the film Ferngully, the Last Rainforest. He then attended the
Character Animation program at CalArts, where his animated short "Are We There Yet?" was selected for the "Best of
the Year" show as well as the Spike and Mike Festival of Animation. After Cal Arts, Charles worked on The Ren &
Stimpy Show.
Charles was hired as an animator at Pixar and then given the opportunity to work in story on Toy Story 2. Later, he
storyboarded and animated for South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut. As Story Supervisor for Pulse Entertainment, he
oversaw production of Kung Fu 3D, an online series for Warner Bros, and co-designed an interactive Coyote and
Roadrunner project. Charles' work has been shown at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and at the Centre
Pompidou in Paris.
During his free time Charles likes to write. He has written a screenplay and is currently working on children's book ideas
so that he can read them to his son Charlie and his daughter Alex.
Educational Background: Northwestern University (BA-Studio Art)
David Nethery
Online Director, 2D Animation
David has been teaching at Academy of Art University since 2007. Prior to teaching for the Academy, David enjoyed 25
years of experience in the field of classical animation specializing in theatrical feature film projects as an animation artist
for various studios, including a long stint at Walt Disney Feature Animation. His work has been featured in animated films
such as Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, The Lion King, Pocahontas, Mulan, Lilo & Stitch and
Brother Bear among others.
David has said that as a teacher he still considers himself a student of animation and is constantly interested in learning
new techniques about the art and craft of drawn animation. In recent years he has focused on adapting his classical
pencil-on-paper animation training to digital paperless animation using a graphics tablet and is enthusiastic about
inspiring his students with innovative applications of classical hand-drawn animation principles to modern production
pipelines.
Educational Background: Sheridan College (Diploma in Classical Animation)
Sherrie H. Sinclair
Director of MFA Animation – 2D
Sherrie H. Sinclair joined the Academy over ten years ago, after almost nine years as a clean-up animator with Walt
Disney Feature Animation in Orlando, FL. Her film credits include The Lion King, Pocahontas, Mulan, Tarzan, and Lilo
and Stitch.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration); Florida State University (BA-History & Criticism of
Art)
93
Beth Sousa
Director of BFA 2D Animation
Beth has been teaching at the Academy of Art University since 2003. She started her career as a professional artist in
1978 and double majored in Painting and Metalsmithing at the University of Houston where she also studied animation.
She has created work for ABC, Fox, NBC, Paramount, Virgin, Maxis and Disney and specializes in teaching stop-motion
and experimental animation. In addition to teaching at the Academy of Art University, she also works on her own art and
animation projects in her San Francisco studio.
Educational Background: Texas Tech University (BFA-Communication Design) [contingent]
Dennis Blakey
Online Associate Director, School of Animation and Visual Effects
Dennis Blakey is a visual effects and computer graphics artist, inventor and producer that began using Wavefront 3D
software in 1986, and Side Effects Software since its beginning. His early computer graphics work includes Project
Galileo at JPL, creating the morphing effects for the security character "Odo" on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine for which
he received a visual effects Emmy in 1993, and film visual effects and animation for Digital Domain and Walt Disney
Feature Animation, now Walt Disney Animation Studios.
Diana Coco-Russell
Associate Director of 2D Animation
Diana Coco-Russell has spent most of her artistic career in animation, with her longest run at Walt Disney Feature
Animation as a clean-up animator. Beginning with Beauty and the Beast in 1992 and ending with Home on the Range in
2003 her credits appear on most films from that decade. She was known for specializing in animals and villains, and
focuses her skills on costumed gesture drawing for animation and storyboard in addition to introducing students to the
skills and craft of classical hand drawn animation.
Educational Background: University of California, Los Angeles (MA-Education); Art Center College of Design (BFAIllustration)
Derek Flood
Associate Director, Visual Effects
Derek Flood received his BFA in Painting from University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. He has also had intensive
training at the School of the Art Institute in Chicago where he focused on classical and computer animation. He has over
10 years of experience in character animation, directing, and photorealistic lighting/texturing. Prior to becoming full-time
faculty, Derek was an Independent Director and Animator at Sharktacos Studios, which he founded in 2003. Derek has
also worked at DreamWorks and various companies in Munich and Berlin. Film credits include The Pianist and Shrek2.
Derek has been the recipient of the Audience Favorite at Animago, Germany's premier CG animation award. His Say
Cheese has been an official selection at festivals and they include SIGGRAPH Electronic Theater, World Animation
Celebration, Anima Mundi in Brazil, Edinburgh International Film Fest in the UK, Art Futura in Spain, Hiroshima in Japan,
and many more. Say Cheese has been aired on television programs in Holland, Japan, the UK, and the US.
Educational Background: University of Illinois Urbana (BFA-Painting)
George Pafnutieff
Associate Graduate Director, Animation & Visual Effects
George teaches courses in Maya fundamentals and pre-production principles, and was previously a Senior Systems
Engineer at Apple Computer, Inc., Technical Supervisor for ILM, and Systems Administrator for Reliant Integration
Systems. George holds a BS in Information Systems Management from San Francisco State University.
Educational Background: University of San Francisco (B.S.-Computer Science)
Robert Steele
Undergraduate Associate Director, Portfolio for Animation & Visual Effects
Robert studied Fine Arts at Santa Monica College, and is an accomplished art director for animation, storyboarding, and
computer animation with a wide range of traditional and interactive entertainment production knowledge. Credits include
Disney's Jungle Book, NFL '97, numerous commercials, and the Terminator and RoboCop vs. Terminator games. He
has worked at Sega Technical Institute, Virgin Interactive, Cinemawave Inc. and Captivation Digital Laboratories and has
over 12 years of professional experience and game credits include Half-Life, Diablo II, and Die Hard Arcade.
Educational Background: Santa Monica College (AA-Fine Arts)
94
Peter Bakic
Dynamics Coordinator
Peter Bakic received his degree in 3D computer graphics from the University of Toronto. Prior to teaching, Peter was a
VFX Supervisor at Rocket Studio and worked on advertising projects for Lexus, Apple, Nissan, Gucci, Subaru,
Southwest Airlines, and Sprint. Peter also worked at ILM on a variety of movies, including Star Wars Episode 2: Attack
of the Clones, Harry Potter, Minority Report and Sleepy Hollow. He founded the Chiron School for Creative
Technologies in Yugoslavia and is a member of ACM SIGGRAPH and the Visual Effects Society.
Professional Background: Rocket Studio (CG supervisor / Lead Technical Director), Industrial Light and Magic (R&D
Technical Director)
Gilbert Hannibal Banducci
Pre-Production Lead
Gilbert Hannibal Banducci majored in Film and Animation at Academy of Art University. He produces, writes, and directs
commercials, documentaries, and animated projects, and is CEO of Helpful Bear Productions, Inc., a visual development
company. He is interested in how the entertainment industry works and teaches graduate level courses on the science
and nature of the industry. In addition, Gil has edited several books on concept art, and is the producer and creator of
Tales of Amalthea, an online interactive epic adventure that combines science, art, and storytelling.
Professional Background: Helpful Bear Productions (owner)
Daisy Church
Full-Time Faculty
Daisy Church works and lives in San Francisco as an artist and illustrator.
She has worked extensively for over 10 years as a 2D animator for both television and mobile games. Her work has
been seen on Cartoon Network, HBO, MTV, Adult Swim, Nick Jr, Disney Interactive Games and Disney Playhouse.
She loves to paint and work on her personal fine art, and actively exhibits her work in galleries worldwide. She also loves
to curate and organize group art shows in San Francisco.
In her free time, Daisy loves to travel with her husband and artist partner in crime, Damon O'Keefe.
Norman DeCarlo
Full-Time Faculty, 2D
Norman DeCarlo has been a working artist in San Francisco since his arrival in 1975. Since then he has been an
illustrator, cartoonist, sculptor, model maker, graphic designer and an art director and sculptor for both advertising and
on various television and feature film projects.
In addition to his work as an artist, Norman also teaches animation principles and techniques to students attending the
Academy of Art University in San Francisco where he has taught since 2011. He also teaches courses on the creation
and building of sculptures for feature film, television work and for gaming. These sculptures, called maquettes, are
miniatures used to help to completely understand the three-dimensional form being discussed.
Norman is also a drummer and has played professionally since he was 15 years old. His focus has been on American
blues music and all of its derivatives, like jazz and rock. I have lead bands but mostly prefer to back up others.
Educational Background: Minneapolis College of Art and Design (BFA-Sculpture)
Shaun Featherstone
Freshmen Studies Coordinator
Shaun Featherstone is currently the Storyboard Coordinator at Academy of Art University where he has taught since
2003. As a full-time instructor in the university's Animation & Visual Effects department, Shaun works with undergraduate
and graduate students in the following areas: animation pre-production, history and techniques of visual effects and
computer animation, character animation techniques and theory. Shaun holds a BA in Art & Education from the
University of Leeds. He also holds a post-graduate certificate in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education from
Teesside University.
Educational Background: University of Lincoln Hull (BA-Animation)
95
Rob Gibson
Technology Officer / CAPS Coordinator
Rob Gibson has been a full-time instructor at the Academy of Art University's Animation & Visual Effects department
since 2002. Currently, he is the Technology Officer and Coordinator of Computer Animation Production for the
department. He was previously a Senior Animator at Forensic Technologies; Director of Computer Arts for Academy of
Art College; and Director of Digital/Visual Media for the Ex'pression Center for New Media. Rob holds a Bachelor of
Architecture from California College of the Arts.
Educational Background: California College of Arts and Crafts (B.Arch.-Architecture)
Edward Kats
Systems Administrator / Full-Time Faculty
Ed Kats received his BFA in Computer Arts from Academy of Art University. He is currently Systems Administrator and
Full-Time Faculty at the Academy of Art University's School of Animation and Visual Effects. He currently teaches 3D
modeling and animation to undergraduate and graduate students onsite and online. Previously, he had worked as a Web
Designer, Test Engineer, Identity Designer, 3D Artist, and Graphic Designer.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Computer Arts)
Sasha Korellis
Production Lead
Sasha Korellis is currently a Production Coordinator in the Academy of Art University's School of Animation. She is also
currently Executive Producer and Head of Content Development for Girl Friday Productions. Previously, she has worked
for such companies as Leap Frog Enterprises, There TV, Wild Brain, Carl's Fine Films, and NVIDIA. She holds a BA in
Film & Video with concentrations in producing and editing from Columbia College.
Educational Background: Columbia College (BA-Film & Video)
David Latour
Animation Coordinator
David Latour is an experienced Animator with years of experience working with the industry's leaders. David is currently
Animation Coordinator for the Academy of Art University's Animation & Visual Effects department. Simultaneously, he is
also the Animation Lead at MegaPickle Entertainment where he supervises an international team of animators.
Previously, he was a Senior Animator with ILM where he produced CG character animation for use in 17 feature films
and 3 television commercials. He is the recipient of several awards. Among these are the 1991 Best Male Performance
from the Blyth Drama Festival; Outstanding Achievement Design Award from the National Collegiate Festival; and two
Outstanding Performance Awards from the Ontario Collegiate Festival. Latour's major film credits include Van Helsing,
Hulk, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, MIB II, Star Wars: Episode II, The Green Mile, and Wild Wild West. He is
a member of the Canadian Actor's Equity. Latour received his diploma in Animation from Sheridan College. In his spare
time, David volunteers with Wildcare helping to rehabilitate injured and orphaned wildlife.
Educational Background: Sheridan College (Association of Arts Degree)
Virginie Michel d’Annoville
Online 3D Animation Coordinator
Virginie Michel d'Annoville is an animation supervisor, animator, rigger and professor of animation with over 25
experience in feature animation and visual effects, commercials, and games for various studios with most of that time
spent at Industrial Light + Magic in San Francisco in addition to Lucasfilm Animation in Singapore and Sony Pictures
Imageworks in Los Angeles. She was a technical animation supervisor on the Academy Award winning animated film
Rango as well as a sequence supervisor and a character lead. Virginie has also worked on a large variety of other films
such as Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace, Star Wars Episode 2: Attack of the Clones, Star Wars Episode 3:
Revenge of the Sith, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, The Hulk, Superman Returns, The Chronicles of Narnia:
The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.
Virginie has been teaching at the Academy of Art University since 2011 and she currently lives in San Francisco.
Educational Background: Malaysian Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administrators MAISCA (MA-Image Synthesis
& Computer Animation); SUPINFO International University (MA-Graphic Design & Computer Science)
96
Tareq Mirza
Online 3D Modeling Coordinator, Animation & Visual Effects
Tareq Mirza has been creating since his parents bought him his first LEGO set at the age of three. For hours each day
throughout his childhood he would build whatever came to his mind and create a story to go with it. Lego was eventually
replaced by a love of comic books and a desire to create his own characters and content. He received his BFA from
George Mason University in studio art and computer graphics and went on to work in the visual effects industry.
After several years in Los Angeles working on television visual effects and animation, Tareq relocated to the San
Francisco bay area to work at Industrial Light + Magic on Star Wars: Attack of the Clones. His other credits include
Matrix Reloaded, Matrix Revolutions, Pirates of the Caribbean and Van Helsing.
Tareq left the film industry to pursue a career in education. His faculty position as Online Modeling Lead at the Academy
of Art University in San Francisco allows him to create curriculum, improve his teaching skills and become a better artist.
He is currently exploring possibilities in 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing for artistic and educational purposes.
Educational Background: George Mason University (BFA-Art Studio)
Ease Owyeung
Full-Time Faculty
Ease Owyeung is currently the 3D Modeling Coordinator for the Academy of Art University's Animation & Visual Effects
department. He holds a BA degree in Architecture from the University of Arizona. Prior to joining the faculty at AAU,
Ease was Modeling Director for Virtual Space Entertainment; CD 3D Modeler for the Walt Disney Co.; Art Director for
3DO Company; and Senior Modelmaker for ILM. A sampling of film credits includes: Meet the Robinsons, My Favorite
Martian, Mask 2, Empire Strikes Back, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Hunt for Red October, and others.
Educational Background: University of Arizona (BA-Architecture)
Jason Patnode
Technical Lead
Jason Patnode has taught at the Academy of Art University since 2001 and he is currently Full-Time Faculty/ Maya
Coordinator for the school's Animation & Visual Effects department. He teaches graduate and undergraduate students in
3D modeling, visual effects, and animation for video games and film. Jason has written several books on the subject of
Maya and Zbrush. Prior to joining AAU as full-time faculty, Jason was a Lead Technical Artist for LucasArts
Entertainment where he worked on various games: Star Wars Episode 3, Full Throttle 2, and Star Wars: Jedi Fighter.
Jason received his BA in Film Production from San Francisco State University.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (BA-Film Production)
Catherine Tate
Collaboration Lead
Catherine Tate is an accomplished Visual Effects Artist and Compositor who has worked on some of the industry's most
recognizable films and video games. Catherine Tate is currently the Compositing Lead in the Animation & Visual Effects
department at Academy of Art University where she has been teaching since 2004. She established a collaborative class
in 2006 at AAU known as ""Studio400A"" which has produced visual effects on numerous independent films. Her
objective is to connect visual effects students to filmmakers to create a more real world experience in the classroom.
Some of Studio400A's most recent work includes Beasts of the Southern Wild, which was nominated for four Academy
Awards including best picture, 2013 Sundance and Festival de Cannes winner Fruitvale Station, and the feature
Bluebird, which opened the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival. Studio400A also worked on the features Half-Life and
Circumstance, along with the short Crazy Beats Strong Every Time, which were also official selections at the Sundance
Film Festival.
Some of her studio feature film credits include: Men in Black, Contact, Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace,
Sleepy Hollow, Galaxy Quest, Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones, Hulk, and Hellboy.
Professional Background: Industrial Light + Magic (1991-1995 and 1997-2003), The Orphanage (2003-2004), ESC
Entertainment (Contractor). Visual Effects Supervisor: “Beasts of the Southern Wild”, “Crazy Beats Strong Every Time”,
“Exposure”, “Circumstance”, “Midnight Son”, “Dear Lemon Lima”. Partial list of feature films compositor: “Synedoche,
New York,” “Hulk,” “Men in Black II,” “House of Wax,” “Wild Wild West,” “Perfect Storm,” “Minority Report,” “AI,” and “Star
Wars.”
97
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE FULL-TIME FACULTY
Mimi Sullivan
Executive Director, School of Architecture
Mimi Sullivan is a registered Architect in California and a principal of Saida + Sullivan Design Partners (SSDP) a full
service, award winning, San Francisco architectural firm. Ms. Sullivan is just as passionate about the process of design
as she is about the final built structure. She oversees community outreach, design team coordination, project
management, sustainability, and construction supervision. Ms. Sullivan's 28 years of diverse architectural and interior
design experience includes extensive work in award winning multi-family/mixed use/transit oriented housing as well as
commercial, retail, civic building design and custom single family homes. Ms. Sullivan’s work in affordable housing has
been published in Architectural Record as well as the San Francisco AIA magazine, “Small Firms – Great Projects”. She
is both an architect and an educator. She has taught architectural design, media, and process at universities in the
United States and in Japan. She was the founding director of the Graduate Architecture Program at the Academy of Art
University in San Francisco and achieved the initial NAAB accreditation for the program in 2007.
Prior to starting SSDP in 1999 with her partner, Ms. Sullivan was teaching Japanese architectural history at Waseda
University in Tokyo, Japan while acting as the Resident Director for the Oregon State System of Higher Education for
study abroad programs at multiple universities in Tokyo. Ms. Sullivan was a guest critic and lecturer at Daido University
in Nagoya and Aoyama Gakuin in Tokyo, Japan. Ms. Sullivan received a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from Rice
University with a Minor in Fine Arts, and a Master of Architecture and Master of International Studies from the University
of Oregon.
Educational Background: University of Oregon (M.Arch.-Architecture); University of Oregon (MA- International Studies);
Rice University (BA-Architecture)
Jennifer Asselstine
Undergraduate Director, Architecture
Jennifer Asselstine AIA has 30 years of experience in architecture and design and 10 years of teaching experience. She
is a licensed architect in the state of Maryland and runs her own design office in San Anselmo. She received her
Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Minnesota, where she was honored with an award from the American
Institute of Architects. Ms. Asselstine went on to work for RTKL and CS&D in Baltimore, Maryland. She later moved to
the U.K., where she studied at the Architectural Association in London and later worked for WATG Architects. Ms.
Asselstine studied at the Architectural Association in London and has worked in the U.S., London, Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia and Sydney, Australia on a broad range of projects, from hotel and resort design and senior housing, to an
IMAX theater. The Red Cross Headquarters and Blood Processing Center, which was designed by Ms. Asselstine for
CS&D Architects in Baltimore, Maryland, won a Design Award from the American Society of Interior Designers. She
currently specializes in single-family housing and community design work.
Educational Background: University of Minnesota (BA-Architecture)
Eric Lum
Online Director, School of Architecture
Eric Lum, AIA, Ph.D., LEED BD+C, is a licensed architect in the state of California and NCARB certified. He has worked
for Kallmann, McKinnell and Wood Architects in Boston, Arthur Erickson Architects in Los Angeles, and Gensler in San
Francisco, among others. He is a founding principal of his firm Architecture 3 (A3) and studied architecture at the
University of California Berkeley, the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, where he gained his doctorate in architectural history.
Educational Background: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Ph.D.); Harvard (MDesS); University of California,
Berkeley (M.Arch.); University of British Colombia (BA)
98
Mark Mueckenheim
Graduate Director, Architecture
Mark Mückenheim Architekt AKNW BDA (Germany) is a licensed architect in Germany and the European Union, the
principal of MCKNHM Architects, and the co-author of the book "Inspiration - contemporary design methods in
architecture" released by BIS Publishers in 2012. Before establishing his own architecture practice in 2001, he worked
and collaborated with different architecture firms in Germany, USA and England, gaining extensive experience from
concept to realization on various projects of internationally recognized design excellence.
Mark Mückenheim has lectured and acted as a guest critic at numerous institutions in Germany, the European Union,
and the US. Among other schools, he taught for more than six years at the distinguished RWTH Aachen before being
appointed as a visiting professor at the TU Munich from 2009 to 2012. Since 2013, he is appointed as the graduate
director of the school of architecture at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. His award winning work has
been featured in various international book and journal publications and has also gained reputation through a number of
exhibitions in Germany and abroad - most recently the house of architecture in Lille, France, the German Architecture
center in Berlin and the 12th Architecture Biennale in Venice.
Educated in Germany, the United States, and England, sponsored by a Fulbright scholarship and a DAAD grand from
the German government, Mückenheim received his Master of Architecture from Parsons School of Design, New York,
and his Graduate Diploma in Architecture at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London.
Educational Background: Parsons School of Design, New York (M.Arch.-Architecture); Bartlett School of Architecture,
University College London (Graduate Diploma-Architecture)
Nicole Lambrou
Assistant Graduate Director
Nicole Lambrou received a Masters of Architecture from Yale University in the spring of 2006. In her final year at Yale
she was selected as a Teaching Fellow for two graduate courses in the School of Architecture, Visual Representation
and Independent Drawing Projects. Nicole is also the recipient of the Yale School of Architecture Drawing Prize, and
architectural drawing continues to be an integral part of her design process.
During her work in Germany with Behnisch Architekten, Nicole had the opportunity to become immersed in design that is
integrated with sustainable concepts while working on Harvard University's campus expansion. At the time she was also
involved with generating graphics for a rotating exhibition, in collaboration with Transsolar, representing human impact
on the planet and throughout history.
Since moving to San Francisco in August of 2007 and before founding her own practice, Nicole worked for several years
at an architecture firm whose scope of work involved public housing in the city of San Francisco and public schools
throughout the state of California. Through a collaborative partnership with AE Design she also completed several
houses at Sea Ranch, CA. Most recently Nicole launched a green roof system that was included in the CitiesAlive
Conference in San Francisco.
Nicole also participated in the AIAS conference in the Fall of 2012. She was awarded second place for the design of a
public library in Gevgelija, Macedonia in an international competition sponsored by the United Nations Development
Program, and has received accolades for various other architectural submissions throughout her design career. Nicole is
a registered architect in the state of New York.
Educational Background: Yale University (M.Arch.-Architecture); Binghamton University (BA-Philosophy)
Karen Seong
Undergraduate Assistant Director of Architecture
Karen Seong is a licensed architect in California and New York, a LEED accredited professional, and NCARB certified.
She developed her professional expertise while with Skidmore Owings and Merrill in New York and in San Francisco.
She held leadership positions working collaboratively with large international teams on award-winning projects ranging
from high-rise to institutional buildings in the US and in the Middle East. Driven by an interest in materials and systems
innovations, she helped establish SOM LAB to conduct research in collaboration with industry leaders in an effort to
develop new building materials. Karen’s teaching philosophy is stimulated by an interest in seeking innovation in the
margins of established practices. Her pedagogy places an emphasis on materials studies and a process-oriented design
method. She firmly believes that inventiveness is the most meaningful and relevant when it is grounded in an
understanding of the current limitations in the building industry. Her design research is centered on crafting a conceptual
strategy to draw out latent opportunities. Karen has previously taught at UC Berkeley and has been a guest critic at
various institutions in the US and in Korea. She received a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from UC Berkeley and a
Master of Architecture from Columbia University with distinction.
Educational Background: Columbia University (M.Arch.-Architecture); University of California Berkeley (BA-Architecture)
99
Albert Bertoli
Full-Time Faculty, School of Architecture
Mr. Bertoli has vast experience in different areas of the architectural profession. His work ranges from the planning of
shuttle facilities for the space program to the designing of a performing arts center. He most recently designed the
InterContinental San Francisco hotel. His work has also been recognized by multiple AIA Chapters, the Architectural
Association of France, and at numerous international competitions. Mr. Bertoli started his formal education at the
University of Buenos Aires, and continued at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. He has his professional license through the
State of California. Before joining the Academy he was a lecturer at Cal Poly SLO, UCLA Graduate School of
Architecture, and taught for more than 20 years at SCIARC.
Educational Background: California Polytechnic State University (BA-Architecture)
Braden Engel
Undergraduate Architecture History / Theory Coordinator
Braden Engel is a full-time faculty member and undergraduate history theory coordinator. He has taught internationally –
at the Architectural Association, London, the University of Greenwich, London, and he was a Senior Lecturer in
Architecture at California College of the Arts, Lecturer in Architecture at UC Santa Cruz and at the University of California
Berkeley before joining the Academy of Art University.
Braden received an M.A. in Histories & Theories of Architecture from the Architectural Association, London, and an
M.Arch. and a B.S. in Philosophy from North Dakota State University. His written work has been published in the United
States and abroad, including The Journal of Architecture (RIBA), Planning Perspectives, AA Files, and PLAT. Braden’s
current research and writing focuses on the interval between aesthetic experience and modes of presentation in
architectural historiography, framed by the mixing of continental European and American pragmatist philosophies in the
United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.
Educational Background: Architectural Association School of Architecture (MA Histories & Theories of Architecture);
North Dakota State University (BS Philosophy & Master of Architecture)
Benjamin Rice
M.Arch Emerging Technologies Coordinator
Benjamin Rice is principal of Matter Management. Before joining Matter Management Benjamin helped deliver high
profile architectural projects and competitions ranging in scope from residential, to commercial, to transportation for
some of the world's leading architectural firms.
Benjamin’s work, both personal and professional, has been published and exhibited widely. Recent exhibitions include
the A+D Museum in Los Angeles, the Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, and the Denver Art Museum.
Recent publications include On Ramp, Pidgin Magazine, TARP, eVolo Magazine, and The Huffington Post.
Benjamin is a full time faculty member and graduate coordinator for emerging technologies at the Academy of Art
University. He was a Lecturer at the UC Berkeley College of Environmental Design and a Senior Lecturer at the
California College of the Arts. He has also taught previously at the Virginia Tech School of Architecture + Design, as an
assistant at the Southern California Institute of Architecture and the Princeton University School of Architecture, as well
as having been involved with several international workshops. He received his Bachelor of Architecture from the
Southern California Institute of Architecture where he is a graduate of distinction, and his Master of Architecture from the
Princeton University School of Architecture where he was a Fellow of the Graduate School.
Educational Background: Princeton University (M.Arch.-Architecture); Southern California Institute of Architecture
(B.Arch.-Architecture)
Hans Sagan
Urban Design and Research Coordinator, B. Arch and M. Arch
Hans Sagan is a full time faculty member at the Academy of Art University and a Ph.D. candidate at the University of
California - Berkeley. His research, "Specters of '68: Protest, Policing and Urban Space" investigates the role of the built
environment in law enforcement and spatial control over political protest under neoliberalism. His teaching deals with
urbanism, evidence-based design, architectural theory, and 20th Century architecture history. In his research he
investigates cities and spaces as cultural phenomena, based in specific social and economic contexts, critically
examining both the practices of creation and using spaces and places. He received his Master of Arts in Communication
Studies (with a certificate in Cultural Studies) from the University of North Carolina. His Bachelor of Arts degree is from
the University of Minnesota in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature. Hans has taught Evidence-Based Design
and Design Theory at the University of California, Media and Cultural Studies at the University of North Carolina, and
Media Studies and Cultural History at Duke University.
Educational Background: UC Berkeley (Ph.D. Candidate-Architecture); University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (MACommunications); University of Minnesota (BA Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature)
100
Vahid Sattary
BFA Structures Coordinator
Dr. Vahid Sattary is a California Registered Structural and Civil Engineer and the principal of Sattary Structural and
Earthquake Engineering. He has over 25 years’ experience in structural engineering and seismic design including the
state-of-the-art design of seismic protective systems, base isolation and energy dissipation application in buildings. He
has been the structural engineer for many projects including new building designs, seismic retrofit of historic buildings,
and structural evaluation studies.
Vahid Sattary received his BS in Civil Engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago and his MS in Civil
Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor where he later also obtained his Ph.D. in Structural Engineering.
Dr. Sattary is affiliated with the Structural Engineering Association of Northern California (SEAONC) where he is an
active member of the Seismology Committee. From 2006 to 2008, Mayor Gavin C. Newsom appointed him to the
Building Inspection Commission of San Francisco.
Educational Background: University of Michigan (Ph.D.-Structural Engineering & MS-Civil Engineering); Illinois Institute
of Technology, Chicago (BS-Civil Engineering)
Doron Serban
BFA Emerging Technology Coordinator
Doron Serban is a full-time faculty member and the undergraduate emerging technologies coordinator. His research
focuses on how the transdisciplinary role of visualization in architecture can reshape the boundaries between logical and
intuitive decision processes.
Besides teaching, Doron Serban is a designer working in the Bay Area. Through Doron Serban Design, his professional
work navigates building design, design competitions, photography, cinematography, motion design, branding, and
architectural visualization. Outside of architecture, he is a co-owner and coach of CoCo CrossFit in Concord, CA.
He received his graduate degree in architecture from Syracuse University’s School of Architecture and his
undergraduate degree in music from the University of California, Riverside.
Educational Background: Syracuse University (M.Arch-Architecture)
SCHOOL OF ART EDUCATION FULL-TIME FACULTY
Marybeth Tereszkiewicz
Director, School of Art Education & Teaching Credential Program in the Visual Arts
Marybeth Tereszkiewicz holds a Master of Education and Credential in Art from San Francisco State University and a BA
from the State University of New York. Prior to her current post as the Director, School of Art Education & Teaching
Credential Program at the Academy of Art University, Marybeth was the Chairperson of the Visual and Performing Arts
Department at ICA High School for 20 years.
Marybeth is passionate about the potential of art education to improve the lives of students, schools and communities.
As well as her extensive classroom experience, she has worked to bring the arts to many community organizations, both
locally and globally; e.g. School/community Liaison for the San Francisco International Arts Festival and Program
Creator/ Director for the ‘Tree of Life Arts Empowerment Camp’ held over two summers 2012-2013 in rural impoverished
Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (M.Ed.-Education); State University of New York (BA-Political
Science)
Rachel Shirkey
Associate Director Online Programs, Art Education
Rachel utilizes her education and experience in visual arts, education, and project management. She earned a Bachelor
of Science degree in Design Communication from the University of Minnesota, and worked as a project manager at
design and brand agencies for several years. Rachel returned to the University of Minnesota to earn a Master of
Education degree in Art Education and teaching credential, and has been working in art education since. Prior to joining
the Academy, she was a high school visual arts teacher and held positions as a school district Visual Arts and
Multimedia Magnet Coordinator.
Educational Background: University of Minnesota (MED-Art Education); University of Minnesota (BS-Design
Communication)
101
SCHOOL OF ART HISTORY FULL-TIME FACULTY
Gabriela Sotomayor
Director, Art History
Gabriela is completing her PhD at the University of Oxford, UK, with a dissertation on the materials and techniques of
Ptolemaic jewelry and engraved gems. While attaining her BA in Art History and Archaeology at Washington University
in St Louis as a Gates Millennium Scholar, she studied in Florence, Italy, and Athens, Greece for a year. Subsequently,
she earned her MA in Greek and Roman Art at the Courtauld Institute of Art in London. Gabriela has worked in art
museums and galleries in the US, UK and Chile, in addition publishing on Greek and Roman art. Gabriela continues to
conduct research and publish on the subjects of ancient jewelry, luxuries and trade in the ancient world, engraved gems
and the technical side of jewelry and gem production. In addition to her duties as the Director of the School of Art History,
Gabriela teaches art history courses and designs jewelry.
Educational Background: University of Oxford (Ph.D.-Classical Archaeology); Courtauld Institute of Art (MA-History of
Art); Washington University in St. Louis (BA-Art History & Archaeology)
Eileen Everett
Academic Vice President of Liberal Arts
Eileen M. Everett has been with the Academy of Art University since 1999 and has directed the Liberal Arts Department
since 2003. Eileen earned her BA in Art History at Indiana University’s Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts and her
MA from the University of California, Santa Barbara in the History of Art and Architecture where her Master’s Thesis on
18th Century French Painting was received with Honors. In addition to her duties as Academic Vice President, Eileen
teaches Art History courses online and onsite and travels with the AAU Art History Study Abroad program when her
schedule permits.
Educational Background: University of California, Santa Barbara (MA-History of Art and Architecture); Indiana University
(BA-Art History)
Kevin Brent Forman
Study Abroad Coordinator
Kevin Brent Forman began teaching at Academy of Art University in 2000. Since coming to the Academy, Kevin has
been a Support Instructor in a variety of graduate & undergraduate Art History classes, and in 2006, became a lead
instructor in the undergraduate Art History classroom. He has team-taught Study Abroad seminars throughout Europe,
and loves traveling to experience Art History firsthand. In addition to teaching Art History, Kevin has also taught English
for Art & Design purposes for non-native speakers of English. With a strong background in pedagogy, Kevin regularly
presents his best-practices to audiences within the University and external at academic conferences.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-English); San Francisco State University (BA-Humanities)
Craig Griffeath
Full-Time Faculty
Craig Griffeath holds a Bachelor's degree in Physics with a minor in Music Composition and Theory from Haverford
College and a Master's in Humanities/Art History from Dominican University of California. He also has a certificate in
Western Art Education from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, where he has been a member of the Docent
Council since 1992. Craig has been performing and teaching music professionally for more than twenty-five years, and
has over seventy-five album credits as a player, engineer, and producer. Craig has been an instructor at Academy of Art
University since 1995, and to date has taught thirteen different subjects in the Academy's Liberal Arts Department.
Educational Background: Dominican University (MA-Humanities: Art History); Haverford College (BS-Physics)
Candace Huey
Full-Time Faculty
Candace earned her MA in Art History at Courtauld Institute of Art (London, UK), graduating with Honors. Her thesis
explores the issues surrounding the visual and material culture of 17thC Netherlandish Art. She earned her BA from UC
Berkeley in the History of Art with a minor in Anthropology. Candace has worked for the Fine Arts Museums of San
Francisco as well as a major Bay Area art gallery and has interned at Courtauld Institute Gallery and Butterfields Auction
House. Candace is a member of the Historians of Netherlandish Art and has presented her research at their conference
in Amsterdam.
Educational Background: Courtauld Institute of Art (MA-History of Art); University of California, Berkeley (BA-History of
Art)
102
David Riffert
Full-Time Faculty
David has 20 years of teaching experience. His articles have been featured in print and publications. Colleges that David
has taught at include The Pennsylvania State University, Principia College, and Academy of Art University. David
received his BA in History and Art History from Principia College in 1986, and earned his MA in Art History from The
Pennsylvania State University in 1992. David also coordinates the Liberal Arts Study Abroad graduate curriculum and
has traveled to Europe numerous times with Academy students.
Educational Background: Pennsylvania State University (MA-Art History); Principia College (BA-History/Art History)
Kimberly Reid-Schafer
Full-Time Faculty
Kimberly Schafer has been with the Academy of Art University since 1996 teaching a wide range of art history courses.
Ms. Schafer holds two graduate degrees from Oxford Brookes University (formerly Oxford Polytechnic), and a Bachelor
of Arts degree with a major in art history (fine art, painting) and a minor in anthropology. Her graduate thesis focused on
the twentieth century British artist Stanley Spencer and was concerned with the subject of primitivism.
Professionally Ms. Schafer has worked at Butterfield & Butterfield in the Restoration department, worked at the Museum
of Modern Art, Oxford, and Courtland Institute, as well as the Museum of London Archaeological Service. She has
traveled extensively through Europe as well as China and Tibet.
Educational Background: California State University Hayward (BA-Art History)
Cedric Wentworth
Full-Time Faculty
Cedric Wentworth began his studies in stone carving and clay modeling abroad, receiving his certificate of
apprenticeship at Cacciatori Studios, Italy. Returning to the United States, he continued his studies at the Art Students
League in New York City.
In 1991, the City of Oakland commissioned Cedric to sculpt the monument of Jack London for the plaza at Jack London
Square. This commission led him to sculpt numerous public monuments, including the Frank Ogawa monuments in front
of the Civic Center of Oakland, and in Fukuoka, Japan, and the bronze wolf at Jack London Square. He has many
outdoor sculptures on permanent display throughout California, including works in Fresno, Davis, Saratoga, and Santa
Clara. Cedric Wentworth is currently represented by the John Natsoulas Gallery in Davis, California, and the Art
Exchange Gallery in San Francisco.
Professional Background: Cedric Wentworth is a widely exhibited fine artist. He has participated in numerous group and
solo shows. He has received numerous awards for his work. Wentworth is a member of the Guild and the National
Sculpture Society.
Stephen P. Williams
Full-Time Faculty
Stephen Williams earned a BA and an MA in history at San Francisco State University. His graduate work included not
only the study of civilization from antiquity through the Renaissance, but also the art of the early Renaissance. His
research projects included the representation of St. Francis of Assisi in literature and art, the graphic art and text of the
Hypnerotomachia Poliphili of Colonna and its representation of Renaissance pagan ideals, as well as the evolution of
early Christian iconography. Other topics of interest and research include the French Revolution and World War I. He is
also enthusiastic about Italy and has studied Italian and history at the Scuola Leonardo Da Vinci in Rome. Mr. Williams
has been teaching courses on art history and western civilization at the Academy since 2001.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-History); San Francisco State University (BA-History)
103
SCHOOL OF FASHION FULL-TIME FACULTY
Simon Ungless
Executive Director, School of Fashion
Simon Ungless graduated from Central Saint Martins School of Art and Design in 1992 and was awarded the prestigious
M.A. Degree in Fashion with Distinction. He collaborated with Alexander McQueen on the first ten collections shown in
London and New York, and personally introduced Sarah Burton, Creative Director of Alexander McQueen, to the late
designer. In 2002, he became Creative Director of Member Holiday, a Korean-based contemporary brand, launching
both men’s and women’s collections with 37 freestanding stores. His work experience covers Fashion Design, Textile
Design, Forecasting, Brand Development, and Marketing for such clients as Givenchy, Paul Smith, and Versace.
Educational Background: Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design (MA-Fashion); Polytechnic of East London
(BA-Textiles)
John Bauernfeind
Graduate Director, School of Fashion
John Bauernfeind holds a MA in Fashion Menswear from St. Martin's College of Art and Design and a BFA in Fashion
Design from Parsons School of Design. John has worked for CK Jeans Calvin Klein, Vanderbilt by Murjani, Knitcraft St.
Croix, London Fog Industries, BCBG, and Pollini in various capacities. Since 2005, he has taught fashion at various
universities. He is currently Graduate Director in the School of Fashion at the Academy of Art University.
Educational Background: St. Martin’s College of Art and Design (MA-Fashion Menswear); Parsons School of Design
(BFA-Fashion Design)
Keanan Duffty
Senior Director of Merchandising
Keanan Duffty established his eponymous fashion label in 1999. Over 70 premium retailers carry his collection, with a
large celebrity following that includes David Bowie, the Sex Pistols, the New York Dolls, Mick Jagger, Iggy Pop, and the
Smashing Pumpkins. In addition to his successful fashion career, Keanan Duffty is lead singer in the band Slinky
Vagabond, alongside Glen Matlock of the Sex Pistols, Clem Burke of Blondie, and Earl Slick. Duffty received his BA
degree in Fashion Design from Central St. Martin’s in London.
Educational Background: Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design (BA-Fashion Design)
Ian Mackintosh
Director of Public Relations & Special Events, School of Fashion
Ian Mackintosh most recently was a Consultant with A. Cicognani Communications in New York where he raised
consumer awareness for international clients such as La Maison du Chocolat, Brioni, Iceberg, Giuliana Teso, Georgina
Brandolini and even the Region of Campania. Previously, he was Partner and President of ILIAN Communications and
Production where he produced fashion shows for design houses which included Cynthia Rowley, Michael Boris, Bill
Blass Ltd., Halston, and Anand Jon. He has also been Director of Publicity and Production for Eleanor Lambert Ltd. and
Senior Projects Coordinator for the Council of Fashion Designers of America. Mackintosh has done charity work for The
Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS, The Friends of Helen Aldrich Recreation Park, as well as the AIDS Center
of Queens County. Mackintosh holds a Bachelor of Professional Studies in Fashion Design and Merchandising from
Marist College as well as an AS in Business Administration from Dutchess Community College.
Educational Background: Marist College (BA-Professional Studies, Fashion Design & Merchandising); Dutchess
Community College (AA-Business Administration)
Sharon Murphy
Director of Fashion Merchandising
Sharon Murphy spent over 25 years in the apparel industry including management positions in sourcing, manufacturing,
product development and fashion retailing. She worked for Esprit de Corp, as well as for Jessica McClintock, Inc. She
also continues to consult with Venice Collaborative to source textiles and related materials for architects and builders of
residential projects in Venice, CA.
Educational Background: Ohio State University (BA-English)
104
Iliana Ricketts
Director, Online Fashion
Iliana received her MFA in Fashion Design from the Academy of Art University in 1999. Iliana launched her own line of
tailored women’s wear, ILYA, in 2002. At the same time she also worked as a part-time instructor at the Academy of Art
University and has had numerous freelance jobs as a designer, illustrator and consultant. Before becoming the Director
of Online Fashion, Iliana worked as the Creative Director of GGblue, a lifestyle and golf line sold in over 300 stores
across the US.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Fashion Design); Training Centre Calgaria (BFA)
Robert Curry
Associate Director, 3D Design & Construction Draping & Flat Pattern
Robert Curry graduated from University of Leeds in 1994. He joined Vivienne Westwood in 1996 as a dressmaker in the
Couture Atelier, specializing in corsetry and evening wear. Within a year, he was promoted to “Premier” of the Atelier—
responsible for the creation of the showpieces for the Paris womenswear collections, as well as orders for client wedding
dresses, ball gowns, exhibition and advertising pieces. His work has appeared on the covers of Vogue, Elle and Marie
Claire. He has dressed Liza Minelli, Jerry Hall, Jennifer Lopez, Helena Bonham Carter, Kylie Minogue, Minnie Driver,
and the Queen of Jordan, as well as many women of the European aristocracy.
Educational Background: Leeds University (BA-Fashion)
Gary Miller
Associate Director, Fashion
Gary Miller is a Menswear Fashion Director with more than 16 years of experience in New York and London. Gary's
design scope encompasses building and maintaining a brand's identity, initiating a start-up concept, reinvigorating an
existing line, and nurturing an ongoing successful brand. For many years, he worked as a Design Director for the Men's
Sportswear division at Macy's Merchandising Group in New York. Previously, he had worked at The Men’s Wearhouse,
Wilke-Rodriguez, Here and There, and Michiko Koshino. Gary holds a BA from Ravensborne College of Design and
Communication.
Educational Background: Ravensbourne College of Design & Communication (BA-Fashion Design & Textiles)
Jinah Oh
Associate Director, Merchandising
Associate Director of Fashion Merchandising, Jinah earned her M.B.A. in Marketing at Golden Gate University in San
Francisco, as well as a B.S. in Clothing and Textiles and a B.A. in Philosophy from EWHA Women’s University in Seoul,
Korea. She has extensive experience in international fashion and luxury brands. With Escada Asia, she developed
business and market strategies, managed merchandising and buying for multiple brands, pioneered and initiated brick
and mortar and e-commerce channel development. Later with Cartier, Richemont Korea Ltd., she oversaw retail
operations and all aspects of retail marketing activities for the Korean market. In 2010, she joined Savannah College of
Art and Design (SCAD) and was the first appointed chair of Fashion Marketing and Management (B.F.A.), and Luxury
and Fashion Management (M.A. / M.F.A.). To this day, both are the fastest growing programs at SCAD. She has
developed and led multiple industry sponsored projects with partners in various sectors including technology, fashion
and luxury, and trade associations such as Microsoft, Kohl’s, Sonoma Brand, Silver Promotion, JC Penny, HSBC,
Benetton, and others.
Educational Background: Golden Gate University (MBA-Marketing); Ewha Women's University (BS-Clothing & Textiles);
Ewha Women's University (BA-Philosophy)
Russell Clower
Assistant Director, Online Merchandising
Russell Clower received his BFA in Illustration from Parsons School of Design and has contributed to numerous retail
outlets as both in-house visual merchandising manager and consultant. He spent much of his career at San Francisco's
luxury retailer Wilkes Bashford Company, where he was Assistant Visual Director, and later, Creative Director/Director of
Special Events. Clower was also Visual Merchandising Director and Assistant Art Director at Bebe, where he was
responsible for the visual merchandising of 128 stores. He has worked with numerous clients over the years, including
Polo Ralph Lauren, Sue Fisher King Home, DISH Inspired Tableware, Wilkes Sport, Hamilton Jewelers, and Juniper Hill
Furniture.
Educational Background: Parsons School of Design (BFA-Illustration)
105
Rhona MacKenzie
Assistant Director, Textiles
Rhona MacKenzie received her BA in Printed Textiles from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, and has had
much experience designing and printing fabric for a variety of companies. She has worked for Eley Kishimoto as Print
Studio Manager, and also worked on prints for Guy Laroche, Jil Sander, and Alexander McQueen. Her work has been
published in magazines such as Vogue (UK), ID Magazine, Fabrex, and International Textiles. MacKenzie has also done
freelance work for Schweppes International Ltd., The Scotch House, and BBC Television.
Educational Background: Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design (BA-Printed Textiles)
Stephan Rabimov
Assistant Director, Fashion Journalism
Stephan Rabimov has ten years of experience in digital and print publishing, journalism, new media, communications,
and public relations and marketing. He is the Founder, Publisher, and Editor-in-Chief of DEPESHA, a leading Russianexpatriate culture magazine on the intersection of fashion and arts. Stephan has taught at various institutions in the
United States. Stephan was also Executive Contributing Fashion Editor for Dot429 Magazine since May 2011 and
Founder and Principal of RABIMOV Public Relations Agency since May 2010. Stephan directly managed the opening of
Nicola Formichetti’s pop-up store in New York City as well as various fashion shows showcasing emerging Russian and
American designers during New York, St. Petersburg, Toronto, and Vancouver Fashion Weeks. Stephan has also
worked for the United Nations Development Program as well as Bloomberg Philanthropies. Stephan holds a Masters of
International Affairs and a MA in Statistics from Columbia University. He received his BS in Mathematics from Oregon
State University. Stephan is fluent in Russian.
Educational Background: Columbia University (MIA & MA-Statistics); Oregon State University (BS-Mathematics)
Cris Applegate
Full-Time Faculty
Cris Applegate designs and produces high end contemporary clothing for men and women as well as contemporary
sportswear for Maximum Clothing in San Jose, CA. He received a Master’s degree in Tailoring from the Samson
College of Science and Technology in the Philippines, and a certificate in apparel design from West Valley College in
Saratoga, CA. Cris has won numerous awards, including Contemporary Apparel Design at the California Symposium.
Professional Background: Maximum Clothing (Contemporary Sportswear Designer), Opera San Jose (Pattern Tailor and
Cutter), Theater Works (Tailor and Draping), AMT San Jose (Tailor), Paramount Theater (Designer Assistant)
Nelson Cantada
Online Full-Time Faculty, Fashion
Nelson Cantada has had a long career in the fashion industry having worked in both the business side of fashion and
more recently, the design end. He gained his early exposure to fashion working in the buying offices of Ann Taylor Inc
and later at Barneys NY. He then went on to obtain a Bachelor Degrees in Fashion Design from the Academy of Art
University and attended Studio Bercot through the Academy’s Paris Exchange program. While a student at Studio
Bercot Nelson interned for Tom Van Lingen (Knitwear Designer for Sonia Rykiel) and Sharon Wauchob, working with
each designer to develop garments for their Paris fashion shows. Since returning to the States, Nelson has worked as a
Designer for Laundry by Shelli Segal, BCBG/Max Azria Collection and Velvet by Graham and Spencer. His design
experience has primarily been focused on Womenswear within the Contemporary market and developing runway
garments (for Max Azria Collection) with an emphasis on embellishment and fabric/garment treatments. In 2008 Nelson
started a Menswear line called Jet Los Angeles with a longtime friend he met while a student at NYU’s Stern School of
Business. The casual California inspired Menswear line was presented at major trade shows and was sold to small
boutiques in NYC and Atlanta.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Fashion); New York University (BS-Marketing/ Quantitative
Design)
Jeffrey Chow
Full-Time Faculty, Fashion Design
Jeffrey Chow received his BA in Fashion Design from Central St. Martin's School of Art in London. He first started his
career in the fashion industry with Perry Ellis International. He then moved on to Espirit Asia and Espirit International
where he stayed for three years. Jeffrey has also worked for such recognizable names as Theory, Emilio Pucci, Tommy
Hilfiger, Diane Von Furstenberg, Poleci, and Lilly Pulitzer. Since 2003, he has been a Designer for his own collection of
high-end women's ready-to-wear collection, Jeffrey Chow Collection. His collections were featured in such notable
magazines as Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, WWD, Marie Claire, and Elle. Most recently, Jeffrey has been a Design Director
at Chaiken Clothing.
Educational Background: Central St. Martin’s School of Art (BA-Fashion Design)
106
Kevy Desantis
Technical Design Manager
Keverne Desantis is an artist, crafter, and seamstress with over 17 years of professional experience in Fashion Design.
She was a freelance production artist at Rapid Design Services and Twentieth Century Fox. She is also owner and
producer of Kevernes Crafts. Her credits include the feature film, "Nine Months" and production on projects for Clorox,
Nestles, Lucas Arts, and others. Desantis has attended an intensive 7-hr CAPPS Teacher Training Workshop and is a
member of the San Francisco Quilt Guild. She received an extensive 3 years of in house training with Gonbee Tanaka.
She has taken sewing workshops and semester courses in Advanced Construction/ Tailoring and Quilting/ Soft
Sculpture. She holds an AA in Business from College of San Mateo.
Educational Background: College of San Mateo (AA-Business)
Sarah Fifield
Knitwear Coordinator
Sarah Fifield graduated with a BA from Nottingham Trent University. She is a Fashion Knitwear Designer who is
experienced with hand and machine knitwear design. In 2008 she joined the Academy of Art University and is currently a
full time faculty member for the Fashion department.
Educational Background: Nottingham Trent University, UK (BA-Fashion Knitwear Design)
Jayne Foster
Full-Time Faculty
Jayne Foster graduated in 2001 from The Royal College of Art with a Masters in Womenswear. She led a fashion course
in London for 8 years and worked on private projects with clients such as Urban Outfitters, Burton Snowboards and
House of Fraser. Most recently, Jayne designed womenswear for UK high street store Monsoon. Her fashion illustrations
have also been exhibited at various art galleries in London.
Educational Background: Royal College of Art (MA-Womenswear)
Yuko Fujishima
Full-Time Faculty
Yuko Fujishima is an experienced instructor with more than 14 years of experience. Areas of expertise include basic to
advanced designing, pattern-making, sewing, and draping. She has taught at Bunka Fashion College where she also
received her degree in Apparel Design. She is now teaching full-time at the Academy of Art University's School of
Fashion.
Educational Background: Bunka Fashion College of Japan (Apparel Design Technique)
Jennifer Jeon
Full-Time Faculty
Jennifer Jeon is a Freelance Textile Designer with customers that include Club Monaco, London Portfolio, and Academy
of Art University. Additionally, Jeon also works as a Print Textile Technician for the Academy and an instructor at Brooks
College. Jeon's work has been exhibited in Italy at the Le Arti Tessilli: International Textile and Fiber Art Competition and
at the Ford Focus project's The Project Show in San Francisco. Jeon holds an MFA in Textile Design from Academy of
Art University and a BFA in Fiber Arts from Kyungwon University in South Korea.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Textile Design ); Kyungwon University (BFA-Fiber Arts)
Terhi Ketola-Stutch
3D Design Coordinator
Terhi Ketola-Stutch received her BFA in Fashion Design from Fashion Institute of Technology in New York and has had
a varied career as a designer and product developer. Terhi worked In New York as eveningwear Designer at Tom and
Linda Platt, was Studio Manager at Marc Jacobs Collection and Atelier Director at Zac Posen before launching her own
design and product development company. Her clients have included Little Marc Jacobs and Levi’s Men’s Concept
Department.
Educational Background: Fashion Institute of SUNY (BFA-Fashion Design)
107
Bethany Meuleners
Freshman Student Online Coordinator
Bethany Meuleners has lived all over the US and abroad. She now considers “home” to be San Francisco. Bethany
received a Bachelor of Science with Honors, Dual Degree in Apparel Design and Fashion Merchandising from the
University of Delaware in 2005. In addition to graduating Magna Cum Laude at the University of Delaware, she studied
costume design in London and International Marketing Management in Peru. After working several years in the fashion
industry, she completed her Master of Fine Arts in Fashion Knitwear Design at the Academy of Art University.
After debuting her collection at New York Fashion Week in February of 2010, Bethany was awarded the prestigious
Fullbright Scholarship to travel to Nepal and continue her fashion studies. She was based in Kathmandu for one year
studying the local textiles and fashion and their place in the larger global fashion industry. While in Nepal she wrote a
weekly fashion and style column for the Himalayan Times. After finishing her grant, Bethany was invited back as a
consultant to organize and run Nepal Fashion Week in September, 2011.
Bethany is currently in San Francisco working on her latest collections and doing freelance and consulting work.
Educational Background: University of Delaware (BS-Apparel Design and Fashion Merchandising)
Hannah Norman
Full-Time Faculty
Hannah Norman recently joined the School of Fashion as an online instructor having worked previously as a full time
faculty to build classes in Fashion Accessory Design. At the moment, she is based in Paris, working as a freelance
accessory designer (jewelry, sunglasses and watches) alongside her online teaching for the Academy.
After graduating with distinction in Art and Design from Cambridge University and with Honours in Fashion design from
Kingston University, she moved to Italy to work for Max Mara. In 2001, she joined the L.V.M.H. Group in Paris to work
with Michael Kors on fashion and accessories. While with the L.V.M.H. Group, she became Artistic Director of Jewelry at
Celine. Most recently she has designed pieces for Chloe. Her career in Fashion to date has enabled her to travel to
many different countries and to work with many inspirational people; she hope that she has a reflection of all those
different experiences.
One aspect of her job that she particularly enjoyed was working closely with interns who came to the companies,
creating projects for them that showcased their talent. It is this particular experience that fueled her desire to begin a
career in teaching.
Research and illustration has always been one idea that is of interest to her and she hope to share this passion with her
classes.
Educational Background: Kingston University, England (BA-Fashion Design); Cambridge University (Art and Design)
Serita Sangimino
Full-Time Faculty
Serita Sangimino has more than 22 years of retail management experience, both in mass department stores and
specialty store environments. Most recently, she was General Manager at Wilkes Bashford where she managed four
locations in Northern California with over $40 million in total sales. Previously, she had been a Store Director for the
Wilkes Bashford store in Palo Alto. She has also been a Merchandise Manager of Cosmetics and The Man's Store at
Neiman Marcus. Sangimino started her career as a Department Manager and then, Group Sales Manager at Macy's
Union Square. She attended San Francisco State University for a few years before pursuing her career.
Educational / Professional Background: San Francisco State University. Work Experience: Wilkes Bashford (General
Manager), Wilkes Bashford (Store Director), Neiman Marcus (Merchandise Manager of Cosmetics and The Man’s
Store), Macy’s Union Square (Group Sales Manager and Department Manager).
Hersha Steinbock
Full-Time Faculty
Hersha Steinbock received her BA in English from UC Berkeley and MA in English from Portland State University. She
has worked in the fashion industry since 1978 when she worked as a Sportswear Buyer for I. Magnin & Co. After 7 years
there, she moved on to become Sales Manager for Spumoni Sportswear, Vice President/ Sales Manager for Byer
California. For a few years, she worked as a Store Manager for The Susan Co., a high end specialty apparel retailer.
More recently, she has been a Buyer for Bebe Stores Inc. and Director of Sales & Merchandising for Fiona/ Cou Paris at
San Jose's Santana Row. She now currently serves as a Full-Time Instructor for the Academy of Art University's Fashion
Merchandising program.
Educational Background: Portland State University (MA-English); University of California Berkeley (BA-English)
108
Gonbee Tanaka
Full-Time Faculty
Gonbee has 27 years of experience in fashion industry. He has received recognition in the fashion design industry for his
excellent performance and management of all elements of the design process. He had been a head instructor at San
Francisco School of Fashion Design from 1966 to 1979; and he had worked as designer and pattern maker for many
companies since 1979, such as, Wilkie Garment Company, Levi Straus & Company, Achuch Fashion Group Apparel
Group, Murlin Apparel Group and Lilli Ann Corporation. Gonbee received his BA in Fashion Design from Chiyo Fashion
Design School, Tokyo, Japan in 1960, and received his BA in Law from Ritsumcikau University, Tokyo, Japan in 1957.
Educational Background: Chiyo Tanaka Fashion Design School (BA-Fashion Design); Ritsumeikan University (BA-Law)
Judith Toerge
MFA Merchandising Coordinator
Judi Toerge is currently Product Manager for Hardgoods & Accessories where she designs, develops, sources, and
produces hardgoods for catalog concepts relating to travel related clothing and accessories. She has also had her own
consulting firm, worked on the Pottery Barn Kids catalog as a Product Manager, and for The Nature Company/Discovery
Channel Stores as a Senior Buyer. Toerge has also been a Buyer for I. Magnin, Macy's West, and many more. Toerge is
a Visiting Lecturer at San Francisco State University and a Mentor at Academy of Art University. She holds a BA in
Sociology from the University of Cincinnati.
Educational Background: University of Cincinnati (BA-Sociology)
Danielle Wallis
Full-Time Faculty, Styling
Danielle Wallis is currently Full-Time Faculty in the School of Fashion's Styling program at Academy of Art University.
Prior to joining AAU, Danielle was a Social Media and Marketing Intern at Free People in Philadelphia. She also worked
at Free People as a Manager in Training and Social Media Specialist for the brand's flagship store in New York. Previous
to that, she was a Visual Assistant and Senior Sales Associate for Anthropologie in SoHo and San Francisco. Danielle
holds a BFA in Visual Merchandising from the Academy of Art University.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Visual Merchandising)
Paul Wilner
Full-Time Faculty
Paul Wilner received his BA in English from the City University of New York. Wilner has more than 25 years of
experience as a Report and Editor for various publications. Shortly after graduating from college, he was a Copy Clerk
for the New York Times. He then moved on to become a Reporter for the LA Herald Examiner before becoming a
Managing Editor for The Hollywood Reporter after 4 years. In 1987, he started his career with the San Francisco
Examiner as the Features Editor for the Style section. After two years, he was promoted to Assistant Managing Director
for the Features section which he worked for 6 years. In 1995, Wilner became the Editor for the SF Examiner Magazine
during which he was honored by the Society of Newspaper Design, the Sunday Magazine Association and the
Associated Press Sports Editors Contest. In 2001, he left the SF Examiner and became Senior Editor of the SF
Chronicle's Insight section. Most recently, he was the Editor for the Chronicle's Style section which focused on fashion,
society and trend pieces. Wilner is a member of the National Book Critics Circle.
Educational Background: City University of New York (BA-English)
109
Chelsea Snyder
Full-Time Faculty, Digital Design for Fashion
Chelsea Rae Snyder was born in New England. During her childhood she was fortunate to be surrounded by creative
and resourceful family. Influenced by skills learned from her grandmother helped set her path as a Fashion designer. Her
grandmother was a teacher, and taught her how to sew. Her mother was a musician and an artist, and taught her how to
draw.
Following high school, Chelsea studied at Indiana University of Pennsylvania for two years, focusing on graphic design
and fiber arts, before making a decision to focus on fashion design and continue her studies in San Francisco.
Chelsea received Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in fashion design from the Academy of Art University, in San Francisco.
In addition, she completed three internships: Nice Collective in San Francisco, California; EDUN, New York City, New
York; and, Veronique Branquinho in Antwerp, Belgium.
Since completing her degree, Chelsea has worked for Abercrombie and Fitch, Dockers, and Old Navy. Presently her
career consists of freelancing for local companies in San Francisco and working with individual clients designing and
sewing custom pieces.
Chelsea's career goals consist of developing her own line of clothing as well as continuing to work with individual clients.
Her design philosophy is to create pieces with sustainability, versatility, and durability in mind.
Chelsea presently resides in San Francisco, California with her husband Michael Paul Snyder, her daughter, and her
dogs. She enjoys all the city has to offer as well as the nature that surrounds it.
Examples of her work can be found on her website chelseasnyder.com.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Fashion Design)
Tsomo Tsering
Full-Time Faculty, 3D Design
Tsomo Tsering is an experienced professional in the fashion industry. After she received her BA from the University of
Tibet, she worked in various capacities within the fashion industry. She has done freelance sewing, pattern drafting, and
designed traditional costumes for individuals. Since 1998, she has also been a Production Assistant at Diana Slavin
Woman's Wear. In addition to her day job, Tsering also works as a freelance patternmaker for local designers, Arlen
Wohl, Loretta Warner, GG Sport, and others. She received the Critic's Merit Award, the ADM Student Merit Award for
Best Sportswear, and placed 3rd at the CA Community College Symposium for Professional Wear. Tsering is fluent in
Mandarin and Tibetan.
Educational Background: University of Tibet (BA-Art)
Maggie Whitaker
Costume Design Coordinator
As a costume designer, Margaret Whitaker received a BATCC award for Costume Design for Truffaldino Says No!,
performed at Shotgun Players in Berkeley, CA. She work regionally in the SF bay area, designing for a number of
theatres, including Marin Theatre, Aurora Theatre, TheatreWorks, Crowded Fire, and Cutting Ball Theatre. She was the
design assistant at Berkeley Repertory Theatre prior to teaching at the Academy of Art University, and her work at that
institution lead her to assist Andrea Lauer for the 2010 Grammy awards for American Idiot. In 2010, she collaborated
with Alisa T. Weinstein, creating the copy for the Costume Designer entry for her book, Earn it Learn it.
Margaret's primary interest in theatre is developing new plays for world premieres, and as an instructor, she strive to put
engaging design challenges together for her students that will give them the skills needed to succeed in the professional
work place. At the university, she works closely with the directing instructor on the development of the productions done
twice a semester. This relationship has fostered interdepartmental collaborations between her costume design majors
and directing students in the MPT department, giving her students film projects to design and more reel footage for their
portfolios.
Educational Background: University of California San Diego (MFA-Costume Design); University of South Florida (BACostume and Scenic Design)
Chun Ming “Jim” Yang
Fashion Drawing Coordinator
Jim Yang earned his BFA in Illustration from the Academy of Art University. Since 2007, he has been teaching at AAU
and currently serves as a full-time instructor for the Fashion department where he teaches fashion illustration. Prior to
joining AAU, he was an Animator for Radical Entertainment. Jim has been an acting board member of the Vancouver
Figure Drawing Society since 2007. He speaks fluent Mandarin and Taiwanese and has been training in martial arts for
at least 9.5 years.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
110
SCHOOL OF FINE ART FULL-TIME FACULTY
Lawrence Noble
Chair, Fine Art Sculpture
Currently the owner of Noble Studio, a design and sculpture company founded in 1973, Noble originally earned an
esteemed reputation as illustrator and designer of movie poster campaigns such as Time After Time, Flash Gordon,
Sharky's Machine, and The Empire Strikes Back (10th Anniversary Poster). Lucasfilm commissioned four life-size
bronzes from Noble for their Presidio campus, including father of film Eadweard Muybridge, Jedi Master Yoda, special
effects pioneer Willis O'Brien, and television inventor Philo T. Farnsworth.
Professional Background: He is the owner of Noble Studio, a company founded in 1973. Noble Studio designed and
produced the Star Wars Chess Set for The Danbury Mint as well as designed coins and medallions for the Franklin Mint.
Lawrence’s numerous accolades include the legendary Yoda sculpture that was placed on a fountain and resides at the
Letterman Digital Arts Center in the Presidio of San Francisco, and last year, on July 9, 2011 his 21’ tall Hampton,
Virginia 400th Anniversary Monument was unveiled.
Craig Nelson
Executive Director, School of Fine Art-Painting
For over 30 years, Craig has been depicting figures, landscapes, California coastal paintings and various environments
in rich, vibrant oils. He has painted countless movie posters, many book covers, and album covers. Some of his most
prestigious works have been his Broadway production posters for Neil Simon's Lost in Yonkers and Proposals, both
originals are in the private collection of Neil Simon. During his illustrious career, Craig has won over 200 awards of
excellence in various shows, five gold medals, four silver medals, and in 1996, a painting of his was chosen for the
Communication Arts Annual cover.
Educational Background: Art Center College of Design (BFA-Illustration)
Steve Krochman
Director of Classical Sculpture
Steven Krochman holds a MFA and BFA in Sculpture from Boston University and CSU Long Beach. He has over 15
years of professional experience in Fine Arts including work as a Mold Maker at the New England Sculpture Service,
Graduate Student Teacher for Life Sculpture, and work on a commissioned project for the Elbert Weinberg Estate. His
work has been exhibited in solo, group, and juried exhibitions in galleries at Cal State University at Long Beach, Boston
University, Long Beach Arts Association Gallery, Cypress College and Chemers Gallery. He won the Friedman Brothers
Fellowship while studying at Boston University.
Educational Background: Boston University (MFA-Sculpture); California State University Long Beach (BFA-Sculpture)
Carolyn Meyer
Director, School of Fine Art-Painting
Carolyn Meyer is also a full time faculty member teaching Landscape painting and Abstract painting classes. Her career
began as an art director for an advertising agency in San Francisco, and was one of the founding principles of Paris
Printing, a large size printing Company in Northern California. Her works is on display at ArtHaus, William Lester Gallery,
and Hang Gallery in San Francisco as well as several others around the U.S.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Fine Arts); Academy of Art University (BFA-Advertising)
Annamarie Nelson
Online Director, School of Fine Art-Painting
Annamarie Nelson, also known as Anna, started teaching still life painting in 1992 for the summer Art Experience
program at Academy of Art University and has been a member of the faculty ever since. She graduated from UCLA with
a degree in Italian Language and Literature, worked for the Italian Department at UCLA as well as various travel
agencies acting as tour guide for students studying in Florence, Italy. She attended Art Center College of Design in
Pasadena, CA as an illustration major and after 6 terms began accepting freelance work and commission paintings.
Anna continues to contribute work to the annual Academy of Art faculty/alumni auction to help raise scholarship money
benefiting Academy students.
Educational Background: University of California, Los Angeles (BA-Italian Language and Literature)
111
Carrie Ann Plank
Director, Fine Art-Printmaking
Carrie Ann Plank is an artist working in both the mediums of printmaking and painting. She exhibits locally, nationally,
and internationally. Plank’s work is included in private and public collections including the Fine Art Archives of the Library
of Congress, the SGC International Archives, the Special Collection at Washington University, and the Permanent
Collection at The University of Virginia, Charlottesville Va. Recent and upcoming noteworthy shows include the Zoller
Gallery of the Pennsylvania University, the Liu Haisu Museum of Fine Art in Shanghai, China, and the Guangzhou
Academy of Fine Arts Museum in Guangzhou, China, and residencies at Druckwerk in Basel, Switzerland and the
Venice Printmaking Studio in Venice, Italy. Additionally, Plank is the Associate Director: Printmaking MFA & BFA
Programs at the Academy of Art University. She is active in the local arts community as a participant, juror, and
volunteer, and is a board member of the California Society of Printmakers. Plank also sits on the Steering Committee for
the 2014 SGC International Conference. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Printmaking from East Carolina
University and her Masters of Fine Arts in Printmaking from the Pennsylvania State University.
Educational Background: Pennsylvania State University (MFA-Art); East Carolina University (BFA-Art)
Margaret Keelan
Associate Director of Sculpture
Margaret Keelan received her BFA at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada and her MFA at the University of Utah. In
2003 she juried the California Clay Competition at the Artery in Davis, CA, and was invited to lecture on her latest work
at the 2005 National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts in Baltimore, 2007 CCACA, Davis California and at 2007
SOFA, New York. Recent exhibitions have included Vanitas: Transient Treasures at the Lacoste Gallery in Concord MA
and Regina Clay: Worlds in the Making, traveling across Canada. Other venues have been in Chicago, New York, Santa
Fe, Montana, and Pomona, as well as solo shows in St. Louis, MO and Seattle, WA. Her work can also be seen in 500
Figures in Clay: Ceramic Artists Celebrate the Human Form, The Craft and Art of Clay, Ceramics: Art and Perception,
Confrontational Ceramics, and Ceramics Review in England.
Educational Background: University of Utah (MFA-Ceramic Sculpture); University of Saskatchewan (BA-Ceramic
Sculpture)
Jennifer Almodova
Full-Time Faculty
Jennifer Almodova has been a faculty member at Academy of Art University since 1991. She has 25 years of experience
as an exhibiting artist, visual designer and is an educator in design, color theory, painting and sculpture. Her watercolors
are noted for their exquisite light, luminosity, color harmony, and brush language. It is for these reasons that artists seek
out Almodova’s private painting workshops in California, Hawaii, Italy and France. She considers teaching a privilege
and exhibits internationally, with work hanging in collections across the United States, Europe and Asia. She received a
first place award from the National Association of Printers and a Grant Award from the Sesnon Foundation. A partial
listing of collectors include: the Bank of Tokyo, Pacific Bell, Bill Graham Presents, Ruth Asawa and the collection of
Stephen DeStaebler.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA); Scripps College (BA)
Meri Brin
Full-Time Faculty
Meri Brin was born in Chicago, Illinois and moved to the Bay Area in 1994. She received her BFA in Printmaking from
the School of Fine Art at Academy of Art University. She currently teaches Printmaking and Silkscreen. Previously, she
taught paper crafts at Zeum and Silkscreen at Mission Grafica. She has shown locally and nationally, including a solo
show at Oaklandish in 2012. Group shows have included Junk Mail at The Soap Gallery in 2010 and the Print Zero
Exchange in Seattle, Washington. In 2008, she won a materials award from the Monotype Guild of New England.
Besides prints, Brin also makes books, zines and stationery under the name Fixed Orifice Press. She has contributed
artwork to Good Mail Day from Quarry Press, and the Stoner Coffee Table Handbook from Chronicle Books. Brin is a
member of Southern Graphics, and is on the board of the California Society of Printmakers.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Fine Art)
Baoping Chen
Full-Time Faculty
Mr. Chen has over 25 years of experience as a professional fine artist. In 1984 he graduated from the Guangzhou Fine
Art Institute in China where he became an instructor. He then attended Academy of Art University in the United States
and graduated with a MFA and has been teaching at the Academy of Art University since 1995. Mr. Chen has had many
one-person exhibitions in New York and San Francisco. In addition, he has had many solo and group exhibits throughout
the world, and has sold many collections.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Fine Art); Guangzhou Fine Arts Institute (BFA-Fine Art)
112
Sean Connor
Full-Time Faculty
Mr. Connor attended the Academia Di Belle Arti in Venice, Italy – graduated from U.C. Berkley with a Bachelor’s degree
in fine art, then received his Master’s degree in painting from the graduate school of figurative art at the New York
Academy of Art, a teaching school based on Ecole des Beaux Artes which concentrates on the figure and the pictorial
mode. Mr. Connor’s specialty is the figure as he has strong anatomical skills, but he is also well versed in various media.
He feels, “An understanding of art, especially figurative art is important for students as they gain an awareness of
themselves and what they want to express.” He has taught part time at Academy of Art for ten years.
Educational Background: New York Academy of Art (MFA-Painting); UC Berkeley (BA-Fine Art)
Earl Enriquez
Full-Time Faculty
Earl Enriquez is an accomplished fine artist with over 8 years of commissioned projects and exhibitions. Having started
as a student at Academy of Art College and displaying his work at the Academy's Annual Spring Show, Enriquez has
since exhibited his work worldwide. He has participated in the Artworks Foundry Moonlight Pour and Mussi Artworks
Foundry Moonlight Pour. He has also displayed his work in the Drawing Room Gallery in the Philippines and the Artists
Association of the Philippines. Commissioned projects are numerous and include works for the Jesuit Community of San
Francisco (two busts of St. Ignatius and Crucifix), Bellarmine College Preparatory (figure of Christ's resurrection and
bronze shrine, tabernacle, cross, altar, and more), and more recently, the Eternal Faith Inc. (Guardian Angel and Mother
Mary.) Enriquez's work is also held in numerous private collections in the Philippines and the Bay Area.
Professional Background: Earl Enriquez is an accomplished fine artist with over 8 years of commissioned projects and
exhibitions. Commissioned projects are numerous and include works for the Jesuit Community of San Francisco (two
busts of St. Ignatius and Crucifix), Bellarmine College Preparatory (figure of Christ's resurrection and bronze shrine,
tabernacle, cross, altar, and more), and more recently, the Eternal Faith Inc. (Guardian Angel and Mother Mary.)
Enriquez's work is also held in numerous private collections in the Philippines and the Bay Area.
Beverly Lazor
Online Coordinator, BFA
After a long career as a freelance illustrator and product designer, Beverly Lazor found her passion for plein air painting
as well as instructs online classes. She currently has work exhibited in Jessup Cellars Gallery in Napa, California, as well
as galleries in Southern California.
Educational Background: Art Center College of Design (BFA-Illustration)
Jesse Mangerson
Online Coordinator, MFA
Jesse Mangerson studied Illustration at University of Wisconsin Eau Claire earning a BFA. He then migrated west where
he earned his MFA in Illustration at Academy of Art University, where he continues to teach in the online Foundations
and MFA Fine Art Painting departments. His work shows in galleries in Northern California and the Midwest.
Independent publishers on both the East and West coasts have published his illustrations both in print and online.
Mangerson lives with his wife and two children in Madison, Wisconsin, where he works from his home studio.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Illustration); University of Wisconsin (BFA-Illustration)
Kevin Moore
Full-Time Faculty
Kevin Moore was born in Rotterdam, Holland in 1976. His father's role as a missionary with the Church of the Nazarene
took the Moore family to Kenya, South Africa, France and Zaire before settling in California. He has exhibited
consistently in San Francisco and has works in collections in Italy and Denmark. Moore has been reviewed in
ARTNEWS, American Art Collector and WHERE Magazines, and was selected as one of the top "21 under 31" emerging
artists by Southwest Art Magazine in 2005. The artist lives and works in the Bay Area and is a full-time faculty member at
Academy of Art University where he graduated in 2000.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Painting)
113
Carol Nunnelly
Full-Time Faculty
Carol Nunnelly is an artist, illustrator and master teacher based in San Francisco, California. Nunnelly has over 60
semesters of classroom experience at Academy of Art University. She is noted for her ability to bring out the best in her
students through innovative teaching methods as well as serving as an inspiration and mentor to her fellow faculty
members. Her experience at Academy of Art University has included curriculum development, professional development
workshops for faculty and extensive exhibition and special events production. She is currently a full-time
interdepartmental instructor for Academy of Art University. Nunnelly is also a gifted illustrator, painter and muralist with
numerous projects and publication contributions to her credit. She has been recognized for her ability to work with clients
to realize their vision through research, design and innovative execution. Her book, The Encyclopedia of Fashion
Illustration Techniques, was released in June of 2009.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Fine Art)
Dennis Peterson
Full-Time Faculty, Painting & Printmaking
Dennis Peterson’s artistic practice stems from extensive training in traditional printmaking mediums such as lithography,
intaglio and letterpress. Although viewed as obsolete tools, these printmaking practices have led him towards an interest
in visual communication as conveyed through letterforms and symbols. His works are an experiment with these methods
and their extraordinary power to both create and confound meaning. Peterson received his BFA in 2003 from the Rhode
Island School of Design’s Printmaking Department and his MFA in 2009 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In
addition, he has studied traditional Japanese woodblock printing at Kyoto Seika University in Kyoto, Japan. In his current
position, Peterson teaches letterpress, lithography and other printmaking courses within the School of Fine Art at
Academy of Art University. He lives in Oakland, California, with his wife, cats and bicycles.
Educational Background: University of Wisconsin-Madison (MFA-Studio Art); Rhode Island School of Design (BFAPrintmaking)
Christine Rolik
Full-Time Faculty
Chris Rolik is an artist and educator who wears a number of hats – maker of one-of-a-kind altered books, creator of
textile-inspired sculptural objects made primarily with found and recycled materials, and instructor of popular bookmaking
classes and workshops in San Francisco and around the country. She also maintains a busy textile conservation practice
where she has the unique opportunity to handle and spend time with all manner of historical textiles, traditional costume
and the occasional ritual object. These different areas of interest all end up having a wonderful and exciting influence on
one another.
She is full time faculty at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco where she has taught Book Arts since 1998.
She maintains a studio and lives in Dogtown – West Oakland, CA.
Educational Background: California College of Arts and Crafts (BFA-Textiles)
Peter Schifrin
Full-Time Faculty
Peter Schifrin is a professional sculptor who has created numerous large-scale public and private commissions in
bronze, including 18-foot bronze, Full Sky for award-winning home in New York (2008), 17-foot bronze, Earth & Sky for
DeLoach Vineyards, Sonoma (2009), 16-foot bronze and steel, Coyotes in downtown San Jose, the11-foot bronze and
steel, Firefighter in San Ramon, 9-foot bronze, Wounded Man for the city of San Mateo’s Performing Arts Center, and
Play Sky a 12-foot bronze at a private residence in Sonoma (2009).
In 2004, Peter Schifrin created two 22-foot bronze monuments, Confluence and Skyward at Post and Mason St in San
Francisco's premier Union Square District, commissioned by the Academy of Art University. His work is highlighted in the
hardcover monograph, Love and Fear: The Sculpture of Peter Schifrin with accompanying film on DVD. In 2009 thru
2012 Peter collaborated with artist David Duskin, to create a monumental-scale work, J-Line. Peter Schifrin is a member
of the International Sculpture Center and is a voted "Fellow" with the National Sculpture Society.
Educational Background: Boston University (MFA-Sculpture); San Jose State University (BA-Sculpture)
114
Brandon Smith
Full-Time Faculty
Brandon is a California native raised on the central coast, and is now residing in Oakland. Brandon is a traditional oil
painter whose subject matter is primarily figurative. In addition he is known to paint street scenes, and the occasional still
life and landscape. He began teaching for the Academy in 2003, and in 2008 became a full time faculty member of the
Fine Art department. His paintings are represented by Grey McGear Modern in Santa Monica.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Fine Art)
Tomutsu Takishima
Full-Time Faculty
Tomutsu's work has been seen in many exhibitions in the bay area, including AAC, Romeo 5 Art Cafe, and Merced
Multicultural Art Center. His awards include a 3rd place MFA Fine Art Painting Award from AAC, as well as a first award
in oil from Society of Western Artists national open show. Tomutsu received his BFA with distinction in Painting and
Drawing from AAC in 1994, and received his MFA in Painting from AAC in 1998.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Painting); Academy of Art University (BFA-Painting and
Drawing)
Cedric Wentworth
Full-Time Faculty
Cedric Wentworth began his studies in stone carving and clay modeling abroad, receiving his certificate of
apprenticeship at Cacciatori Studios, Italy. Returning to the United States, he continued his studies at the Art Students
League in New York City.
In 1991, the City of Oakland commissioned Cedric to sculpt the monument of Jack London for the plaza at Jack London
Square. This commission led him to sculpt numerous public monuments, including the Frank Ogawa monuments in front
of the Civic Center of Oakland, and in Fukuoka, Japan, and the bronze wolf at Jack London Square. He has many
outdoor sculptures on permanent display throughout California, including works in Fresno, Davis, Saratoga, and Santa
Clara. Cedric Wentworth is currently represented by the John Natsoulas Gallery in Davis, California, and the Art
Exchange Gallery in San Francisco.
Professional Background: Cedric Wentworth is a widely exhibited fine artist. He has participated in numerous group and
solo shows. He has received numerous awards for his work. Wentworth is a member of the Guild and the National
Sculpture Society.
Valerie Winslow
Anatomy Coordinator, Fine Art
Valerie L. Winslow is a professional fine artist exhibiting her paintings and drawings in museums and galleries nationwide
since 1977. Her work has won numerous awards and is in many private collections.
Valerie has been teaching figurative art and artistic anatomy for over thirty years and has been with the Academy of Art
University since 1989, where she is a Full-time Faculty Member and Anatomy Coordinator in the School of Fine Arts. Her
artistic anatomy book Classic Human Anatomy was released nationally in 2008 by Watson Guptill Publications.
Educational Background: California State University Los Angeles (BA-Art)
Zhao Ming Wu
Full-Time Faculty
Zhaoming Wu was born in China and grew up in Guangzhou City. He received his BFA from Guangzhou Academy of
Fine Art China and his MFA from Academy of Art University, San Francisco. Since 1983, he has been exhibiting his work
in Asia, Europe, the United States and other countries around the world. He has won numerous awards, including the
Merit Award at the 6th National Art Exhibition in Beijing, China, the Gustafson Fund Award, from the National Oil and
Acrylic Painter's Society, 1st place in the 9th Biennial National Figure Painting and Drawing Exhibition, from Mendocino
Art center, California; Second Prize Winner in International Artist magazine (Aug/Sept 2001), grand prize winner in
International Artist magazine (Aug/Sept 2005); the Daler-Rowney Award from the Oil Painters of America (2000) and the
Art Distributor Award from the Oil Painters of America (2005). Long active as both an artist and a teacher, he served as a
professor of painting at the Guangzhou Academy of Fine Art and is currently an instructor of painting at Academy of Art
University. His works have been featured in many publications, including two drawing books of Zhaoming Wu and two
painting books of Zhaoming Wu; International Artist magazine (April/May 2003, August/September 2005), Art of the West
magazine (September/October 2004, July/August 2007), Art Talk Magazine (February 2005), and American Art Collector
(January 2007).
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Fine Art); Guangzhou Academy of Fine Art (BFA-Painting)
115
SCHOOL OF GAME DEVELOPMENT FULL-TIME FACULTY
David Goodwine
Executive Director, School of Game Development
David Goodwine is an Animation & Visual Effects graduate of Academy of Art University. He has been in the industry for
11 years, including 7 years in games. David has worked for companies such as Double Fusion, Eidos/Crystal Dynamics,
Electronic Arts, and PDI/DreamWorks in the positions of studio creative director, senior producer, and art production
manager. His credits include projects such as 25 to Life, Legacy of Kain: Defiance, Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers,
Project: Snowblind, Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, and Tomb Raider: Legend.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration); San Diego State University (BS-Exercise
Physiology/Kinesiology)
David “Rez” Graham
Director, Game Programming
David “Rez” Graham is currently Director, Game Programming at the Academy of Art University’s School of Game
Development. Most recently, he was the Lead Artificial Intelligence Programmer at Electronic Arts. He has worked in the
gaming industry as an engineer since 2005 spending most of that time working on various kinds of AI, from platform
enemy AI to full simulation games. Prior to working at EA, he was at PlayFirst, Slipgate Ironworks, and Planet Moon
Studios. He is the co-author of Game Coding Complete, 4th Edition and regularly speaks at The Game Developers
Conference as well as various colleges and high schools. Rez spends his free time performing improv and running
tabletop RPGs.
Educational Background: Heald Institute of Technology (AS-Electronics/Computer Technology)
Charles Huenergardt
Online Director, School of Game Development
Charles started in the Games Industry in 1996 at Sega as a Quality Assurance Analyst (Tester). Over the years Charles
worked his way up to become a Game Designer and Project Lead. Charles has worked on such PlayStation games as
God of War, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, Project: Snowblind, Shrek the Third, 25 to Life, Army Men,
Pictionary for Wii and SpiderMan: Web of Shadows for the XBOX 360.
Professional Background: Danger Mine Games (Creative Director & Founder), Page 44 Studios (Project Lead), Shaba
Games (Sr. Game Designer), Crystal Dynamics (Game Designer), Pirate Games (Game Designer), Electronic Arts
(Game Designer), Sony Computer Entertainment America (Jr. Game Designer), 3DO (Level Designer)
Pryce Jones
Graduate Program Director, School of Game Development
After receiving his Bachelor of Architecture from Syracuse University and working in that field for several years, Pryce
realized that 1. making entertainment art looks more fun, and 2. many of the techniques he’d learned for designing real
buildings would work for virtual worlds. He then embarked on a career in video games and has spent the past 11 years
as an environment artist, concept painter, and art director. He’s worked on games such as Lord of the Rings: The Two
Towers, Legacy of Kain: Defiance, Tomb Raider: Legend and the next-gen version of Indiana Jones and the Staff of
Kings.
Educational Background: Syracuse University (BA-Architecture)
James Bach
3D Modeling Lead
Jim Bach received his BFA in 3D Modeling from Academy of Art University. He has more than a decade of industry
experience, working as a modeler for Electronic Arts, Activision, and various mobile companies. Throughout his career,
he has also worked on freelance graphic design projects and private commissions. He has authored modeling and
texturing curriculum for the Academy, and is in the process of updating the pipeline for the School of Game Development
to current-gen standards.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Animation)
116
Scott Berkenkotter
Full-Time Faculty
After earning a BA degree in Linguistics at UC Davis, Scott Berkenkotter realized his true passion for game design and
returned to his home town of Fremont, CA to earn a Certificate in Game Design at Ohlone College. Scott was the
Founding President of the Ohlone Game Developers Club for two years, and led a team of five to build an interactive
educational experience in Second Life. He has since worked his way up from a tester at Electronic Arts to working as
Lead Engineer at independent studios such as Millionants Productions and Foam Robot, Inc. Prior to joining the
Academy of Art University he developed the English-learning app Idiom Power for web, iOS, and Android. Scott has
been teaching game scripting, programming, and mobile development courses, writing online courses, and developing
tools that help form the backbone of the Game Development program at Academy of Art University. In 2013, Scott
helped launch the School of Game Development at Academy of Art University, AAU's first mobile game brand.
Educational Background: UC Davis (BA-Linguistics); Ohlone College (Certificate-Game Design)
Michael Buffington
Concept Art Lead
Michael Buffington is a graduate of the Academy of Art University where he majored in Illustration. He works as a
freelance illustrator producing storyboards and concept art for video games, animation, and film. In 2008, Michael
worked as the In-house designer and Props supervisor on a high profile CG animated feature film entitled Alpha &
Omega. Michael also worked as a Designer for Lucas Film Animation on the Third season of The Clone Wars television
series which airs on Cartoon Network.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
Steve Goodale
Game Development and UI/UX Lead
Steven’s long career began in 1992 at Sega. His first design work was at Electronic Arts working on Road Rash3D
where he shipped multiple titles in both Design and Production capacities. While at 3DO he helped ship some of their
more successful products including WDL Thunder Tanks and Sarge's War. Steven moved into AAA development when
he was both Lead Systems Designer and Creative Director for Crystal Dynamics popular Tomb Raider (Underworld).
Professional Background: Work Experience: BabyBubblez! (CEO & Founder), Crystal Dynamics (Creative Director), 3DO
(Game Designer), Electronic Arts (Assistant Produce), Sega of America (Lead Analyst
Patrick Kenney
Online Coordinator
Patrick has created 2D and 3D art and animation for video games since 1995 – most notably for Activision and Acclaim
Entertainment. His freelance work includes Forge and a Virtual Congress project for the Library of Congress. He is
credited on more than 20 published titles, including Spiderman: Web of Shadows, Shrek Super Slam, well as several
titles within the Tony Hawk franchise. Before joining the Academy of Art University, Patrick was an instructor at the
Columbus College of Art and Design.
Educational Background: Champlain College (BS-Graphic Design and Digital Media), studied abroad at Florence
University of the Arts and Champlain College Dublin
Jamin Shoulet
Full-Time Faculty
Jamin Shoulet has worked in the gaming and multi-media industry for over 15 years. As a veteran game artist, he has
worked with heavy hitting companies such as Blizzard Entertainment, Trion, Gazillion, Ubisoft, Perpetual Entertainment,
and One Thumb Mobile. He was a key core artist for the immensely popular online game World of Warcraft. Other titles
include Star Trek Online, RIFT, Warcraft 3 and Rocksmith. Previous years of experience includes working with Toyota,
United States Air Force, US Dept. of State, Toshiba, Nissan and Honeywell on various multi-media projects for CD-ROM
and Web based training. His experience has also brought him overseas to Taiwan as a consultant for games such as
Holy Beast Online, and now currently freelances his skills for smaller mobile companies.
Professional Background: As a veteran game artist of 15 years, Jamin Shoulet has worked with heavy hitting companies
such as Blizzard Entertainment, Trion, Gazillion, Ubisoft, Perpetual Entertainment, and One Thumb Mobile. He was a
key core artist for the immensely popular online game “World of Warcraft.” Other titles include “Star Trek Online,” “RIFT”,
“Warcraft 3” and “Rocksmith”. Previous years of experience includes working with Toyota, United States Air Force, US
Dept. of State, Toshiba, Nissan and Honeywell on various multi-media projects for CD-ROM and Web based training.
His experience has also brought him overseas to Taiwan as a consultant for games such as “Holy Beast Online, “ and
now currently freelances his skills for smaller mobile companies.
117
SCHOOL OF GRAPHIC DESIGN FULL-TIME FACULTY
Mary Scott
Executive Director of Graphic Design
School of Graphic Design Chair Mary Scott can usually be found teaching the program's signature portfolio class to both
grads and undergrads. This gives her a bird's-eye view of the students as they launch their careers in design. Prior to
coming to the Academy in 1999, Mary taught at Art Center College of Design and Otis College of Art and Design. Her
professional life was spent as partner and creative director at Maddocks & Company in Los Angeles, where her projects
for Procter & Gamble, Hitachi, Sony, Disney, Microsoft, Max Factor, Avon and Vidal Sassoon received numerous
industry awards. With almost 40 years of experience, Mary has served on the national board of AIGA, was chapter
president in Los Angeles, and received the AIGA Fellows Award from the San Francisco Chapter in 2006. In 2012 she
was awarded an honorary doctorate from the Academy of Art University. Her hobby is landscape and garden design.
Educational / Professional Background: University of California, Los Angeles and Mount St. Mary’s College. Work
Experience: Maddocks and Company (Vice President and Director of Creative Operations, 25 years), Audio Magnetics,
Sony Superscope, William Pereira and Associates, Capitol Records.
Phil Hamlett
MFA Director, Graphic Design
Graduate Director Phil Hamlett teaches classes, develops curriculum, manages the thesis development process, and
provides broader strategic guidance for the graduate program. His students emerge as advanced design practitioners
and go on to acquire positions at leading firms around the world. Prior to joining the Academy in 2004, Phil led design
studios on both coasts, doing award-winning work for clients large and small. His extensive experience provides him with
the perspective necessary to prepare students for the challenges of the real world. Capable of playing a wide variety of
design and communication roles, he is adept at identifying creative challenges, distilling core objectives, and facilitating
the development of whatever works to make it all better. As a former AIGA national board member, founder of
Compostmodern and co-author of The Living Principles for Design, he sets the agenda for sustainable business practice
within the design community through writing and speaking engagements. Phil was recently named incoming president of
the AIGA San Francisco chapter, his term begins in June of 2014.
Educational Background: University of Georgia (BFA-Graphic Design)
Anitra Nottingham
Online Director, School of Graphic Design
Online Director Anitra Nottingham translates the Academy's onsite program into an innovative and ever-evolving online
learning environment, providing strategic guidance for the online learning process and the broader development of the
School of Graphic Design. She develops curriculum – building and teaching online classes for both MFA and BFA
programs – and guides the thesis development process for online MFA students. Anitra's students attend their virtual
classes from all over the world and emerge from Academy's online-only program as advanced practitioners uniquely
prepared for their respective markets. Before coming to the Academy in 2006, Anitra was a book designer for Oxford
University Press and Penguin Books Australia, and creative director of numerous teams – most recently for the software
company Intuit. Her research interests are in e-learning technology and the socio-material practices of design education.
She is a self-confessed typography nerd and can be found typesetting classic novels for kicks.
Educational Background: Monash University (BA-Graphic Design)
William Culpepper
Associate Director, BFA Online
For the past 14 years, William Culpepper has worked on a variety of visual communication projects for both public and
private organizations. His practice has encompassed all facets of the graphic design profession, from typesetting at a
local newspaper to acting as creative director for national campaigns. In his current capacity at the Academy, he
manages the organization and quality of online class content, and in addition facilitates learning and skills acquisition in
graduate-level thesis development courses. Prior to arriving at Academy of Art University, William has taught at Virginia
Commonwealth University, Northern Arizona University and Ferris State University. William received his BFA from
Montana State University and his MFA at the Academy of Art University. His thesis project, “Grafik Intervention: Sparking
Urban Revitalization Efforts through Graphic Design,” has become an active point of reference for the design community
and its efforts to promote “Design for Good.” This project has been featured in national design publications, online and in
print, including Communication Arts, Design Observer and AIGA's Design for Good. William’s work includes mixed media
and visual messaging through typography. His artistry is interactive and customized to reflect locations, situations,
conversations and observations from his environment, and has been exhibited across the United States and nationally.
William currently lives in Bozeman, Montana looking for perfect vistas in the morning light with his wife and two active
daughters.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA Graphic Design); Montana State University (BFA-Studio Art)
118
Tom McNulty
Associate Director of BFA Graphic Design
Thomas McNulty has taught at the Academy since 1991 and has served as a brand and package design consultant for
over 25 years in the U.S. and Europe. During his career, he has worked with renowned designer Robert Miles Runyan,
Enterprise IG, CFNAPA, Neworld Associates (Ireland) and was the co-founder and vice president of Profile Design in
San Francisco for over 10 years. He has successfully managed and directed many multinational brand and packaging
programs for clients such as Anheuser Busch, Apple, Oracle, The Hershey Company, Art of the Olympians, Logitech,
Pasta Pomodoro, Charles Krug Winery, Anomaly Vineyards, Lynch Vineyards, Trinchero Family Estates, Mrs. Fields,
Safeway, The Coca-Cola (Ireland) and Mileeven Fine Foods (Ireland), winning awards and recognition for design
excellence. His work can be found in numerous design industry publications. He is a graduate of Art Center College of
Design.
Educational Background: Art Center College of Design (BFA-Graphic Design)
John Nettleton
Associate Director, Graphic Design BFA
John Nettleton has extensive experience in both academia and professional practice. He previously served as chair of
the Graphic Design Program at OCAD University in Toronto and as an assistant professor at Oregon State University.
Prior to moving to the Bay Area, John was the creative director for a Seattle-area design studio. He has also practiced as
an art director and designer in Washington, D.C. His design work ranges across a wide range of projects and
experiences, from corporate communications to branding, identity systems, environmental design, publication and web
design. Clients have included Nike, Microsoft, Filson and The National Academy of Sciences. His research examines
design process, methodology, systems and design education. His design work has received numerous awards and has
been shown at a number of venues. John has also presented at numerous national and international design and visual
communication conferences. John earned an MFA in Design/Visual Communications from Virginia Commonwealth
University and a BFA in Advertising Design from Boise State University.
Educational Background: Virginia Commonwealth University (MFA-Design/Visual Communications); Boise State
University (BFA-Graphic Design)
Jeremy Stout
Associate Online Director of Graphic Design
Jeremy Stout has been the associate online director for the School of Graphic Design since 2009. He develops content
integral to school curriculum and planning in the MFA and BFA programs. His wide range of design experience allows
him to teach all levels of typography, brand, digital, and print design. Jeremy has worked at a number of large and small
firms in the Bay Area. At Chronicle Books he art directed and designed over 150 titles. He was also a senior designer at
Landor and Associates, where he created branding for clients such as FedEx, Visa, Accenture and John Deere. At
Character, he was as an art director on projects for clients such as Nike, Restoration Hardware, Facebook and Adobe.
Jeremy has received numerous awards for his graphic design and fine art painting. He is a recipient of the Gold Award
for packaging. His work is in the permanent collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and has been shown
nationwide in numerous galleries.
Educational Background: California College of the Arts & Crafts (BFA-Graphic Design & Printing)
Hunter Wimmer
Associate Director of Graphic Design
Hunter Wimmer has nearly two decades of experience in translating strategic business objectives into innovative,
relevant visual solutions. As design director for IDEO, he broadened his professional scope by bringing a unique
perspective on user-centered research and multidisciplinary collaboration into the overall design process. Through his
work with Gap and as design director of Banana Republic's marketing team, he discovered new insights into branding
and consumer messaging, which he leverages in both his work and teaching. Prior to joining the Academy in 2005, he
spent several years anchoring the Graphic Design program at the University of California Berkeley Extension in San
Francisco. Hunter's work has been featured in numerous books and publications such as Print, HOW, Critique and
Wallpaper magazines. He holds a degree in Communication Arts and Design from Virginia Commonwealth University.
Educational Background: Virginia Commonwealth University (BFA-Communication Arts & Design)
119
Amy Broadbent
Full-Time Faculty
Amy Broadbent has been at the Academy since 1992. In her teaching, Amy emphasizes the correct use of tools and
materials to freshmen students, creating mockups of graphic design projects, including brochures, shopping bags,
embossed and die-cut packages, and bottle labels. She has a BFA in Advertising from the University of Santo Tomas in
Manila, Philippines. After coming to the U.S., she worked for Cato, Yasumura, Behaeghel and later became art director
for Ogilvy & Mather Direct. She also founded a design agency in San Francisco. With over 30 years of experience in
creative services, Amy has designed marketing and promotional materials for the following clients, among others:
American Express, Chevron, Ford Motors, United Vacations, Wells Fargo Bank, Levi's, Pacific Bell, KNBR, Coldwell
Banker, Century 21 Contempo, Schwab Institutional, Fugazi Travel, Glaucoma Research Foundation and the Diocese of
Oakland. Amy has been published in the International Biographical Centre in England, Who's Who In Advertising,
California Who's Who, San Francisco Business Times, Contra Costa Times and in Philippine publications.
Educational Background: University of San Tomas (BFA-Advertising)
Lian Ng
Full-Time Faculty
Lian Ng started his career in 1990 as a graphic designer in Seattle. Past employers included design agencies such as
Hornall Anderson Design in Seattle and Cahan & Associates in San Francisco. Since 2000, Lian has freelanced for
design firms such as Character, Templin Brink Design, Turner & Associates, Turner Duckworth, Eleven and Pool Design.
Lian has worked with brands such as Starbucks, Restoration Hardware, K2 Skis, Kohler, RedEnvelope, Levis and Nike.
His experience ranges from print, packaging and retail graphics to environmental design. Lian’s work has been
recognized internationally and is in the permanent collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. His work has
been published in both trade and consumer magazines, including Communication Arts, Type Directors Club annuals, ID
magazine, Print and HOW, as well as in books such as Paper Perfect, Paper Craft and Tangible. In addition to his wide
range of professional experiences and clients, Lian also runs a small business in home accessories—Publique Living
and PubliqueShop.com. He currently teaches graphic design and typography at the Academy.
Educational Background: California State University, Fresno (BS-Mathematics & Computer Science)
Samantha Perkins
Online Class Coordinator
Samantha Perkins spends her days at her computer, writing and teaching for the online program as online class
coordinator. When Samantha joined the Academy faculty in June 2013, she had already been teaching graphic design
and architecture for nearly 10 years. She has worked across design industries and the academic landscape as an inhouse graphic designer for University of Cincinnati's College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning, as well as
working as an environmental graphic designer at Catt Lyon Design of Cincinnati and an architectural designer at DSGN
Associates of Dallas. Recently, Samantha obtained her MFA in Graphic Design from the Academy, focusing her thesis
materials on the use of context and behavior in the development of wayfinding educational materials. Her efforts have
earned design accolades from the Society of Environmental Graphic Designers and national recognition from the Interior
Design Educators Council. Her thesis findings have been presented at conferences for both organizations, as well as to
students at both Miami University (Ohio) and the University of Cincinnati School of Design.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Graphic Design); University of Texas (BS-Architecture)
Scott Rankin
Full-Time Faculty
Scott Rankin is a third generation Bay Area resident who brings a vast array of cultural experiences, fine art training and
graphic design acumen to the Academy of Art University’s Graphic Design department. Rankin received a Fine Arts
Master degree from the University of California at Berkeley, working with highly influential Beat and Abstract
Expressionist artists. Rankin has parlayed his fine art knowledge into a pivotal career of thirty-three years in graphic
design with topical clients such as: Sidjakov, Berman and Gomez, Michael Maybry, Clement Moc and Ketchum
Advertising, into his teaching. Rankin views his diverse background as essential in teaching the process of visual
thinking and divergent thinking. He continues to maintain a studio in the East Bay and to exhibit in both Northern and
Southern California.
Educational Background: University of California, Berkeley (MFA-Art); University of California, Santa Barbara (BA-Art
Studio)
120
Roland Young
Full-Time Faculty
Roland Young has been teaching since the late 1960's and continues to inspire students and professionals alike. Roland
began his design career at Capitol/Angel Records in 1964 under the guidance of Louis Danziger. He later moved to A&M
Records as creative director where he produced some of the music industry's finest album covers and advertising
campaigns. Prior to joining Academy of Art University as a full-time professor in January 2009, Roland spent 2008 as a
professor at the National Taiwan Normal University in Taipei. Currently he is Design Consultant at Meryl Pollen Design
whose clients include Suzanne Felsen Jewelry, Rolling Greens Nurseries, and Getty Museum. He remains a Design
Consultant for Paper Design Magazine in Taipei, Taiwan.
Educational Background: Art Center (BPA-Advertising Design)
SCHOOL OF ILLUSTRATION FULL-TIME FACULTY
Chuck Pyle
Director of Illustration
Mr. Pyle was trained as an illustrator at the Academy, and comes from an impressive freelance career. He is an
internationally sought-after artist, working with clients from New York to Tokyo. His past clients have included Microsoft,
Pacific Bell, Safeway, Avis, Ask Jeeves, Sun Microsystems, Reader’s Digest, The New York Times, The Boston Globe,
Atlantic Monthly, Redbook, Good Housekeeping, McCall’s, Penguin, Bantam, Book of the Month Club, Houghton Mifflin,
Seattle Opera, Nisshin Foods, and the Chicago Museum of Science and Technology.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
Jeannie Brunnick
Director, Online Illustration, MFA
Jeannie is an adept illustrator who has gained national recognition for her work with clients such as: Universal/MCA,
MGM Studios, 20th Century Fox Studios, Sony Pictures, Warner Bros. Studios, Disney Imagineering, and Mattel Toys.
Jeannie was a featured illustrator in Outstanding American Illustrators and has been awarded by the Society of
Illustrators in Los Angeles.
Educational Background: Art Center College of Design (BFA-Illustration)
Lourdes Livingston
Undergraduate Online Director, School of Illustration
From 1977 until 1993, Ms. Livingston worked as an Editorial Graphic Designer, Illustrator and Columnist for the San
Francisco Chronicle. Her assignments at the Chronicle included all aspects of visual newspaper reporting, from
developing daily political commentaries to backroom action at the Cannes Film Festival and street fashions in Milan. As
Creative Director at Women.com, she defined the look and feel of the entire network, working with art staffs in New York
and San Francisco.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
William Maughan
Director of MFA Illustration
A professional illustrator and fine artist, Mr. Maughan has provided numerous illustrations for such companies as
DreamWorks, CBS, Universal Studios, Chevrolet, Doubleday, Oxford University Press, to name but a few. His work has
been represented by major galleries and publishers, domestically and internationally. Mr. Maughan’s book, The Artist’s
Complete Guide to Drawing the Head, was published in 2004.
Educational Background: Art Center College of Design (BFA-Illustration)
121
Gordon Silveria
Director, Arts Technology
Gordon Silveria is a San Francisco native. He earned his BFA in Illustration from Academy of Art University in 1991. He
began teaching for the Academy 12 years ago, and created the Academy's first digital art classes for illustrators. He went
on to become the Illustration Department Director, a position he held for 7 years. During his tenure, the Illustration
department became "The number two illustration department in the United States," according to the New York Society of
Illustrators' top ten list.
He currently is on the faculty of the Academy's Illustration department and is the Director of Alumni and Industry
Outreach. He illustrated the bestselling children's book The Greedy Triangle by Marilyn Burns, and has just finished his
own book, The Upside Down Book, which should be out soon. He has two dogs, Digby and Rooney.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
Lisa Berrett
Assistant Director of Illustration
Lisa earned her BFA in Illustration at Academy of Art University in 1986 and has worked as a freelance illustrator for
nearly 20 years. She has illustrated for a wide range of products, including children's books and magazines, games, CDROM packaging as well as advertising, food label art, and educational materials for kids. Lisa returned to the Academy in
2001 to instruct future illustrators on the principles of clothed figure drawing.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
Gary Amaro
Full-Time Faculty, Illustration
Gary has worked in genres ranging from storyboard and comics art to visual development and fine art. His sketches are
featured in the book, The Art of Urban Sketching: Drawing on Location Around the World, and his paintings show at Los
Angeles’ Gallery Nucleus. His comics work includes The Sandman and Gotham Central, and his video game concept art
appears in Darkspore, The Godfather 2, and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. Gary’s illustrations have
won the New Yorker’s Eustace Tilley contest five consecutive years.
Educational Background: University of California Berkeley (BA-Art, BA-English)
Jason Bowen
Full-Time Faculty, Online
Mark Jason Bowen is an accomplished fine artist. He has participated in many group and solo exhibitions in Europe and
USA. He has won the Best of Show at the Capital Art Show in Utah and 2nd Place at the Tanglewood Art Exhibition.
Bowen’s work has also been published in many magazines. He holds a BFA in Illustration from Brigham Young
University and a MFA in Painting from American University.
Educational Background: American University (MFA-Painting); Brigham Young University (BFA-Illustration)
Daniel Cooney
Full-Time Faculty
Daniel Cooney is an artist, writer, and publisher who specializes in sequential art and multi-media. Currently, he is a
comic book and sequential art drawing instructor with The Learning Exchange and Utrecht Gallery, a Reading and
Writing Tutor with Sylvan Learning Center, and an Illustrator, Writer, Letterer, and Publisher with Red Eye Press.
Additionally, Cooney is also a Graphic Designer. Cooney has worked as an assistant editor with Marvel Comics in NY.
Cooney holds a BFA in Illustration and Sequential Art from the School of Visual Arts and is pursuing his MA in Education
from the University of Phoenix. Cooney is a member of the Cartoon Art Museum.
Educational Background: School of Visual Arts (BFA-Illustration and Sequential Art)
Thomas Ellsworth
Full-Time Faculty
Tom Ellsworth received his BFA in Illustration from Academy of Art University. He is an experienced illustrator with
numerous years of experience specializing in digital illustration and more specifically, vector art. Current and previous
clients have included Biocodex Inc., Hewlett-Packard, Safeway, Performance Computing Magazine, Commish Kit, Space
Dog Books, Rebel Bar, Blue Restaurant, Velvet Cantina Restaurant, Tessitura Network, and Truck Bar. Published books
include Snark, Inc. and The Amazing Snox Box.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
122
Thomas Gronbukt
Full-Time Faculty
Thomas Gronbukt has extensive training and education in Illustration, Fine Art, Design and Digital Technology. He
designed and created images in multiple mediums. He creates professional illustrations in acrylics, oil, watercolor, pastel,
pen &ink, colored pencil, printmaking, computer software and mixed media. Gronbukt received his BFA in Illustration
from Academy of Art College.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
Steve Kloepfer
Full-Time Faculty
Steven Kloepfer has more than 20 years of professional experience in Illustration. He has been an instructor/consultant
of art with the San Mateo Park and Recreation Department and PDI, copywriter/producer/consultant with DKS Creative,
owner/illustrator of Creative Illustrator, freelance desktop publisher and freelance editor. His previous clients have
included Atari Games, Pandemonium Pictures, Black Swan Press, Scalawag Studios, Kirson Works, Adams & Allgood,
Fearon Education, Apple Computer, Charles Schwab, SKI, and Stanford University. He is an associate member of the
California Academy of Painters. Steve is currently Full-Time Faculty in the Academy of Art University’s School of
Illustration and School of Visual Development. Prior to becoming full-time faculty, Steve had been teaching at the
Academy of Art University since 2002.
Craig Marshall
Full-Time Faculty
Craig Marshall attended Academy of Art University in 1971 and received a BFA degree in illustration in 1976. He spent
several years as a freelance commercial illustrator before becoming a staff illustrator for a small medical publishing
company. In 1986 he was invited to teach head drawing and illustration courses at Academy of Art University, where he
stayed for 11 years while continuing his freelance work. In 1997 he moved to Burbank, CA and taught drawing classes
for Walt Disney Feature Animation, Associates in Art, and Woodbury University.
He returned to San Francisco in 1999 and now teaches Heads and Hands for the Academy's School of Illustration and
Character Design & Drawing for Cartoons for the School of Animation. His past freelance accounts include Bank of
America, Chevron, Del Monte, Fuddrucker's Restaurants, Macy's California, Oracle Corporation, Pacific Gas & Electric,
Safeway Stores, The United States Air Force Art Program, and Walt Disney Feature Animation.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
Stephen Player
Full-Time Faculty
Stephen Player was born in England in 1965. He acquired a first-class honors illustration degree in London in 1985.
Since then, Stephen has enjoyed a thriving freelance career. His work has been used in advertising, television, film,
promotion, and over one hundred books. These books are mostly in the sci-fi, fantasy, horror, and children's genres, as
well as graphic novels. Stephen is a winner of the British Sci-Fi and Fantasy Association Award, received a Substantial
Contribution to Children's Literacy Award, and received a Sheffield Children's Book Award. Stephen has been exhibited
widely across Europe. He has been teaching at Academy of Art University since 2001.
Educational Background: Camberwell College of Arts (BA-Illustration)
Robert Revels
Full-Time Faculty
Robert Revels graduated from Academy of Art College with a BFA in Illustration.
Robert has worked as a professional artist since 1994. He has worked on a variety of projects ranging from children's
stories to large concert backdrops for artists such as Carlos Santana and U2. Since graduating from the Academy, he
has garnered numerous awards. He is the founder of the greeting card company, Rockfish Designs.
Robert has returned to teach at his alma mater to give back to the next generation of artists.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
123
Christopher Schenck
Full-Time Faculty
Christopher Schenck has been in the comic, magazine and book illustration industries since 1988 when he first started
his career as Art Director for New Comics Group. While there, he worked on such groundbreaking comics as Asylum,
Young Master, and Demon Blade. One year later, Schenck went freelance, concentrating primarily in the comic industry,
while also doing magazine and book illustration. He has worked on the Eisner-Award winning Big Book of Urban
Legends, and on Steven Spielberg's The Lost World. Schenck's clients have included Bay Guardian, Chronicle Books,
HP, and Sun Microsystems. He received his BFA in Illustration from Academy of Art University and his BA in Liberal Arts
from the University of San Francisco.
Educational Background: University of San Francisco (BA-Illustration)
SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGN FULL-TIME FACULTY
Tom Matano
Executive Director, Industrial Design
Tom Matano has almost 30 years of experience in the automotive design industry. He held design positions at General
Motors in Detroit, and GM Holden's Ltd. in Melbourne, Australia and BMW in Munich, Germany. In 1983, he joined
Mazda's North American studio as a Chief Designer. He continued to become Executive Vice President of Western
Operations for Mazda R&D North America, Inc., and Executive Designer & Director of Mazda North American
Operations.
From 1999 to 2002, Mr. Matano has been moved to Mazda headquarters in Japan, as an Executive Designer in the
Global Advance Studio, oversees Japan, Europe and North American Advance studios, and the General Manager of
Mazda Design in charge of the Chief Designers. His accomplishments at Mazda include the 1993 RX-7, Miata, and many
other projects by the design teams he managed and created. Since 2002 to present, Mr. Matano is committed to
becoming an educator, and using his diverse knowledge and experience to enhance the Industrial Design program at the
Academy of Art University in San Francisco, now ranked #4 in the Red Dot World Ranking of ID schools.
Educational Background: Art Center College of Design (BS-Transportation Design)
Mark Bolick
MFA Director, School of Industrial Design
Mark worked various jobs in Silicon Valley where he collaborated on projects with Nike, Motorola, IDEO, NASA,
Stanford, MIT and The Exploratorium. In pursuit of his passions, Mark abandoned his career as an industrial designer to
pursue his love for furniture. As Design Manager for William Sonoma Inc., Mark designed hundreds of production
furniture pieces in China, Malaysia, Indonesia, Mexico, Vietnam, Italy and the United States. As Director of Furniture for
Restoration Hardware, Mark assisted in the growth of the furniture division, including the launch of the company’s Bed
and Bath catalog. In 2006, Mark officially joined the family business named after his first daughter, India Rose. India
Rose LLC is a vertically integrated home furnishings design firm that designs, develops, sources and manufactures
home products all over the world for retailers such as Crate and Barrel, Anthropologie, Harry and David, and Jackson
Perkins.
Educational Background: California College of Arts & Crafts (BFA-Industrial Design)
Antonio Borja
Associate Director, School of Industrial Design
Antonio Borja studied at Academy of Art University where he earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Industrial Design. He then
went one to freelance for one year, before joining General Motors as a creative designer. While at General motor he was
on the design team of full-size truck, mid-size truck and rear drive performance vehicles. In addition to his daytime
responsibilities Antonio was part of the design SWAT team which collaborated with the global studios during the ideation
phase of the program. Antonio returned to teach at his alma-mater in 2009 and has taught Design Drawing,
Transportation Design, Portfolio Enhancement and Digital 3D modeling courses.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Industrial Design)
Hideki Masuda
Associate Online Director of Industrial Design Designs
Hideki Masuda received a Bachelor of Arts degree in fine art from Bard College in Annandale, New York, and a Bachelor
of Science degree in industrial design/transportation design from the Art Center College of Design. While he was a
student at the Art Center, Mr. Masuda designed, engineered, and built a full-scale running prototype vehicle. In 1998, he
joined the Academy of Art University as an instructor in the School of Industrial Design. In addition to playing his role as
an instructor, Mr. Masuda has contributed to developing the Industrial Design program. He currently teaches both
transportation design classes and computer courses at the Academy.
Educational Background: Bard College (BA-Studio Art); Art Center College of Design (BS-Transportation Design)
124
Shiz Kobara
Full-Time Faculty
Shiz earned his B.S. Industrial Design degree from San Jose State University in 1981 and went to work for Hewlett
Packard for 26 years as an industrial designer and later as a user experience designer. He designed the first
commercially viable visually 3-D user interface adopted by the Open Software Foundation in 1988 called OSF Motif user
interface. Shiz then wrote a book on the principles of visual design in 1990 called Visual Design with OSF Motif. Shiz
rose to the position of HP Corporate Global Industrial Design manager in 2000 managing the corporate industrial design
team and implemented a new industrial design language internally called "Design for Brand" for all HP products
worldwide. Shiz retired from HP in 2007 and served briefly as senior user experience design manager for Intuit before
founding his own strategic design firm Kobara Design, LLC in 2008.
Educational Background: San Jose State University (BS-Industrial Design)
Paul Wilczynski
Full-Time Faculty, School of Industrial Design
Paul studied industrial design at the University of Illinois and the Art Institute of Chicago. He has worked in staff and
consultant designer capacities, and served a full apprenticeship as a precision product model maker and finisher. He
designed his own car at age eighteen while still in college, and formed a company that built over fifty examples. He has
created several Top Ten Toys, and his toy designs have won a number of awards from parents' groups. A vehicle that he
designed and built won the Nissan Biennial Design Competition in 1990. His career comprises hundreds of projects in
the design and fabrication of toys, medical devices, power tools, recreational vehicles, automobiles and automobile
accessories, computer peripherals, electronics, trade show and point-of-purchase displays, home furnishings, and
consumer goods.
Educational / Professional Background: University of Illinois, Chicago and Art Institute of Chicago. Work Experience: Skil
Corporation (Staff Industrial Designer), Design Consultants, Inc., Miniwoodie, Inc. (Principal), Playskool (Senior Staff
Designer), Playstuff Inc. (Principal), Wilson Product Models (Partner), Wilson Design (Principal), The CDM Co (Director
of New Product Development), Studio California (Director).
SCHOOL OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN FULL-TIME FACULTY
Laura Blumenfeld
Executive Director of Interior Architecture & Design
Laura Blumenfeld is a graduate of the University of San Francisco and Academy of Art College Co-Op program. She
brings over 20 years of experience in the field of interior design specializing in both commercial and residential projects.
Her work has been published in The San Francisco Chronicle, Town and Country, San Francisco magazine, Interior
Design and Metropolitan Home. In 2004, one of Laura's residential projects received a Distinguished Building Award
from The American Institute of Architects.
Educational Background: University of San Francisco (BFA-Interior Design)
Archana Myer
Director, Interior Architecture & Design
Archana Myer has a unique background which combines hospitality design, project management, and marketing. Most
recently she was at the world's largest Hospitality Firm, Hirsch Bedner Associates (HBA) as a Senior Designer/Project
Manager. While at HBA she worked on several large-scale international hospitality projects including properties for Ritz
Carlton, Hilton Hotels, and InterContinental Hotel Group.
In addition to her design and project management responsibilities, she co-managed the San Francisco office of HBA and
played a key role in creating a new marketing and client development strategy which has proven to be quite successful.
Prior to HBA, Ms. Myer worked as a Marketing Coordinator at Fluor Corporation, a Fortune 500 engineering and
Construction Company. The skills gained while at Fluor proved to be extremely useful in the design industry throughout
the course of her career.
Holding degrees from UC Santa Barbara and Academy of Art University, Ms. Myer has a unique educational background
that has led to her diversity as a design professional. Her combination of design skills and management experience
makes teaching the natural next step for her.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Interior Architecture & Design); University of California Santa
Barbara (BA-Global Studies)
125
Marc DiGiacomo
Online Coordinator
Marc DiGiacomo, Architect, LEED AP is licensed in the State of California, and received his Bachelor of Architecture
from the University of Notre Dame in 1995. He has served as Project Manager and Senior Designer on interior design
and architectural projects ranging from mid-rise multifamily buildings, restaurants, executive office spaces, healthcare
projects, and private residences. Marc began teaching with the Academy as an adjunct instructor in 2001.
Educational Background: University of Notre Dame (B.Arch.-Architecture)
Sharon Robertson
Online Full-Time Faculty
Sharon Robertson was trained as an Interior Designer receiving her MA from the Rudolph Schaeffer School of Design. In
1980 she specialized in kitchen and bathroom design, opening wholesale designer showrooms in San Francisco, Los
Altos, Seattle and Oakland, that imported European cabinets, bathroom fixtures, and tile, as well as distributed many of
the leading American manufacturers. Ms. Robertson designed many residential projects for both new construction and
remodeling. She was the kitchen and bathroom designer for several large multi-housing projects including 1150 Lombard
and 1150 Sacramento in San Francisco.
Educational Background: Rudolph Schaeffer School of Design (MFA-Interior Design); University of California Berkeley
(BA-History and Art History)
Agustin Sanders
Full-Time Faculty
Agustin grew up in a very artistic family. His mother was an interior designer and first introduced him to fabrics, furniture
and design. He started his career in Mexico City working as a set designer for one of Mexico's most influential fashion
photographers at the age of 19. After living in Mexico for almost the first 20 years of his life, he decided to relocate to
San Francisco, California. In 2009 Agustin had the opportunity to design the Urban Knights Art Cafe for the Academy of
Art University. The main design for this space was based on a modern version of an art studio, utilizing the Academy
colors and incorporating different material and textures all throughout the space to create a very contemporary
environment but comfortable and eye catching for students. Agustin received his BFA degree from the Academy of Art,
School of Interior Architecture and Design.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Interior Architecture & Design)
Stephanie Smith-Haenel
Full-Time Faculty
Stephanie comes to us with over twelve years’ experience in commercial interior design. She holds a BA in interior
Design and is a graduate of the School of Interior Architecture and Design MFA program at Academy of Art University.
Stephanie has been coordinating special projects for IAD since 2008. Stephanie teaches undergraduate and graduate
courses both online and on campus.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Interior Architecture & Design); California State University,
Fresno (BA-Interior Design)
Danny Song
Full-Time Faculty, School of Industrial Design
Danny Song is currently a Full-Time Faculty in the Academy of Art University's School of Industrial Design. Prior to
becoming full-time, Danny had been teaching in the university's industrial design department since 2011.
Danny received his BFA in General Fine/Studio Arts from UC Santa Barbara. He then received a second BFA degree in
Transportation Design from the Academy of Art University.
In addition to teaching, Danny has been a freelance Industrial Designer since 2010.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Transportation Design); UC Santa Barbara (BFA-General
Fine/Studio Arts)
126
SCHOOL OF JEWELRY & METAL ARTS FULL-TIME FACULTY
Charlene Modena
Director, Jewelry & Metal Arts
Ms. Modena received her MA in Sculpture from San Francisco State University with an emphasis in Jewelry and Metal
Arts and an MFA in Sculpture from Academy of Art University. She also studied with the S.F. Art Institute, Penland
School in North Carolina and Haystack School in Maine, and conducted additional research in England, Mexico, Italy and
Hawaii. She has participated in numerous group and solo exhibitions throughout the world, including the American
Institute of Architects, the University of Guanajuato (Mexico), the Butler Museum, Elements Gallery, the Velvet da Vinci
Gallery and the Biennale Internationale-Limoges in France.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-Sculpture with an emphasis in Metal Arts); Academy of Art
University (MFA-Sculpture)
Gordon Silveria
Director, Arts Technology
Gordon Silveria is a San Francisco native. He earned his BFA in Illustration from Academy of Art University in 1991. He
began teaching for the Academy 12 years ago, and created the Academy's first digital art classes for illustrators. He went
on to become the Illustration Department Director, a position he held for 7 years. During his tenure, the Illustration
department became "The number two illustration department in the United States," according to the New York Society of
Illustrators' top ten list.
He currently is on the faculty of the Academy's Illustration department and is the Director of Alumni and Industry
Outreach. He illustrated the bestselling children's book The Greedy Triangle by Marilyn Burns, and has just finished his
own book, The Upside Down Book, which should be out soon. He has two dogs, Digby and Rooney.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
Kelly Nedderman
Online Coordinator
Kelly Nedderman is a San Francisco based artist, educator and designer, who balances her time between commercial design and
making unique, one of a kind adornments. She has had 10 years of working in the textile and jewelry fields, having designed a wide
range of products for different genders and various age groups.
Trained primarily as a textile designer, she strives to combine her passion for metal with her passion for pattern, repetition and
textures every time she sits down at her bench. She is drawn to the compelling contrast between modern and organic imagery. In
practicing her craft, she has melded her textile work into components used in her jewelry. Shapes and patterns created using
printmaking techniques are merged together with simple geometrical forms, creating rhythm and contrast.
Kelly is actively involved in the local art community through her volunteer work with the Metal Arts Guild as a board member and
teaches metalsmithing at the university level and for various non-profit arts organizations. She has taught in the Schools of Jewelry
& Metal Arts and Fine Art Sculpture for the Academy of Art University since 2007. She is currently the university’s Online
Coordinator for the School of Jewelry & Metal Arts.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Fashion Textiles)
SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE FULL-TIME FACULTY
Heather Clendenin
Director, Landscape Architecture
Heather is a licensed landscape architect in California and was the Program Director for the Landscape Architecture
Certificate Program at UC Berkeley Extension where she initiated and directed the Sustainable Environmental Design
and Stewardship Professional Sequence program. She has worked on projects including the Advanced Concepts Center
for General Motors in Malibu, Columbia University’s athletic training center in the City of New York, Carousel Park
Playground at the Santa Monica Pier, the master plan for Claremont’s Harvey Mudd College and General Motors
Corporate Headquarters in Thousand Oaks. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Design from U.C. Berkeley
and a Master’s degree in Landscape Architecture (MLA) from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design.
Educational Background: Harvard University (MLA-Landscape Architecture); University of California, Berkeley (BAEnvironmental Design)
127
Yasmine Farazian
Full-Time Faculty
With 7 years of experience at a local San Francisco Master Planning, Urban Design and Landscape Architecture firm,
Yasmine has had the opportunity to focus on projects of varying scales. Yasmine's strong design, communication, and
graphic skills have allowed her to work as a project and production manager on projects such as The 1st ACT Vision for
Downtown San Jose, The NASA Research Park at Moffett Field and The Coldstream Master Plan in Truckee, California.
Educational Background: University of Berkeley, California (BA-Landscape Architecture)
SCHOOL OF MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION FULL-TIME FACULTY
James Egan
Executive Director, School of Motion Pictures & Television
James Egan is an award-winning writer-producer whose documentary Raise Hell: The Life and Times of Molly Ivins is
currently being filmed in association with Robert Redford’s Sundance Productions. With best-selling author Michael
Connelly (The Lincoln Lawyer and the TV series Bosch), he recently produced the feature documentary Sound of
Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story. Working with Participant Media, James produced Angels in the Dust, which won
the Amnesty International VARA Award for Social Justice. He also teamed up with writer-director Mike Figgis (Leaving
Las Vegas) to executive produce the award-winning Kimjongilia, which premiered at Sundance.
James began his film career working with director John Waters. He has sold feature screenplays to Fox, Disney,
Paramount and Sony. James began his television writing career at the BBC and received his first break in American
television by selling a story to Remington Steele. With Barbara De Fina and Martin Scorsese, he developed and sold a
TV series, The 12, to the SyFy channel.
James is a vested member of the Writers Guild of America (WGA). He is a national advocate for educating wounded
veterans and has been honored by the Marine Corps for the educational programs he created at the Wounded Warrior
facilities at Camp Pendleton and Camp 29 Palms. Before becoming Executive Director of the School of Motion Pictures
& Television, James served as Online Director since 2012.
Educational Background: University of Minnesota (BA)
Brad Hughes
Director of Music for Visual Media & Director of Sound / Audio for Motion Pictures & Television
Originally from Sacramento, California, Brad Hughes has over 14 years of experience in sound and music as a
composer, musician, and recording engineer for a wide variety of production environments. He has provided audio and
music services to many clients, including The Hollywood Edge, Creativity Studios, and 13th Generation Productions.
Prior to moving to the Bay Area, he spent 10 years in Los Angeles as a studio musician, where he recorded on the
scoring stages at 20th Century Fox and Warner Bros.
He is a voting member of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, which hosts the annual Grammy Awards,
and serves in the San Francisco chapter of N.A.R.A.S. on the Education committee, as well as the Producers &
Engineering Wing.
He holds a BFA in World Arts & Cultures from U.C.L.A., and an MFA in Music from The California Institute of the Arts.
Most recently, he was at Skywalker Ranch, working on his soundtrack for a new zombie film!
Educational Background: California Institute of the Arts (MFA-Music Performance); University of California, Los Angeles
(BA-World Arts & Cultures)
Jess Kreusler
Online Director, School of Motion Pictures & Television
Jess Kreusler joined Wild at Heart Films as Creative Executive in 2009, developing feature screenplays and television
series including projects with Martin Scorsese, three-time Oscar-winner Mark Harris, and Richard Donner. Before
becoming Online Director of the School of Motion Pictures & Television, Jess served as Online Coordinator since 2012.
Educational Background: Kent State University (BA-Theatre Studies & Sociology)
128
Shaaron Murphy
Director of Editing, Motion Pictures & Television
Shaaron Murphy has been teaching at the Academy since 1995, teaching Final Cut Pro, Avid, The Work of Great
Directors, and the Advanced Editing Theory course, which she created for the department. She also oversees more than
100 labs and a large group of instructors, technicians and staff. With her fifteen years of work in feature films,
documentaries, national ads and narrative shorts, she brings valuable industry expertise to the editing portion of the
program. She is a graduate of the USC School of Cinema Production, where she was a winner of the Student Emmy
Award for Production.
Educational Background: University of Southern California (BA-Cinema/Television)
Tim Boxell
Full-Time Faculty, School of Motion Pictures & Television
Tim Boxell directed feature films Aberration for Artisan and romantic comedy Chasing Destiny for Artists View as well as
working on dozens of features in the roles of visual consultant and storyboard artist. As creative director for Colossal
Pictures Tim was actively involved in MTV’s notorious mixed media hit show Liquid Television for which he directed
Winter Steele and Las Apassionadas. His work has been seen on Saturday Night Live, Comedy Central, The Disney
Channel, ABC, The WB and Nickelodeon. He’s directed and designed numerous award-winning commercials
(Hershey’s, Nintendo, Doritos, Budweiser) and broadcast graphics (VH-1, MTV, TNT) featuring and inventive blend of
animation, live action and effects.
Educational Background: University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (BA-Studio Arts)
Curran Engel
Producing Track Head
Curran is a producer, production manager, first assistant director, and second assistant director, and has over 12 years
of extensive industry experience. He was the producer on several feature films, such as Skeleton Woman, This Space
Between Us, Downfall, and Cherish and First Assistant Director on Heartwood, Tweeker, and Chalk. Curran is an
accomplished professional who has worked in a variety of roles. He guides graduate students through the various
elements of production, from breaking down a script to scheduling and budgeting, and his first-hand experience of sales
and marketing prepares students for the challenges of producing their own projects. Curran's extensive list of projects
includes music videos, commercials, television and movies.
Educational Background: University of California, Los Angeles (MFA); Amherst College (BA)
Kenneth Ferro
Cinematography Track Head
Kenneth Ferro is a working professional in the film and television industry with nearly two decades of experience. Since
1989 Ferro has been a cameraman on various music videos, commercials, and long form projects. Professional credits
include A Walk in the Clouds, Higher Learning, Nash Bridges, ER, Party of Five, and music videos for such artists as
Santana, Faith Hill, NSYNC, Air Supply, Cypress Hill, and many more. Ferro is a member of the International
Cinematographers Guild and the Society of Operating Cameramen. He holds a Bachelor of Applied Arts & Sciences in
Radio & Television from San Diego State University.
Educational Background: Saint John's College (BA-Art)
Robert Martin
Motion Pictures & Television Foundations Coordinator
Robert Martin has more than 10 years of experience in the motion picture and television industry. He started out in West
Hollywood working for Sunset Studio and Beverly Hills Releasing. Since that time, Martin has worked at Nahurac
Foundation of United Artists, Anthropology Film Center, and Craftshop.com/Notions Marketing. Currently, he is Writer,
Director, and Producer of film and digital media with Edge Productions and a member of the Academy of Art University's
motion picture department. He received his BA in Film from SFSU. Martin is a member of the Film Arts Foundation and a
founding director of NFUA.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (BA-Film)
129
Jack Perez
BFA Directing Track Lead
Jack Perez has directed over a dozen feature films. His latest is a World War 2 adventure-comedy being produced by
Ben Stiller. His movies include the indie hits Some Guy Who Kills People (produced by John Landis), La Cucaracha
(Winner Best Feature Austin Film Festival), and The Big Empty (Winner AFI Film Fest Best New Writer). He is also the
writer/director of the modern cult classic Mega Shark vs. Giant Octopus; directed Wild Things 2 for Sony Columbia and
wrote/directed Monster Island for MTV. He is also the director/creator of the hit Adult Swim video game, Polar Bear
Payback.
His television directing credits include the pilot for Xena: Warrior Princess; episodes of Hercules: The Legendary
Journeys; the hit reality series Temptation Island and Last Comic Standing; and the made-for-television movies,
Unauthorized: Brady Bunch, The Final Days and The Mary Kay Letourneau Story.
A member of the DGA & WGA, he is the recipient of awards for both writing and directing and has received the critical
praise of Roger Ebert, Harry Knowles of Ain't It Cool News, Fangoria magazine, Film Threat, The LA Weekly, the Austin
Chronicle and the New York Times.
Educational Background: New York University (BFA-Film & Television)
Alfred Pollard
Set Design Manager
Since 1976, Alfred Pollard has been designing and constructing sets for stage, television, and film. Currently, Pollard is
designing a set for Shorgun Player's "The Miser" Moliere. Some of Pollard's career highlights include work on an
independent film called "The Californians," in which he helped coordinate construction of a set with a $100,000 budget.
Ultimately, the film went on to earn $10,000,000. Pollard was also an Art Director at the Sundance Film festival, where
he designed three main sets and graphics for locations.
Professional Background: Set Design for Shotgun Players
Eduardo Rufeisen
Full-Time Faculty
Eduardo Rufeisen has more than 17 years of international experience producing, directing, and managing creative teams
and crews. He worked as the Senior Advisor of Advertising for Bosch-Blaupunkt group in Brazil, directing ad campaigns
for print, TV and radio and has been producing and directing multi-camera TV shows for local San Francisco Bay Area
cable channels and multinational companies including Hewlett Packard. Since completing his Master of Fine Arts degree
(MFA) in Motion Pictures and Television Studies at Academy of Art University, Eduardo has also been working as a film
and television instructor at various colleges in Northern California.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Motion Pictures & Television); Escola Sup de Propaganda e
Mar (MBA-Marketing); State University of Campinas (BS-Economic Sciences)
Stuart Thomas
MFA New Student Coordinator
A teacher, writer, actor and director, Stuart Thomas has extensive experience in the motion picture, television and
theater arts. Additionally, he is an experienced musician and composer for productions, an author of numerous articles
on arts-related subjects, and the former playwright-in-residence at the Citizens Theater in Glasgow, Scotland. He has
been an Acting instructor at Academy of Art University since 2009. Previous to joining AAU, Stuart was a Music and
Drama Specialist for the Scottish Opera For All. Stuart is currently the MFA New Student Coordinator for the School of
Motion Pictures & Television at AAU. Stuart received his MFA in Motion Pictures & Television with an emphasis in
Screenwriting from the Academy of Art University. He completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Glasgow.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Motion Pictures & Television, emphasis in Screenwriting);
University of Glasgow
130
SCHOOL OF MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATIONS FULL-TIME FACULTY
Jan Yanehiro
Director, Multimedia Communications
Jan Yanehiro co-hosted Evening Magazine, a nightly program in San Francisco that ran for 15 years on KPIX TV-CBS5.
The television show pioneered the use of video. Evening Magazine is often cited as the show that launched
entertainment and reality programming. Yanehiro traveled the world in search of exotic places and fascinating celebrities.
She has bungee jumped, sky dived with the Army’s Golden Knights and climbed a frozen waterfall in Colorado. She has
hosted 6 documentaries on the US Government relocation and the redress of 110,000 Japanese Americans during
World War II. Yanehiro has won multiple awards including an Emmy, the Eleanor Roosevelt Humanitarian Award and the
Girl Scout’s Woman of Distinction. She is Board Chair of The Representation Project and holds seats on Kristi
Yamaguchi’s Always Dream Foundation and The Bank of Marin. Yanehiro graduated from Fresno State University with a
degree in Journalism: News-Editorial. She is the author of three books, her latest is, This Is Not The Life I Ordered…50
Ways To Keep Your Head Above Water When Life Keeps Dragging You Down.
Educational Background: Fresno State University (BA-Journalism: News Editorial)
Steve Kotton
Associate Director, Multimedia Communications
Steve Kotton has more than 30 years of experience in visual communication productions. He is the co-owner and
Director of Production for New Material, Inc., that syndicates science and technology programming to broadcast
networks and the web. His prior company, Pacific Video Resources, produced satellite broadcasts, webcasts, live action
and VFX for video games, and syndicated series. Kotton was the Director of Digital Education Productions and a
Producer and Director for HGTV, The History Channel, and the DIY Network. He was selected as one of the first
cinematographers in the country to test the first field video camera, the Ikegami HL 33 back in 1977. Since then he has
won many awards including 4 Emmys, a Clio and an International Film and Video Festival Award for Creative
Excellence. Kotton is the Director of Photography for a new silent movie, The Canyon, produced for the 100th
Anniversary of Essanay Films, Niles, California.
Professional Background: New Material, Inc. (co-owner and Director of Production), Director of Digital Education
Productions and a Producer and Director at HGTV, The History Channel, and the DIY Network
Charles Mauer
Studio and Program Technical Director
Kevin Mauer was the Head Technical Director and Studio Manager for The Wealth Channel, directing daily live shows
including Wealth Today and The One Person Campaign. Previously, he was an Associate Producer and Coordinating
Producer for QVC, one of the largest multimedia retailers in the world. Mauer was part of the team that built the QVC
Studio, one of the largest studios in the country located in West Chester, Pennsylvania. Mauer has a BS degree in Film
and Television from Drexel University in Philadelphia.
Educational Background: Drexel University (BS-Film & Video)
Cyrus Tabar
Director of Editing / Mac Tech Manager
Cyrus Tabar is the co-creator of the online music magazine, Chromavision. His company produces videos showcasing
up and coming electronic musicians in the San Francisco Bay Area and across the country. Tabar worked as a “Genius”
and an Administrator, at Apple. He uses his keen knowledge of technology to ensure the department adapts to today’s
rapidly changing, technology-driven world. Tabar has created a number of light and sound sculptures and his work has
been shown in galleries in San Francisco. He also produces multimedia (art, music, films) events for public venues. He
received his BFA in New Genres at the San Francisco Art Institute
Educational Background: Art Institute of San Francisco (BFA)
131
John Scott
Multimedia Communications Online Coordinator / Career Services Manager / Instructor
John has been Content Manager and Program Director for two Clear Channel Media and Entertainment radio brands in
the San Francisco Bay Area. He is the Founder and President of ReinventU, a mobile channel app featuring job tips and
career advice. In 2000, Scott was part of the team at Command Audio.com that launched the world's first on-demand
audio service. He has appeared in music videos, television commercials and a Hollywood movie - as the dinosaur rustler
in Jurassic Park: The Lost World. He has received several awards from the Northern California Radio/TV News
Directors Association, for Best Breaking News Coverage, Best Newscast Under 15 Minutes and Best One-Person News
Bureau. Scott is the author of two e-books and audio books, Destination Reinvention: Starting Over During The Worst
Economy Of A Lifetime and You. Employed: Why Winners Get Jobs.
Professional Background: President and Founder, SMF Media, LLC, San Francisco Operations Manager, KKGN/ KNEW
San Francisco Executive producer: Television/Radio/Web trimulcast, KNEW San Francisco Content manager:
green960.com and 910knew.com Production Director: WLXR-FM La Crosse Music director: KHYI Dallas
Matthew “Matty” Staudt
General Manager, Urban Knights Radio & Urban Knights Radio Sports Network
Matty Staudt launched the University’s UrbanKnightsRadio.com, a student run radio station featured on iHeart Radio.
The online station has 70,000 listeners a month. Staudt started as a radio DJ in high school and became at 16, the
youngest DJ in West Virginia. He later served as Executive Producer for the nationally syndicated G Gordon Liddy Show
in Washington, DC. He moved on to co-host and executive produce for morning radio at WNEW, New York City. He
came to San Francisco to be a Producer/On Air Talent for the #1 rated The Alice Morning Show. Staudt then created the
podcast radio app Stitcher Radio which is now the world’s biggest app for on demand talk radio and podcasts. Look for
Staudt, as Matti the car (blue car with the microphone) in Pixar’s animated movie, Cars. Currently, Staudt is a radio
consultant for Premiere Radio, the nation’s largest radio syndicator. His clients include Director/Actor Kevin Smith, NFL
All Pro Bill Romanowski, and Oscar Winner Jamie Foxx. Staudt graduated with a BA in English/Creative Writing from
West Virginia University.
Educational Background: West Virginia University (BA-English/Creative Writing)
Paul Colardo
Full-Time Faculty
Paul Colardo has been a writer, producer, director and videographer. His work has been on Good Morning America, The
Disney Channel and broadcast networks ABC, CBS and NBC. He is the Founder and President of East West
Communications Group, a company that produced marketing videos and “Live” presentations for Fortune 50 companies
such as Apple, Cisco, HP and Oracle. He has been honored with a broadcast Emmy for Best Feature Story and a Cine
Golden Eagle for Outstanding Photography. Colardo graduated with a BA degree in Sociology from Providence College,
Providence, Rhode Island.
Educational Background: Providence College (BA-Sociology/Psychology)
Richard Hart
Full-Time Faculty
Richard Hart has reported on emerging technologies for ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, Discovery, SyFy, and USA Network. As
producer and host of Discovery’s longest-running technology series, he became the only person to win both a DuPontColumbia Journalism Award for investigative reporting and an Emmy Award for comedy. Also one of the founding
members of CNET/CBS Interactive, he continues to host technology reports syndicated to television stations in the US.
Hart has co-hosted with Ryan Seacrest, Robin Williams, Whoopi Goldberg and Jan Yanehiro. He holds a degree in
Physics from the University of Detroit, where he was an NCAA fencer. As a 2nd degree black belt, he founded United
Taekwondo of San Diego. Hart is an instrument-rated pilot and an advanced SCUBA diver who has piloted an F-16 and
bungee jumped from the Golden Gate Bridge.
Educational Background: University of Detroit (BS-Physics)
132
SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRODUCTION & SOUND DESIGN FOR VISUAL MEDIA FULL-TIME FACULTY
Brad Hughes
Director, Music Production and Sound Design for Visual Media & Director of Sound/Audio for Motion Pictures & Television
Bradley Hughes has over 23 years of experience in sound and music as a composer, saxophonist, recording engineer
and editor for clients including DreamWorks, Soundelux, The Hollywood Edge, and Creativity Studios. He has recorded
on the scoring stages of 20th Century Fox and Warner Bros. Studios. He is a voting member of the Recording
Academy's Grammy Awards, and serves on the Board of Governors of the San Francisco Chapter of the National
Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences. He has a BFA from U.C.L.A., and an MFA from The California Institute of the
Arts.
Professional Background: California Institute of the Arts (MFA-Music Performance); University of California, Los Angeles
(BA-World Arts & Cultures)
Scott Drapeau
Manager, Multimedia Language Labs
Scott Drapeau has over 10 years of multimedia production and teaching experience. He has worked in film, advertising,
theater, and independent cinema. In New York, San Francisco, and Tokyo, Scott has worked as a sound engineer,
camera operator, editor, colorist, musician, vocalist, & actor. His work has been shown worldwide at festivals and on
international television.
Scott has been an instructor in EAP, MUS, and WNM at the Academy of Art University since 2007 and has also served
as an Instructional Designer, Music and Video-Editing Tutor, ESL Support Specialist, and occasional Guest Speaker in
his areas of expertise. His current passions lie in music production and education.
Educational Background: Hampshire College (BA-Film and Video Production)
Sahba Aminikia
Online Coordinator
Sahba was born in Iran and studied music composition at the St. Petersburg State Conservatory under Boris Ivanovich
Tishchenko. He earned a Bachelor of Music and Master of Music from San Francisco Conservatory of Music and
received a Phyllis Wattis Foundation scholarship.
His work has been commissioned by numerous classical and jazz ensembles and his third string quartet, "A Threnody for
Those Who Remain," commissioned by Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and Kronos Performing Arts Association, was
described by Financial Times as “An experience not to be easily forgotten.”
Educational Background: San Francisco Conservatory of Music (BA- Music, MA- Music)
Dirk Epperson
Full-Time Faculty / Curriculum Coordinator – Music Composition & Scoring
Dirk Epperson has worked for the entertainment industry for over 40 years. He has worked with many major theaters,
symphony orchestras, opera companies and professional singers in both North America and Europe. He has also
worked in television and with well-known composers.
His musical expertise is as an Arranger and Orchestrator, working in genres including Classical, Film Scores, Musical
Theater, Opera, and Pop. He also has a focus on music technology, and especially on creating orchestral mockups
using sampling technology in order to get the most realistic possible sound.
Dirk has instructed at the Academy of Art University since 2012. As Music Production Curriculum Coordinator he is
engaged in helping the department expand and adapt the course offerings for an ever-changing 21st century musical
and technological environment. He has an M.F.A. from Yale University.
Educational Background: Yale University (MFA-Theatrical Engineering); Harvey Mudd College (BS-Physics)
Stephen Romanko
Full-Time Faculty
Steve Romanko has worked in the entertainment industry for more than 25 years, including radio, television and motion
pictures. His work has appeared on television and at film festivals around the world and his background in sound gives
him an interesting perspective that continues to influence his writing, producing and teaching. During his years at
Skywalker Sound, the audio division of Lucasfilm, he worked on more than 100 feature films, including Star Wars,
Titanic, Saving Private Ryan and Fight Club. Steve has taught at Academy of Art University since 2001.
Educational Background: Marywood University (BA-Communications: Radio, Television and Film Production)
133
SCHOOL OF PHOTOGRAPHY FULL-TIME FACULTY
James Wood
Executive Director of Photography
Jim Wood has been teaching for more than 35 years, while simultaneously running one of the west coast’s largest
commercial studios. His client list tops 1000, among them: Life magazine, American Motors, Honda, IBM, Apple,
Yamaha, Gallo, Levi’s, Marlboro, Wells Fargo, Polaroid, Kodak, Nikon, Kraft and Toyota. Mr. Wood has the honor of
being named one of the 65 best photographers in the world by Canon U.S.A.
Educational Background: Art Center College of Design (BFA-Photography)
Ryan Baldwin
Vice President of Online Education & Director, Online Photography
Ryan Baldwin has been a professional photographer for more than 20 years and manages his own stock photo library.
His fine prints have been showcased at numerous gallery shows and his work has been published in magazines, books
and national advertising campaigns. He is especially interested in using photography as a tool for environmental
awareness and cultural preservation. He has taught photography at AAU since 2001 and helped develop the digital
imaging curriculum before transitioning to his role as Director of Online Photography.
Educational Background: Brooks Institute of Photography (BA-Still Photography)
William Mosgrove
Director MFA, Photography
Will Mosgrove has been involved in the photographic community for over thirty years. He is an alumnus of the Academy
of Art University as well as a long-time instructor in the School of Photography. Throughout his career he has maintained
a strong tie to the school. In 2007, he was awarded the Academy of Art University's "Alumnus of Distinction" award. Mr.
Mosgrove has run and maintained his own successful photography business for the past twenty-eight years and has won
numerous national awards for his work. He has also volunteered his time with the Advertising Photographers of America
(APA) where he held the office of National President for three terms. In 2008, Mosgrove was awarded APA's 25th
anniversary leadership award and in 2009 he received the prestigious International Photographic Council's Photographic
Leadership Award, which was presented at the United Nations.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Photography)
James Goins
Associate Director Online, Photography
James Goins is a fine art photographer based in San Anselmo, California. He holds a BFA in photography from the
University of Missouri-Saint Louis and specializes in mixed media and alternative processes. His photographs and
paintings have been exhibited throughout the Midwest and the West coast. James is a member of the Society for
Photographic Education and the College Arts Association.
Educational Background: University of Missouri (BFA-Photography); St. Louis Community College (AAS-Graphic
Design); St. Louis Community College (AA-Photography)
Tamara Hubbard
Associate Director Online Photography
Tamara Hubbard is a fine art photographer based in northern California. She has an MFA degree in Photography from
the Academy of Art University. Her photography work has been exhibited throughout California and the Pacific
Northwest. Her passion for the photographic medium has been her primary involvement in the visual arts for the past 10
years. Tamara is a dedicated member of the photographic community and is involved in the Society for Photographic
Education, the College Art Association and the Humboldt Arts Council.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Photography); Southern Oregon University (BS-Psychology);
College of the Redwoods (AA-General Education)
Shannon Ayres
Full-Time Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator
Shannon has a Bachelor’s degree in Communications from American University and an MFA in Photography from
Academy of Art University. He began his career 10 years ago as a photojournalist freelancing for numerous publications,
including Wild Bird Magazine, Blue Ridge Country magazine, Chesapeake Life and Richmond-Times Dispatch. He works
in the documentary tradition of Eugene Atget and Walker Evans.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA Photography); American University (BA Communications)
134
Sarah Barsness
Full-Time Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator
Sarah Barsness received an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and attended the Photographic Center Northwest
in Seattle, where she later taught for many years. Her photographs, installations and mixed media pieces – which
incorporate photography, printmaking, fabric, and other media – have been exhibited in galleries throughout the U.S. and
in Japan and Mexico. She was recently an Affiliate Artist at the Headlands Center for the Arts, and is also a former Artist
in Residence at Recology – the San Francisco "dump."
Educational Background: San Francisco Art Institute (MFA-Printmaking); Evergreen State College (BA-Art)
Connie Begg
Full-Time Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator
Connie Begg is a fine art photographer and curator specializing in alternative photographic processes. She received a
MFA degree from Mills College and maintains an art studio and darkroom in San Francisco. Her photographs are in
many private collections and have been exhibited internationally. She is the founder of Photo Alchemy and a grant
recipient of the California Arts Council. She is also a member of FotoForum and has served on the boards of the Society
for Photographic Education and the Artspan Artist Advisory Council.
Educational Background: Mills College (MFA-Art Photography); San Francisco State University (BA-Art); Fashion
Institute of Design and Merchandising (AA-Merchandising/Marketing)
Alyson Belcher
Full-Time Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator, Online
Alyson received her BA in Humanities from UC Berkeley and an MFA in Photography from San Francisco State
University. She investigates the relationships between movement, stillness, and time by photographing her subjects with
pinhole and other low-tech cameras. She is represented by the Robert Tat Gallery in San Francisco and Gallerie Citi in
Burlingame and has exhibited in galleries from New York to Taiwan. Recent publications include Poetics of Light:
Contemporary Pinhole Photography.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MFA-Art); University of California Berkeley (BA-Humanities)
Erik Butler
Full-Time Faculty
Erik Butler has over twenty-three years of photographic experience as the owner of a successful San Francisco based
commercial photography studio. Whether shooting large format in the studio or environmental portraiture on location,
Butler is known for his dynamic, elegant lighting style and use of saturated color to produce dramatic imagery.
Professional Background: Partial Client List: Asics, Nike Footwear , Sketches Footwear, Bank of America, Wells Fargo
Bank, California Lottery, Coors Brewing Companies , Miller Brewing Companies, Gay.com, Kaiser Permanente, The
Learning Channel, SPC
Marico Fayre
Full-Time Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator
Marico Fayre is a fine art photographer, specializing in environmental portraits and conceptual storytelling. She holds a
BFA in Photography from the Pacific Northwest College of Art and an MFA from the Academy of Art University. Marico is
a full-time faculty member and curriculum coordinator for the Academy’s Online Photography department, and she also
puts her photographic and marketing skills to work for a variety of non-profit organizations and publications
internationally. Marico is passionate about engaging viewers in the shared dialogue that exists between artist, audience,
and artwork. For over 15 years she has combined reality and personal narrative in portraits and self-portraits, examining
ideas of transformation, identity, and the meaning of home. Her work incorporates mythology and archetype into an
intimate examination of memory, place, and personal metaphor. Marico’s work can be found in publications, galleries,
and private collections nationwide.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Photography); Pacific Northwest College of Art (BFAPhotography)
135
Katty Hoover
Full-Time Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator
Katty Ryan Hoover was born in Corbin, Kentucky. She received her BA in the College Scholars program at University of
Tennessee and her MFA in photography at San Francisco Art Institute. She has also studied at University of Notre Dame
and Semester at Sea through the University of Virginia. Her work is aimed at people: narratives of isolation, loneliness,
and social tension, and the body as a site of psychological negotiation. Her work has been shown at Tampa Museum of
Art, Marin Museum of Contemporary Art, James Madison University, and Michael Rosenthal Contemporary Art in San
Francisco. Hoover currently lives and works in San Francisco and Los Angeles.
Educational Background: San Francisco Art Institute (MFA); University of Tennessee, Knoxville (BA)
Joseph Lavine
Full-Time Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator
Joe Lavine is an award winning commercial photographer, educator, and author living in Golden, Colorado. For more
than two decades he has specialized in food and beverage photography. Joe's clients include General Mills, McDonalds,
Quiznos, Rock Bottom Restaurants, Coors, Pillsbury, Betty Crocker, Wells Fargo Bank, Duracell, and Coleman Foods.
As a college educator for fifteen years, he has taught numerous subjects to a wide range of students. Education has
always been important to him; he holds an undergraduate degree from Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, California, and a
master’s degree from Savannah College of Art and Design. Joe has authored multiple courses for online education, been
a contributing author for books, and magazine articles, and has recently put the finishing touches on his latest book,
Light Right.
Educational Background: Savannah College of Arts and Design (MA-Digital Photography); California Polytechnic State
University San Luis Obispo (BA-Commercial Photography)
Kent Marshall
Full-Time Faculty
Kent has 26 years’ experience as a professional photographer with studios in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Kent has
been a respected teacher at the Academy of Art University since 2001. Kent earned a BFA in Photography at Art Center
College of Design in Pasadena. He earned a BFA in Art and Education at the University of the Pacific in Stockton. Kent
has exhibited his work in galleries including the M.H. de Young Museum in San Francisco and the American
Photographers Show in Tokyo Japan. Kent has designed, written and taught online lighting classes, and specializes in
lighting for commercial and fine art applications, both in the studio and on location.
Educational Background: University of the Pacific (BA-Art); Art Center College of Design (BFA-Photography)
Kimberly Mowbray
Full-Time Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator
Kimberly Mowbray is a fine art photographer based in Santa Rosa, California. She has an MFA degree in Photography
from Academy of Art University. Kimberly works primarily in alternative processes. Through her photographs she
explores the understanding of self and how that interacts with a given environment. By using the photographic medium
she is able to show the beauty and serenity in various locations and pair that with her own figure reacting and responding
to the stillness of the landscape. Kimberly is an active member in Society for Photographic Education and exhibits her
work nationally.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Photography); Sonoma State University (BA-Psychology)
Adrienne Pao
Online Full-Time Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator
Adrienne Pao is a photographer based in the San Francisco Bay Area, California. She is currently investigating two
photographically based projects. Hawaiian family portraits and dress tents. Both projects investigate notions of tourism in
real and simulated fantasy landscapes, and involve a combination of performative and staged scenarios.
Her work is featured in fashion and pop culture magazines, as well as art journals around the world. Adrienne has shown
her work nationally and internationally from the Museum of African Diaspora in San Francisco, California to Recoleta
Cultural Center in Buenos Aires, Argentina and Caixa Cultural in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Adrienne received her MFA in
Photography from San Jose State University in 2005 and has been committed to photographic education for the past six
years. Her work can be viewed at www.adriennepao.com.
Educational Background: San Jose State University (MFA-Photography); University of California, Los Angeles (BA)
136
Michael Sims
Full-Time Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator
Michael Sims is a photographer and educator living and working in San Francisco. He has been teaching in the Bay Area
for the past 10 years and in 2011 joined the Academy of Art as a full-time faculty member.
Michael earned a BFA from Indiana University, with a major in photography and a minor in Art History. He earned his
MFA in photography from the Rochester Institute of Technology.
Michael’s photographic practice utilizes the medium’s cutting-edge technology but also engages its historic traditions. He
is interested in blurring the line between the contemporary and the antique. His work explores cultural concepts of beauty
while also tracing the roots of ancient ritual alive within contemporary society. Michael’s photographic expertise ranges
from medium and large format digital photography and printing to hand-brushed platinum printing and handmade
bookbinding.
Educational Background: Rochester Institute of Technology (MFA-Photography); Indiana University (BFA-Photography)
SCHOOL OF VISUAL DEVELOPMENT FULL-TIME FACULTY
Nicolas Villarreal
Director, Visual Development
Nicolás P. Villarreal was born and raised in La Plata, Argentina. He studied at the Escuela of Animacion y
Cinematografía de Avellaneda, and under the tutelage of well-known Argentinian artist Miguel Alzugaray. He has been
working as a traditional animator, character designer, sculptor and Visual Development artist for films and video games
including Walt Disney Studios, Sony Computer Entertainment, Jim Henson Studios, Sega, DigitalDomain and Amazon
Studios among others.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Illustration); Instituto de Arte Cinematográfico de Avellaneda
(BFA-2D Animation)
Chris Carman
Associate Director of Visual Development
Chris Carman is a versatile and communicative graphic artist with strong background in Web and Mobile based games,
apps, as well as design for the entertainment, education, and design industries. He currently works for Zynga and has
previously worked for Adobe Systems/BYXB, Multiverse, Bardo Entertainment, Electronic Arts/Maxis, Giftventure
Entertainment, and others.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
Francisco Hsu
Full-Time Faculty / Curriculum Coordinator
Francis Hsu received a BFA in Illustration from Academy of Art University. He has many years of professional
experience working for film and games in studios such as Weta, ILM, and Lucas Arts. Francis has been teaching Figure
Drawing and Background Painting at AAU since 2000 and is currently Full-Time Faculty / Curriculum Coordinator for the
School of Visual Development.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration)
Steve Kloepfer
Full-Time Faculty
Steven Kloepfer has more than 20 years of professional experience in Illustration. He has been an instructor/consultant
of art with the San Mateo Park and Recreation Department and PDI, copywriter/producer/consultant with DKS Creative,
owner/illustrator of Creative Illustrator, freelance desktop publisher and freelance editor. His previous clients have
included Atari Games, Pandemonium Pictures, Black Swan Press, Scalawag Studios, Kirson Works, Adams & Allgood,
Fearon Education, Apple Computer, Charles Schwab, SKI, and Stanford University. He is an associate member of the
California Academy of Painters. Steve is currently Full-Time Faculty in the Academy of Art University’s School of
Illustration and School of Visual Development. Prior to becoming full-time faculty, Steve had been teaching at the
Academy of Art University since 2002.
137
Jeremy Saliba
Online Curriculum Coordinator
Jeremy Saliba received his BFA in Illustration with an emphasis in 2D Animation from the Academy of Art University. He
is currently Online Curriculum Coordinator for the Academy of Art University's School of Visual Development. He has
been a part-time instructor at AAU since January 2007. In addition to teaching, he is also a Cover Artist for Dynamite
Entertainment; Comic Builder at Madefire; and Art Director for UltraSylvania, a graphic novel. Previously, he has worked
as a Digital Artist, Concept Artist, and Character Designer for various companies.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration, emphasis in 2D Animation)
Alessandro Squitti
Visual Development Production / Liberal Arts Italian Lead Faculty
Originally from Rome, Alessandro Squitti has a Master’s Degree in Italian Language and Literature from Sapienza
University. He joined AAU as a Lab Technician in 2000 and has helped organize the Fall Animation Festival and Spring
Show. As a freelance web designer and videographer, he’s worked with Current TV, Notable Inc. and Red Clover
Studios, and the company he co-founded, CurlyHairedPeople Films, has created more than 20 short action films,
including award winning music videos. He also promotes community events for the Italian Cultural Institute of San
Francisco.
Educational Background: La Sapienza University (Masters-Italian Language and Literature)
SCHOOL OF WEB DESIGN & NEW MEDIA FULL-TIME FACULTY
Ryan Medeiros
Director, School of Web Design & New Media
In over 15+ years as a designer, Ryan has worked for a variety of technology and design companies in the Silicon Valley
and San Francisco. Ryan’s honors include exhibiting at the International Biennial of Graphic Design in Russia in 2008, a
solo fine art show at the 3a gallery in 2007, and as a finalist in the Fernet-Branca Poster Show in 2006. He lectured on
the intersection of typographic history and emerging Web fonts technology at Swissnex in 2011.
Educational Background: University of California, Santa Cruz (BA-Fine Art)
Fred McHale
Online Director, Web Design & New Media
Fred is a Web application developer from Southern California who currently resides in San Francisco. He began his
career doing freelance Web development and design in the mid-1990s before attending California State University,
Bakersfield. After graduating with a BS in Computer Science, he decided to focus his energy in the area of Web
technology. Besides Fred's current client, Cisco, he has worked with some of the largest companies in the Silicon Valley
as well as Bay Area start-ups. In these roles he develops Web and mobile applications with a social media core. Much of
his work can be seen in use today with hundreds of thousands of users. He enjoys speaking at industry events and
devotes his time to education and contributing to the open source community.
Educational Background: California State University Bakersfield (BS-Computer Science)
Andrea Pimentel
Associate Director, School of Web Design & New Media
Andrea is a New Media designer and Interactive Art Director in San Francisco. She has worked for large-scale websites
and some of San Francisco’s top advertising agencies, working on award-winning advertising campaigns, cutting-edge
social media, web design, mobile application design, and motion graphics. As an Art Director and Creative Director,
Andrea has worked with many top brands, creating campaigns for clients such as Suzuki, Shutterfly, G4tv, SanDisk,
Nokia, Tonik Health, WaMu, eBay, and Bank of America. Andrea has taught a range of classes at the Academy,
including web and programming, visual design, and motion.
Educational Background: Brigham Young University (BFA-Visual Design, emphasis Industrial Design)
138
Haydn Adams
Technical Director, AAU Mobile Press
Haydn received a BFA degree in Computer Arts New Media from Academy of Art University. He has been a pioneer in
the multimedia industry for more than 20 years and owns and operates his own design company, Nautilus Designs, in
Marin County. Haydn is the National President of the Graphic Artists Guild and has been on the National Executive
Committee of the Guild for more than eight years. He is also a professional wine critic and author of the book, Wineries
Beyond Napa Valley: Dry Creek & Alexander Valley.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Computer Arts/New Media)
Mitchell Hudson
Technical Lead, BFA
As full-time faculty, Mitch is a critical partner in Web Design + New Media's implementation of current Web and
interactive design strategies. His insights into interaction design are a vital part of our curriculum's evolution. His
collaboration with other departments at the Academy is one of our best assets as we grow our New Media program.
Based on his freelance activities and knowledge of the industry, he has helped guide our program to include the most
recent developments in designing for both desktop and mobile platforms using the latest advances in design, coding and
production. Mitch has a BFA in printmaking from the San Francisco Art Institute and has a passion for guitar. He has
developed a formidable list of clients and the latest software skills including HTML5, CSS3, ActionScripting, jQuery,
jQTouch, PHP and MySQL.
Educational Background: San Francisco Art Institute (BFA-Printmaking)
Ben Hulan
Technology Lead
Ben Hulan has many years of experience in mobile website and application development. Most recently, Ben was a Web
Producer and Part-Time Instructor in Web Design & New Media at the Academy of Art University where he had a major
role as Product Manager and Programmer in mobile publishing. He has also worked for UC Berkeley Extension where
he developed an iPhone/iPad marketing app. Previously, he worked as a UI/UX Designer and Creative Consultant for
various companies. For 10 years, he was a Theater Arts Educator in the Eastern United States. He has also conceived,
written, illustrated, and recorded energy conservation video campaigns for elementary schools across the United States.
Ben Hulan received his BA in Theater from the College of William and Mary.
Educational Background: College of William and Mary (BA-Theater)
Nicole Oettinger
Online Coordinator
Nikki Oettinger is a designer and artist living in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is a graduate of the Web Design & New
Media department at the Academy of Art University, receiving a Bachelor of Fine Art. Nikki started her professional
career working at a small video marketing company in the city where she specializes in blending video, animation and
typography into an integrated visual experience. She continues to freelance for design firms in the area. Her experience
ranges from print and packaging to UX and UI design to motion graphics.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Web Design & New Media)
David Scarpelli
Full-Time Faculty, Design Lead BFA
DC Scarpelli's design and production clients include the California Attorney General's Office, Napa/Sonoma Magazine,
the American Cancer Society, Catholic Healthcare West, UC Hastings School of Law, Chevron, Frito Lay, the Oakland
A's and the San Francisco Giants. He regularly designs theater graphics for companies throughout the Bay Area.
Additionally, he has created and edited several art books in the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
He holds a BFA in Computer Arts/New Media from the Academy of Art University and a BA in Theater Studies from Yale
University.
Educational Background: Yale University (BA-Theater Studies); Academy of Art University (BFA-Web Design & New
Media)
139
Colin Sebestyen
Full-Time Motion Graphics Lead, BFA
Colin is currently motion graphics lead at the Academy of Art University, San Francisco, School of Web Design + New
Media. He has more than 10 years of experience in the design field, with an emphasis on music visualization, animation,
presentation, and time-based media. He has worked for clients both large and small, within the spectrum of agency to
the boutique levels. His professional highlights include producing design and animation at Apple, Inc., Al Gore's An
Inconvenient Truth, commissions for IDN magazine, and the Cliff Bar 2-Mile Challenge campaign. His real passion lies in
audio/visual collaboration, and he has produced visual design for a wide array of musicians as diverse as Snoop Dogg,
Bjork, Aesop Rock, Nonagon and Edison.
Colin has spoken at many conferences in his field of study: HOW Design, HOW Interactive, NAB, VDJC, and SF
Mograph. He's also a winner of the international Cut & Paste design competition. In addition to teaching at AAU, he has
instructed at both the graduate and undergraduate levels at California College for the Arts. He has taught courses in
Graphic Design, Animation/Visual effects, and Web Design + New Media. Colin holds a BFA from AAU, and has
completed MFA studies at San Francisco Art Institute.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Web Design & New Media)
Eric Stampfli
Full-Time Faculty
Eric Stampfli is a well-known, established, professional photographer for commercial advertising and packaging. His
work includes photography for Fortune 500 corporations as well as smaller, local gourmet companies. A partial list of his
clients includes: Coca-Cola, Nestle, Clorox, Safeway, HP, California Grape Commission, California Almond Board, and
The Australian Wine Commission. Currently, he is the Owner of Eric Stampfli Photography and a freelance Retoucher for
the Unison Corporation, a service bureau with offices in SF, London, and New York.
Professional Background: Partial Client List: Nestle, Coca Cola, Dole, Del Monte, Clorox, Dean & DeLuca, Safeway,
California Grape Commission, Hewlett Packard, BBC & Bank of America.
SCHOOL OF WRITING FOR FILM, TELEVISION & DIGITAL MEDIA FULL-TIME FACULTY
Robert Keats
Executive Director, School of Writing for Film, Television & Digital Media / Executive Director, The Network
Robert Keats has been writing for film and television since the 1970s. His work in television includes Happy Days, The
Love Boat, The Ellen Burstyn Show, Buck Henry's comedy sci-fi Quark, and the adaptation of Down and Out in Beverly
Hills. He has also written and produced pilots for networks and cable including the HBO presentation Women Without
Men, which was produced in association with Lorne Michaels' company, Broadway Video. In film, Mr. Keats has written
screenplays for studios including MGM, Columbia and Warner Bros., as well as a number of independent production
companies. Mr. Keats began teaching at Academy of Art University in 2008 and was named the Screenwriting and
Television Coordinator in 2011.
Educational Background: University of Arizona (BA)
SUPPORT DEPARTMENT: ACADEMY RESOURCE CENTER
Andrea Keklikian
Director, Classroom Services
Andrea has been working for students with disabilities at the Academy of Art University since 2004. She is especially
interested in applying alternative methods to teaching and learning, and has degrees in Elementary Education and
Special Education from the University of Delaware and holds a California state teaching credential. Before joining the
Academy, she taught in a K–8 school in a group home and was a public high school special day class teacher.
James O’Hara
ARC Tutoring Director
James J. O'Hara began his teaching career in 1984 while an undergraduate at Brown University in Providence, RI. Two
years later, he joined the Peace Corps and worked as a teacher trainer and supervisor in Indonesia and Thailand.
Returning to the U.S. in 1988 to teach in the Minnesota public schools, he then moved to the Bay Area, where he
received his M.A. from U.C. Berkeley in 1992. From 1989 to 1996, he taught at Golden Gate University, and has worked
to ensure student success at the Academy of Art University since 1995.
140
Toby Silver
Director, Retention & Online Academic Development
As Director of Retention and Online Academic Development, Toby collaborates with faculty and students to implement
ways to improve the success of our online programs. A graduate of Rutgers University, Toby worked in product
development for more than a decade with clients such as Nestle, Wal-Mart, and Electronic Arts. In 2005, he transitioned
full time into higher education. He’s an avid ultra runner and has been a volunteer coach for the Academy’s Cross
Country and Track & Field teams. He is also the former Director for Online Training and Tutoring.
Educational Background: Rutgers University (BS-Business Management)
Vanessa Spang
Director, Faculty Development
Vanessa joined the Academy of Art University faculty in 1997, serving many years in the English for Art Purposes
program before moving into the field of faculty development. She has over 20 years of teaching experience in both
university and high school settings as well as numerous years of teacher training experience. Vanessa graduated from
St. Lawrence University with a BA in French, Spanish and German and has an MA from San Francisco State University
in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. She has a keen interest in assessment and continual improvement
and is a member of The Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages); St.
Lawrence University (BA-French, Spanish and German)
SUPPORT DEPARTMENT: ENGLISH FOR ART PURPOSES FULL-TIME FACULTY
Bob McDonald
Director, English for Art Purposes
Bob McDonald is an experienced teacher specializing in ESL. He has been teaching at the Academy of Art College since
1996. He also taught and designed an adult EFL program while working at Lincoln University College in Argentina.
McDonald also has taught high school students algebra, geometry and physical education. Currently, McDonald is CoCoordinator of the Conversation Partner Program at the Academy of Art College and Associate Director of the ESL
department. He received his MA from San Francisco State University and his BA from UC Santa Cruz. McDonald also
holds a degree in Culinary Arts. He is a member of TESOL.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-English-ESL/EFL); University of California, Santa Cruz
(BA-American Studies)
Anne Connors
Director of Intensive English Courses
Anne Connors has more than 10 years of ESL and EFL teaching experience in both academic and community-based
settings. With a MA in TESOL English from SFSU, a BA in Linguistics from the University of Geneva and a BA in English
from CSU Chico, she has taught in Italy, Switzerland, Taiwan, as well as throughout the bay area. Most recently, she
was a Teacher with the American Language Institute at SFSU. In Switzerland, she was a Lecturer at the University of
Geneva while in Taiwan, she taught at Feng Chia University. Anne also taught at University Popolare in Italy. Pelote also
possesses curriculum design experience. She regularly attends CATESOL conferences. Anne is fluent in French,
proficient in Italian and has a limited understanding of Spanish and Mandarin.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-TESOL English); University of Geneva (BA-Linguistics);
California State University, Chico (BA-English)
Jane Emley
Associate Director, English for Art Purposes Support
Jane Emley holds a MA in English and a BA in Latin American Studies and Italian from SFSU and UC Berkeley
respectively. She has over 19 years of professional teaching experience as an instructor for foreign students for UC
Berkeley Extension, ESL instructor at SFSU and other various teaching positions including private instructor for students
at Centro Studi Dell'Univerisita di California in Padua, Italy. She has attended the ACCTLA Conference and the TESOL
Conference as a presenter. She is also a current member of TESOL.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-English); University of California, Berkeley (BA-Italian &
Latin American Studies)
141
Shalle Leeming
Associate Director, English for Art Purposes Courses
Shalle Leeming has over 10 years of experience in teaching ESL. She has taught in such institutions as Koc University in
Turkey, Stanford University, Training and Development, Inc., in Argentina, Kwansei Gakuin University in Japan,
University of San Francisco, and the American Language Institute at SFSU. In addition to teaching experience, she
trains other instructors in teaching writing, reading, and public speaking. She has attended and participated in six annual
TESOL Conventions all over the world and is a member of TESOL and CATESOL. Leeming holds a MA from SFSU and
a BA from San Jose State.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-English TESOL); San Jose State University (BARadio/Television/Film, Minor in Art)
Chantelle Ferguson
Online Language Support Director
Chantelle Ferguson has loved language and culture since the day she learned her first Spanish words from the children's
television show, Sesame Street. She followed these interests by working as a newspaper journalist, traveling, and
earning a bachelor's degree in Spanish and a master's degree in English. After graduate school, she moved abroad and
taught English at a private university where she developed one of the first online academic writing courses offered in the
region. She has since designed and taught numerous onsite and online courses at numerous universities in the United
States.
Educational Background: California State University Hayward (MA-English)
John McConnel
Faculty Observation Program Director
John earned his BA in Theater from the University of Vermont and his Master’s in Applied Linguistics at Queens College.
He was an Adjunct Professor at New York University’s American Language institute from July 2007 to December 2011.
There he taught extensive English courses for levels 1-6, incorporating original material into four-skill curriculum.
Additional teaching responsibilities have included five semesters teaching Academic Writing in the Advanced Workshop
Program. In 2009, Queens College Linguistics Department awarded John the Elaine Newman Award from Academic
Excellence.
Educational Background: Queens College (MA-Applied Linguistics); University of Vermont (BA-Theater)
Alexander Hosmer
Academy Resource Center Technical Services Managing Director
Alexander Hosmer has 10 years of professional experience in teaching English as a second language. He has taught at
ASPECT International Language School, UC Berkeley Extension, SFSU, and Refugee Transitions. In addition to
teaching ESL, Hosmer has also taught in the Physical Education and Dance departments. He graduated from SFSU with
a MA in teaching ESL/EFL and a BA in English Language Studies. Hosmer has attended Database Workshops and is a
member of TESOL and CATESOL.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-Teaching ESL & EFL); San Francisco State University
(BA-English Language Studies)
Keith Anderson
English for Art Purposes Testing Coordinator and Administrative/Faculty Support
Keith Anderson is happy to be teaching at AAU! In addition to working at the Academy, Keith teaches at San Francisco
State University in the English department. When he is not teaching, Keith loves to travel the world, meet interesting
people, and learn new things.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-TESOL); University of Hawaii, Manoa (BA-Teaching
Spanish, German, and English & BA-General Linguistics)
Camille Andreacchi
Full-Time Faculty
Camille Andreacchi received an MA in Linguistics from San Jose State, a BS in Education from Florida Atlantic and a
Post Baccalaureate in Art from Mills College in Oakland. She has worked as a Liberal Arts and ESL instructor at
Academy of Art University for the past nine years and piloted the instruction of proofreading skills in writing classes and
“The Proofreading Skills Project.” She currently maintains an art studio in Novato and her work recently appeared in
“Shifting Boundaries,” a show hosted by the Museum of Contemporary Arts, Novato.
Educational Background: San Jose State University (MA-Linguistics); Florida Atlantic University (BS-Education)
142
Jill Ballard
Major-Specific Curriculum Coordinator & Graduate Graphic Design Liaison
Jill Ballard has been an instructor of graduate English since 2007 and is the EAP Major-specific Curriculum Coordinator.
She holds an MA in English (TESOL concentration) from San Francisco State University, and a BFA (emphasis on
design and photography) from USF Tampa. Jill has taught in public schools and in corporate and private settings,
domestically and abroad. Prior to completing her graduate degree, she worked in graphic design/art direction for more
than 10 years. Throughout her careers, she has traveled widely through the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, Southeast Asia
and Polynesia.
Educational Background: SFSU (MA-TESOL); University of South Florida (BA-Fine Arts)
Colin Blake
Full-Time Faculty, English for Art Purposes / Graduate Industrial Design Liaison
After graduating from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, Colin found himself in San Francisco, looking for work with
nothing but a degree in English Literature. That search brought him to the world of teaching, but not in California. He took
his first job in English as a Second Language instruction in Tokyo, Japan. One year later, he returned to the Bay Area
but after spending several years in the educational publishing arena, Colin returned to teaching and attended the MA
TESOL program at the University of Washington in Seattle. Since returning to the Bay Area with a Master's in hand, he
has taught at a number of schools, but he is delighted to call the Academy of Art University home. He has taught at AAU
since January 2011, and spends his time between semesters traveling the world with his partner and hanging out with
his dog Sweeney in Alameda.
Educational Background: University of Washington (MA-TESOL); Reed College (BA-English Literature)
Yvonne Campbell
Full-Time Faculty, English for Art Purposes
Yvonne Campbell has worked in the field of education for over 20 years in the areas of public education in bilingual
education and teaching English to students of other languages at the university level. She has instructed English for Art
Purposes for the last two years at the Academy of Art in addition to supported languages learners in art major classes.
During her teaching, she has written curriculum in English and designed art integrated with core subject areas thematic
units for elementary students to young adults. Additionally, she has acted as an art docent in the Luther Burbank
Museum of Modern Art in Santa Rosa, as well as a community activist for local artists.
She has also mentored several teachers through the Sonoma State University Education department and continues to
support teachers in the education practices and in art education. She has completed art education programs at San
Francisco's Museum of Modern Art and is an acting artist as well. She has displayed her art in various galleries,
community centers and museums.
Yvonne has a Masters in teaching English to Students of Other Languages.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-TESOL); University of California Berkeley (BA-English)
Lisa Chou
Online Writing Lab Coordinator
Lisa Hsu holds a BA in Psychology from UC Berkeley and a MA in TESOL from San Francisco State University.
Currently, she is an Instructor at St. Mary's College and Ohlone College where she works with international students
learning ESL and English Composition. Previously, she taught at American Language Institute where she taught high
intermediate and advanced reading, writing, TOEFL, and pronunciation classes. Hsu is a member of CATESOL and she
is the SFSU MA TESOL Student Association Budget Officer.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-TESOL); University of California, Berkeley (BAPsychology)
Alice Clay
Online Language Support Faculty
Alice Clay has 11 years of professional experience teaching English as a second language including work as a
proofreader/writer in Athens, Greece, Director of ESL Studies in Moscow, Russia, Art Education teacher in Minnesota,
Co-founder of the American English School of Moscow, ESL instructor in Japan, and instructor of ESL and 20th Century
Design History in Japan. Clay holds two BA degrees from the University of Minnesota in Fine Arts and Russian Area
Studies. She speaks 4 foreign languages, having worked with International students for over 10 years. She completed a
post-graduate Apprenticeship with the master printmaker at the Moscow House of Artists Union.
Educational Background: University of Minnesota (BA-Fine Arts and Russian Area Studies)
143
Donna Dager
Online Educational Support Website Coordinator
Donna Dager holds an MA in Communication Arts and a BS in Education from Norwich University and SUNY-Cortland
respectively. She has over 19 years of professional experience in Computer Arts including work as a CD-ROM
Designer/Animator, Producer/Director at Mid-Peninsula Access Corporation, Multimedia Artist for Red Button
Productions and teaching experience for the San Mateo County Office of Education, Palo Alto Arts & Cultural Center,
and Foothill College. She is currently a FT Instructor with the Academy of Art College. She is a member of TESOL and
has participated in ESL multi-media workshops in Vancouver, B.C., and Seattle, Washington.
Educational Background: Vermont College of Norwich University (MA-Communication Arts); State University of New
York College at Cortland (BS-Education)
Beverly Edge
Full-Time Faculty
Beverly Edge has over 20 years of professional experience in teaching English as a Second Language including
instructor for the English Language Program at UC Berkeley Extension, Research Assistant at the Department of English
as a Second Language at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and English Instructor in Japan. She was also a teaching
Fellow at Harvard University and at Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Nice-Sophia in Antipolis, France. She
has been published in Studies in Second Language Acquisition. Edge can speak at least 7 foreign languages. She is a
member of the American Association of Applied Linguistics and TESOL.
Educational Background: University of Washington (MA-Russian & East European Studies); University of Hawaii (MAESL); San Francisco State University (BA-History)
Laurie Frazier
Full-Time Faculty & Level 1 Coordinator
For the past five years, Laurie Frazier has worked as a full-time instructor at the Minnesota English Language program at
the University of Minnesota. During that time, she has taught in the intensive English program and in the academic
program in all skill areas. Teaching listening and speaking is one of her areas of expertise, and she has been in charge
of articulating and developing curriculum and selecting the texts and materials used in oral skills courses. Currently,
Laurie is collaborating with the Law School to develop a Legal English course for incoming international students in their
programs.
Assessment is another area of expertise. While at the University of Minnesota, Laurie has helped to develop and
implement the performance test used to evaluate international graduate students to determine their eligibility to teach
courses at the University. She has also helped to develop a new rubric and system for evaluating student writing for
placement purposes.
As an Author, Laurie has been particularly busy over the last five years, publishing two texts for Pearson Education and
one for Oxford University Press. She has also written online materials for Wall Street Institute’s Professional English
course. Currently, she is writing a fourth edition of “NorthStar 2: Listening and Speaking”, one of Pearson Education’s
best-selling texts for use in academic settings.
Throughout the years, Laurie has been an active member of the ESL community, regularly attending and presenting at
regional conferences, as well as TESOL. Twice she has been selected to present on a panel of experts at TESOL, for
the SPLIS, Materials Writers, and ITA Interest Sections.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-English, TESOL); UC Santa Barbara (BA-Political
Science/International Relations)
Jessica Gardner
English for Art Purposes Level A Coordinator
Jessica Gardner received her bachelor's degree in Studio Art/Art History from the University of Minnesota, Morris and
her master's degree in TESOL from St. Mary's College of California in Concord. She spent the 2011-2012 academic year
teaching English at the University of Macau and had a great experience working with the staff and students there. She is
very excited to be working at AAU because it provides an ideal environment for her to combine her degrees and previous
experiences.
Educational Background: St. Mary’s College of California (MA-Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages,
TESOL); University of Berkeley California (CA TESL Certificate); University of Minnesota (BA-Studio Art/Art History)
144
C. Heyward Gignilliat
Full-Time Faculty
Heyward Gignilliat has over ten years’ experience teaching ESL/EFL. He graduated from the University of Georgia with a
Bachelor’s degree in History and Political Science. After graduation, he moved to Nagoya, Japan to teach English as a
Second Language. He worked as an Assistant Language Teacher (ALT) in Japanese public elementary and junior high
schools for six years. While in Japan, he also founded his own English conversation school. In 2006, Heyward attended
The School for International Training (SIT) for a Master of Arts in Teaching in TESOL. After completing his course work,
he became an adjunct faculty member at Northeastern University's English Language Center for one year. In 2008,
Heyward moved to the Bay Area and served as an Academic Director at an English conversation school on Mission St
where he implemented student centered workshops. In 2010, Heyward started working at the Academy of Art as an EAP
teacher and Support Instructor. Heyward enjoys listening to music, snowboarding, and generally just goofing off.
Educational Background: School for International Training (MA)
Janine Gluud
English for Art Purposes Faculty Coordinator
Janine Gluud has a MA in English as a Second Language and a BA in French from the University of Hawaii and NYUBinghamton respectively. She has over 20 years of professional teaching experience including work in the English
Fluency Program at SF State University Ext. Ed., English Institute at Canada College, Peralta Community College, UC
Berkeley Extension, and other teaching programs in Spain, Portugal, Hawaii, Taiwan, and Mexico. She is fluent in
French and Spanish and has studied Portuguese, Japanese, and Mandarin. She is a member of TESOL and CATESOL
and volunteered on the Canada College Evening Advisory Board Panel. She has held numerous presentations and
workshops on the English language in Spain and Canada.
Educational Background: University of Hawaii (MA-English as a Second Language); State University of New York at
Binghamton (BA-French)
Blaire Kilbey
Online Language Support Faculty
Blaire left her native New Mexico to combine her love of foreign travel, language learning and cross-cultural
communication at the School for International Training in Brattleboro, Vermont. There she earned her Master of Arts
Degree in Teaching ESL and Spanish, with a minor in French. She has lived and worked in Spain, France, Ecuador,
Costa Rica, Japan and Thailand and has traveled through dozens of countries. Blaire has collaborated with Harvard
University and Scott-Foresman publishers to develop meaningful, student-centered, hands-on teaching materials and
continues to develop material in this fast paced world we live in. Blaire holds a MA in Teaching ESL and Spanish from
the School of International Training and a BA in Spanish and Psychology from the University of New Mexico.
Educational Background: School for International Training (MA-TESOL, MA-Spanish); University of New Mexico (BASpanish, BA-Psychology)
Richard La Rose
Full-Time Faculty
Richard La Rose received his MA in TESOL from the University of San Francisco and his BA in Speech Education from
Nicholls State University. Since then, he has been teaching for more than 20 years. Most recently, he was an Adjunct
Professor at Escuela Superior de Administracion y Direccion de Empresas in Barcelona, Spain. Having worked there for
nearly 20 years, La Rose taught ESL credit courses in both the undergraduate and graduate programs as well as noncredit courses. He also taught TOEFL and CFC preparation courses as well as an Intro to American History and Culture
course while there. Additionally, La Rose owned and operated a country guest house and B&B for several years.
Educational Background: University of San Francisco (MA-TESOL); Nicholls State University (BA-Speech Education)
Sherise Lee
Speaking Lab Coordinator
Sherise brings her love for both teaching and art into her role at the Academy. She graduated from the University of
California at Davis (Go Ags!) with degrees in Art History and Sociology. She later completed a master’s degree in second
language education. Her experiences range from working in event marketing to teaching elementary school in China.
When she's not traveling Sherise enjoys running and pursuing her design interests. You can also find her on the hunt for
good eats in the city.
Educational Background: Biola University (MA); Dallas Theological Seminary (MA); University of California, Davis (BA)
145
Laura Messina
Full-Time Faculty
Laura has taught English at San Francisco State University, American language institute since 1999. Beside teaching
students, she also trained and supervised new teachers. Laura is a member of CATESOL. She received her BA in Social
Ecology from UC Irvine in 1989, and earned her MA in English with TESOL emphasis from San Francisco State
University in 2002.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-English TESOL); University of California, Irvine (BA-Social
Ecology)
Stacy Nelson
English for Art Purposes 604 Speaking & Listening Coordinator
Stacy Nelson has an M.A. in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from San Francisco State University,
where she also earned a Certificate in Teaching Post-secondary Reading. As an undergraduate, she studied Writing and
Music at Whitworth University in Spokane, Washington. Stacy has taught ESL courses at all levels and has over two
years of experience tutoring in academic writing labs.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages);
Whitworth University (BA-Music and Writing)
Paget Norton
Full-Time Faculty
Paget Norton is an experienced educator with more than 10 years of experience. After receiving her MFA in Creative
Writing from San Diego State University and her BA in Literature/Writing from UC San Diego, Norton went on to teach at
San Diego State University as an Adjunct Professor. Afterwards, she worked for two years with the US Peace Corps as
an English Professor. Most recently, she was responsible for Instruction and Special Projects at Vallecitos CET for two
years. She has worked on the White Ribbon Campaign in Morocco and was a Team Leader for Taking Our Daughters to
Work Day in Morocco. Currently, Norton is an ESL instructor with Academy of Art University. In addition to teaching,
Norton has also worked with the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and has managed the coordination of
volunteers and books from the Sabre Foundation to Morocco.
Educational Background: San Diego State University (MFA-Creative Writing); University of California, San Diego (BALiterature/Writing)
Amy Parker
Midpoint Review Lab & English for Art Purposes 605W Coordinator
Amy has more than 20 years of teaching experience. She was the co-author of Talking Together, a beginning ESL
conversation text, Lateral Communications, a division of Longman Publishers. She also reviewed several textbooks such
as, The Advanced Grammar Book, second edition, Heinle and Heinle publishers; Grammar Mastery, Houghton-Miffin
publishers, etc. Moreover, Amy is a member of numerous professional affiliations such as CATESOL.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-English: EFL/ESL); Michigan Technological University
(BA-Liberal Arts)
Carlo Pellegrini
Online Language Support Faculty / Online Speaking Lab Coordinator
Carlo Pellegrini has interdisciplinary experience in website production, education and curriculum development in the fine
arts. He is currently Head Teacher/Internship Coordinator at the Aspect International Language Academy teaching
English as a second language to adults. Carlo is proficient in 5 languages and has taught English in many countries
including Japan, Italy and Guatemala. He also is credited with a number of ESL video works. Pellegrini holds a BA in
Italian from the University of Washington.
Educational Background: University of Washington (BA-Italian)
Susannah Schoff
Art Education Liaison
Susannah Schoff received her BA in French and English Literature from the University of San Francisco and her MA in
TESOL from San Francisco State University. Most recently, she was an English Language Fellow at the IAIN Antasari
State Institute for Islamic Studies in Indonesia. Previously, she has been a Senior Teacher and ESL Teacher at the
American Language Institute at SFSU, Albany Park Community Center in Chicago, NAVA Language School in Thailand,
and the AmericanCorps Program at the Presidio Child Development Center. Schoff has made numerous presentations at
various universities in Indonesia and Malaysia.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-TESOL); University of San Francisco (BA-French &
English Literature)
146
Michael Schuller
Full-Time Faculty
Michael has more than 20 years of English teaching experience. He has taught in numerous institutes and colleges such
as: Wisconsin English Language Institute, Madison, Wisconsin; Centre National de la Recherche Scientific, Paris,
France; University of California-Berkeley, Extension; Canada College, Redwood City; and Academy of Art College.
Michael earned his BS in Secondary English Education and MA in English from University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1972
and 1974.
Educational Background: University of Nebraska Lincoln (MA-English); University of Nebraska Lincoln (BS-Secondary
English Education)
George Schupp
Full-Time Faculty
George has 12 years of teaching experience specializing in secondary ESL and special education classes. The schools
that he taught include Nova Intercultural Institute, Osaka, Japan; The Arc San Francisco; and San Francisco Unified
School District. George received his Bachelor of Science in Communications with honors from Ohio University in 1985.
George also holds a MA in English from San Francisco State University.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-English); Ohio University (BS-Communications)
Michael Shehane
English for Art Purposes 3 Curriculum Coordinator
Michael Shehane received his MA in English with a concentration in TESOL from San Francisco State University and a
BA in English from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. He has taught for various schools,
including Kansai Gaidai University in Japan, San Francisco State University, and NOVA Group in Japan. Shehane has
also published a book on English language. He has a high intermediate understanding of German, a high beginning level
understanding of Japanese, and a beginner's level understanding of Chinese.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-English TESOL); California Polytechnic State University
(BA-English)
Amy Shipley
Full-Time Faculty / Instructional Technology Curriculum Integration Coordinator / English as a Second Language Coordinator
Amy Shipley holds a MA in TESOL from SFSU and a BA in Rhetoric and Communication from UC Davis. She has nearly
10 years of teaching experience both in the US and internationally. Most recently, she has been teaching Reading and
Writing at the American Language Institute at SFSU and UC Berkeley Extension. Prior to that, Shipley taught English
conversation at the Excel Language Center in Peru and volunteered at the Save Exiled Tibetan Scholars Association in
India. Additionally, she taught English conversation at the Ota English School in Japan. Shipley also has teacher training
experience, having enrolled in the program at the American Language Institute. She has served as the Conference
Chairperson at the MA TESOL Conference and gave a presentation at the same event. Shipley has been a member of
TESOL and CATESOL since 2002.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-TESOL); University of California, Davis (BA-Rhetoric &
Communication)
Nancy Taylor
Full-Time Faculty
Nancy Taylor received her BA in English from Mary Washington College. She went on to obtain a Certificate in
Beginning and Intermediate Arabic through the US Army's Defense Language Institute. She also worked as a Linguist
and Analyst for the US Army for 8 years. She has since worked as a Paralegal, English/ Drama Teacher, and Language
Arts Teacher. Since 2004, she has been a Career Placement Counselor and Instructor at the English Center for
International Women where she instructs all levels of international university students in Grammar, Reading, Writing, and
Speaking/ Listening. Taylor also obtained her AA in Paralegal Studies from Phillips Business College, an MA in English
from the University of Alabama, and a TESL Certificate from UC Berkeley Extension.
Educational Background: University of Alabama (MA-English); Mary Washington College (BA-English)
147
Walter Thoma
Full-Time Faculty
Walter has more than 10 years of teaching experience. He has been teaching at Academy of Art University since 1996
providing specialized English language instruction for international students. He worked for World Learning Inc., an
international educational services organization, founded in 1932, which provides language instruction for international
students and executives. Walter received his BA in Sociology and Fine Arts from Brandeis University in 1981, and
received his MA in ESL from University of Massachusetts at Boston in 1989.
Educational Background: University of Massachusetts (MA-ESL); Brandeis College (BA-Sociology & Fine Arts)
Erika Weisbrich
English for Art Purposes Lab Coordinator
Erika Weisbrich has worked for over twelve years in San Francisco and abroad as ESL teacher and program developer.
She has an M.A. TESOL and the Certificate in the Teaching of Composition from San Francisco State University. A
native Californian with travel experiences in twenty countries, she has lived in Germany and taught in Japan and Turkey.
Having specialized in English for Art Purposes and curriculum development since 2001, she greatly enjoys the English
for Art Purposes courses at AAU and started teaching them in Spring 2008. She has also recently taught writing for the
extension program at San Francisco State University. In her free time she enjoys delving into the international flavors of
the Bay Area, especially when seeking out a good "cheap eat". A lifelong lover of words and the arts, she holds a B.A. in
English/Creative Writings from SFSU and enjoys poetry, Romanticism, etymology, languages, her husband's British
English, and the cute "wordlets" now spoken by her little boy/girl twins.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-English TESOL); San Francisco State University
(Graduate Certificate in the Teaching of Composition); San Francisco State University (BA-English)
Maw Shein Win
Full-Time Faculty
Maw Shein Win received her BA in English with a focus on Creative Writing from CSU Long Beach. She has continued
taking graduate courses in TESL and TEFL at SFSU. She has taught various ESL, EFL and literacy courses throughout
the bay area. Win has also taught an Intensive English Program in Japan as well as volunteering as an English teacher
for a Burmese community in Japan. Her training includes TOEFL and TOEIC, English Speaking Proficiency testing, Adult
Basic Education Credential for English and Humanities, CBEST Verification, ESL Citizenship workshops, and OTAN ESL
Institute workshops.
Educational Background: California State University, Long Beach (BA-English)
Steven Weiss
Full-Time Faculty
Steven Weiss is a dynamic ESL teacher with years of experience. For the last 4 years, Weiss has been an English
Teacher in Brussels at Interface III and Babelachtig. Additionally, he has worked as a Freelance Translator for French to
English texts. Weiss holds a Master's in Philosophy from Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and a BA in Philosophy and
Sociology from Pennsylvania State University.
Educational Background: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (MA-Philosophy); Pennsylvania State University (BA-Philosophy
and Sociology)
SUPPORT DEPARTMENT: FOUNDATIONS FULL-TIME FACULTY
Leandro Ng
Director of Foundations
Leandro Ng is an Illustrator and Instructor with years of experience. He has worked for companies such as the Gap, Levi
Strauss, Hasbro Toys, Synergy, and others. Most recently, he worked on a graphic novel series entitled "One World
Manga which will be distributed in several countries. He received his BFA in Illustration from Academy of Art University.
Ng works with various media, including watercolor, acrylic, oil, pastel, charcoal, and others. Ng regularly attends the San
Diego ComiCon and San Francisco Wondercon conferences. He is an active member of both groups. Leandro is
currently Director of the Foundations department at Academy of Art University.
148
Kris Komsthoeft
Associate Director Onsite & Online, Foundations
Kristina has 22 years professional experience in Illustrative Design including freelance graphic artist/bookseller, owner of
Komsthoeft Design, manager of Creative Services at Network Equipment Technologies, Inc., and Graphics Consultant
for Ashton-Tate. Her clients include American Heart Association, Apple Computer, Graphically Speaking, Net Labs, Inc.,
Network Equipment Technologies, Inc., Reply Corporation, and SynOptics Communication, Inc. Kristina received her BA
in Art from University of California, Santa Cruz, and BFA in Illustration from AAU.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration); University of California, Santa Cruz (BFA-Fine
Art)
Joko Budiono
Full-Time Faculty
Joko has 8 years professional experience in Illustration including freelance architectural rendering and illustration
projects for Midlen Production, Punch Studio. Joko's shows include work submitted to Academy of Art Galleries, SF
Open Studio, and San Francisco Society of Illustration Shows. In addition, he has been involved with Laguna Honda
Hospital Art Project and teaches perspective drawing/workshop at the Academy of Art College. He holds a BFA in
Illustration and MFA in Fine Art from Academy of Art University.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Fine Art); Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration);
Hartnell College (AA-Art)
Adam Caldwell
Full-Time Faculty
Adam Caldwell has a BFA in Painting and Illustration from California College of Arts and Crafts. Caldwell has over 9
years of professional experience including work in restaurant management, freelance illustration for Caldwell Illustration
Company, kickboxing instruction, and work as an instructor at the Academy of Art University in the Foundations Dept. He
was an instructor and director of the board at the Evolving Body Mind Institute. He is a member of the Society of
Illustrators West.
Educational Background: California College of Arts and Crafts (BFA-Painting and Illustration)
Shawna Chan
Full-Time Faculty
Shawna's career in Animation started in 2001 in her native country of Singapore and she has worked with talented artists
and directors at Disney, Pixar, DreamWorks, Gonzo and Nickelodeon.
After becoming the recipient of a Presidential scholarship, Shawna Chan enrolled in the Academy of Art University’s
graduate program in Visual Development for Animation. Her work has received recognition by the Society of Illustrators.
Prior to joining the Academy as an instructor, Shawna was a Production Intern at Nickelodeon Animation Studios for the
Annie nominated series, The Legend of Korra. Since 2013, she has been teaching in the Academy of Art University’s
Foundations department.
Her love for adventure and travel has taught her sensitivity to social diversity in any environment. The appreciation for
the simple details in life is deeply embedded in the designs that she create. She believes in striving for the best and
constructive criticism is essential to any growth of a creative individual.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA & BFA-Animation)
Jon Dalton
Full-Time Faculty, Foundations
Jon Dalton is a freelance illustrator. He is also a member of the Children's Writers & Illustrators Market and Artists &
Graphic Designer's Market. Dalton received his BFA in Illustration from Academy of Art University.
Educational Background: Academy of Art College (BFA-Illustration)
Michele Goodwin
Full-Time Faculty
Michele has 5 years professional experience in Fine Arts including portraiture for private commissions, working with
interior designer and teaching experience as an instructor of Color & Design, Figurative Drawing, and Painting at AAC.
Her work has been included in a number of exhibitions in San Francisco, Humboldt State, CA, and Tuscany, Italy.
Educational Background: Academy of Art College (BFA-Illustration)
149
Cameron Brei Harris
Foundations Figure Modeling Coordinator
Having grown up in an artistic family, Brei Harris has been inspired by paintings from nineteenth century Europe and
Russia. Since moving to San Francisco and earning a degree in Fine Arts from the Academy of Art University, Brei has
strengthened her technical skills in drawing, oil painting and figurative sculpture. She specializes in contemporary
figurative sculpture and enjoys the tangible nature of the creative process and the presence a three-dimensional piece
evokes.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Fine Art); University of California, San Diego (BA)
Karl Jensen
Full-Time Faculty
Karl Jensen graduated from San Jose State University with a MFA and from CSU-Hayward with a BA in Music. Since
that time, Jensen has had over 27 years of professional experience in Fine Arts, Drawing & Painting. This also includes
several years of teaching at Canada College, San Jose State, San Mateo High School District, and over 20 years of
teaching experience at Academy of Art University. His work has been exhibited in solo, group, and juried shows across
the San Francisco Bay Area. He has served as a juror for the Academy of Art Merit Scholarship Competitions and for
scholarships awarded to high school students. Jensen also served extensively on review committees for undergraduate
applicants and MFA candidates.
Educational Background: San Jose State University (MA-Art); Cal State Hayward (BA-Music)
David Choong Youb Lee
Full-Time Faculty
David Lee has 4 years of professional experience in Fine Arts. Currently, he is a foundations instructor at AAU and
founder of Hookin Style Design Company. His work has been exhibited in galleries in San Francisco and Las Vegas. He
has received the Herman Lambert Scholarship, Best of Show-30th Annual National Juried Exhibition at the Palm Springs
Desert Museum, two Best Figure Painting awards and one Best Landscape award at the Academy of Art University's
Spring Show. He has attended the Society of American Portrait Artist's seminar and various clothing design and comic
conventions. Lee holds a BFA from Academy of Art University.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Fine Art); Academy of Art University (BFA-Fine Art)
Cristen Miller
Full-Time Faculty, Foundations
Cristen Miller is an oil and pastel painter who has received several awards. Her works have been selected to various
exhibitions and private collections throughout the San Francisco Bay Area as well as Southern California, Wyoming and
Utah. Miller placed third in the Academy of Art University's Annual Show and she was one of only four students invited to
represent the University in painting on the television show "Entertainment Tonight." Miller has also participated in various
exhibitions, including Contemporary Realism Group Show and a solo exhibit at 688 Sutter Gallery. She has a BFA in
Painting from Academy of Art University. Miller is a member of the National Portrait Society.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (MFA-Fine Art); Academy of Art University (BFA-Fine Art)
Yelena “Helen” Uger
Full-Time Faculty
Yelena Uger is a talented artist with more than 20 years of experience. Since 1989 she has been a freelance artist in
various media, including portraiture and landscape commissions. She has also been a private art instructor. Uger's work
has been exhibited at Dahesh Museum, Salmagundi Club, and the NY Area MFA Exhibition. She holds a MFA in
Painting from the New York Academy of Fine Arts.
Educational Background: New York Academy of Art (MFA-Painting); Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (4 year
Certificate)
Henry Yan
Full-Time Faculty
Since 1990, Henry Yan has been doing portraits, figures and landscapes for various galleries and commissioned clients
as an experienced Painter. For the last 9 years, Yan has been a FT Instructor in the Academy of Art University's
Foundations department where he teaches drawing and painting classes. He holds a BFA in Illustration from Academy of
Art University as well as a Bachelor in Electrical Engineering from Shanghai Institute of Applied Technology. He is a
member of the American Society of Portrait Artists Foundation.
Educational Background: Academy of Art University (BFA-Illustration); Shanghai Institute of Applied Technology (BAElectrical Engineering)
150
SUPPORT DEPARTMENT: LIBERAL ARTS FULL-TIME FACULTY
Eileen Everett
Academic Vice President of Liberal Arts
Eileen M. Everett has been with the Academy of Art University since 1999 and has directed the Liberal Arts Department
since 2003. Eileen earned her BA in Art History at Indiana University’s Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts and her
MA from the University of California, Santa Barbara in the History of Art and Architecture where her Master’s Thesis on
18th Century French Painting was received with Honors. In addition to her duties as Academic Vice President, Eileen
teaches Art History courses online and onsite and travels with the AAU Art History Study Abroad program when her
schedule permits.
Educational Background: University of California, Santa Barbara (MA-History of Art and Architecture); Indiana University
(BA-Art History)
Michael Leitch
Associate Director of Liberal Arts
Michael Leitch has over 25 years of professional experience in theater, radio, and television arts. He has been an
instructor with Academy of Art University since 1998. He has also taught match, flight, physics, and ESL to high school
and college students. Leitch has professional experience both in Japan and the USA as a theater actor, radio
personality, and TV and voice-over artist. Leitch possesses years of training in radio and TV production. He also has
international experience, having worked in Japan for 4 years. Additionally, he has traveled to Nepal, Thailand, and
China. He is a member of the World Affairs Council and was a Peace Corps dependent in Costa Rica. Leitch studied
French and Japanese for several years and is a certified commercial pilot. Leitch received his BS in Physics from
Evergreen State College. He is an active member of the American Physics Society and the FAA.
Educational Background: Evergreen State College (BS-Physics)
Paul Delevati
Full-Time Faculty
Paul Delevati has more than 18 years of professional teaching experience. He has been an Instructor in the Liberal Arts
Department at the Academy of Art University since 2001. Previously, he taught Critical Thinking at San Francisco State
University. Delevati received his BA in Philosophy from CSU Chico and his MA in Philosophy from San Francisco State
University. He is a member of the American Philosophical Association and attends their annual meetings.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-Philosophy); California State University, Chico (BAPhilosophy)
Jesse Ficks
Film History Coordinator
Jesse Ficks is currently Host and Curator of the monthly series, Midnites for Maniacs at The Castro Theatre. He is also
working as a Film Editing Technician at the Academy of Art University. Previously, he was Manager of The ImaginAsian
Theatre, Assistant Manager & Curator of the Four Star Theatre as well as Membership Associate of the Film Arts
Foundation. Ficks has participated in various film festivals, including Sundance, Cannes, and SF Asian American Film
Festival. He has been published in the SF Bay Guardian. Ficks holds a BA in Theatre Arts/Film from Portland State
University.
Educational Background: Portland State University (BA-Theatre Arts/Film)
Kevin Brent Forman
Study Abroad Coordinator
Kevin Brent Forman began teaching at Academy of Art University in 2000. Since coming to the Academy, Kevin has
been a Support Instructor in a variety of graduate & undergraduate Art History classes, and in 2006, became a lead
instructor in the undergraduate Art History classroom. He has team-taught Study Abroad seminars throughout Europe,
and loves traveling to experience Art History firsthand. In addition to teaching Art History, Kevin has also taught English
for Art & Design purposes for non-native speakers of English. With a strong background in pedagogy, Kevin regularly
presents his best-practices to audiences within the University and external at academic conferences.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-English & BA-Humanities)
151
Robert Goldie
Social Studies Curriculum Coordinator
Bob Goldie has been with the Academy of Art University since 2005 where he has been an instructor, academic coach,
and a coordinator for the Writing Lab before moving to Liberal Arts 2011 to serve as a social studies coordinator and a
sociology instructor for both online and onsite classes. He received his B.A. in History and M.A. in Social Studies
Education at the University of Colorado and has since pursued an ambition to empower students to become passionate
lifetime learners and thinkers by making education interesting and meaningful. Bob also writes music and fanzine
reviews for Maximum RocknRoll, collects records, fixates on the history of San Francisco, and enjoys life’s experience.
Educational Background: University of Colorado at Boulder (MA-Education); University of Colorado at Boulder (BAHistory)
Craig Griffeath
Full-Time Faculty
Craig Griffeath holds a Bachelor's degree in Physics with a minor in Music Composition and Theory from Haverford
College and a Master's in Humanities/Art History from Dominican University of California. He also has a certificate in
Western Art Education from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, where he has been a member of the Docent
Council since 1992. Craig has been performing and teaching music professionally for more than twenty-five years, and
has over seventy-five album credits as a player, engineer, and producer. Craig has been an instructor at Academy of Art
University since 1995, and to date has taught thirteen different subjects in the Academy's Liberal Arts Department.
Educational Background: Dominican University (MA-Humanities: Art History); Haverford College (BS-Physics)
Heather Holliger
Full-Time Faculty
As an instructor of English, Ms. Holliger teaches developmental writing, composition, literature, and critical thinking
courses. She is a professional writer, poet and spoken word artist.
Educational Background: George Mason University (MFA-Creative Writing); American University (BA-Women's &
Gender Studies)
Claudia Holm
Full-Time Faculty
Claudia Holm has 16 years professional experience in liberal arts including management of organizational systems and
implementation of educational seminars for Gold Coast Seminars in San Francisco and manager of accounts payable/
receivables, and payroll for Jeff Morley, DDS. She has attended the Writer's Center Workshop in San Francisco and is a
member of the Associated Writer's Program (AWP). Holm received her BA in Humanities from New College of California
and her MA in Writing and Consciousness from New College of California.
Educational Background: New College of California (MA-Writing and Consciousness); New College of California (BAHumanities)
Kelly Holt
Writing Coordinator
Claudia Holt holds a MA in Psychology from Sonoma State University, an MS in Education from Nazareth College and a
BA in German Language and Literature from UC Santa Barbara. Most recently, after obtaining her MA she has traveled
extensively through South America where she strengthened her Spanish speaking skills and studied sacred geography.
Previously, she was Director of the Academy Resource Center at the Academy of Art University and has taught ESL
courses for more than 10 years.
Educational Background: University of California, Santa Cruz (Ph.D.-Literature); San Francisco State University (MALiterature, & MFA-Creative Writing); University of California, Santa Cruz (BA-Literature and American Studies)
Candace Huey
Full-Time Faculty
Candace earned her MA in Art History at Courtauld Institute of Art (London, UK), graduating with Honors. Her thesis
explores the issues surrounding the visual and material culture of 17thC Netherlandish Art. She earned her BA from UC
Berkeley in the History of Art with a minor in Anthropology. Candace has worked for the Fine Arts Museums of San
Francisco as well as a major Bay Area art gallery and has interned at Courtauld Institute Gallery and Butterfields Auction
House. Candace is a member of the Historians of Netherlandish Art and has presented her research at their conference
in Amsterdam.
Educational Background: Courtauld Institute of Art (MA-History of Art); University of California, Berkeley (BA-History of
Art)
152
Susan Meserve
Full-Time Faculty
Susie Meserve is a creative writing instructor and has taught at a variety of learning institutions including: University of
Massachusetts and Portland International Community School. She was a founding member of Valley Free Radio Project
in Northampton Massachusetts. Her poems have been published in Indiana Review, Red Rock Review, Redactions,
Willamette Week, and Terminus. Her articles have also been published in Rain Taxi Review of Books, Oregon
Humanities, The Voice, Anodyne Magazine, and Technology & Learning. She received her B.A. in English from Tufts
University and her MFA in English from University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
Educational Background: University of Massachusetts at Amherst (MFA-English); Tufts University (BA-English)
Tom Molanphy
Full-Time Faculty
Tom Molanphy received his BA in English Literature from Loyola University and his MFA in Creative Writing from the
University of Montana. He has more than 16 years of combined experience in teaching and writing. Since 2001,
Molanphy has taught English at the Academy of Art University. He previously taught at Archbishop Riordan High School
and Meadowhill Middle School in Montana. He has also taught 8th grade English for the Toledo School District in Belize.
Molanphy has written and copy-edited computer manuals for Education Logistics and worked as a news reporter, copy
editor, and editorial editor/columnist for Loyola Maroon while at Loyola University. He has published a novella and
several essays for the StreetBeat Quarterly. Molanphy is a Volunteer Tutor for 826 Valencia.
Educational Background: University of Montana (MFA-Creative Writing); Loyola University (BA-English Literature)
Cynthia Mossman
Full-Time Faculty
Cynthia Mossman holds a MA in the Teaching of Writing, BA in Studio Art, and BA in English from Humboldt State
University. Since 2003, she has taught various writing courses, ESL courses, and screenwriting courses for the Academy
of Art University. She has previously taught at Humboldt State University, San Diego State University, College of the
Redwoods, and Miramar College.
Educational Background: Humboldt State University (MFA-Dramatic Writing); Humboldt State University (MA-Teaching
of Writing); Humboldt State University (BA-Art & English)
Kimberly Reid-Schafer
Full-Time Faculty
Kimberly Schafer has been with the Academy of Art University since 1996 teaching a wide range of art history courses.
Ms. Schafer holds two graduate degrees from Oxford Brookes University (formerly Oxford Polytechnic), and a Bachelor
of Arts degree with a major in art history (fine art, painting) and a minor in anthropology. Her graduate thesis focused on
the twentieth century British artist Stanley Spencer and was concerned with the subject of primitivism.
Professionally Ms. Schafer has worked at Butterfield & Butterfield in the Restoration department, worked at the Museum
of Modern Art, Oxford, and Courtland Institute, as well as the Museum of London Archaeological Service. She has
traveled extensively through Europe as well as China and Tibet.
Educational Background: California State University Hayward (BA-Art History)
Mark Reynolds
Full-Time Faculty
Mark has been an art educator for 35 years. He is also a freelance commercial illustrator/designer/artist on the east
coast. He is a member of Maryland Bicentennial committee for the arts and is on the board of directors for a museum in
Bolinas, CA. He has won several awards and honors including Second place/Professional Art, "Fells Point Art Festival",
Baltimore, Maryland; Second place/Professional Art, "27th Courthouse Arts Festival", Towson, Maryland, and Best-inShow Award, "17th Annual Baltimore Outdoor Art Show", Baltimore, Maryland, etc.
Educational Background: Towson State University (MA-Art); Towson State University (BS-Art)
David Riffert
Full-Time Faculty
David has 20 years of teaching experience. His articles have been featured in print and publications. Colleges that David
has taught at include The Pennsylvania State University, Principia College, and Academy of Art University. David
received his BA in History and Art History from Principia College in 1986, and earned his MA in Art History from The
Pennsylvania State University in 1992. David also coordinates the Liberal Arts Study Abroad graduate curriculum and
has traveled to Europe numerous times with Academy students.
Educational Background: Pennsylvania State University (MA-Art History); Principia College (BA-History/Art History)
153
Allyson Ritger
Full-Time Faculty
Allyson Klein holds an MFA and MA in Writing & Consciousness from New College of California. She also holds a BA in
Criminal Justice from University of Delaware. Currently, she is Assistant to the Librarian at New College of California
where she tutors students with compositions and essays and assists students with database research. She has
published a work of fiction, Notes from the Creamery and has a forthcoming work, Five Fingers Review. Klein has also
been published in Transitions Abroad, Big World Magazine, and SF Downtown Magazine. Klein has also taught English
in China and has been a freelance travel writer in Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, Thailand, Burma, Hong Kong, Singapore,
Pakistan, Tanzania, Sudan and many more. She is a regular newsletter contributor to Insight Meditation Community of
San Francisco and has been a pen-pal for over 3 years with the SF Zen Center's Prison Outreach Program.
Educational Background: New College of California (MA); New College of California (MFA); University of Delaware (BA)
Simone Scott
Full-Time Faculty
Currently, Simone Scott is an ESL/EFL Teacher at Aspect International Language Academies where she designs
curriculum teaches grammar, and combined skills courses. Previously, she provided one-on-one ESL instruction for
beginners at the Embassy Center for English Studies. Scott has nearly 3 years of English Instruction. She has been
published in Zyzzyva, Tampa Review, Toward Freedom Magazine, and WetFeet.com. Scott holds a MA in
English/Creative Writing from SFSU and a BA in English from the University of Vermont.
Educational Background: San Francisco University (MFA); University of Vermont (BA)
James Sidel
Full-Time Faculty
James Sidel has worked as supervisor/administrator, research assistant, and instructor at the Academy of Art College
and University of Iowa since 1997. He obtained his BA in Film Studies and Writings at the University of Pittsburgh in
1991, and his MFA in Fiction Writing from the University of Iowa in 2002. Throughout his career and studies, James has
received numerous awards, including a scholarship from The Maine Institute of Photography, a Teaching Writing
Fellowship from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, and the Undergraduate Non-Fiction Award from University of Pittsburgh.
His work has been published in The Pittsburgh Quarterly and Emic On-Line Literary Magazine. Some of his past clients
include The United Way, YMCA, and The Pittsburgh Public Schools. Currently, he is completing a novel: From
Thumbsuckers to Graybeards.
Educational Background: University of Iowa (MFA-Fiction Writing); University of Pittsburgh (BA-Film Studies)
Richard Tubiolo
Full-Time Faculty
Richard Tubiolo's experience spans through 12 years of marketing leadership, including account management for
accounts up to $8.1 million; advertising; brand management and development; business development and relationship
management; education and training; project and program management; research, strategic planning and product
development.
Educational Background: Golden Gate University (MBA); California State University, Northridge (BA)
Marta Wendlinger
LA 291 Coordinator
Marta Wendlinger had a varied career. She received her BA in Humanities from the Univ. of California at Berkeley and
later her JD from Boston University Law School. She worked in the legal field, as a school social worker, and for various
UN organizations including the International Labour Organization in Geneva and the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) in
Belize before making a switch to fashion in 2002. Marta worked in the Fashion & Textile Department of the Escola
Superior de Disseny (ESDI) where she was in charge of organizing and implementing quarterly fashion shows and
events, both within the school and with partner organizations.
Educational Background: Boston University School of Law (JD); University of California, Berkeley (BA-Humanities)
154
Katherine Williams
Full-Time Faculty
Katie Williams holds a MFA in Writing from the University of Texas at Austin and a BA in English from the University of
Michigan. She has more than 5 years of teaching experience, having taught Fiction at Community High School in
Michigan and Writing at Youth Voices in Ink in Texas. She also worked as a Youth Program Coordinator and Instructor
for San Francisco Suicide Prevention. Her works of fiction have been published in Indiana Review, the Austin Chronicle,
Prairie Schooner, and Poor Mojo's Almanack. Her works of non-fiction have been published twice in Michigan Today and
she completed three screenplays in collaboration with Momentum Cinema.
Educational Background: University of Texas Austin (MFA-Writing); University of Michigan Ann Arbor (BA-English)
Stephen P. Williams
Full-Time Faculty
Stephen Williams earned a BA and an MA in history at San Francisco State University. His graduate work included not
only the study of civilization from antiquity through the Renaissance, but also the art of the early Renaissance. His
research projects included the representation of St. Francis of Assisi in literature and art, the graphic art and text of the
Hypnerotomachia Poliphili of Colonna and its representation of Renaissance pagan ideals, as well as the evolution of
early Christian iconography. Other topics of interest and research include the French Revolution and World War I. He is
also enthusiastic about Italy and has studied Italian and history at the Scuola Leonardo Da Vinci in Rome. Mr. Williams
has been teaching courses on art history and western civilization at the Academy since 2001.
Educational Background: San Francisco State University (MA-History); San Francisco State University (BA-History)
Jose Yulo
Full-Time Faculty
Jose Yulo is an award-winning college instructor with over five years of teaching experience at various colleges. After
receiving his BA in Liberal Arts from St. John's College and his MA in Communication Studies from Emerson College
where he received the Outstanding Student Award for Theories of Rhetoric, Yulo went on to teach at Mission College.
He then taught at Foothill College and Campion College where he taught Speech, Rhetoric, and American Society and
Culture. Most recently, he has been teaching Philosophy at Foothill College. Yulo recently earned his Doctor of
Education with a concentration on the Philosophy of Education from the University of San Francisco. His dissertation
covered Presocratic and Platonic ethical philosophy, the literature of J.R.R. Tolkien, and Friedrich Nietzche's and
Immanuel Kant's educational and ethical philosophies. Yulo also helped interview Holocaust survivors for the Bay Area
Holocaust Oral History project in 2002.
Educational Background: University of San Francisco (PhD-International & Multicultural Education): Emerson College
(MA-Political Communication); St. John's College (BA-Liberal Arts)
155
Back to Table of Contents
156
UNIVERSITY LEARNING OUTCOMES
University learning outcomes state the skills that all students should be able to demonstrate upon graduation, regardless
of their major. These institutional-level outcomes are developed with input from Academy of Art University’s academic
directors and Board of Directors.
Graduates of Academy of Art University will demonstrate the ability to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Produce a body of work suitable for seeking professional opportunities in their chosen field of art and design.
Solve creative problems within their field of art and design, including research and synthesis of technical, aesthetic,
and conceptual knowledge.
Communicate their ideas professionally and connect with their intended audience using visual, oral, and written
presentation skills relevant to their field.
Execute technical, aesthetic, and conceptual decisions based on an understanding of art and design principles.
Evaluate work in their field, including their own work, using professional terminology.
Recognize the influence of major cultural and aesthetic trends, both historical and contemporary, on art and design
products.
Learn the professional skills and behaviors necessary to compete in the global marketplace for art and design.
157
PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
Program learning outcomes state what students will know or be able to do upon graduation. The program learning
outcomes are developed with input from relevant stakeholders including academic directors, faculty, advisory boards,
employers, and alumni. Click on the links below to view the outcomes of each program.
SCHOOL OF ACTING
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Acting Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Acting Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF ADVERTISING
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Advertising Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Advertising Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF ANIMATION & VISUAL EFFECTS
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Animation & Visual Effect Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Animation & Visual Effect Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Undergraduate Program
B.Arch (Candidacy Status) Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
M.Arch Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF ART EDUCATION
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Art Education Program Learning Outcomes
Art Teaching Credential Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MA in Art Education Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF ART HISTORY
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Art History Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF FASHION
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Fashion Program Learning Outcomes
BA in Fashion Journalism Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Fashion Program Learning Outcomes
158
SCHOOL OF FINE ART
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Fine Art Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Fine Art Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF GAME DEVELOPMENT
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Game Development Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Game Development Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF GRAPHIC DESIGN
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Graphic Design Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Graphic Design Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF ILLUSTRATION
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Illustration Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Illustration Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Industrial Design Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Industrial Design Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Interior Architecture & Design Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Interior Architecture & Design Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF JEWELRY & METAL ARTS
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Jewelry & Metal Arts Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Jewelry & Metal Arts Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Landscape Architecture Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Landscape Architecture Program Learning Outcomes
159
SCHOOL OF MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Motion Pictures & Television Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Motion Pictures & Television Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATIONS
Undergraduate Program
BA in Multimedia Communications Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MA in Multimedia Communications Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRODUCTION & SOUND DESIGN FOR VISUAL MEDIA
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Music Production & Sound Design for Visual Media Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Music Production & Sound Design for Visual Media Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF PHOTOGRAPHY
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Photography Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Photography Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF VISUAL DEVELOPMENT
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Visual Development Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
BFA in Visual Development Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF WEB DESIGN & NEW MEDIA
Undergraduate Program
BFA in Web Design & New Media Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Web Design & New Media Program Learning Outcomes
SCHOOL OF WRITING FOR FILM, TELEVISION & DIGITAL MEDIA
Undergraduate Program
Writing for Film, Television & Digital Media Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
MFA in Writing for film, Television & Digital Media Program Learning Outcomes
SUPPORT DEPARTMENT: FOUNDATIONS
Undergraduate Program
Foundations Program Learning Outcomes
SUPPORT DEPARTMENT: LIBERAL ARTS
Undergraduate Program
Liberal Arts Program Learning Outcomes
Graduate Program
Graduate Liberal Arts Program Learning Outcomes
160
Back to Table of Contents
161
CAMPUS AND FACILITIES
OUR CAMPUS
A Campus in the Heart of The City
Academy of Art University offers students a uniquely urban campus: The city of San Francisco. The Bay Area is a
buzzing and bustling hub of innovation. Fusing cutting-edge technology, sustainable design and the creative arts,
Academy of Art University students benefit from our one-of-a-kind location.
Primary Site of Instruction:
79 New Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
FACILITIES
Students taking courses on-campus will join a vibrant community of artists and designers in the school and in the city
itself. A wide range of equipment and resources is available to students on campus at Academy of Art University.
Facilities are tailored to each school’s unique needs for equipment and resources necessary for students bring their
creative visions to life.
SCHOOL OF ACTING
School of Acting Facilities
SCHOOL OF ADVERTISING
School of Advertising Facilities
SCHOOL OF ANIMATION & VISUAL EFFECTS
School of Animation & Visual Effects Facilities
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
School of Architecture Facilities
SCHOOL OF ART EDUCATION
School of Art Education Facilities
SCHOOL OF ART HISTORY
School of Art History Facilities
SCHOOL OF FASHION
School of Fashion Facilities
SCHOOL OF FINE ART
School of Fine Art Facilities
SCHOOL OF GAME DEVELOPMENT
School of Game Development Facilities
SCHOOL OF GRAPHIC DESIGN
School of Graphic Design Facilities
SCHOOL OF ILLUSTRATION
School of Illustration Facilities
SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
School of Industrial Design Facilities
SCHOOL OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN
School of Interior Architecture & Design Facilities
162
SCHOOL OF JEWELRY & METAL ARTS
School of Jewelry & Metal Arts Facilities
SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
School of Landscape Architecture Facilities
SCHOOL OF MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION
School of Motion Pictures & Television Facilities
SCHOOL OF MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATIONS
School of Multimedia Communications Facilities
SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRODUCTION & SOUND DESIGN FOR VISUAL MEDIA
School of Music Production & Sound Design for Visual Media Facilities
SCHOOL OF PHOTOGRAPHY
School of Photography Facilities
SCHOOL OF VISUAL DEVELOPMENT
School of Visual Development Facilities
SCHOOL OF WEB DESIGN & NEW MEDIA
School of Web Design & New Media Facilities
SCHOOL OF WRITING FOR FILM, TELEVISION & DIGITAL MEDIA
School of Writing for Film, Television & Digital Media Facilities
SUPPORT DEPARTMENT: LIBERAL ARTS
Liberal Arts Homepage
Online Library resources
163
Back to Table of Contents
164
Prerequisite
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
ACT 112 Speech 1: Building the Voice
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$50.00
ACT 123 Improvisation 1
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2
$25.00
ACT 141 Movement: Physical Acting
ACT 105, ACT 112, & ACT 141 (ACT 141
may be concurrent)
$35.00
ACT 166 Singing 1: Vocal Technique
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$100.00
ACT 181 Movement: Body Awareness
and the Conscious Actor
ACT 141. On campus English as a second
language students must pass EAP level 2.
$150.00
ACT 205 Acting 3
ACT 141 & ACT 155
$35.00
ACT 212 Speech 2: The Power of Voice
ACT 112 & ACT 166 (ACT 166 may be
taken concurrently). On campus English as
a second language students must pass
EAP level 2.
$50.00
ACT 123, ACT 141, & ACT 105 (ACT 105
may be taken concurrently). On campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 3.
$25.00
ACT 241 Movement: Mask, Mime &
Clown
ACT 243 The Craft of Comedy
ACT 155 & ACT 181
ACT 255 Acting 4
ACT 223 Improvisation 2
















$100.00


ACT 141, ACT 155, & ACT 223
$50.00


ACT 181, ACT 205, & ACT 212 & LA 291
(LA 291 may be concurrent). Students
seeking their second Bachelor’s degree are
exempt from LA 291.
$35.00




ACT 261 Movement: Tap Technique,
Repertory and History
ACT 181
ACT 266 Singing 2: The Power of
Performance
ACT 112, ACT 166, & ACT 105 (ACT 105
may be taken concurrently)
$100.00
ACT 275 Classical Performance 1
ACT 181, ACT 205, & ACT 212
$35.00


ACT 281 Stage Combat 1
ACT 155 & ACT 181
$125.00


ACT 305 Acting for the Camera 1
ACT 255
$250.00


ACT 312 Voiceovers
ACT 205 & ACT 212
$60.00
ACT 321 Speech 3: Accents and Dialects
ACT 212 & ACT 255
ACT 333 Monologue Technique 1
ACT 255 & Department Director approval
ACT 355 Acting for the Camera 2
ACT 305
$550.00
ACT 366 Singing 3: Musical Theatre
Scene Study
ACT 205 & ACT 266
$100.00







SU14 Onsite



SU14 Online





FA14 Onsite
FA14 Online

$100.00
ACT 155 Acting 2
SP15 Onsite
Course
Fee
$35.00
Course
ACT 105 Acting 1
SP15 Online
SPRING 2015 COURSE FEES & PREREQUSITES







165
ACT 370 Theatre Performance: The Play
ACT 212, ACT 255, & Department Director
approval
$200.00
ACT 375 Classical Performance 2
ACT 275
ACT 381 Stage Combat 2


$35.00


ACT 205 & ACT 281
$175.00


ACT 395 Acting for Commercials
ACT 255 (for ACT students) or Department
Director's approval for all other schools
$100.00


ACT 405 Acting for the Camera 3
ACT 355
$550.00


ACT 433 Monologue Technique 2
ACT 333 & Department Director approval
ACT 466 Singing 4: Musical Theatre
Showcase
ACT 255 & ACT 366
$100.00
ACT 468 Audition Process: From Cold
Readings to Callbacks
ACT 355
$140.00
ACT 490 Portfolio Enhancement




Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


ACT 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


ACT 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ACT 500 Internship in Acting
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
ACT 615 MS: Voice and Speech 1
ACT 617 MS: Voice and Speech 2

On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 602
$50.00
ACT 615 and on campus English for a
second language students must pass EAP
level 603.
$50.00


ACT 620 MS: Movement: The Alexander
Technique
$150.00
ACT 625 MS: Vocal Production
$200.00
ACT 630 MS: Acting for Performance 2
ACT 610, ACT 615, & ACT 620
$50.00
ACT 635 MS: Acting Techniques: Meisner
1
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 603.
$35.00
ACT 637 MS: Acting Techniques: Meisner
2
ACT 635 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604.
$35.00
ACT 639 MS: Acting for Performance 1
ACT 637
$35.00
ACT 640 MS: Movement: Creating
Physical Character
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 601
$100.00
ACT 645 MS: Improvisational Techniques






$25.00
ACT 650 MS: Acting for Camera 1
ACT 639
$550.00
ACT 660 MS: Monologue Technique
ACT 639
ACT 670 MS: Acting for Camera 2
ACT 650
$550.00
ACT 680 MS: Audition Techniques
ACT 670
$140.00
ACT 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ACT 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ACT 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.








166
ACT 801 MS: Group Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
ACT 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate student with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal.
ACT 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
ACT 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.
ADV 109 Introduction to Advertising
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
ADV 112 Marketing & Advertising
Strategies
ADV 109
ADV 115 The Creative Process
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
ADV 150 Studio Production 1
GR 102
ADV 207 Creative Strategy 1
ADV 109, ADV 112, & either LA 125 or
ADV 115


ADV 215 Short Copy for Campaigns
LA 110 or LA 133, and either ADV 115 or
LA 125 (LA 110 or LA 133 may be taken
concurrently).



















$150.00

ADV 230 Drawing for Advertising 1
FND 113 & on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 1.




ADV 109, GR 102, & either LA 125 or ADV
115. (Both GR 102 and LA 125/ADV 115
may be taken concurrently). NonAdvertising students: WNM 105, WNM 110,
& WNM 120.




ADV 207, ADV 241, GR 105 & either LA
125 or ADV 115 & either ADV 230 or GR
235. ADV 207, ADV 230, & GR 105 may
be taken concurrently.









ADV 250 Studio Production 2
ADV 150
ADV 267 Creative Strategy 2
ADV 207, ADV 244, & LA 291 (LA 291 may
be taken concurrently. Students seeking a
second bachelor's degree are exempt from
LA 291.)
$60.00

ADV 267 & either GR 235 or ADV 230
ADV 244 Art Direction for Advertising



$150.00
ADV 267 & ADV 226
ADV 315 Copy for Radio
ADV 215 & either LA 110 or LA 133 & also
either LA 202 or LA 280
ADV 341 Ideation for Campaigns 2
ADV 244, ADV 207, ADV 215, LA 291 &
either ADV 230 or GR 235 (LA 291 may be
taken concurrently. Students seeking a
second bachelor's degree are exempt from
LA 291.)




ADV 342 Campaign Design
ADV 341 & either FND 122 or FND 125




ADV 343 Integrated Campaigns
ADV 341


ADV 346 Interactive Advertising 1
ADV 341 and one of the following: WNM
205 or PRO WNM530 or MPT 110 or COM
102




ADV 341 & either WNM 249 or GR 182


ADV 314 Creative Strategy 3
ADV 355 Guerilla Online & Television


ADV 226 Research Methods for Creative
Strategists
ADV 241 Ideation for Campaigns 1

$150.00



$100.00




167
ADV 362 Creative Communications
Strategy
ADV 267 & ADV 226
ADV 367 Art of Presentation
ADV 346 or ADV 362
ADV 370 Brand and Branding
ADV 342 or ADV 226 & either GR 122 or
MPT 133 or LA 113
ADV 415 Long Copy for Campaigns
ADV 315
ADV 446 Innovative Advertising
ADV 370
ADV 462 Digital Strategy
ADV 362 or ADV 343
ADV 464 Interactive Advertising 2
ADV 346, ADV 367, ADV 446, and obtain
Department Director's Approval
ADV 467 Television Commercial
Production
ADV 341
ADV 470 Portfolio for Creatives
ADV 346, ADV 367, ADV 446, and either
GR 182 or WNM 249 and obtain
Department Director's approval


ADV 475 Portfolio for Creative Strategists
ADV 367, ADV 462 and obtain Department
Director's approval



ADV 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ADV 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.



ADV 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.



ADV 500 Internship in Advertising
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
ADV 600 MS: Strategic Thinking
ADV 624 & (COM 602 or MPT 625)
ADV 602 MS: Art Direction
ADV 622, ADV 623, and on campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 604 (ADV 623 may be
taken concurrently)
ADV 604 MS: Copywriting Techniques










$100.00























ADV 622, ADV 623, and on campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 604 (ADV 623 may be
taken concurrently)
























Obtain Department Director's Approval.
ADV 606 MS: Campaign
ADV 602, ADV 604, & ADV 623
ADV 616 MS: Advanced Advertising
Concept Development
ADV 606
ADV 620 MS: Advanced Art Direction
ADV 602

ADV 621 MS: Advanced Copywriting
Techniques
ADV 606 & ADV 623 (ADV 606 may be
taken concurrently)

ADV 622 MS: Perspectives in Advertising
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 603.








$100.00


ADV 622 & on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604.
ADV 624 MS: Creative Thinking for
Advertising
ADV 606 & ADV 623 (ADV 606 may be
taken concurrently)
$60.00
ADV 625 MS: Interactive Advertising
ADV 606 and one of the following: ADV
630 or MPT 625 or COM 602
$100.00
ADV 626 MS: Brand & Branding
Obtain Department Director's Approval.
ADV 630 MS: Digital Motion Graphics


$100.00
ADV 605 MS: Digital Graphics
ADV 623 MS: Brand Strategy

$100.00













168
ADV 695 MS: Collaborative Project
ADV 600, ADV 602, ADV 604, & ADV 616.
Department Director’s Approval is required.
/ Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ADV 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.

ADV 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.










ADV 801 MS: Group Directed Study
ADV 802 MS: Thesis Forum
$100.00
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.

Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.





ADV 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
ADV 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.





This course is only open to Art History
majors. English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 202, Senior status, and two of the
following: LA 420, LA 421, LA 422, LA
423, LA 432, LA 433, LA 464



AHS 600 MS: Art History Methodologies &
Theory
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.



AHS 610 MS: Art of the Ancient World
AHS 600 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604
AHS 613 MS: Art of the Middle Ages
AHS 600 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604
AHS 620 MS: Italian Renaissance Art
AHS 600 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604





AHS 116 Looking at Art and Design
AHS 466 Art History Senior Thesis
AHS 621 MS: Art of the Northern
Renaissance
AHS 600 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604
AHS 622 MS: Art of the Italian Baroque
AHS 600 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604

AHS 623 MS: Art of the Dutch Golden
Age
AHS 600 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604

AHS 633 MS: Art of 18th and 19th
Century Europe
AHS 600 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604
AHS 634 MS: Dada and Surrealism
AHS 600 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604

AHS 600 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604

AHS 636 MS: Abstraction in Art
Throughout the 20th Century



169
AHS 661 MS: The Artist in the Modern
World
AHS 600 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604
AHS 665 MS: The History and Study of
Signs: Semiotics & the Visual Arts
AHS 600 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604
AHS 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
AHS 699 MS: Special Topics
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604. / Note:
Course fees and prerequisites will vary by
topic.
AHS 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
AHS 801 MS: Group Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
AHS 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate student with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal.
AHS 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
AHS 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.
ANM 101 Introduction to Computer
Graphics for Animation
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$100.00
ANM 102 History of Animation
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$25.00
ANM 104 History and Technology of VFX
and Computer Animation
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
ANM 105 Computer Animation Production
ANM 101 or ILL 133 and on campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 3.
$400.00
ANM 101 & on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 2
$400.00
ANM 180 Introduction to Animation
Principles & Techniques
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.
$400.00
ANM 182 Mixed Media Animation
ANM 180
$400.00
ANM 190 Traditional Animation 1
FND 110, ANM 180, & FND 112. FND 112
may be concurrent.
$400.00
ANM 202 3D Modeling and Animation 1
(Maya)
ANM 105
$400.00
ANM 203 Preproduction Principles
ANM 101 & on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 3
$200.00
ANM 204 3D Modeling & Animation for
VFX (Maya)
ANM 105
$400.00
ANM 205 Careers in Animation & VFX
ANM 105, ANM 180, LA 291, FND 110 and
either FND 122 or FND 125. VFX Students:
ANM 180, ANM 241, LA 291, and either
FND 110 or FND 113 and also either ANM
202 or ANM 204. (Second bachelor's
degree students are exempt from LA 291.)
$400.00
ANM 109 Editing for Animation & VFX






















































170
ANM 206 Producing for Animation &
Visual Effects
ANM 105 & ANM 203
ANM 220 Fundamentals of 3D Animation
ANM 202 or ANM 204
$400.00
ANM 221 3D Character Animation 1
ANM 202 or ANM 204
$400.00
ANM 222 Introduction to Rigging
ANM 202 or ANM 204 or GAM 201 and FA
213
$400.00
ANM 223 3D Workflow of Animation
ANM 220 & ANM 221
ANM 241 Visual Effects 1 - Principles of
Compositing
ANM 105
$400.00
ANM 242 Procedural Effects: Houdini 1
ANM 202 or ANM 204
$400.00

ANM 243 Rotoscoping
ANM 105
$400.00

ANM 246 Digital Painting for VFX Artists
ANM 241
$400.00
ANM 251 Fundamentals of Texturing &
Lighting
ANM 202 or ANM 204 or GAM 201
$400.00
ANM 253 Lighting for VFX
ANM 202 or ANM 204
$400.00
ANM 254 Dynamics 1: Particles
ANM 202 or ANM 204
$400.00
ANM 255 Scripting
ANM 202 or ANM 204
$400.00
ANM 260 Traditional Animation 2
FND 110, ANM 180, ANM 190, & ILL 120
(ILL 120 may be taken concurrently)
$400.00
ANM 270 Storyboarding 1: Camera
Language & Animatics
FND 112, MPT 105, & either ANM 203 or
ANM 260. On campus English as a second
language students must also pass EAP
level 4.
$400.00
ANM 285 Puppet Making for Stop Motion
ANM 180
$400.00
ANM 287 Stop Motion Set Design &
Fabrication
ANM 180 & ANM 182
$400.00
ANM 303 Previsualization & Animatics
ANM 203 & (ANM 202 or ANM 204)
$400.00
ANM 312 Hard Surface Modeling 1
ANM 202 or ANM 204
$400.00




ANM 313 Organic Modeling 1
ANM 202 or ANM 204
$400.00




ANM 316 Environment Creation
ANM 202
$400.00
ANM 321 3D Character Animation 2
ANM 221
$400.00


ANM 322 Advanced Rigging
ANM 222 & ANM 255
$400.00


ANM 324 Lip Sync & Facial Performances
ANM 321
$400.00

ANM 325 3D Realistic Animation
ANM 321
$400.00

ANM 326 Motion Capture
ANM 202 & ANM 222
$400.00
ANM 341 Visual Effects 2 - Intermediate
Digital Compositing
ANM 241
$400.00
ANM 342 VFX 3: Node-Based
Compositing 1
ANM 341
$400.00
ANM 344 3D Modeling & Animation 2
(Houdini)
ANM 242
$400.00
ANM 345 Matte Painting
ANM 341
$400.00


ANM 352 Matchmoving
ANM 202 or ANM 204 & ANM 341
$400.00


ANM 353 Advanced Texturing & Lighting
ANM 251 or obtain department director's
approval
$400.00

ANM 354 Dynamics 2: Fluid Simulation
ANM 254
$400.00

ANM 356 Cloth Simulation
ANM 222, ANM 254, & ANM 354 (ANM
354 may be taken concurrently)
$400.00
ANM 357 3D Texture Painting
ANM 251
$400.00
























































































171
ANM 362 Traditional Animation 3
ANM 180, ANM 190, ANM 260, FND 112,
& FND 116
$400.00
ANM 370 Storyboarding 2: Drawing for
Cartoons
ANM 203, ANM 270, FND 116, ILL 120, &
ILL 222 (ILL 222 may be taken
concurrently)
$400.00
ANM 372 Storyboarding 3: Drawing for
Feature Film
ANM 270
$45.00
ANM 375 Maquette Sculpting
ANM 180, FND 110, FND 131, & FASCU
270
$200.00
ANM 377 2D Production and Layout 1
FND 116, ANM 180, & either ANM 190 or
ANM 105
$400.00
ANM 380 Stop Motion Animation 1
ANM 180, ANM 182, ANM 260, & ANM 285
(ANM 260 may be taken concurrently)
$400.00
ANM 382 Stop Motion Animation 2
ANM 260, ANM 285, & ANM 380
$400.00
ANM 385 Puppet Making for Stop Motion
2
(ANM 180 & ANM 285) or (ANM 180 &
FASCU 232)
$350.00
ANM 405 Senior Portfolio for Animation &
VFX
Must be an ANM senior
$400.00
ANM 412 Hard Surface Modeling 2
ANM 312
$400.00
ANM 413 Organic Modeling 2
ANM 313
$400.00
ANM 414 Head Sculpting & Facial
Expression
ANM 202
$400.00
ANM 415 Modeling Studio
ANM 312 & ANM 313
$400.00
ANM 419 Organic Modeling 3
ANM 413
$400.00
ANM 421 3D Character Animation 3
ANM 321
$400.00
ANM 441 VFX 4: Node-Based
Compositing 2
ANM 342
ANM 443 Advanced Rotoscoping
ANM 243
$400.00
ANM 445 Advanced Matte Painting
ANM 345
$400.00
ANM 451 Renderman
ANM 353
$400.00
ANM 461 Maya for Traditional Animators
ANM 202 or ANM 204, ANM 260, ANM
362, LA 285 and Department Director
approval
ANM 321 & ANM 421. ANM 421 can be
taken concurrently.
$400.00
ANM 466 Traditional Animation 4
ANM 260 & ANM 362
$400.00
ANM 471 Background Painting for
Animation
ANM 377
$100.00
ANM 477 2D Production and Layout 2
FND 116, ANM 180, ANM 190, ANM 260,
& ANM 377
$400.00
ANM 478 Storyboarding 4: TV / Live
Action / VFX
ANM 370 & ANM 372
$400.00
ANM 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ANM 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ANM 499 Special Topics
ANM 500 Internship in Animation
ANM 462 Character Animation Studio























































$400.00








$100.00




Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.




Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.




ANM 604 MS: VFX: Cinematography
$400.00




ANM 605 MS: Layout Design for
Animators
$160.00





172
ANM 609 MS: Gesture & Quick Sketch for
Animators
$120.00
ANM 610 MS: Figurative Concepts
$170.00
ANM 612 MS: Traditional Animation
Principles & Pipelines
ANM 610 (ANM 610 may be taken
concurrently)
ANM 615 MS: Modeling & Animation for
VFX
ANM 620 MS: Advanced Character
Animation
ANM 623 MS: 3D Modeling & Animation 1
(Maya)









$200.00
$400.00
ANM 687

$400.00
$400.00


















ANM 628 MS: Fundamentals of Digital
Animation
ANM 688
$400.00
ANM 629 MS: Fundamentals of Texturing
& Lighting
ANM 615 or ANM 623
$400.00
ANM 630 MS: Node-Based Compositing 1
ANM 642
$400.00




ANM 631 MS: Matte Painting
ANM 642
$400.00




ANM 632 MS: Hard Surface Modeling 1
ANM 623
$400.00




ANM 633 MS: Drawing and Design for
Animation
ANM 610
$200.00




ANM 634 MS: Traditional Animation 3
(Character Development)
ANM 692
$245.00
ANM 636 MS: Organic Modeling
FASCU 620, FA 622, & FASCU 632.
FASCU 632 may be concurrent.
$400.00
ANM 639 MS: 3D Texture Painting
ANM 629 & Department Director approval
ANM 640 MS: Advanced Texturing &
Lighting
ANM 629 or obtain instructor's approval
$400.00
ANM 641 MS: Node-Based Compositing 2
ANM 630
$400.00
ANM 642 MS: Production Compositing
Principles
ANM 615 or ANM 623
$400.00
ANM 643 MS: Dynamics 1 - Particles
ANM 615 or ANM 623
$400.00
ANM 648 MS: Digital Animation for
Production
Obtain Department Director's Approval.
$400.00
ANM 649 MS: Previsualization and Layout
GS 622, ANM 623, ANM 626 & ANM 670
$400.00
ANM 650 MS: Matchmoving
ANM 615 or ANM 623
$400.00

$400.00
ANM 651 MS: Rotoscoping























$400.00
ANM 655 MS: Scripting
GLA 622 & (ANM 615 or ANM 623)
$400.00


ANM 656 MS: Organic Modeling 2
ANM 636
$400.00


ANM 670 MS: Preproduction
ANM 685 & ANM 688. Visual Effects and
Modeling students are exempt from this
prerequisite.





$235.00
ANM 685 MS: Storyboarding



ANM 623, FASCU 620, & GLA 622
ANM 632


ANM 654 MS: Modeling Studio
ANM 682 MS: Hard Surface Modeling 2


$400.00
ANM 670



ANM 623 & FA 622
ANM 675 MS: Thesis Development


ANM 652 MS: Introduction to Rigging
ANM 671 MS: Stop Motion Puppet
Animation






$400.00










$400.00




ANM 686 MS: 3D Character Animation 1
ANM 688
$400.00




ANM 687 MS: 3D Character Animation 2
ANM 686
$400.00




ANM 688 MS: Traditional Animation
ANM 610
$225.00






173
ANM 689 MS: Story Development
$40.00
ANM 691 MS: Advanced Storyboarding
$400.00






ANM 692 MS: Traditional Animation 2
ANM 688
$215.00
ANM 693 MS: Traditional Animation
Thesis Production
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal
$400.00
ANM 694 MS: Head Sculpture & Facial
Expressions
ANM 623 & ANM 636
$400.00
ANM 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.



ANM 699 MS: Special Topics
Obtain Department Director’s Approval. /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.



ANM 800 MS: Directed Study
ANM 801 MS: Group Directed Study
ANM 802 MS: Thesis Forum






Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.






Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.






Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.

ANM 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
ANM 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.
ARE 110 Drawing for Art Educators












LA 108 & LA 202 or LA 280. LA 202 or LA
280 may be concurrent.(Students with start
terms of Spring 2013 and beyond must
achieve a C- or higher in LA 108)




ARE 225 History of Art Education
Either ARE 205 or LA 205 and either LA
202 or LA 280




ARE 310 Artmaking
ARE 225, FA 145, FND 125, GR 105 & ILL
133




ARE 340 Learning to Talk About Art
ARE 225, ARE 310, FND 125 & GR 105

ARE 460 Senior Seminar in Art Education
ARE 340 & Senior status
ARE 205 Developmental Psychology






ARE 600 Developmental Psychology




ARE 601 History of Art Education




ARE 610 Teaching Audiences in a
Diverse Society
ARE 600 & ARE 601 / ARE Teaching
Credential: ARE 600 & ARE 601 (both may
be taken concurrently)



ARE 611 Teaching Audiences with
Special Needs
ARE 600 & ARE 601 / ARE Teaching
Credential: ARE 600 & ARE 601 (both may
be taken concurrently)



ARE 615 Integrating Technology into Art
Education Settings
ARE 610 & ARE 611 (both may be taken
concurrently) / ARE Teaching Credential:
ARE 600, ARE 601, & ARE 611 (all may be
taken concurrently) / BFA-ARE students:
Senior status, minimum 2.5 GPA, ARE
340, & ARE 310 (minimum grade of B-)


174
ARE 620 Curriculum Development and
Analysis in Art Education Settings
ARE 610, ARE 611, & ARE 615 / ARE
Teaching Credential: ARE 600, ARE 601,
ARE 610, ARE 611, ARE 615, & ARE 621
(ARE 610, ARE 611, ARE 615, & ARE 621
may be taken concurrently)





ARE 621 MS: Instruction & Assessment of
Academic Literacy
ARE 600, ARE 601, ARE 610, ARE 611,
ARE 615, & ARE 620 (ARE 610, ARE 611,
ARE 615, & ARE 620 may be taken
concurrently)
ARE 630 Museum Literacy: Learning to
Teach in Museums
ARE 610, ARE 611, ARE 615, & ARE 620.
ARE 620 may be taken concurrently.

ARE 631 MS: Teaching Art in the
Community
ARE 610, ARE 611, ARE 615, ARE 620.
ARE 620 may be taken concurrently.

ARE 635 MS: Research Methods and
Writing for Art Education
ARE 610, ARE 611, ARE 615 and ARE
620 (may be taken concurrently)




ARE 640 Internship Placement &
Concurrent Class Meetings
ARE 620 & either ARE 630 or ARE 631 (all
may be taken concurrently)




ARE 641 MS: Student Teaching 1
ARE 600, ARE 601, ARE 610, ARE 611,
ARE 615, ARE 620, ARE 621, ARE 642, &
ARE 645 (ARE 642 & ARE 645 may be
taken concurrently)
ARE 642 MS: Student Teaching 2
ARE 600, ARE 601, ARE 610, ARE 611,
ARE 615, ARE 620, ARE 621, ARE 641, &
ARE 645 (ARE 641 & ARE 645 may be
taken concurrently)
ARE 645 MS: Final Review &
Professional Portfolio
ARE 600, ARE 601, ARE 610, ARE 611,
ARE 615, ARE 620, ARE 621, ARE 641, &
ARE 642 (ARE 641 & ARE 642 may be
taken concurrently)
ARE 650 Final Thesis Project Preparation
and Presentation
ARE 635 & ARE 640 (may be taken
concurrently)




ARE 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ARE 615BFA Integrating Technology into
Art Education Settings
ARE 610 & ARE 611 (both may be taken
concurrently) / ARE Teaching Credential:
ARE 600, ARE 601, & ARE 611 (all may be
taken concurrently) / BFA-ARE students:
Senior status, minimum 2.5 GPA, ARE
340, & ARE 310 (minimum grade of B-)



ARH 110 Studio 1: Conceptual Design
Studio
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$150.00
ARH 150 Studio 2: Spatial Ordering &
Form
ARH 110 & ARH 170 (ARH 170 may be
taken concurrently)
$260.00
ARH 170 Projective Drawing &
Perspective
ARH 180 2D Digital Visual Media
ARH 110 & FND 113
$50.00
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
$350.00
ARH 190 Building Information Modeling
ARH 210 & ARH 390
$350.00
ARH 210 Studio 3: Site Operations &
Tectonic Systems
ARH 150, ARH 170, & ARH 180
$305.00
ARH 230 Color, Perception and Space
ARH 170 or IAD 241
ARH 239 Materials & Methods
ARH 150
ARH 240 Site Design & Mapping
ARH 170 or LAN 213 or IDS 116 or IAD
241 or FND 110
ARH 250 Studio 4: Site Culture & Integral
Urbanism
ARH 210 & LA 219 (LA 219 may be
concurrent)

























$30.00




$100.00














$390.00

175
ARH 310 Studio 5: Assembly Buildings &
Context
ARH 320 Structures: Wood & Steel
ARH 250, ARH 390, LA 292, LA 219 (C- or
higher), LA 296 (C- or higher), and either
LA 293 (C- or higher) or LA 256 or
Quantitative Literacy Exam score of 400 or
higher.
$1,490.00
ARH 250, LA 219 (C- or higher), LA 296
(C- or higher) and either LA 293 (C- or
higher) or LA 256 or Quantitative Literacy
Exam score of 400 or higher.
$40.00
ARH 330 Structures: Concrete, Masonry,
& Tensile Systems
ARH 320
$40.00
ARH 350 Studio 6: Site Conditions &
Building Performance
ARH 190 (may be concurrent), ARH 310,
ARH 320 & LA 249 (C- or higher)
$350.00
ARH 390 3D Digital Modeling
ARH 180
$400.00
ARH 410 Studio 7: Tectonics and
Structure
ARH 350, LA 319 (C- or higher), ARH 330,
& ARH 420 (ARH 420 may be concurrent)
$400.00
ARH 420 Structures: Systems
Investigation
ARH 320 & ARH 330
ARH 430 Climate & Energy Use:
Sustainable Strategies
ARH 310
ARH 440 Building Systems: Mechanical,
Electrical & Plumbing
ARH 350 & ARH 430
ARH 441 Tectonics: Code Analysis &
Building Envelope Documentation
ARH 190 & ARH 310
$200.00
ARH 450 Studio 8: Housing and
Comprehensive Design
ARH 190, ARH 410, ARH 420, ARH 430,
ARH 440, & ARH 441 (both ARH 440 &
ARH 441 may be concurrent)
$390.00
ARH 475 Professional Practices for
Architects
ARH 450 (may be concurrent)
ARH 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.



































ARH 499 Special Topics
ARH 500 Internship in Architecture
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
ARH 510 Studio 9: Mixed Use Urbanism
& Research
ARH 450 & LA 292
ARH 529 From Theory to Practice
ARH 450 & students must be concurrently
enrolled in ARH 510
ARH 550 Studio 10: Final Thesis Project
ARH 510
$400.00
ARH 601 MS: Spatial Composition
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
$250.00
ARH 602 MS: Graduate Design
Technology 1: Structures
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 603
ARH 604 MS: Material and Methods of
Construction: Building Detailing
ARH 609 & ARH 602
ARH 605 MS: Graduate Design
Technology 2: Environmental Controls
ARH 608 & ARH 604
ARH 606 MS: Construction Documents
and Building Codes
ARH 604 & ARH 608
$350.00
ARH 608 MS: Advanced Design Studio 1
- Concept, Context, & Typology
ARH 609, ARH 602, & either ARH 640 or
ARH 601
$425.00
ARH 609 MS: Intermediate Design Studio
1
ARH 653, ARH 654, and on campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 603.
$405.00
$400.00
$250.00




































176
ARH 610 MS: Programming and Space
Planning
ARH 614 MS: Architectural Professional
Practices
$200.00
Only available for M.ARCH Students. ARH
608 & on campus English as a second
language students must pass EAP level 4.


















ARH 617 MS: Urban Mapping
ARH 619 MS: Advanced Design Studio 2
- Concept & Comprehensiveness
ARH 608, ARH 604, & ARH 641
$375.00
ARH 620 MS: Digitally Generated
Morphology
IAD 611 or ARH 654 & on campus English
as a second language students must pass
EAP level 602.
$400.00
ARH 621 MS: Architectural History 1:
Antiquity to da Vinci
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604
ARH 631 MS: Architectural History 2:
Ascendancy of the Renaissance
ARH 621
ARH 635 MS: Contemporary Urban
Theory
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
ARH 640 MS: Architectural History Introduction
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.
ARH 641 MS: Architectural History:
Modernism and its Global Impact
ARH 640 or ARH 621 & on campus English
as a second language students must pass
EAP level 604
ARH 642 MS: Architectural Theory
ARH 641 & on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604
ARH 650 MS: Introductory Design Studio
1
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
$450.00
ARH 651 MS: Design Process and 2D
Media
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
$350.00
ARH 652 MS: Architectural Tectonics
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
$50.00
ARH 653 MS: Introductory Design Studio
2
ARH 654 MS: Design Process & 3D
Media
ARH 656 MS: Introductory Design Studio
3
ARH 657 MS: Design Media - Perspective
ARH 650, ARH 651, & ARH 652
$50.00





















$400.00



ARH 650 & ARH 651
$350.00



ARH 621, ARH 653, & ARH 654
$400.00

ARH 608
$350.00
ARH 659 MS: Digitally Generated
Fabrication
ARH 620
$350.00
ARH 671 High Performance Facades:
Strategy, Design, and Analysis
ARH 609 (ARH 609 may be taken
concurrently)
$250.00
ARH 690 MS: Thesis Preparation &
Development
ARH 604, ARH 608, ARH 619, & ARH 641
(ARH 619 may be taken concurrently)
ARH 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ARH 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ARH 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.



ARH 658 MS: Introduction to Computer
Aided Drafting & Modeling
ARH 801 MS: Group Directed Study






















177
ARH 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.
ARH 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
ARH 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.

ARH 320L Structures Required Lab
ARH 320 (concurrent)
COM 102 Non-Linear Editing for
Multimedia Storytelling
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.
$325.00
COM 103 You Media: Short Form
Production 1
COM 102 (concurrently). On campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 2.
$260.00
COM 104 Multimedia Communications 1:
Performance
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
$175.00
COM 105 Writing for Multimedia
LA 108. LA 108 may be taken concurrently.
(Students with start terms of Spring 2013
and beyond must achieve a C- or higher in
LA 108)
$150.00
COM 106 Introduction to Sports Reporting






















$200.00
COM 110 Media Now: Introduction to
Digital Production
COM 103 & COM 102. On campus English
as a second language students must pass
EAP level 3.
$175.00
COM 115 Digital Tools for New Media
COM 103
$175.00
COM 141 Storytelling: From Telephone to
Transmedia
On campus English as a second language
students must complete LA 103 with a
grade of “C-“ or higher.
COM 150 Introduction to Radio/
Podcasting
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
$290.00
COM 200 In Production: The Newsroom
COM 104, COM 110, & either COM 105 or
FSH 108
$235.00
COM 202 Multimedia Formats & Trends
COM 110
$165.00
COM 204 Multimedia Communications 2:
Interviewing
COM 102, COM 103, & COM 104
$200.00
COM 206 Play By Play & Live Field
Reporting
COM 106
$275.00
COM 210 The Wrap: The Newscast
COM 200 (may be concurrent) or by
Department Director approval
$235.00
COM 230 Graphics for Digital Media
COM 110 & COM 115
$150.00
COM 250 Long Form Radio/Podcast
Production
COM 150 & on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 4
$175.00
COM 301 Multimedia Journalism
COM 105, COM 110, & COM 200
$200.00
COM 302 Producing Live Media
COM 110 & COM 200
$225.00
COM 303 You Media: Short Form
Production 2
COM 105, COM 110, COM 150, COM 200,
COM 210, & LA 291 (Students seeking a
second bachelor's degree are exempt from
LA 291).
$180.00
COM 304 Multimedia Communications 3:
Hosting & Creative Content
COM 204
$225.00
COM 306 Play by Play 2
COM 103 & COM 106
$250.00
COM 310 Redefining Informational Media
Production
COM 200 & COM 210
$235.00
























































178
COM 330 Graphics for Digital Media 2
COM 230
$150.00
COM 340 Interactive Design for
Communications
COM 115
$200.00
COM 351 Media Station Management
COM 250
COM 400 In-Depth Project




$200.00


COM 303
$250.00

COM 420 In-depth Project: Studio
Entertainment Series
COM 303
$325.00
COM 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
COM 495 Resume Reel and Beyond
Senior status and COM 303
COM 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
COM 499 Multimedia Communications
Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
COM 500 Internship in Multimedia
Communications
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
COM 602 MS: Editing Essentials for
Multimedia Communications
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 602
$325.00
COM 603 MS: Visual Communications:
Advanced Short Form Production
COM 602 & on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 603 (COM 602 may be concurrent).
$260.00
COM 604 MS: Broadcast Interview &
Speaking Techniques
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 603.
$175.00
COM 610 MS: Multimedia Production 1
COM 603. On campus English as a second
language students must pass EAP level 4.
$175.00
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 603.
$100.00
COM 620 MS: Writing for a Media
Specialty
COM 603 & on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 604.
$150.00
COM 625 MS: Video Journalism:
Enterprise Reporting
COM 603 & COM 604
$150.00
COM 635 MS: Marketing & Public
Relations in Practice
COM 603
$165.00
COM 645 MS: Digital Tools for
Multiplatform Interactive Design
COM 603 & COM 625 (COM 625 may be
taken concurrently)
$175.00
COM 650 MS: Multimedia Production 2
COM 610, COM 620, COM 625 &
Approved Midpoint Review
$200.00
COM 690 MS: Resume Reel: Media
Specialty Thesis
COM 610, COM 645, COM 620, COM 625
& Approved Midpoint Review
$150.00
COM 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Obtain Department Director’s approval /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
COM 699 MS: Special Topics
Obtain Department Director’s Approval. /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
COM 611 MS: The Evolution of Media
COM 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
$150.00













































































179
COM 801 MS: Group Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
COM 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate student with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal.
COM 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
COM 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.






EAP 1 English for Art Purposes Intensive
1
EAP 2 English for Art Purposes 2
EAP A (or placement test)
$20.00



EAP 001 (or placement test)
$20.00



EAP 3 English for Art Purposes 3
EAP 002 (or Placement Test)
$20.00



EAP 4 English for Art Purposes 4
EAP 003 or EAP 003W (or Placement
Test)
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
$20.00



EAP 601 MS: English for Art Purposes
Intensive 1
EAP 600 (or Placement Test)
$20.00



EAP 602 MS: English for Art Purposes:
Level 2
EAP 601 (or Placement Test)
$20.00



EAP 603 MS: English for Art Purposes:
Level 3
EAP 602 (or Placement Test)
$20.00



EAP 604 MS: English for Art Purposes:
Level 4
EAP 603 or EAP 603W (or Placement
Test)
$20.00








EAP 490 Specialized Study
EAP 690 Specialized Study
EAP 3W English for Art Purposes 3
Writing
Placement Test or Department
Assessment
EAP 4ARH English for Art Purposes:
Level 4 for Architecture, Interior
Architecture, & Landscape Design
EAP 3
EAP 600A English for Art Purposes
Intensive
$20.00
$20.00
EAP 603W MS: English for Art Purposes:
Level 3 Writing
Placement test or Department assessment
EAP 604B MS: English for Art Purposes:
Level 4 - Writing & Reading
Concurrent enrollment in EAP 604 is
required.


EAP 605S MS: English for Art Purposes:
Level 5 Speaking
Placement Test or Department
Assessment



EAP 605W MS: English for Art Purposes:
Level 5 Writing
EAP 604 (or Placement Test)





EAP A English for Art Purposes Intensive
A
EAP B English for Art Purposes Intensive
B
FA 110 Still Life Painting 1
$20.00

FND 110 and FND 125 (FND 125 may be
concurrent)

FA 142 Lithography 1
$110.00
FA 143 Silkscreen 1
$295.00

FA 144 Etching 1/Intaglio
$135.00

FA 145 Printmaking
One of the following: ARE 110, FND 110,
FND 113, FSH 100, FSH 102, GR 235, IDS
116, or PH 108. On campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 2.










$245.00






180
FA 210 Still Life Painting 2
FA 110
FA 213 Introduction to Anatomy
FND 112
FA 214 Intermediate Anatomy




$190.00




FA 213
$190.00




FA 220 Watercolor Painting 1
FND 110 or FND 113
$40.00




FA 224 Composition & Painting
FA 110, ILL 140, & LA 291 (LA 291 may be
concurrent). Students seeking a second
bachelor's degree are exempt from LA 291.




FA 226 Advanced Figure Drawing/Fine
Art
FA 227 Fine Arts Heads & Hands
FA 213 & ILL 221
$190.00
FA 213 & ILL 221 / Printmaking students:
FA 213 or FA 249 or ILL 221
$190.00
FA 228 Landscape Painting 1
FA 224
FA 241 Book Arts 1
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$225.00
FA 242 Lithography 2: Color
FA 142
$150.00
FA 243 Silkscreen 2
FA 143
$295.00
FA 244 Etching 2
FA 144
$135.00
FA 249 Inspired Drawing for Project
Development
FND 110 or FND 113 or FSH 102 or IDS
116
$190.00
FA 255 Letterpress
Take one of the following: FA 143, FA 145,
FA 241, FSH 274, GR 106, or GR 235
$255.00
FA 310 Surrealism, Stylization &
Expression 1
FA 224 & FA 227 or FA 311
$65.00
FA 311 Clothed Figure Painting 1
ILL 140
$190.00




FA 313 Wildlife Painting 1
ILL 140
FA 320 Watercolor Painting 2
FA 220
$40.00




FA 321 Head Painting 1
ILL 140 AND take ILL 221 or FA227
$190.00

FA 322 Quick Studies 1
FA 311
$150.00




FA 325 Mixed Media Drawing & Painting
1
FA 326 Head Painting 2: Portraiture
FA 110, FA 227, & ILL 140
$100.00




FA 227 & FA 321
$190.00

FA 327 Advanced Figure Painting 1
FA 224, FA 311, & FA 321
$190.00

FA 330 Still Life Painting 3
FA 210 & Department approval


































FA 340 Screen Printing for Painters
FA 341 Book Arts 2
FA 241
$225.00
FA 343 Silkscreen 3
FA 243
$295.00
FA 344 Monotype 1
FA 145
$190.00
FA 345 Advanced Projects in Printmaking
1
FA 142, FA 143, & FA 145. Both FA 142 &
FA 143 may be concurrent.
$245.00
FA 347 Relief Printing 1
FA 145
$170.00
FA 348 Paper Sculpture
60 units completed and one of the
following: FND 122 or FND 125 or FSH 120
or FASCU 130 or GR 104 or ARH 230


FA 350 Mural Painting 1
Either FA 228 & FA 311 or ILL 237 & ILL
320 (ILL 320 may be concurrent)



FA 355 Letterpress 2
FA 255


FA 368 Urban Landscape
FA 224
FA 373 Painting Concepts
ILL 133 & FA 224








$255.00



181
FA 385 Advanced Projects in Printmaking
2
FA 345
FA 410 Surrealism, Stylization &
Expression 2
FA 310
FA 411 Clothed Figure Painting 2
FA 311
FA 413 Wildlife Painting 2
FA 313 & Department Director approval
FA 420 Senior Portfolio
Workshop/Professional Practices
Must be a senior to take this class
FA 421 Landscape Painting 2
FA 228
FA 422 Quick Studies 2
FA 322
$150.00
FA 423 Abstract Painting 1
FND 125
$40.00
FA 424 Techniques of the Masters 1
FA 228, FA 311, and either FA 227 or FA
321
$190.00
FA 425 Mixed Media Drawing & Painting
2
FA 426 Head Painting 3: Advanced
Portraiture
FA 325
$100.00
FA 326
$190.00
FA 427 Advanced Figure Painting 2
FA 327
$180.00

FA 433 Abstract Painting 2
FA 423
$40.00

FA 438 Studio Landscape 1
FA 228 & FA 421
FA 439 Studio Landscape 2
FA 438
FA 441 Book Arts 3
FA 341
$150.00
FA 444 Monotype 2
FA 344
$190.00
FA 445 Advanced Projects in Printmaking
3
FA 385
$245.00
FA 447 Relief Printing 2
FA 347
$205.00
FA 450 Senior Painting Studio
Must have Senior status and obtain
Department Director’s approval.
FA 453 Painting Concepts 2
Obtain Department Director's Approval.
FA 471 Clothed Figure Painting 3
FA 411
$180.00
FA 473 Abstract Painting 3
FA 423 & Department Director approval
$40.00
FA 475 Mixed Media Drawing & Painting
3
FA 480 Watercolor Painting 3
FA 425 & Department Director approval
$100.00


FA 320 & Department Director approval
$40.00


FA 484 Techniques of the Masters 2
FA 424 & Department Director approval
$190.00

FA 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FA 493 Study Abroad
Obtain Department Director's approval. /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FA 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FA 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FA 500 Internship in Fine Arts
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
FA 600 MS: Figure Studio
FA 601
FA 601 MS: Drawing
FA 602 MS: Head Drawing
FA 603 MS: Mixed Media / Printmaking
FA 626 or ANM 610
$195.00

$190.00



































Study Abroad in Florence, Italy
last offered in 2014 Summer
$100.00


$190.00






$50.00






$190.00






$175.00


182
FA 604 MS: Figurative Painting
FA 600 & FA 606
FA 605 MS: Landscape Painting
$190.00





FA 606






FA 606 MS: Still Life Painting
FA 609 & FA 630






FA 607 MS: Cityscape Painting
FA 605

















FA 608 MS: Abstract & Interpretation
$40.00
FA 609 MS: Painting
FA 610 MS: Etching
$155.00
FA 611 MS: Lithography
$95.00
FA 612 MS: Silkscreen
$250.00
FA 613 MS: Monotype and Relief Printing
$150.00







FA 614 MS: Contemporary Painting
FA 604, FA 606, FA 626, & FA 630
$150.00
FA 616 MS: Portrait Painting
FA 602
$190.00
FA 618 MS: Composition for Abstract Art
FA 630
$40.00
FA 620 MS: Expressive Painting
FA 639 or FA 604
$190.00

$190.00






















FA 622 MS: Anatomy for Artists
FA 623 MS: Monotype Relief/ Advanced
Techniques
FA 613
$135.00
FA 624 MS: Mixed Media / Printmaking Advanced Techniques
FA 603
$175.00
FA 625 MS: Life Size Figure Drawing











$180.00
FA 626 MS: Chiaroscuro
FA 601
$50.00
FA 627 MS: Figure Studio 2
FA 600
$190.00
FA 629 MS: Letterpress Printing
$210.00
FA 630 MS: Color Theory
FA 631 MS: Book Arts
$210.00
FA 632 MS: Abstraction & Interpretation 2
FA 608, FA 618 & FA 630
$40.00
FA 633 MS: Litho/Advanced Techniques
FA 611
$150.00
FA 634 MS: Etching/Advanced
Techniques
FA 635 MS: Book Arts/Advanced
Techniques
FA 610
$155.00
FA 631
$210.00
FA 636 MS: Silkscreen/Advanced
Techniques
FA 612
$250.00
FA 639 MS: Expressive Drawing
FA 626 (FA 626 may be concurrent).
$75.00
FA 642 MS: Abstraction & Interpretation 3
FA 632
$40.00
FA 644 MS: Quick Studies
FA 604, FA 605, & ILL 607 (FA 604 may be
concurrent)
$150.00
FA 645 MS: Advanced Composition
FA 600, FA 602, & FA 606
FA 655 MS: Midpoint & Thesis
Preparation
FA 695 MS: Collaborative Project
FA 606, FA 626, & either FA 600 or FA 639
FA 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FA 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
FA 801 MS: Group Directed Study






























Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.

183
FA 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate student with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal.
FA 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
FA 810 MS: Printmaking 1
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal


FA 830 MS: Printmaking 2
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal


FA 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.
FA 903 MS: Study Abroad
Obtain Department Director's approval. /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
Study Abroad in Italy last
offered in 2014 Summer
FASCU 130 Sculpture 1
$360.00
FASCU 150 Modeling & Sculpting
Animals
FASCU 155 Painting for Sculpture
$185.00
FASCU 180 Modeling & Sculpting the
Classical Figure
FND 131
$300.00
FASCU 230 Sculpture 2
FASCU 130, FASCU 231, FASCU 270,
IDS 131, & LA 291. (IDS 131 & LA 291
may be concurrent. Students seeking a
second bachelor’s degree are exempt from
LA 291.)
$220.00
FASCU 231 Sculpting in Ceramics 1
FASCU 233 The Art of Moldmaking &
Casting 1

$240.00
FASCU 130
$475.00
FASCU 234 Modeling & Sculpting the
Head and Figure 1
$275.00
FASCU 235 Metal Fabrication 1
$415.00
FASCU 236 Wood Structures and
Construction
FASCU 130
$200.00
FASCU 237 Neon/Illuminated Sculpture
FASCU 130. No prior knowledge of
electricity or glass bending is required.
$260.00
FASCU 240 Modeling & Sculpting
Figurative Gesture
$300.00
FASCU 270 Ecorche
$130.00














FASCU 231
$240.00

FASCU 334 Head and Figure Sculpture 2
FASCU 234
$430.00

FASCU 335 Metal Fabrication Skills 2
FASCU 235
$415.00
FASCU 337 Casting Bronze 1
FASCU 233
$360.00
FASCU 360 Life-Size Figure Modeling
FASCU 270 & FASCU 234
$460.00

$200.00


FASCU 435 Metal Fabrication Skills 3
FASCU 335
$415.00



$410.00
$240.00


FASCU 233 & FASCU 234
FASCU 331


FASCU 345 Modeling & Sculpting the
Portrait
FASCU 431 Ceramic Sculpture 3


FASCU 331 Sculpting in Ceramics 2
FASCU 361 Glaze Technology



$225.00


$220.00
FASCU 339 Stone Carving


FASCU 230 & FASCU 235
$240.00


FASCU 330 Sculpture 3
FASCU 338 Wheel Formed Sculpture





184
FASCU 437 Casting Bronze and Metal 2
FASCU 337
$360.00
FASCU 461 Ceramic Sculpture 4
FASCU 431
$240.00
FASCU 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FASCU 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FASCU 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FASCU 500 Internship in Sculpture
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.


FASCU 620 MS: Figure Modeling
$290.00

FASCU 622 MS: Moldmaking
$475.00

FASCU 623 MS: Metals - Forging &
Welding
$415.00
FASCU 624 MS: Expressions in Clay
$250.00
FASCU 626 MS: Neon
$260.00
FASCU 627 MS: Wood Carving Studio
$200.00
FASCU 620
FASCU 632 MS: Ecorche: Sculpting the
Figure from the Inside Out
FASCU 636 MS: Neon/ Advanced
Techniques
$290.00
$130.00
FASCU 626 (FASCU 626 may be
concurrent)
FASCU 637 MS: Metals - Foundry
$240.00
FASCU 640 MS: Figurative Sculpture:
Life-Size
FASCU 620 or FASCU 632
$300.00
FASCU 642 MS: Figurative Sculpture:
The Portrait
FASCU 620 or FASCU 632
$380.00
FASCU 644 MS: Final Project Seminar
$65.00
FASCU 645 MS: Relief: Expression &
Interpretation
$150.00
FASCU 623
FASCU 648 MS: Bronze Pour
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FASCU 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FASCU 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
FASCU 805 MS: Continued Group
Directed Study

















$415.00


$360.00
FASCU 695 MS: Collaborative Project
FASCU 802 MS: Thesis Forum



$360.00
FASCU 624
FASCU 801 MS: Group Directed Study

$260.00
FASCU 638 MS: Clay - Advanced
Techniques
FASCU 647 MS: Advanced Forging &
Welding


FASCU 625 MS: Public Art
FASCU 630 MS: Advanced Figure
Modeling



Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.

Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.








Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
185
FASCU 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.

FND 110 Analysis of Form
FND 112 Figure Drawing
FND 110 or FND 113. FA & ILL students
may take FND 112 concurrently with FND
110.
FND 113 Sketching for Communication
FND 116 Perspective
FND 122 Color Fundamentals
FND 110 or FND 113. On campus English
as a second language students must pass
EAP level 2.
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.
FND 131 Figure Modeling
FND 110 or FND 113. Either may be taken
concurrently with FND 131.
$185.00
FSH 100 Drawing for Fashion
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level A.
$120.00
FSH 101 Fashion Design 1
FSH 102, FSH 111, FSH 112, & either FSH
210 or FSH 164. (FSH 112 may be taken
concurrently.) On campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 2.
FSH 100
FSH 105 Fashion and Merchandising
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
FSH 108 Introduction to Fashion
Journalism




































































$25.00
FND 125 Color and Design
FSH 102 Fashion Drawing 1

$105.00
$20.00
One of the following: ANM 101 or GR 102
or GAM 105 or WNM 105. On campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 2.

$150.00
$100.00
FSH 109 Introduction to Product
Development
FSH 100 & either FSH 111 or FSH 105
(FSH 100 may be concurrent)
FSH 111 Introduction to Fashion
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
FSH 112 Fashion Drawing 2
FSH 102
$150.00
FSH 114 Fashion Figure & Rendering
Techniques
FSH 102 & FSH 112
$50.00
FSH 118 Fashion Journalism: Fashion
Editing & Writing
FSH 108 & LA 108. LA 108 may be
concurrent. (Students with start terms of
Spring 2013 and beyond must achieve a Cor higher in LA 108)
$100.00
FSH 119 Fabric and Fiber Technology
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
FSH 120 Fashion Color & Design
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
FSH 124 Knitwear Design
FSH 102

FSH 125 Textile Design
FSH 102


FSH 135 Graphic Design in Fashion
FSH 274



$15.00
































FSH 140 Introduction to Costume Design

FSH 145 Fashion Marketing 1
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
FSH 161 Digital Techniques for the
Fashion Business
FSH 100 or FSH 102. On campus English
as a second language students must pass
EAP level 3.








$100.00



186
FSH 164 Fashion Sewing Techniques
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
FSH 181 Costume Design for Film
$350.00




FSH 112




FSH 182 Costume Design for the Stage
FSH 101 or FSH 101M



FSH 184 Styling
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.



$100.00
FSH 188 Editorial Makeup & Hair Styling
$170.00
FSH 190 Tambour Beading 1
$100.00
FSH 192 Tambour Beading 2
FSH 190
FSH 194 Surface Embroidery 1

FSH 194
FSH 201 The Reclaimed Object
(FSH 100 or FSH 102 or FND 110 or FND
113 or IDS 116) & (FSH 120 or FND 122 or
FND 125)





$100.00
$60.00
FSH 196 Surface Embroidery 2





$75.00

FSH 210 Fashion Manufacturing
FSH 111 or FSH 105 & either FSH 119 or
LA 119





FSH 213 Fashion Marketing 2
FSH 145 & either FSH 111 or FSH 105





FSH 215 Retailing and Management
FSH 105 or FSH 111





FSH 220 Construction/Draping/Flat
Pattern 1
FSH 164 & either FSH 101 or FSH 140.
FSH 101 may be taken concurrently. On
campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.




FSH 221 Fashion Design 2
FSH 101, FSH 224, & FSH 274




FSH 224 Knitwear Design & Construction
1
FSH 100 or FSH 102 and on campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 3.
$225.00
FSH 230 Construction/Draping/Flat
Pattern 2
FSH 220, FSH 274, & either FSH 181 or
FSH 224
$200.00
FSH 239 Fashion Jewelry Design and
Rendering
FND 113 or FSH 112 and one of the
following: FSH 120 or FND 122 or FND 125
FSH 240 The Classical Tutu: Introduction
FSH 230
$325.00
FSH 241 Costume Production for Film
FSH 181 or FSH 182
$200.00
FSH 242 Costume Production 1
FSH 164 & FSH 220
$200.00
FSH 244 History of Fashion
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
FSH 245 Marketing: Beauty Products
FSH 145, FSH 213 and Junior status
FSH 250 Buying Fundamentals
FSH 105 or FSH 111
FSH 252 Visual Merchandising 1
(FSH 100 or FSH 102), (FSH 120 or FND
125), (FSH 111 or FSH 105), & (FSH 161
or GR 102) (FSH 161 may be taken
concurrently)
FSH 257 Accessory Design: Jewelry
FSH 101
FSH 258 Accessory Design: Handbags &
Small Leather Goods
FSH 101
FSH 262 Fashion Design 3
FSH 221, FSH 230 & LA 291 (LA 291 may
be concurrent). Students seeking a second
bachelor's degree are exempt from LA 291.
FSH 266 Computers for Fashion 1
FSH 221 or FSH 267
FSH 267 Menswear Fashion Design 2
FSH 224, FSH 274, & either FSH 101 or
FSH 101M
$200.00









$100.00




























$100.00



187
FSH 268 Menswear Construction 2
FSH 101 and FSH 220
FSH 269 Product Line Development
FSH 210, FSH 250, and either FSH 119 or
LA 119
FSH 274 Applied Textiles 1
One of the following: FSH 100, FSH 102,
FND 113, FND 110 and one of the
following: FSH 120, FND 122, FND 125.
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.
$250.00
FSH 276 Applied Textiles 2
FSH 101, FSH 224, & FSH 274
$275.00
FSH 278 Fashion Journalism: Blogging
FSH 108, LA 108, & LA 202 or LA 280 (LA
202 or LA 280 may be concurrent)
(Students with start terms of Spring 2013
and beyond must achieve a C- or higher in
LA 108)
$100.00
FSH 280 Personal Styling
FSH 184
$100.00


FSH 282 Knitwear Design&Construction 2
FSH 102 and FSH 224
$250.00


FSH 284 Photo Shoot Production for
Stylists
FSH 184 & LA 291 (LA 291 may be
concurrent). Students seeking their second
Bachelor’s degree are exempt from LA
291.
$100.00
FSH 287 Knitwear Design & Construction
3
FSH 101, FSH 220, FSH 281 & FSH 282
$250.00
FSH 289 Corsetry & Underpinnings
FSH 220 & FSH 230
$200.00
FSH 291 Fashion Make Up: Artistry &
Business
FSH 105 or FSH 111
FSH 295 Sustainable Design
FSH 221
FSH 297 Visual Merchandising: Tools &
Materials
FSH 252 & either (FSH 161 or GR 102)
FSH 300 Shoe Design 1
Junior status
FSH 305 Fashion Public Relations
FSH 145, FSH 213, & Sophomore status
FSH 311 Millinery
$200.00

(FSH 244 or LA 244) & (LA 202 or LA 280)
FSH 316 International Retailing/Global
Marketing
FSH 213
FSH 317 Menswear Fashion Design 3
FSH 267 & LA 291 (LA 291 may be
concurrent). Students seeking a 2nd
Bachelor's degree are exempt from LA 291.






















$50.00




$150.00
FSH 313 Style Icons




$200.00








FSH 318 Menswear Construction 3
FSH 268
FSH 320 Interpreting & Reporting Fashion
(FSH 105 or FSH 111), (FSH 120 or FND
125), & (FSH 100 or FSH 102)





FSH 323 Fashion Trend Analysis
FSH 145 & either FSH 105 or FSH 111





FSH 328 Fashion Journalism: Magazine
Editing and Production
FSH 108, LA 108, & LA 202 or LA 280 (LA
202 or LA 280 may be concurrent)
(Students with start terms of Spring 2013
and beyond must achieve a C- or higher in
LA 108)
$100.00
FSH 330 Construction/Draping/Flat
Pattern 3
FSH 230 & either FSH 221 or FSH 242
$200.00
FSH 331 Construction/Draping/Flat
Pattern 4
FSH 262 & FSH 330
$200.00
FSH 333 Technical Design & Grading
FSH 266 and either FSH 164 or FSH 220
$400.00
FSH 335 Computerized Patternmaking
FSH 230 or FSH 268
$400.00












188
FSH 337 Construction/Draping/Flat
Pattern 5
FSH 331 and either FSH 340 or FSH 333
FSH 340 Fashion Design 4
FSH 262 & FSH 266
FSH 342 Costume Production 2
FSH 164 & FSH 220
$250.00
FSH 343 Marketing: Short Form Video
Junior status
$100.00
FSH 344 Fabric and Form
FSH 330 or FSH 287
$200.00
FSH 346 Marketing: Streetwear
Promotion
FSH 347 Inventory Management &
Planning
FSH 213 and Junior status
FSH 250
$100.00
FSH 348 Interactive Marketing
FSH 213
$100.00
FSH 350 Product Development
FSH 210 & either FSH 119 or LA 119
FSH 352 Visual Merchandising: Space
Planning and Directives
$250.00






















$100.00
FSH 357 Retail Store Management
FSH 145, FSH 215, FSH 250, & must be
Junior status
FSH 363 Special Event and Promotion
FSH 145, FSH 213, & Junior status
FSH 368 Accessories Merchandising
FSH 250
FSH 369 Merchandising: Beauty Products
Junior status
FSH 374 Applied Textiles 3
FSH 276 & LA 291 (LA 291 may be
concurrent). Students seeking a 2nd
Bachelor's degree are exempt from LA 291.


$150.00








$275.00
FSH 375 Fashion Merchandising
Strategies
FSH 213, FSH 215, & FSH 250, and must
have Junior status
FSH 376 Applied Textiles 4
FSH 374
$275.00
FSH 377 Visual Merchandising 2
FSH 297 (may be taken concurrently)
$80.00
FSH 378 Menswear Fashion Design 4
FSH 266 & FSH 317
FSH 379 Menswear Construction 4
FSH 318
$200.00
FSH 382 Knitwear Design & Construction
4
FSH 286 & FSH 287
$250.00
FSH 384 Menswear Styling
FSH 284
$100.00
FSH 385 Marketing Promotion Strategy
FSH 145
FSH 387 Knitwear Design & Construction
5
FSH 381 & FSH 382
FSH 390 Fashion Merchandising Career
Development
Must have Senior status
FSH 391 Fashion Product Styling
FSH 184
$100.00
FSH 392 Social Media Strategy for
Fashion
FSH 394 Fashion Advertising and Brand
FSH 348 & Junior status
$100.00
FSH 213 & Junior status
$75.00
FSH 397 Visual Merchandising:
Mannequins, Forms, & Fixtures
FSH 297
$50.00
FSH 398 Computers for Textiles
FSH 374
$100.00
FSH 399 Computers for Knitwear
FSH 381 & FSH 382
$350.00
FSH 400 Construction/Draping/Flat
Pattern 6: Senior Collection
FSH 337 and either FSH 430 or FSH 333
$350.00
FSH 405 Researching & Writing Features
FSH 108, LA 108, & LA 202 or LA 280
(Students with start terms of Spring 2013
and beyond must achieve a C- or higher in
LA 108)
$100.00

















$250.00



















189
FSH 407 Visual Merchandising: Concepts
for the Display Window
FSH 297
FSH 410 E-Commerce
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
$50.00


FSH 417 Menswear Fashion Design 5
FSH 378
FSH 418 Menswear Construction 5
FSH 379
$250.00
FSH 427 Visual Merchandising: Graphics
for Presentation
FSH 297
$75.00
FSH 430 Fashion Design 5
FSH 340 & FSH 331. Take concurrent with
FSH 337.
FSH 440 Portfolio for Costume Design
FSH 182
FSH 441 Costume Construction 1
FSH 164, FSH 220, FSH 230, & FSH 320
$375.00
FSH 442 Computer Aided Design for
Textiles
FSH 398
$400.00
FSH 445 Contemporary Retail Strategy
Senior Status
FSH 456 Fashion Portfolio & Computer
Aided Design
FSH 266 & one of the following: FSH 340
or FSH 378 or FSH 382
FSH 460 Merchandising: Industry
Collaboration
Senior status
FSH 464 Fashion Retail Management &
Operations
Must be a Fashion Senior to enroll in this
course
FSH 465 Fashion Design 6: Senior
Collection
FSH 430
FSH 467 Menswear Fashion Design 6
FSH 417
FSH 468 Menswear Construction 6
FSH 418
$300.00

FSH 472 Visual Merchandising 3
FSH 377
$100.00

FSH 473 Textile Portfolio
FSH 474
FSH 474 Applied Textiles 5
FSH 376
$275.00
FSH 476 Applied Textiles 6: Senior
Collection
FSH 474
$275.00
FSH 477 Visual Merchandising: Project
Studio
FSH 472
$75.00
FSH 478 Editorial Styling
FSH 284
$100.00
FSH 479 Computers for Senior Collection:
Knitwear
FSH 399
$350.00
FSH 482 Knitwear Design & Construction
6
FSH 387
$300.00
FSH 484 Fashion Show Styling
FSH 284
$150.00
FSH 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FSH 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FSH 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FSH 500 Internship in Fashion
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
FSH 600 MS: Fashion Design 1
FSH 601 MS: 3D Design 1






$100.00









































$150.00
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 603.
$200.00

190
FSH 602 MS: Fashion Design 2
(FSH 600 or FSH 600A) & (FSH 601 or
FSH 601A)
FSH 603 MS: 3D Design 2
FSH 600 & FSH 601
FSH 604 MS: Fashion Design 3
FSH 602 & FSH 603
FSH 605 MS: 3D Design 3
FSH 602 & FSH 603
FSH 606 MS: Fashion Design 4
FSH 604 & FSH 605
FSH 607 MS: 3D Design 4
FSH 604 & FSH 605
$300.00
FSH 609 MS: Digital Design for Fashion
FSH 600 & FSH 604 (FSH 604 can be
taken concurrently)
$100.00
FSH 610 MS: Applied Textiles 1
$200.00
$250.00
$275.00
































FSH 611 MS: Applied Textiles 2
FSH 600 & FSH 610
$275.00


FSH 612 MS: Applied Textiles 3
FSH 602 & FSH 611
$275.00


FSH 613 MS: Applied Textiles 4
FSH 604 & FSH 612
$275.00




FSH 614 MS: Applied Textiles IV
FSH 615 MS: Textile Design
FSH 616 MS: Dynamics of Fashion

On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.

FSH 617 MS: Introduction to Fashion
Journalism











FSH 618 MS: Knitwear Design
FSH 619 MS: Developments & Current
Debates in Fashion Journalism
$100.00
FSH 620 MS: Knitwear Design &
Construction 1
$250.00
FSH 621 MS: Knitwear Design &
Construction 2
FSH 600 & FSH 620
$250.00
FSH 622 MS: Knitwear Design &
Construction 3
FSH 602 & FSH 621
$250.00
FSH 623 MS: Knitwear Design &
Construction 4
FSH 604 & FSH 622
$250.00
FSH 624 MS: Language of Fashion
ESL 61, ESL 62, & Department Director's
Approval
FSH 626 MS: Magazine Writing, Editing,
& Production
FSH 617
FSH 627 MS: Writing, Researching, &
Reporting Features
FSH 617






$100.00




































FSH 635 MS: Creating Competitive
Strategy






FSH 637 MS: Product Sourcing and
Assortment Planning












FSH 629 MS: Introduction to Styling
$100.00
FSH 630 MS: Fashion Marketing Strategy
FSH 631 MS: Merchandising Principles
Basic Math Skills are Required
FSH 632 MS: Trend Analysis & Product
Development
FSH 634
$100.00
FSH 633 MS: Retail Management and
Operations
FSH 634 MS: Textiles & Other Raw
Materials
FSH 638 MS: Product Line Development A Collaborative Process
FSH 640 MS: Fashion Drawing
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
FSH 634
$150.00



191
FSH 641 MS: News & Short Lead Boot
Camp
FSH 617
$100.00
FSH 650 MS: Intro to Fashion Design
FSH 651 MS: Fashion Construction
$400.00
FSH 656 MS: Fashion and Sustainability
FSH 657 MS: Online Retailing
FSH 661 MS: Costume Design 1














EAP 604





FSH 662 MS: Costume Design 2
FSH 663 MS: Costume Design 3
FSH 664 MS: Costume Design 4
FSH 671 MS: Costume Construction 1
FSH 675 MS: Visual Merchandising:
Image & Brand
$375.00
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
FSH 676 MS: Costume crafts
FSH 695 MS: Collaborative Project






$400.00
FSH 600, FSH 601, FSH 602, & FSH 603.
Department Director Approval is required. /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
$150.00

FSH 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
FSH 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.






Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.














FSH 801 MS: Group Directed Study
FSH 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.
FSH 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
FSH 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.


FSH 101M Fashion Design 1 for
Menswear
FSH 102, FSH 111, & FSH 112. FSH 112
may be concurrent.
FSH 114M Croquis Development &
Rendering for Menswear
FSH 102 & FSH 112
$120.00
FSH 220M Construction/ Draping/ Flat
Pattern for Menswear
FSH 101 & FSH 164. FSH 101 may be
taken concurrently.
$200.00
FSH 600A MS: Fashion Design
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 603.
FSH 601A MS: 3D Design 1


$200.00
GAM 105 Game 3D Production
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
$400.00
GAM 110 Introduction to Game
Development
GAM 105 (GAM 105 may be taken
concurrently). On campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 3.
$400.00
GAM 115 Elements of Scripting
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$400.00


















192
GAM 130 Vector Graphic Games 1
GAM 105, GAM 110, & either FND 110 or
FND 113 (FND 110 or FND 113 may be
taken concurrently). On campus English as
a second language students must pass
EAP level 3.
$400.00
GAM 131 History of Gaming
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
GAM 136 Mobile Gaming Art
Either GAM 105 or ANM 105 & also either
FND 122 or FND 125 (FND 122 may be
taken concurrently)
$400.00
GAM 145 Scripting for Vector Games
GAM 115 & GAM 130 (GAM 130 may be
taken concurrently)
$400.00
GAM 150 Game Design, Theory &
Analysis
GAM 110 & either ANM 105 or GAM 105
(GAM 105 may be taken concurrently).
$400.00
GAM 177 Game Engines
GAM 150 and GAM 115 (GAM 150 may be
taken concurrently)
$400.00
GAM 190 Mobile UI and UX
GAM 130 or WNM 120
$400.00
GAM 201 3D Modeling for Games 1
Either ANM 105 or GAM 105 & also either
FND 110 or FND 113 & also either FND
122 or FND 125 (FND 122 may be taken
concurrently)
$400.00
GAM 202 3D Animation for Games
GAM 105
$400.00
GAM 209 Rigging for Games 1
GAM 202
$400.00
GAM 215 Scripting for 3D Game Engines
1
GAM 115 & LA 255 (LA 255 may be taken
concurrently) or test score of: 200 (AAU
Quantitative Literacy); 28 (ACT) or pass
ACT Level I or II; 3 (AP Exam); 5 (IB Math);
500 (SAT II Mathematics); 600 (SAT I
Mathematics).
GAM 110, GAM 115, GAM 130, & either
FND 110 or FND 113 & also either FND
122 or FND 125 (Both FND 122 and GAM
115 may be taken concurrently)
$400.00
GAM 233 Elements of Digital Painting
GAM 105 or ILL 133 and either FND 125 or
FND 122
$400.00
GAM 241 Digital Sculpting
GAM 201 or ANM 202
$400.00
GAM 244 Digital Environment Sketching
FND 116
$400.00
GAM 245 Scripting for Mobile Vector
Games
GAM 215
$400.00
GAM 260 Prop Design & Drawing for
Games
FND 116 & either FND 122 or FND 125
(FND 122 may be taken concurrently)
GAM 265 Vehicle & Robot/Mech Design
for the Entertainment Industry
Either FND 116 or IDS 116 and either FND
122 or FND 125 & also one of the
following: GAM 105 or ANM 101 or ILL 233
or IDS 246 (FND 122 may be taken
concurrently)
GAM 230 Vector Graphic Games 2



















































$400.00












GAM 266 Digital Figure Painting
GAM 233
$615.00
GAM 275 Concept Art for Games 1
FND 112, FND 116, & either FND 125 or
FND 122
$400.00
GAM 288 Concept Art for Games 1:
Designing Characters
GAM 266 & ILL 222
$400.00
GAM 301 3D Modeling for Games 2
GAM 201
$400.00


GAM 303 Creature Rigging & Animation
GAM 202 or ANM 202
$400.00

















193
GAM 310 Prototype Game Production
Studio
LA 291, GAM 201 & GAM 202 (both GAM
202 and LA 291 may be taken
concurrently). Students seeking a 2nd
Bachelor's degree are exempt from LA 291.
$400.00
GAM 315 Scripting for 3D Game Engines
2
GAM 320 Character Animation 1
GAM 215
$400.00

GAM 202
$400.00

GAM 322 Stylized Character Design &
Drawing for Games
FND 112 and FND 125
$430.00
GAM 325 Visual FX for Games
GAM 202 & either FND 122 or FND 125
(FND 122 may be taken concurrently)
$400.00
GAM 328 Creature Design for Games
(FA 213 & ILL 222) or (GAM 233 & GAM
266)
$400.00
GAM 332 Games Texture and Light
Either ANM 251 or GAM 201 & also either
FND 122 or FND 125 (FND 122 may be
taken concurrently)
$400.00
GAM 340 3D Character Modeling 1
GAM 301
$400.00
GAM 342 Environment Modeling for
Games 1
GAM 201 & GAM 332 (GAM 332 may be
taken concurrently)
$400.00
GAM 344 Digital Environment Painting
FND 116 & either GAM 275 or GAM 233 or
GAM 244
$400.00
GAM 350 Rapid Game Development 1
GAM 310 & GAM 215
$400.00
GAM 353 Game Freemium &
Monetization
LA 291 & either LA 255 (C- or higher) or
test score of: 200=AAU Quantitative
Literacy; 28=ACT or pass ACT Level I or II;
3=AP Exam; 5=IB Math; 500=SAT II
Mathematics; 600=SAT I Mathematics.
Students seeking a 2nd Bachelor’s degree
are exempt from LA 291.
$400.00
GAM 360 Environmental Modeling for
Games 2
GAM 301 & GAM 332
$400.00
GAM 370 Level Design for Video Games
1
GAM 380 Character Animation 2
GAM 310 (may be taken concurrently)
$400.00
GAM 320
$400.00
GAM 401 Hard Surface Modeling: High
Resolution Game Assets
GAM 301
$400.00
GAM 403 Organic Modeling: High
Resolution Game Assets
GAM 301
$400.00
GAM 405 Games Portfolio Preparation
Senior status
$400.00
GAM 409 Advanced Rigging
GAM 303
$400.00


GAM 410 Rapid Game Development 2
GAM 350 & Department Approval
$400.00


GAM 432 Advanced Texture & Materials
GAM 332
$400.00


GAM 440 3D Character Modeling 2
GAM 340
$400.00

GAM 442 Digital Matte Painting
GAM 342 & GAM 233
$400.00

GAM 450 Rapid Game Development 3
GAM 410
$400.00

GAM 464 High Resolution Asset Studio
GAM 401 & GAM 432 (GAM 432 may be
concurrent)
$400.00
GAM 481 Interactive Entertainment
Production Entrepreneurship
LA 291, Junior status, & either LA 202 or
LA 280. Students seeking their second
Bachelor's degree are exempt from LA 291.
$400.00




















































194
GAM 483 Interactive Media Production &
Entrepreneurship
LA 291, Junior status, & either LA 202 or
LA 280. Students seeking their second
Bachelor's degree are exempt from LA 291.
GAM 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


GAM 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


GAM 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


GAM 500 Internship in Game Design
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
GAM 601 MS: Elements of Video Games
$400.00

$400.00
GAM 602 MS: Game Theory & Level
Design
ANM 623, GAM 601, & GLA 623
$400.00
GAM 603 MS: 3D Character Modeling 1
ANM 623, GAM 601, & GLA 623
$400.00
GAM 604 MS: Environment Modeling for
Games: Principles
ANM 623
$400.00
GAM 605 MS: Scripting for Video Games
1
GAM 606 MS: Rapid Game Development
GAM 601 (may be taken concurrently)
$400.00
GAM 605
$400.00
GAM 612 MS: Visual Development for
Games
ANM 623, GAM 601, GLA 623, & ILL 610
$400.00
GAM 613 MS: Visual Development:
Storyboards and Animatics
ANM 623, GAM 601, GS 623, & ILL 610
$400.00
GAM 614 MS: Prop & Weapon Ideation
for Games
GAM 699 MS: Visual Design for Games 1
or GAM 699 MS: Drawing Bootcamp for
Games: The Human Figure
$400.00
GAM 615 MS: Vector Graphic Games 1


























$400.00
GAM 618 MS: Action Script 3
GAM 615 (GAM 615 may be taken
concurrently)
$400.00
GAM 621 MS: Texture & Light
GAM 601, ANM 623, & GLA 623
$400.00
GAM 624 MS: Character & Hero Props
Modeling
ANM 623 and GAM 621 or ANM 624
$400.00
GAM 626 MS: Environment Modeling for
Games: Techniques
GAM 604 & GAM 621
$400.00
GAM 631 MS: Portfolio and Thesis
Preparation
ANM 623, GAM 601, & GLA 623
$400.00
GAM 632 MS: Advanced Texture
Techniques
GAM 621
$400.00
GAM 637 MS: 3D Modeling & Animation

































$400.00
GAM 638 MS: Character Rigging
ANM 623
$400.00
GAM 643 MS: Environment Modeling for
Games: Production
GAM 626
$400.00
GAM 644 MS: Advanced Rigging
ANM 623
$400.00
GAM 651 MS: Prototype Game
Development
ANM 623, GAM 601, & GLA 623
$400.00
GAM 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
GAM 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.

GAM 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.








195
GAM 801 MS: Group Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
GAM 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate student with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal.
GAM 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
GAM 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.




GLA 601 The Renaissance Art World & Its
Classical Origins
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$20.00
GLA 602 The Art & Ideology of the 20th
Century
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$20.00
GLA 603 Anthropology: Experiencing
Culture
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.

GLA 605 Motion Picture Theory & Style
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.


GLA 606 Crossing Borders: Art & Culture
in a Global Society
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$20.00
GLA 607 Art & Ideas of the Enlightenment
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$20.00
GLA 608 Professional Presentation and
Communication Development
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
GLA 609 Renovating Tradition: Art &
Ideas of the 19th Century
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$20.00
GLA 610 Balancing Creativity and
Profitability
Obtain Department Director Approval. On
campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$100.00
GLA 611 Cultural Narratives
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
GLA 612 Writing & Research for the
Master's Student
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.
GLA 613 History of 20th Century Fashion
Arts
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
GLA 614 Architectural Professional
Practices
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
GLA 615 History of Graphic Design
























































On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.





GLA 616 Sacred Geometry
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





GLA 617 Mythology for the Modern World
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.












$20.00
$10.00
GLA 618 Film Music History: The Art of
the Film Score
GLA 619 Culture & Identity in Modern
American Theater
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.
GLA 621 History & Techniques of
Character Animation
GLA 622 History & Techniques of VFX
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.




$75.00














196
GLA 623 History and Techniques of
Games
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





GLA 625 History of Photography
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





GLA 626 Business Practices & Principles
for Photographers
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal. On campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 4.





GLA 627 Industrial Design in a Globalized
World
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





GLA 624 History of Visual Development
GLA 630 Survey of Sustainable Design

$150.00
$25.00





GLA 631 Industrial Design Processes
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.






GLA 632 The Science of Design:
Ethnographic Methods
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.


GLA 634 Professional Practice for Interior
Designers
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.












LAN 620 & either LAN 615 or IAD 608. On
campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.




GLA 670 Professional Practices for
Animation, VFX, & Games
Graduate Students with an approved Final
Thesis Project Proposal. On campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 4.






GLA 671 Professional Practices &
Communication for Fashion
Graduate Students with an approved Final
Thesis Project Proposal. On campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 4.






GLA 672 Professional Practices &
Communication for IDS
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.










GLA 636 MS: Acting for Animators
GLA 640 MS: Urban Open Spaces
GLA 673 Entertainment Professional
Practices

GLA 674 Professional Practices for Fine
Artists
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.






GLA 675 Professional Practices for
Illustrators
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.






GLA 676 Professional Practices for
Designers & Advertisers
Graduate Students with an approved Final
Thesis Project Proposal. On campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 4.






GLA 677 Professional Practices for the
Teaching Artist
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
GLA 678 Professional Practices for Game
Developers
$30.00
$400.00


GLA 679 Professional Practices for Visual
Development


GLA 680 Music and Sound Design
Professional Practices


GLA 681 Professional Practice for
Landscape Architecture
LAN 688
GLA 699 Special Topics
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604. / Note:
Course fees and prerequisites will vary by
topic.

197
GLA 712 Genres in Science Fiction and
Fantasy
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$20.00
GLA 713 Creative Writing
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.
$20.00
GLA 714 Acting
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.










GLA 750 GLA Final Project
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
GLA 751 Required First Sem. Session
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.


GLA 752 Required First Sem. Session
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.




GLA 754 Architecture Required Labs
GLA 903 Graduate Seminar in Europe
GLA 615A History of Graphic Design
Minimum 2.75 GPA & successful
completion of at least 1 art history course
(GS 601, GS 602 or GS 607) prior to
departure. Note: extensive walking is
required.
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
GR 104 The Art of Making


Study Abroad in Europe offered
for 2015 June Intersession
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 602
GR 102 Digital Tools: Design Applications


$100.00








On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.






GR 105 Principles of Graphic Design
GR 102 (GR 102 may be concurrent)






GR 107 Principles of User Experience
GR 102






GR 122 Typography 1: Hierarchy and
Form
Either (GR 102 & GR 105) or (WNM 105 &
WNM 110)






GR 221 Graphic Design 1: Visual
Communication
GR 122 & either GR 242 or LA 242 (GR
122 may be concurrent)




GR 235 Photography for Designers
GR 102 (GR 102 may be concurrent). On
campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.





GR 242 History of Graphic Design
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





GR 310 Typography 2: Formalizing
Structure
GR 122, GR 221 & (GR 242 or LA 242).
GR 221 may be taken concurrently.





GR 321 Package Design 1: 3D Thinking/
Making
GR 104, GR 235 & GR 310 (GR 310 may
be concurrent)





GR 322 Package Design 2: Executing 3D
Design
GR 310, GR 321, & GR 327 (GR 327 may
be concurrent)





GR 324 Branding Principles
GR 221, GR 310, & either FND 122 or FND
125





GR 327 Graphic Design 2: Integrating
Principles
GR 235, GR 310, & LA 291 (LA 291 may
be concurrent. Students seeking a 2nd
bachelor's degree are exempt from LA
291.)





GR 330 Typography 3: Complex
Hierarchy
GR 324 & GR 327 (GR 324 may be
concurrent)





GR 350 Visual Systems 1
GR 327, GR 330, & GR 360. Both GR 330
& GR 360 may be concurrent.




GR 360 Graphic Design 3: Nature of
Interaction
GR 324 & GR 327





198
GR 365 Strategies for Branding
GR 330 & GR 360
GR 370 Package Design 3: Advanced 3D
Branding
GR 322, GR 330, & GR 360
GR 425 Visual Systems 2
GR 330, GR 350, & GR 360
GR 426 Package Design 4: 3D
Collaborative Project
GR 365 & GR 370
GR 429 Information Design
GR 330 & GR 360
GR 430 Visual Systems 3
GR 330 & GR 360
GR 434 Typography 4: Refinement of
Form
GR 460 Senior Portfolio
GR 350, GR 365 & GR 370





Department Director Approval & GR 365,
GR 425, and either (GR 370 & GR 426) or
(GR 410 & GR 430) or GR 429



























GR 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
GR 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
GR 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
GR 500 Internship in Graphic Design
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.

GR 600 MS: Visual Communications Lab
GR 620 & GR 601 (GR 601 may be taken
concurrently)




GR 601 MS: Type Systems
GR 616, GR 617, GR 618, GR 619, & GS
615




GR 604 MS: The Nature of Identity
GR 612




GR 605 MS: Digital Design Studio 1
GR 618 & GR 619




GR 606 MS: Design - Publication
Narratives
GR 600, GR 601, GR 613, and Department
Director Approval required.
GR 607 MS: Digital Design 2
GR 601 & GR 605
GR 612 MS: Integrated Communications Message Synthesis
GR 600 & GR 601




GR 613 MS: Type Experiments
GR 601




GR 614 MS: Photo Narratives
GR 600 & GR 612
GR 616 MS: Making Ideas Visible
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.




GR 617 MS: Type Forms
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.




GR 618 MS: Visual Literacy
GLA 615, GR 616, GR 617, GR 619, & on
campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604 (GR 619
may be taken concurrently)




GR 619 MS: Type Composition
GLA 615, GR 616, & GR 617





GR 620 MS: Visual Thinking
GR 618 & GR 619






GR 650 MS: Design Seminar/Portfolio
GR 604




GR 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
GR 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.




Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.




GR 801 MS: Group Directed Study





$100.00


199
GR 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.


GR 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
GR 810 MS: Thesis 1 - Concept
Graduate students must have passed
Midpoint Review.


GR 830 MS: Thesis 2 - Exploration
GR 810


GR 850 MS: Thesis 3 - Refinement
GR 830


GR 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.

IAD 100 Conceptual Design
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
$40.00
IAD 125 Kitchen & Bath Design
IAD 140 or Personal Enrichment Status
$25.00
IAD 135 Patio Design and Garden
Environment










$25.00
IAD 140 Introduction to Construction
Documents
IAD 100 (IAD 100 may be taken
concurrently) & on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 3.
IAD 161 The Golden Section and Sacred
Geometry
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
IAD 200 Design of the Built Environment
A
FND 113 and either ARH 110 or IAD 100
(FND 113 may be taken concurrently)
$25.00
IAD 210 Digital Imaging
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2
$350.00
IAD 215 Modelmaking in the Design
Process
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$50.00
IAD 230 Survey of Traditional Interior
Architecture
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$25.00
IAD 231 Survey of Contemporary Interior
Architecture
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$25.00
IAD 232 Survey of Bay Area Architecture
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
$150.00
IAD 240 Building Construction
IAD 140
$50.00
IAD 241 Perspective Drawing Techniques
FND 113. On campus English as a second
language students must pass EAP level 1.
$25.00
IAD 245 Materials
IAD 200
IAD 250 Design of the Built Environment
B
IAD 260 Computer Aided Drafting


$25.00















































$25.00





IAD 200, IAD 140, IAD 241, IAD 245
$25.00





IAD 140
$350.00
IAD 270 3D Digital Modeling
IAD 280 or LAN 223
$350.00





IAD 280 BIM & Design Graphics
IAD 140
$350.00





IAD 300 Interior Architecture and Design
A
LA 291, IAD 240, IAD 241, IAD 250, & IAD
280 (LA 291 may be taken concurrently).
Students seeking a 2nd Bachelor's degree
are exempt from LA 291.
$350.00




IAD 330 Introduction to Lighting Design
IAD 240
$25.00





IAD 345 Color Rendering Techniques
IAD 241 & FND 125
$10.00





IAD 350 Interior Architecture and Design
B
IAD 300, IAD 330, & IAD 345 or LAN 345
$350.00









200
IAD 363 Furniture & Case Goods Design
$400.00
IAD 380 Sustainable Design
IAD 300
$25.00
IAD 400 Senior Studio A: Commercial
IAD 330, LAN 345, & IAD 350. Open only
to IAD majors in their senior year. May not
be taken concurrently with another senior
studio course.
$350.00
IAD 330, LAN 345, & IAD 350. Open only
to IAD majors in their senior year. May not
be taken concurrently with another senior
studio course.
$350.00
IAD 330, LAN 345, & IAD 350. Open only
to IAD majors in their senior year. May not
be taken concurrently with another senior
studio course.
$350.00
IAD 330, LAN 345, & IAD 350. Open only
to IAD majors in their senior year. May not
be taken concurrently with another senior
studio course.
$350.00
IAD 401 Senior Studio B: Residential
IAD 403 Senior Studio D: Retail
IAD 404 Senior Studio E: Hospitality
IAD 430 Professional Practice for Interior
Design
IAD 300 & LA 291 (LA 291 is waived for
2nd Bachelor's degree students)
IAD 450 IAD Portfolio Preparation
IAD 210, IAD 300, & either LA 291 or IAD
430 (Students seeking a 2nd bachelor's
degree are exempt from LA 291.)
IAD 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
IAD 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
IAD 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
IAD 500 Internship in Interior Design
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.























$350.00




























$100.00
IAD 600 MS: Concept, Theory and the
Design Process
IAD 602 MS: Building Systems for Interior
Design
$50.00
IAD 603 MS: Sketching & Perspective for
Interior Environments
$50.00
IAD 604 MS: Lighting Design

IAD 605 MS: Residential Design
IAD 610




IAD 606 MS: Commercial Design
IAD 610 & IAD 611
$350.00




IAD 607 MS: Hospitality Design
IAD 610 & IAD 611
$350.00




$350.00


























IAD 608 MS: Digital Imaging
IAD 609 MS: Sketching for Design
IAD 603
IAD 610 MS: Spatial Design
IAD 600, IAD 602, IAD 608, & IAD 609
(IAD 609 may be taken concurrently)
$250.00
IAD 611 MS: BIM - Building Information
Modeling
IAD 602
$350.00
IAD 612 MS: Material Use
IAD 609 & IAD 610
IAD 613 MS: Interior Design Studio
IAD 609 & IAD 610
IAD 616 MS: History of Design
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
IAD 620 MS: Retail Design
IAD 621 MS: 3D Modeling




$350.00




IAD 610 & IAD 611
$350.00




IAD 611
$350.00





201
IAD 625 MS: Survey of Sustainable
Design
IAD 636 MS: Modern Design Studio
$25.00
IAD 610 & IAD 611
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis project proposal.
IAD 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
IAD 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
IAD 801 MS: Group Directed Study


IAD 640 MS: Light & Color Perception
IAD 678 MS: Portfolio Development


























$300.00
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
IAD 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.
IAD 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
IAD 810 MS: Concept
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.
IAD 812 MS: Programming & Space
Planning
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.
$350.00
IAD 830 MS: Design Development
IAD 810 & IAD 812
$350.00
IAD 834 MS: Materials
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.
IAD 838 MS: 3D Modeling
IAD 621
$350.00
IAD 850 MS: Thesis Implementation
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.
$350.00
IAD 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.
IDS 101 Form Development
IDS 131 & IDS 140
$300.00
IDS 110 Design Problem Solving
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$255.00
IDS 116 Perspective for Industrial Design





















On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.





IDS 118 History of Industrial Design
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





IDS 121 Design Drawing 1
IDS 116 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 3.

















IDS 124 Design Drawing 2
FND 125 (may be taken concurrently), IDS
101 & IDS 121
IDS 131 Model Making 1
IDS 140 or ILL 133. IDS 140 can be
concurrent.
$300.00
IDS 134 Model Making 2
IDS 101, IDS 121, & IDS 141 or IDS 218.
IDS 141 or IDS 218 may be taken
concurrently.
$370.00
IDS 140 Computer Drafting
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$350.00
IDS 141 Product Design 1
IDS 101, IDS 110, IDS 121, & IDS 140
$400.00
IDS 145 Digital Imaging 1
IDS 140 and on campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 2.
$350.00















202
IDS 150 Digital 3D Modeling 1
IDS 101, IDS 140, and IDS 145
$350.00
IDS 180 Development of Form
IDS 131 & IDS 140
$300.00
IDS 205 Digital 3D Modeling 2
IDS 101 & IDS 150
$350.00
IDS 210 Product Design 2
IDS 124, IDS 141, IDS 145, & LA 291.
Students seeking a 2nd Bachelor's degree
are exempt from LA 291.
$485.00
IDS 213 Digital Solid Modeling
IDS 134, IDS 205, & IDS 210 or IDS 218 or
IDS 222
$350.00
IDS 214 Transportation Design 1
IDS 101, IDS 121, IDS 140 & IDS 145
$200.00
IDS 218 Transportation Design 2
IDS 124, IDS 145, IDS 214, & LA 291.
Students seeking a 2nd Bachelor's degree
are exempt from LA 291.
$550.00
IDS 150 & IDS 214
$350.00
IDS 244 Digital Transportation Modeling 1
IDS 214 and either IDS 205 or IDS 421
$350.00
IDS 245 Digital 3D Modeling 3
IDS 205 or IDS 421
$350.00
IDS 246 Design Drawing 3
IDS 101, IDS 124, & FND 125
IDS 278 Traditional Transportation
Modeling 1
IDS 222 Digital Transportation Design 2






















IDS 239 Materials and Processes













IDS 101, IDS 124, IDS 214, & IDS 218
(IDS 218 must be taken concurrently)


IDS 280 Transportation Drawing
IDS 218 & IDS 246


IDS 285 Product Drawing
IDS 246, & IDS 210 or IDS 218
$350.00


IDS 301 Model Making 3
IDS 134, and IDS 141 or IDS 214
$225.00
IDS 302 Traditional Transportation
Modeling 2
IDS 218 or IDS 222 and either IDS 134 or
IDS 278
$680.00
IDS 304 Digital Transportation Design 3
IDS 218 or IDS 222 and IDS 244. IDS 244
may be concurrent.
$350.00
IDS 305 Transportation Design 3
IDS 134 & IDS 218
$570.00
IDS 310 Product Design 3
IDS 134 & IDS 210
$400.00
IDS 311 Product Design 4
IDS 217 or IDS 301, IDS 310, & IDS 480
(IDS 480 may be taken concurrently)
$400.00
IDS 316 Digital Transportation Design 4
IDS 244 or IDS 245 and IDS 304 or IDS
305
$350.00
IDS 318 Transportation Design 4
IDS 302 or IDS 217 or IDS 301 & IDS 304
or IDS 305 & IDS 480 (IDS 480 may be
taken concurrently)
$585.00
IDS 321 Digital Imaging 2
IDS 205 or IDS 421
$350.00
IDS 365 Furniture Design
IDS 310
$400.00

IDS 375 Intermediate Furniture Design
IDS 365 & IDS 480
$400.00


IDS 410 Product Design 5
IDS 311 & IDS 480
$400.00


IDS 411 Product Design 6
IDS 410
$400.00


IDS 425 Portfolio Enhancement
Department Director approval and one of
the following: IDS 311, IDS 318, IDS 365,
or IDS 450
$350.00
IDS 440 Advanced Furniture Design
IDS 375
$400.00
IDS 450 Toy Design
IDS 310
$400.00


IDS 459 Transportation Design 5
IDS 280, IDS 318 & IDS 480
$590.00


IDS 460 Transportation Design 6
IDS 459
$840.00


IDS 465 Transportation Design 7
IDS 460
$730.00


IDS 470 Intermediate Toy Design
IDS 450 & IDS 480
$400.00
























203
IDS 475 Advanced Toy Design
IDS 470
$400.00
IDS 480 Graphics & Portfolio
IDS 305 or IDS 310. IDS 305 or IDS 310
may be concurrent.
$350.00
IDS 490 Portfolio Enhancement


Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


IDS 494 Corporate Sponsored Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


IDS 496 Digital 3D Advanced Project
IDS 244 or IDS 245 or IDS 419
IDS 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
IDS 500 Internship in Industrial Design
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
IDS 600 MS: Materials and Processes
$350.00















$200.00




$350.00



























On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.
IDS 601 MS: Design Project 1
GLA 631 (GLA 631 may be taken
concurrently)
$400.00
IDS 602 MS: Design Project 2
IDS 601
$400.00
IDS 603 MS: Industrial Design Drawing 3
IDS 630
IDS 605 MS: Thesis Preparation
IDS 602
IDS 609 MS: Digital Design Tools 1
IDS 610 MS: Design Project 3
IDS 602
$400.00
IDS 611 MS: Intermediate Digital 3D
Modeling
IDS 632
$350.00
IDS 613 MS: Digital Solid Modeling
IDS 632
$350.00
IDS 622 MS: Industrial Design Drawing 1:
Perspective
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
IDS 623 MS: Model Making
$305.00
IDS 630 MS: Industrial Design Drawing 2
IDS 622
IDS 632 MS: Introduction to Digital 3D
Modeling
IDS 623
$350.00
IDS 633 MS: Industrial Design Drawing 4
IDS 603
$350.00
IDS 650 MS: Cause / Affect
IDS 601
$350.00
IDS 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
$200.00
IDS 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.

IDS 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.

IDS 801 MS: Group Directed Study
IDS 802 MS: Thesis Forum
IDS 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
IDS 810 MS: Research
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review
IDS 830 MS: Design
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review













Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.
















204
IDS 850 MS: Implementation
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review
IDS 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.


ILL 101 First Year Seminar for Illustrators
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$25.00
ILL 120 Clothed Figure Drawing 1
FND 110 & FND 112
$100.00
ILL 133 Digital Media 1: Photography &
Imaging
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.
$100.00
ILL 140 Introduction to Painting: Figure
FA 110, FND 110, FND 112, & FND 125
$190.00
ILL 192 Comics: Pencils and Stories
FND 112 & FND 116 (FND 116 may be
taken concurrently)
ILL 195 History of Comics
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
ILL 206 Calligraphy & Letterform
ILL 220 Clothed Figure Drawing 2











































ILL 120 and either ILL 222 or FA 227, and
either ILL 232 or VIS 250. Fine Art and
Animation students exempt from ILL 232 or
VIS 250.
$100.00
ILL 221 Intermediate Figure Drawing
FND 110 & FND 112
$190.00





ILL 222 Heads & Hands 1
ILL 120 and either FA 213 or FASCU 270
$190.00





ILL 225 Heads & Hands 2
ILL 120, ILL 222 and ILL 220. ILL 220 may
be taken concurrently.
$190.00
ILL 232 Illustration 1: Story, Process, &
Techniques
LA 291, FND 116, ILL 120, ILL 222, &
either ILL 140 or ILL 292 (ILL 140, ILL 222,
& ILL 292 may be taken concurrently).
Students seeking a second bachelor's
degree are exempt from LA 291.









ILL 233 Digital Media 2: Illustrative
Imaging
FND 110, FND 112, and either FND 122 or
FND 125, and also one of the following: ILL
133 or ANM 101 or VIS 103
ILL 236 Advanced Calligraphy
ILL 206

ILL 237 Illustration 2: Principles, Practice,
& Media
ILL 220, ILL 221, ILL 222, ILL 232, & ILL
310 or LA 243. Both ILL 220 & ILL 310/LA
243 may be taken concurrently.




ILL 238 Drawing the Fantastic Figure
ILL 220 & ILL 233
$100.00




ILL 243 Advanced Perspective for
Illustration, Film & Games
FND 116, ILL 120 and one of the following:
ILL 232 or ANM 260 or ANM 270 or VIS
250
ILL 232 & ILL 233. ILL 233 may be taken
concurrently.
$45.00









ILL 253 Introduction to Science Illustration
$100.00
$100.00
ILL 267 Intro to Animal Drawing and
Anatomy
FND 112 & either FA 213 or FASCU 270 &
also either ILL 133 or ANM 101 or VIS 103
$250.00
ILL 270 Digital Clothed Figure
ILL 120 & either ILL 233 or ANM 105
$500.00
ILL 292 Comics: Pencils and Inks
ILL 192 & ILL 233 (ILL 233 may be taken
concurrently)
ILL 310 History of American Illustration
(20th Century)
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
ILL 315 Location Drawing & Painting
ILL 232
ILL 318 Writing for Picture Books
LA 110
ILL 320 Clothed Figure Drawing 3
ILL 220 and one of the following: ILL 237 or
ILL 292 or VIS 250











$30.00



$100.00






205
ILL 332 Illustration 3: Interactive & Vector
Art
ILL 220 and either ILL 233 or VIS 250 and
either ILL 237 or ANM 364 or VIS 364
$100.00
ILL 333 Digital Media 3: Digital Paint
ILL 233 & ILL 237 or FA 227
$100.00
ILL 335 Illustration 4
ILL 320 & ILL 332
ILL 339 Watercolor for Illustrators
ILL 237
ILL 341 Situation Drawing & Painting
ILL 220 & ILL 243
ILL 364 Visual Development for
Entertainment Arts
ILL 220, ILL 243, and one of the following:
ANM 260, ANM 270, ILL 237, or VIS 250
ILL 367 Advanced Animal Drawing
ANM 267 or ILL 267 or obtain Department
Director’s Approval
ILL 378 Editorial Illustration
ILL 332
ILL 379 Eccentric Illustration
ILL 237 or FA 310
ILL 381 Wildlife Illustration
ILL 233, ILL 237, & ILL 267. Fine Art
Students must have Senior status and
Department approval.

ILL 385 Children's Book Illustration 1
ILL 220 & ILL 237




ILL 388 Illustration for Consumer Products
& Licensing
ILL 332




ILL 392 Comic Book Inking
ILL 192



ILL 420 Clothed Figure Drawing 4: Color
& Value
ILL 320
$100.00
ILL 445 Interactive Illustration
ILL 332
$100.00



ILL 460 Digital Painting & Portfolio
Development
ILL 333
$100.00


ILL 464 Drawing for Film
ILL 243, ILL 220, and either ILL 332 or ILL
364
ILL 485 Children's Book Illustration 2
ILL 385
ILL 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ILL 491 Portfolio Preparation and Self
Promotion
ILL 332, LA 291, & Senior status (Students
seeking a second bachelor's degree are
exempt from LA 291)


















$250.00
















ILL 493 Study Abroad
ILL 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


ILL 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


ILL 500 Internship in Illustration
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
ILL 602 MS: Concept, Technique and
Illustration
ILL 610 & FA 626
ILL 604 MS: Advertising Illustration
ILL 602
ILL 606 MS: Editorial Illustration
ILL 602, ILL 610, & FA 626
ILL 607 MS: Situation & Environment
ILL 610 or ILL 612
ILL 609 MS: Watercolor
ILL 625
ILL 610 MS: Clothed Figure Drawing

$190.00





















$100.00
ILL 612 MS: Sustained Figurative
Concepts
FA 626 & ILL 610
$100.00
ILL 615 MS: Head Drawing for Illustrators
FA 626 & ILL 610
$100.00













206
ILL 620 MS: The Graphic Novel 1
FA 602




ILL 625 MS: Perspective for Illustrators
ILL 610




ILL 630 MS: The Graphic Novel 2
ILL 620




ILL 632 MS: Refining Layouts in Ink
ILL 630

ILL 635 MS: Children's Book Illustration
ILL 645

ILL 639 MS: Creature Design
FA 626
ILL 640 MS: Character Design for Graphic
Novels
FA 626, ILL 610, & (FA 606 or FA 630)
ILL 645 MS: Character Design for
Children's Books
$115.00




























$100.00

ILL 663 MS: Digital Illustration
ILL 660
$100.00

ILL 665 MS: Interactive Illustration
ILL 660
$100.00

ILL 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ILL 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
ILL 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
ILL 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.
ILL 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
ILL 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.


ILL 380F Fantasy Illustration
ILL 237


ILL 380X Illustration: Concept & Narrative
ILL 332
ILL 475A Comics: Senior Project A: World
Building
ILL 192, ILL 220, & LA 217
$100.00
ILL 475B Comics: Senior Project B: The
Comic Book Proposal
ILL 475A
$100.00
JEM 110 Jewelry & Metal Arts 1
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
$312.00
JEM 155 Jewelry & Fashion
JEM 110
$312.00
JEM 165 Centrifugal & Vacuum Casting 1
JEM 110 or FASCU 235 and on campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 4.
$312.00
JEM 210 Jewelry & Metal Arts 2
JEM 110
$312.00
JEM 224 Textile Techniques
JEM 110
$312.00
JEM 233 Digital Design for Jewelry &
Metal Arts: Laser Cutting
ILL 133 & JEM 110. Non-JEM majors:
Either FSH 266 or IDS 145 or GR 102 or
PH 107 or WNM 105 or ILL 133 or Director
Approval.
$350.00
JEM 238 Papermaking/Mixed Media
JEM 240 Enameling 1

JEM 110


















$312.00



$210.00


FA 606 or FA 630
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.


ILL 660 MS: Digital Painting
ILL 801 MS: Group Directed Study



$100.00






207
JEM 265 Centrifugal & Vacuum Casting 2
JEM 165
$312.00

JEM 275 Welding and Smithing
JEM 110
$312.00

JEM 310 Jewelry & Metal Arts 3
JEM 210
$312.00

JEM 333 Organic 3D Modeling & Printing
for Jewelry Design
ILL 133 & JEM 110. Non-JEM majors:
Either FSH 266 or IDS 145 or GR 102 or
PH 107 or WNM 105 or ILL 133 or Director
Approval.
$350.00
JEM 340 Enameling 2
JEM 240
$312.00
JEM 344 Moving Metal 1
JEM 210 & LA 291. Students seeking a
2nd bachelor's degree are exempt from LA
291.
$312.00
JEM 110 & JEM 210
$350.00
JEM 422 Advanced Stone Setting
JEM 450 Jewelry & Metal Arts Portfolio
Project




$312.00
JEM 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
JEM 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
JEM 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
JEM 500 Internship in Jewelry & Metal
Arts
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
JEM 605 MS: Forging & Forming
JEM 610
JEM 610 MS: Jewelry & Metal Arts:
Design & Fabrication

$312.00
$312.00
JEM 610
$312.00
JEM 630 MS: Innovations in Materials and
Processes
JEM 620
$312.00
JEM 643 MS: Papermaking


JEM 620 MS: Jewelry & Metal Arts:
Advanced Design & Fabrication








$210.00
JEM 644 MS: Midpoint and Project
Development
Obtain Department Director's Approval.
$312.00
JEM 649 MS: Modular Casting for
Sculpture and Jewelry
JEM 610 or FASCU 623
$312.00
JEM 659 MS: Advanced Modular Casting
for Sculpture and Jewelry
JEM 649
$312.00
JEM 668 MS: Digital Design Laser Cutting
$350.00
JEM 670 MS: Organic 3D Modeling &
Printing
JEM Majors: JEM 610/ Non-JEM Majors:
None
JEM 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
JEM 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
JEM 801 MS: Group Directed Study

Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
JEM 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate student with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal.
JEM 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
$350.00











$200.00


208
JEM 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.
LA 103 Fundamentals of English
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
LA 106 Speaking & Listening for Artists
EAP 4 (or placement test)
LA 108 Composition for the Artist
English as a second language students
must pass LA 103 with a C- or higher
LA 110 English Composition: Narrative
Storytelling





$20.00











LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)






LA 113 Principles of Short Film
Storytelling
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.




LA 115 The Natural World 1: The Base
Layer
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.



LA 117 Survey of Landscape Architecture
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.





LA 118 History of Industrial Design
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 119 Fabric and Fiber Technology
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.






LA 120 Art History through the 15th
Century
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)






LA 121 Art History through the 19th
Century
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)






LA 123 Design Philosophy: Aesthetics,
Logic, and Ethics
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.


LA 124 Physics for Artists
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.






LA 125 The Creative Process
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.






LA 127 Topics in World Art
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)





LA 131 History of Gaming
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.






LA 132 History of Animation
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.






LA 133 Short Form Writing
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)






LA 134 History & Technology of Visual
Effects & Computer Animation
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 137 History of Visual Development
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.


LA 140 Music Appreciation
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
$10.00
$25.00




$50.00



LA 141 Storytelling: From Telephone to
Transmedia
On campus English as a second language
students must complete LA 103 with a
grade of “C-“ or higher.






LA 142 Film Music Appreciation
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.






LA 151 First Year Seminar for Academic
Success
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.






209
LA 161 Golden Section/Sacred Geometry
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.






LA 171 Western Civilization
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)






LA 172 Astronomy for Artists
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
LA 177 Pre-Industrial Urban Open Spaces
LA 108 (LA 108 may be concurrent)
(Students with start terms of Spring 2013
and beyond must achieve a C- or higher in
LA 108)
LA 182 Genres in Film
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
LA 190 History of Opera
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
LA 195 History of Comics

$90.00







$50.00

LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)




LA 200 Introduction to Computer
Programming
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
LA 202 English Composition: Creative
Persuasion & Argument
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)




LA 205 Developmental Psychology
LA 108 & LA 202 or LA 280. LA 202 or LA
280 may be concurrent. (Students with
start terms of Spring 2013 and beyond
must achieve a C- or higher in LA 108)


















LA 216 Science Fiction and Fantasy
$100.00




LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
$20.00
LA 217 Writing for Comics & Graphic
Novels
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
$25.00
LA 219 History of Architecture 1
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)

LA 220 American Art History
LA 202 or LA 280 or LA 429

LA 221 California Art in Cultural Context
LA 202 or LA 280 or LA 429





LA 222 20th Century Art
LA 202 or LA 280 or LA 429. Art History
students must complete or take
concurrently with LA 291.





LA 224 Women, Art & Society
LA 202 or LA 280 or LA 429

LA 225 History of Art Education
Either ARE 205 or LA 205 and either LA
202 or LA 280




LA 226 Survey of Traditional Interior
Architecture
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$25.00





LA 229 Survey of Contemporary Interior
Architecture
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$25.00





LA 233 Popular Topics in Health,
Nutrition, & Physiology
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 236 Survey of Bay Area Architecture
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)


LA 238 World Literature
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)





$150.00





210
LA 239 Materials & Processes
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 242 History of Graphic Design
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 243 History of American Illustration
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)





LA 244 History of Fashion
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 247 History & Techniques of
Printmaking
LA 121 & (LA 202 or LA 280)
LA 249 History of Architecture 2
LA 219




LA 254 Human-Centered Design
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)





LA 255 College Math
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.






LA 258 Creative Perspectives in Sound
Design 1
LA 142 or MUS 142 or LA 282 or LA 382 or
MPT 256


LA 260 French 1: Basic Grammar &
Speech
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.




LA 262 French 2: Conversational French
LA 260
LA 263 Beginning Chinese
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
LA 264 Intermediate Chinese
LA 263. On campus English as a second
language students must pass EAP level 4.
LA 267 Italian 1: Basic Grammar &
Speech
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 268 Spanish 1: Basic Grammar &
Speech
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 269 Italian 2: Conversational Italian
LA 267


LA 270 U.S. History
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)





LA 255 (C- or higher) or test score of: 200
= AAU Quantitative Literacy; 28 = ACT or
pass ACT Level I or II; 3 = AP Exam; 5 = IB
Math; 500 = SAT II Mathematics; 600 =
SAT I Mathematics. On campus EAP
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 271 College Algebra with Geometry
LA 272 Fundamentals of Drama
LA 273 Spanish 2: Conversational
Spanish
LA 268
LA 276 Seminar in Great Britain
LA 108, minimum 2.75 GPA & completion
of 1 art or architecture history course (LA
120, LA 121, LA 222, or LA 219) prior to
departure. NOTE: extensive walking is
required. (Students with SP13 start terms &
beyond must achieve a C- or higher in LA
108)
LA 277 Post Industrial Urban Open
Spaces
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)








LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)




Study Abroad in Great Britain
offered for 2015 June
Intersession



211
LA 278 Seminar in France
LA 279 Seminar in Italy
LA 280 Perspective Journalism
LA 108, minimum 2.75 GPA & completion
of 1 art or architecture history course (LA
120, LA 121, LA 222, or LA 219) prior to
departure. NOTE: extensive walking is
required. (Students with SP13 start terms &
beyond must achieve a C- or higher in LA
108)
Study Abroad in France last
offered in 2014 June
Intersession
LA 108, minimum 2.75 GPA & completion
of 1 art or architecture history course (LA
120, LA 121, LA 222, or LA 219) prior to
departure. NOTE: extensive walking is
required. (Students with SP13 start terms &
beyond must achieve a C- or higher in LA
108)
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
Study Abroad in Italy last
offered in 2011 June
Intersession
$20.00





LA 281 Film History 1: Pre-1940
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 282 Film History 2: 1940-1974
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





LA 283 Examining Film Noir
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.

On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
LA 289 Tune into the Tube: History of
Television
LA 291 Designing Careers
LA 292 Programming & Culture
LA 293 Precalculus


LA 284 Evolution of the Horror Film
LA 285 Gestures & Emotions in Art

LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)

























$20.00
LA 108 & LA 219. (Students with start
terms of Spring 2013 and beyond must
achieve a C- or higher in both LA 108 & LA
219)

LA 271 (grade of C- or higher) or
placement score of 3






LA 294 German 1: Basic
Grammar/Speech
LA 295 German 2: Conversational
German
LA 296 Applied Physics
LA 297 Landscape Social Factors
LA 294
LA 293 (with a grade of C- or higher) or LA
256 (with a grade of C- or higher) or
Quantitative Literacy Placement exam
score of 400 or higher.
LA 108 & either (LAN 117 or LA 117) &
either (LAN 177 or LA 177) & either (LAN
277 or LA 277). LAN 277/LA 277 may be
concurrent. (Students with start terms of
Spring 2013 and beyond must achieve a Cor higher in LA 108)
LA 300 Introduction to Public Speaking
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
LA 303 Introduction to Philosophy
LA 202 or LA 280 or LA 429
LA 304 Crowdfunding & Social Media
Marketing
LA 291

$10.00








212
LA 306 Creatively Speaking: Presentation
for Designers
LA 202 or LA 280
LA 307 History of Aesthetics
One of the following: LA 202 or LA 280 or
LA 429 & also one of the following: LA 121
or LA 249
$20.00
LA 312 Creative Writing
LA 110
$20.00
LA 313 Style Icons
(FSH 244 or LA 244) & (LA 202 or LA 280)
LA 318 Writing for Picture Books
LA 110
LA 319 History of Architecture 3
LA 249

LA 327 Art of the Classical World
One of the following: LA 202, LA 280, LA
429 and also one of the following: LA 120
or LA 219 (grade of C- or higher in either
LA 120 or LA 219)


One of the following: LA 202, LA 280, LA
429 and also one of the following: LA 120
or LA 219 (grade of C- or higher in either
LA 120 or LA 219)


LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)



LA 345 The Art of Science, the Science of
Art
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)

LA 347 Business Law
One of the following: LA 202 or LA 280 or
LA 429, and also LA 291 or have Junior
status.


LA 333 Medieval Art
LA 343 Comparative Religion
LA 358 Creative Perspectives in Sound
Design 2
MUS 258 or LA 258
LA 359 Urban Sociology
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)

















$20.00


$20.00



LA 361 The Artist in the Modern World
One of the following: LA 202, LA 280, LA
429, and also one of the following: LA 121
or LA 249 (grade of C- or higher in either
LA 121 or LA 249)
LA 365 General Psychology
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)


LA 368 Experiencing Culture:
Anthropology for Today's Artist
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)


LA 381 Marketing Essentials
LA 108 & LA 291 or have Junior status.
(Students with start terms of Spring 2013
and beyond must achieve a C- or higher in
LA 108)



LA 382 Film History 3: Contemporary
Cinema
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.



LA 383 International Cinema in an Age of
Change
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
LA 384 Underrated Cinema
LA 108 and either LA 281, LA 282, MPT
255, or MPT 256 (Students with start terms
of Spring 2013 and beyond must achieve a
C- or higher in LA 108)











213
LA 385 Close-Up on Hitchcock
LA 386 Exploring Science Fiction Cinema
LA 387 Women Directors in Cinema
LA 108 and one of the following: LA 281,
LA 282, MPT 255, or MPT 256 (Students
with start terms of Spring 2013 and beyond
must achieve a C- or higher in LA 108)

LA 108, LA 281 or MPT 255 & LA 282 or
MPT 256 (Students with start terms of
Spring 2013 and beyond must achieve a Cor higher in LA 108)

LA 108 and one of the following: LA 281,
MPT 255, LA 282, or MPT 256 (Students
with start terms of Spring 2013 and beyond
must achieve a C- or higher in LA 108)

LA 388 Survey of Asian Cinema
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
LA 392 French 3: Reading & Writing
LA 262
LA 393 Spanish 3: Reading & Writing
LA 273
LA 395 German 3: Reading & Writing
LA 295
LA 397 Italian 3: Reading & Writing
LA 269
LA 402 Advanced Fiction Writing
LA 110
$20.00
LA 405 Teaching: Principles & Practices
LA 202 or LA 280 or LA 429
$30.00
LA 407 The Beatles in the Visual Arts
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
LA 408 Analog Before Digital: Punk/ No
Wave Film & Music
LA 410 E-Commerce
LA 420 Art of the Italian Renaissance
LA 421 Northern Renaissance Art




LA 108 and one of the following: LA 281 or
LA 282 or MPT 255 or MPT 256 (Students
with start terms of Spring 2013 and beyond
must achieve a C- or higher in LA 108)
$20.00
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
$100.00






One of the following: LA 202, LA 280, LA
429, and also one of the following: LA 121
or LA 249 (grade of C- or higher in either
LA 121 or LA 249)

One of the following: LA 202, LA 280, LA
429, and also one of the following: LA 121
or LA 249 (grade of C- or higher in either
LA 121 or LA 249)



LA 422 Italian Baroque Art
One of the following: LA 202, LA 280, LA
429, and also one of the following: LA 121
or LA 249 (grade of C- or higher in either
LA 121 or LA 249)
LA 423 The Golden Age of Dutch Art
One of the following: LA 202, LA 280, LA
429, and also one of the following: LA 121
or LA 249 (grade of C- or higher in either
LA 121 or LA 249)

LA 429 Architecture Theory
LA 249

LA 432 Art of Spain: From El Greco to
Picasso
One of the following: LA 202, LA 280, LA
429, and also one of the following: LA 121
or LA 249 (grade of C- or higher in either
LA 121 or LA 249)








214
LA 433 18th & 19th Century European Art
One of the following: LA 202, LA 280, LA
429, and also one of the following: LA 121
or LA 249 (grade of C- or higher in either
LA 121 or LA 249)
LA 435 The Power of Signs: Semiotics &
The Visual Arts
LA 202 or LA 280 or LA 429
LA 449 Urban Design Theory
LA 319
LA 462 Power of Myth and Symbol
LA 202 or LA 280 or LA 429
LA 464 Survey of Dada & Surrealism
One of the following: LA 202, LA 280, LA
429, and also one of the following: LA 121
or LA 249 (grade of C- or higher in either
LA 121 or LA 249)
LA 480 The Small Business Entrepreneur
One of the following: LA 202 or LA 280 or
LA 429, and also LA 291 or have Junior
status.















$100.00
LA 483 Interactive Media Production &
Entrepreneurship
LA 291, Junior status, & either LA 202 or
LA 280. Students seeking their second
Bachelor's degree are exempt from LA 291.
LA 492 French 4: Proficiency
LA 392
LA 493 Spanish 4: Proficiency
LA 393
LA 495 German 4: Proficiency
LA 395
LA 497 Italian 4: Proficiency
LA 397
LA 499 LA Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
LA 126LA Seminar in the Arts: Los
Angeles
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
$200.00
LA 126SF Seminar in the Arts: San
Francisco
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
$200.00
LAN 115 The Natural World 1: The Base
Layer
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$10.00
LAN 117 Survey of Landscape
Architecture
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
LAN 135 The Natural World 2: Climate &
Plant Communities
LA 115/LAN 115 & LA 117/LAN 117 &
FND 113 (both FND 113 & LA/LAN 117
may be concurrent)
$10.00
LAN 177 Pre-Industrial Urban Open
Spaces
LA 108 (LA 108 may be concurrent)
(Students with start terms of Spring 2013
and beyond must achieve a C- or higher in
LA 108)
$90.00
LAN 180 Plants in the Landscape 1
On campus English as a second language
students must also pass EAP level 3
$15.00
LAN 193 Landscape Drawing & Drafting
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$10.00
LAN 213 Digital Rendering
FND 113, IAD 210, & LAN 193
$350.00
LAN 223 Computer Aided Drafting for
Landscape Architecture
LAN 193
$200.00
LAN 235 The Natural World 3: Site
Planning
FND 113, LAN 135, & LAN 117/LA 117
$300.00
LAN 240 Planting Design
ARH 110, FND 113, LAN 180, LAN 117/LA
117, LAN 250
$15.00

































215
LAN 250 Landscape Design Studio
LAN 260 The Technical World 1: Grading
& Drainage
ARH 110, LAN 193, LAN 235, & either LAN
177 or LA 177. (LAN 235, LAN 177, & LA
177 may all be taken concurrently).
$210.00
LA 291, LAN 235, LAN 240, LAN 250, &
either LA 271 or Quantitative Literacy test
score of 300 or higher. (LAN 250 & LA 291
may be taken concurrently and students
seeking a second bachelor's degree are
exempt from LA 291.)
$150.00


LAN 277 Post Industrial Urban Open
Spaces
LA 108 (Students with start terms of Spring
2013 and beyond must achieve a C- or
higher in LA 108)
LAN 280 Plants as Design Elements in
the Landscape 3
LAN 240
LAN 297 Landscape Social Factors
LA 108 & either (LAN 117 or LA 117) &
either (LAN 177 or LA 177) & either (LAN
277 or LA 277). LAN 277/LA 277 may be
concurrent. (Students with start terms of
Spring 2013 and beyond must achieve a Cor higher in LA 108)
$10.00
LAN 250, LAN 260, LAN 375, LA/LAN 177,
LA/LAN 277 & LA/LAN 297 (LA/LAN 297
may be concurrent)
$400.00
LAN 323 Technical Digital Drawing 1
LAN 223, LAN 300, & LAN 330 (both LAN
300 & LAN 330 may be taken concurrently)
$350.00
LAN 330 The Technical World 2:
Materials & Details
LAN 260
$285.00
LAN 350 Sustainable Designs & Practices
Studio
IAD 270, LAN 300, & LAN 330 (IAD 270
may be concurrent)
$400.00
LAN 360 The Technical World 3:
Construction Documents
LAN 330
$215.00
LAN 375 Sketching for Idea Development
IAD 241 or LAN 193
$10.00
LAN 391 Portfolio Preparation
LAN 300, LAN 330 & LA 291
$50.00
LAN 392 Professional Practices
LAN 300, LAN 330, & LA 291
$50.00
LAN 398 Community Design Studio
LAN 273, LAN 300, LAN 330 & Department
Approval
$140.00
LAN 400 Regional Planning & Design
Studio
LAN 350
$335.00
LAN 450 Advanced Design Studio
LAN 360, LAN 391, LAN 392 & LAN 400
$290.00
LAN 498 Collaborative Project
LAN 398 / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
$300.00
LAN 499 LAN Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
LAN 500 Internship in Landscape
Architecture
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
LAN 300 Design of Urban Places Studio
LAN 605 MS: Drawing as Process

$10.00
LAN 607 MS: Historical Precedents of
Landscape Architecture
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
LAN 609 MS: Ecological Foundations of
Design 1
EAP 604
$10.00
LAN 610 MS: Landscape Architecture
Design Studio
LAN 605 & on campus English as a second
language students must pass EAP level
604. LAN 605 may be taken concurrently.
$15.00







































216
LAN 617 MS: Site Engineering
LAN 610 & LAN 619 (LAN 619 may be
taken concurrently)
$150.00
LAN 619 MS: Ecological Foundations of
Design 2
LAN 609
$300.00
LAN 620 MS: Site Design Studio
LAN 610, LAN 617, LAN 619, & either LAN
615 or IAD 608 (LAN 615, IAD 608, LAN
617, & LAN 619 may be taken
concurrently)
$300.00
LAN 658 MS: Landscape, Theory &
Design
LAN 620 & on campus English as a second
language students must also pass EAP
level 604.
LAN 660 MS: Designing Public Spaces
Studio
LAN 620 & either LAN 615 or IAD 608. On
campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.
$150.00
LAN 665 MS: Digital Graphics for
Landscape Architecture
LAN 620 & either LAN 615 or IAD 608
$200.00
LAN 670 MS: Regional Planning &
Analysis Studio
LAN 660 & LAN 665
$335.00
LAN 673 MS: Landscape Architectural
Methods & Materials
LAN 660 & LAN 665
$85.00
LAN 678 MS: People & the Environment
LAN 620 & either LAN 615 or IAD 608. On
campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.


























$200.00
LAN 680 MS: Site Planning & Sustainable
Design Studio
LAN 670, LAN 673, & LAN 679
$300.00
LAN 688 MS: Emerging Topics &
Research Methods
LAN 670, LAN 673, & LAN 679
LAN 690 MS: Adv. Professional Studio
LAN 680 & LAN 688
LAN 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Obtain Department Director’s approval /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.

Obtain Department Director’s Approval. /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.

LAN 801 MS: Group Directed Study


LAN 660 & LAN 665
LAN 800 MS: Directed Study


LAN 679 MS: Advanced Digital Graphics
for Landscape Architecture
LAN 699 MS: Special Topics

$285.00
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.



Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.

LAN 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate student with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal.
LAN 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
LAN 900 MS: Internship in Landscape
Architecture
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.
MPT 105 Cinematic Storytelling
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$50.00
MPT 110 Nonlinear Computer Editing 1:
Principles of Editing
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$200.00
MPT 120 Respect for Acting
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.



















217
MPT 130 Motion Picture Language
MPT 105 & MPT 110. On campus English
as a second language students must pass
EAP level 2.
MPT 133 Principles of Short Film
Storytelling
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
MPT 140 Lighting 1: The Art of Seeing
Light
MPT 260 or MPT 261
MPT 205 Introduction to Producing
MPT 133 or MPT 295 & LA 108 (LA 108
may be concurrent) (Students with start
terms of Spring 2013 and beyond must
achieve a C- or higher in LA 108)
$200.00
$200.00
MPT 225 Introduction to Sound/Foley &
Effects
MPT 110 or ANM 109 or MUS 125. On
campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
$200.00
MPT 231 Non-Linear Computer Editing 2
MPT 110 & MPT 130 (MPT 130 may be
concurrent with MPT 231). On campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 2.
$300.00




































MPT 246 Film Scheduling & Practical Set
Management
MPT 205
MPT 250 Unit Production Management
MPT 246 or MPT 378



MPT 255 Film History 1: Pre-1940
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





MPT 256 Film History 2: 1940-1974
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.





MPT 260 Cinematography 1: Film
MPT 130. On campus English as a second
language students must pass EAP level 3.
$475.00
MPT 130. On campus English as a second
language students must pass EAP level 3.
$350.00
MPT 271 Lighting 2: Film
MPT 140 & MPT 260
$250.00
MPT 272 Lighting 2: Digital
MPT 140 & MPT 261
MPT 261 Cinematography 1: Digital













MPT 285 Production Design: Script to
Screen

MPT 299 Directing: Breakdown &
Blocking
MPT 301 Makeup: Street & Special
Effects
MPT 303 Makeup: Character & FX
MPT 120, MPT 130, MPT 133, & MPT 377
$200.00
MPT 304 Crowdfunding & Social Media
Marketing
LA 291
MPT 315 Experimental Filmmaking 1
MPT 260 or MPT 261 (both may be taken
concurrently)
$325.00
MPT 325 Sound 2: Location/Production
MPT 225
MPT 330 Directing Actors for Film & TV
$365.00




$400.00













$250.00




MPT 105, MPT 120, & MPT 130
$200.00




MPT 340 Cinematography 2: Film
MPT 140 & MPT 260
$650.00
MPT 341 Documentary 1
MPT 260 or MPT 261
$275.00

MPT 342 Cinematography 2: Digital
MPT 140 & MPT 261
$300.00

MPT 350 Non-Linear Editing 3
MPT 231
$300.00

MPT 351 Lighting 3: Film
MPT 271
$800.00
MPT 355 Non-Linear Computer Editing 4:
Editing the Professional Portfolio
MPT 350
$300.00
MPT 360 Producing for Motion Pictures
MPT 250
























218
MPT 362 Cinematography: Shooting with
Style
MPT 340 or MPT 342
MPT 363 Film Promotion & Budget
Recouping
MPT majors with Junior status
MPT 367 Securing Rights & Agreements
for Film
MPT 360 or MPT 460
MPT 371 After Effects for Professional
Editors
MPT 225 & MPT 350
$300.00
MPT 372 Advanced After Effects
MPT 371
$300.00
MPT 377 Principles of Directing
LA 291, MPT 120, MPT 130, MPT 133,
MPT 166 (LA 291 & MPT 166 may be
taken concurrently) (Students seeking a
second bachelor's degree are exempt from
LA 291).
$200.00
MPT 378 Directing 2
MPT 377
$600.00
MPT 380 Film Postproduction: Digital
Transfer & Color Correction
MPT 340
$350.00
MPT 384 Shooting the One-Hour Drama
MPT 377
$250.00
MPT 386 Advanced Editing Theory
MPT 231 and MPT 350 (MPT 350 may be
concurrent)





























MPT 389 Production Design: Short Form
Entertainment
MPT 390 The Work of the Great Directors


MPT 256 or LA 282
MPT 391 Production Design: Television




MPT 392 Production Design: Features








MPT 415 Experimental Filmmaking 2
MPT 315
$300.00


MPT 425 Sound 3: MultiTrack Mix/ADR
MPT 325
$200.00


MPT 431 Editing for Performance
MPT 386
$300.00


MPT 435 Writing for Television
MPT 320 or MPT 233
$100.00
MPT 440 Overview: Film & Video Post
Production
A minimum of 100 credits, plus take MPT
465 or MPT 355 or MPT 460
$200.00
MPT 441 Documentary 2
MPT 341
$275.00
MPT 442 Cinematography 3: Digital
MPT 225 & MPT 342
$550.00
MPT 445 Cinematography 3: Film
MPT 340
$800.00
MPT 450 Making the Music Video
MPT 110, MPT 377, & either MPT 260 or
MPT 261
$250.00
MPT 455 Editing: Advanced Color
Correction
MPT 355
$300.00
MPT 456 Emerging Technologies in
Editing
MPT 355
$200.00
MPT 461 Entrepreneurial Producing 1
MPT 250
$50.00
MPT 462 Cinematography 4: Digital
MPT 442
$625.00
MPT 463 Entrepreneurial Producing 2
MPT 461
$700.00
MPT 464 Directing the Commercial
MPT 231, MPT 378, & either MPT 340 or
MPT 342 for MPT majors. All other majors:
MPT 130.



















MPT 465 Cinematography 4: Film
MPT 445
$850.00


MPT 467 T.V. Commercial Production
Senior status
$400.00


MPT 471 Film Production A
Senior status
$850.00


MPT 472 Film Production B
MPT 471 or MPT 470A
$850.00


MPT 480 Producing for Television
MPT 250



219
MPT 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
MPT 495 Demo Reel: Transitioning to the
Film Industry
Must have Senior status.
MPT 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
MPT 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.




MPT 500 Internship in Motion Pictures &
Television
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.





MPT 600 MS: The Art of the Short Film
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 603










$100.00









MPT 603 MS: Making the Documentary
MPT 625
$325.00




MPT 605 MS: Film Language Studio
Recommended concurrent with MPT 625
$150.00




MPT 613 MS: Professional Finishing
MPT 625
$300.00




MPT 615 MS: Lighting
MPT 630 or MPT 634 (either may be taken
concurrently)
$275.00


MPT 616 MS: Directing Actors for Motion
Pictures
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
$200.00




MPT 619 MS: Short Film 2: Writing the
Short Film
MPT 600 or WRI 680

















MPT 625 MS: Editing Concepts
MPT 629 MS: Short Film 3: Rewriting the
Short Film
$250.00
MPT 619
MPT 630 MS: Film Cinematography 1
$500.00
MPT 632 MS: Sound
$210.00

MPT 634 MS: Digital Cinematography 1
$350.00

MPT 636 MS: Film Cinematography 2
MPT 625 & either MPT 630 or MPT 634
$650.00
MPT 637 MS: Lighting 2: Exteriors - Day
& Night
MPT 615
$800.00
MPT 639 MS: Digital Cinematography 2
MPT 634
MPT 640 MS: Producing for Motion
Pictures
MPT 625
MPT 641 MS: Visual Storytelling
MPT 605 & MPT 625
MPT 642 MS: Studio Directing















$200.00


MPT 641
$600.00




MPT 643 MS: Creative Sound Design for
Visual Media
MPT 632
$210.00




MPT 644 MS: Directors Rehearsing
Actors
MPT 616, MPT 625, and on campus
English as a second language students
must pass EAP level 604.
$300.00
MPT 645 MS: Overview of Production
Design

MPT 646 MS: Film Cinematography 3
MPT 636
$700.00
MPT 649 MS: Editing with Motion
Graphics & Visual Effects
MPT 625
$300.00
MPT 651 A Director Prepares
MPT 616 & MPT 641
$250.00
MPT 652 MS: Studio Directing 2
MPT 642
$600.00
MPT 656 MS: Film Cinematography 4
MPT 646
$850.00
MPT 659 MS: Experimental Film
MPT 630 or MPT 634 (MPT 630 or MPT
634 may be taken concurrently)
$300.00





















220
MPT 663 MS: Aesthetics of Editing
MPT 625
MPT 695 MS: Collaborative Project
GLA 602, MPT 620, MPT 630 and
Department Director approval. / Note:
Course fees and prerequisites will vary by
topic.
MPT 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
MPT 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
MPT 801 MS: Group Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.
MPT 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
MPT 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.




























MPT 625, MPT 630 & MPT 632
MUS 101 Music Theory & Basic Notation

$100.00
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
MPT 802 MS: Thesis Forum
MPT 641A MS: Directing 1: Visual
Storytelling


$125.00









































MUS 105 Digital Audio Workstations 1
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$180.00
MUS 110 Harmony 1
MUS 101. On campus English as a second
language students must pass EAP level 2.
$125.00
MUS 120 Music Production 1
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$180.00
MUS 125 Audio Production
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$230.00
MUS 130 Ear Training 1
MUS 110 (MUS 110 may be taken
concurrently). On campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 2.
$125.00
MUS 140 Music Notation and Score
Preparation
MUS 110 (MUS 110 may be taken
concurrently). On campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 2.
$175.00
MUS 142 Film Music Appreciation
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
MUS 150 Harmony 2
MUS 110
$175.00
MUS 160 Ear Training 2
MUS 110, MUS 130, & MUS 150. MUS 150
must be taken concurrently.
$175.00
MUS 170 Music Production 2
MUS 120. On campus English as a second
language students must pass EAP level 2.
$180.00
MUS 180 Arranging 1
MUS 120 & MUS 140
$175.00



MUS 195 Sound for Games 1
MUS 105
$180.00



MUS 210 Harmony 3
MUS 150
$175.00
MUS 230 Ear Training 3
MUS 160
$175.00









221
MUS 235 Analysis of Dramatic Scoring
MUS 150 & MUS 180 and MUS 142 or LA
142
$175.00
MUS 240 Counterpoint 1
MUS 150
MUS 250 Harmony 4
MUS 210
MUS 258 Creative Perspectives in Sound
Design 1
LA 142 or MUS 142 or LA 282 or LA 382 or
MPT 256
MUS 265 Orchestration Techniques 1
MUS 140 & MUS 150 (MUS 140 may be
taken concurrently)
$175.00
MUS 270 Music Editing for Visual Media 1
MPT 225
$175.00
MUS 280 Arranging 2
MUS 170, MUS 180, MUS 240, & MUS 265
(MUS 240 may be taken concurrently)
$180.00
MUS 315 Music Scoring for TV
Commercials
MUS 265 & MUS 280
$100.00
MUS 330 Production Sound Recording
MUS 270 & MPT 325
$200.00

MUS 340 Counterpoint 2
MUS 240
$175.00

MUS 358 Creative Perspectives in Sound
Design 2
MUS 258 or LA 258
MUS 365 Orchestration Techniques 2
MUS 265
$175.00
MUS 370 Music Editing for Visual Media 2
MUS 270 & LA 291 (LA 291 may be taken
concurrently). Students seeking a 2nd
Bachelor's degree are exempt from LA 291.
$175.00
MUS 375 Music Scoring for Film 1
MUS 265 & MUS 280
$180.00
MUS 395 Music Scoring for Games
MUS 195, MUS 265, & MUS 280 (MUS
280 may be taken concurrently)
$175.00
MUS 415 Mixing 1: The Final Music Mix
MUS 370
$180.00


MUS 430 Dialog Editing
MPT 425 & MUS 270
$175.00


MUS 475 Music Scoring for Film 2
MUS 370 & MUS 375
$100.00
MUS 480 Music Demo Reel
Senior Status and MUS 370.
$180.00


MUS 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
MUS 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
$100.00


MUS 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
$100.00
MUS 500 Internship in Music for Visual
Media
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.


$175.00


$175.00



























MUS 600 MS: Fundamentals of Harmony
$185.00




MUS 601 MS: Digital Audio Workstations
1
MUS 605 MS: Music Notation and Score
Preparation
$185.00









MUS 609 MS: Modern Techniques in
Music Production
$190.00









$185.00
MUS 610 MS: Harmony: Advanced
Techniques
MUS 600
$190.00
MUS 615 MS: Arranging
MUS 610 & MUS 639
$185.00


$240.00




$190.00




MUS 616 MS: Audio Production 1
MUS 617 MS: Sound Design for Games
MUS 619 MS: Ear Training / Music
Listening Skills
MUS 601
$185.00







222
MUS 620 MS: The Art of Counterpoint
MUS 605 & MUS 610 (MUS 610 may be
concurrent)
$185.00
MUS 625 MS: Orchestration
MUS 610
$185.00
MUS 629 MS: Music Editing for Visual
Media
MUS 601
$185.00
MUS 635 MS: MIDI Orchestration
MUS 625 (may be taken concurrently)
$185.00
MUS 639 MS: Music Production 2
MUS 609
$190.00
MUS 640 MS: Music Scoring for Film
MUS 610 & MUS 639
$190.00
MUS 643 MS: Creative Sound Design for
Visual Media
MPT 632
$210.00
MUS 645 MS: Music Scoring for Games
MUS 639
$100.00
MUS 649 MS: Analysis of Dramatic
Scoring
MUS 695 MS: Collaborative Project
MUS 615, MUS 625, & MUS 619
$190.00
MUS 699 MS: Special Topics
Obtain Department Director’s Approval. /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
MUS 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
MUS 801 MS: Group Directed Study

























Obtain Department Director’s approval /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
MUS 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate student with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal.
MUS 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
MUS 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.
PH 100 Photography as a Visual
Language
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2. Students
must also be a Photography major or
minor.
PH 101 Photo History and Concepts
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 3.
PH 103 Digital Photography for Artists









$190.00




$125.00










$150.00


PH 107 Photoshop for Photographers
PH 108. On campus English as a second
language students must pass EAP level 3.
$150.00
PH 108 Photography Principles and
Techniques
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2. Must be
Photography major or Photography minor.
$125.00
PH 112 Quality of Light
PH 100 and PH 108. On campus English
as a second language students must pass
EAP level 3.
$150.00
PH 115 Visualization
PH 100 & PH 101
$150.00
PH 150 Traditional Photo Process
PH 100, PH 115, & PH 225
$150.00
PH 177 Imaging for Photographers
PH 107
$150.00




PH 197 Digital Printing
PH 108, PH 177, & PH 233
$175.00




PH 200 Advanced Traditional Photo
Processes
PH 100 & PH 150
$150.00






























223
PH 225 Photo Design and Concept
PH 100 and PH 115
$150.00





PH 233 Color Photography
PH 108 & PH 112
$150.00





PH 235 People Photography
PH 112 & PH 115
$150.00





PH 250 Location Lighting
PH 112 & PH 115
$175.00




PH 260 Documentary
PH 115 & PH 197
$150.00




PH 275 Concept Project
PH 197, PH 225 & LA 291 (PH 197 may be
taken concurrently). Students seeking a
2nd Bachelor's degree are exempt from LA
291.
$150.00





PH 300 Architectural Landscape
Photography
PH 115, PH 197 & PH 225
$150.00
PH 310 Fine Art Photography
PH 115 & PH 225
$150.00





PH 312 Alternative Processes
PH 197 & PH 275
$150.00




PH 316 Landscape as Fine Art
PH 197 and either PH 200 or PH 275
$150.00



PH 335 Contemporary Fine Art Practices
PH 310
$150.00




PH 338 Fine Art Portraiture
PH 197, PH 235, & PH 275
$150.00




PH 345 Still Life 1
PH 112, PH 197 & PH 225
$150.00




PH 350 Architectural Photography
PH 197 & PH 250
$150.00
PH 355 Portfolio Development 1
PH 275
$150.00
PH 365 Advertising Photography
PH 112, PH 197 & PH 355
$150.00
PH 369 The Photo Essay
PH 260
$100.00


PH 370 People Illustration
PH 235 & PH 250
$150.00


PH 371 Advanced Location Lighting
PH 250
$175.00
PH 372 Environmental Portraiture
PH 197, PH 235, & PH 275
$150.00

PH 380 Still Life 2
PH 345
$150.00




PH 385 Advanced Photo Imagery
PH 177, PH 197, & PH 225
$150.00




PH 414 Photography & Mixed Media
PH 197 & PH 310
$150.00
PH 425 Advanced Digital Retouching
PH 197 & PH 385
$175.00



PH 455 Fine Art Project 1
PH 275 & PH 335
$150.00



PH 456 Multimedia Storytelling
PH 369
$150.00
PH 462 Editorial Photography
PH 275 and must have Senior status
$150.00




PH 464 Self-Promotion & Marketing
PH 275 and must have Senior status
$150.00




PH 475 The Business of Photography
PH 275
PH 476 Fashion and Beauty 1
PH 112, PH 197 & PH 235
PH 488 Senior Project
PH 355 & Department Director approval
PH 489 Fine Art Project 2
PH 455
PH 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
PH 495 Senior Portfolio
Must have Senior status and Department
Director approval
$150.00
PH 496 Fashion and Beauty 2
PH 476
$175.00


PH 497 Advertising / Editorial Portfolio
PH 355
$150.00


PH 498 Collaborative Project
PH 365 / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
$150.00
PH 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.























$175.00











$150.00







224
PH 500 Internship in Photography
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.



PH 600 Introduction to Digital
Photography Concepts & Techniques
Non-Photography Majors
PH 601 MS: Photography-Concept
PH 612 (may be taken concurrently)
$150.00





PH 603 MS: The Language of
Photography
PH 604 MS: Fine Art Applications
Student must be a Photography major.
$150.00






PH 603
$150.00
PH 605 MS: Photo - Illustration
PH 612 & GLA 625
$175.00
PH 608 MS: Lighting
PH 603
$175.00


PH 610 MS: Photojournalism
PH 608 & PH 614
$150.00
PH 611 MS: Contemporary Landscape
PH 612
$150.00
PH 612 MS: The Nature of Photography
PH 603 & GLA 625 (GLA 625 may be
taken concurrently)
$150.00

PH 613 MS: Color and Light
PH 603
$150.00
PH 614 MS: Black & White Darkroom



Student must be a Photography major.
$150.00
PH 620 MS: Still Life
PH 608
PH 621 MS: Experimental Photography


















$150.00
PH 616 MS: The Photographer &
Photoshop






$175.00



PH 612
$175.00



PH 622 MS: Documentary
PH 612
$150.00



PH 623 MS: Portraiture
PH 608
$175.00


PH 626 MS: Self as Subject
PH 612
$175.00


PH 632 MS: Lighting & Large Format
Techniques
PH 608 or PH 623
$175.00
PH 633 MS: Fashion & Beauty
Photography
PH 608 or PH 623
$185.00
PH 635 MS: Digital Printing
PH 613 & PH 616
$175.00
PH 636 MS: Digital Imaging
PH 616
$150.00
PH 640 MS: Experimental Historic
Processes
PH 612
$175.00
PH 642 MS: Location Lighting
PH 608
$185.00
PH 644 MS: Photography as Mixed Media
PH 612 & GLA 625
$175.00
PH 645 MS: Experimental Contemporary
Photography
PH 612
$175.00
PH 646 MS: Pinhole, Plastic, & Mobile
Cameras





















$175.00
PH 650 MS: Portfolio Development
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal.
$175.00
PH 655 MS: Digital Montage
PH 612 & PH 616
$175.00
PH 672 MS: The Photography Intensive
Obtain Department Director's Approval.
$175.00
PH 680 MS: Thesis Project Development
PH 601
$175.00
PH 681 MS: Thesis Advancement
PH 680 & Department Director approval
PH 682 MS: Concept & Critical Processes
PH 680
PH 694 MS: The Art of Teaching
Photography
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal
PH 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
$175.00
$300.00




















225
PH 699 MS: Special Topics
PH 800 MS: Directed Study
PH 801 MS: Group Directed Study
PH 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Obtain Department Director’s Approval. /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.

Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.

Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.
PH 810 MS: Concept & Image
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review

PH 816 MS: Fine Art
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.

PH 817 MS: Art for Commerce
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.
PH 818 MS: Documentary
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.

PH 830 MS: Context & Communication
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.

PH 831 MS: Thesis Intensive
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.
PH 836 MS: Advanced Photoshop
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.

PH 837 MS: Alternative Practices
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.

PH 856 MS: Final Review Preparation
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review.

PH 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.








PH 680C MS: Thesis Project
Development - Art for Commerce
PH 601, PH 612, & GS 625
$175.00
PH 680F MS: Thesis Project
Development - Fine Art
PH 601, PH 612, & GS 625
$175.00
PRO 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
PRO LA510 Marketing Essentials
This class is open to Personal Enrichment
students or degree seeking Junior or
Senior students who have completed LA
108 & LA 291. (Students with start terms of
Spring 2013 and beyond must achieve a Cor higher in LA 108)

This class is open to Personal Enrichment
students or degree seeking Junior or
Senior students who have completed LA
291 and either LA 202 or LA 280.

This class is open to Personal Enrichment
students or degree seeking Junior or
Senior students who have completed LA
291 and either LA 202 or LA 280.


Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
PRO LA550 The Small Business
Entrepreneur

$175.00
PH 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
PRO LA520 Business Law













$100.00




226
PRO PH510 Digital Photography:
Shooting
This course is open to non-Photography
Juniors and Seniors and Personal
Enrichment students.
PRO PH512 Digital Photography:
Photoshop
PRO PH 510
PRO PH517 Digital Photography:
Presentation
PRO PH512. PRO PH512 may be
concurrent
VIS 103 Visual Development Imaging
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.
VIS 137 History of Visual Development
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 4.
VIS 150 Visual Development 1
Either VIS 103 or ILL 133, and also FND
116 (FND 116 may be concurrent)
$100.00
VIS 205 Visual Development Production
FND 116, FND 125, ILL 120, LA 291 &
either VIS 150 or ANM 203 (VIS 150 may
be concurrent.) Students seeking a second
bachelor's degree are exempt from LA 291.
$100.00
VIS 230 Digital Painting for Visual
Development
FND 125, FA 110, ILL 120 (FA 110 and ILL
120 may be concurrent)
$400.00
VIS 250 Inspirational Art for Animation
FND 125 & ILL 120
$100.00
VIS 270 Vehicle & Armor Design for
Visual Development
FND 116 & (FND 122 or FND 125)
$400.00
VIS 300 Environment Design for Visual
Development
VIS 250
$400.00
VIS 310 Visual Development for Spot
Animation
FND 116 & VIS 250 or ILL 243
$400.00
VIS 311 Visual Development for Web and
Mobile Gaming
FND 116 & ILL 332 or VIS 250
$100.00
VIS 350 Visual Development for Live
Action
VIS 364 Character Design 1: Bringing
Characters to Life
VIS 310 or VIS 311 or ILL 243
$100.00
ILL 120, ILL 222, & one of the following: ILL
220 or ANM 202 or ANM 203 or ANM 204
or ANM 260 or ANM 285
$145.00
VIS 374 Character Design 2: Production
Ready Characters
VIS 364
$400.00
VIS 375 Creature Design for Visual
Development
VIS 350
$100.00
VIS 400 Visual Development Styles
Obtain Department Director's Approval.
$100.00
VIS 405 Senior Portfolio for Visual
Development
Students must have Senior status
VIS 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
VIS 498 Collaborative Project





$100.00



















































Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


VIS 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


VIS 611 MS: The Visual Elements of
Story
ANM 610, ILL 610, FA 630, ILL 625, &
ANM 633. ANM 633 may be concurrent.
VIS 670 Pre-Production for Visual
Development
$100.00
VIS 699 MS: Special Topics
Obtain Department Director’s Approval. /
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
VIS 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.






$115.00













227
VIS 801 MS: Group Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
VIS 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate student with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal.
VIS 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
VIS 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.




WNM 105 Design Technology
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 1.
$100.00
WNM 110 Visual Design Principles
WNM 105 (WNM 105 may be taken
concurrently). On campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 2.
$100.00
WNM 120 User Experience 1
WNM 105 & WNM 110
$100.00
WNM 205 Motion Graphics 1
Either WNM 105 & WNM 110 or GR 102 &
GR 105
$100.00
WNM 210 Visual Design 1
FND 113, WNM 105, WNM 110, & WNM
230 (WNM 230 may be taken
concurrently). On campus English as a
second language students must pass EAP
level 3.
WNM 105, WNM 110, & WNM 236 (WNM
236 may be taken concurrently). Non WNM
majors: GR 102 & GR 105. On campus
English as a second language students
must also pass EAP level 2.
$100.00
WNM 105 or ANM 101 (either WNM 105 or
ANM 101 may be taken concurrently). On
campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 2.
$100.00
Take one of the following: WNM 105, ANM
101, ARH 180, COM 115, FSH 161, FSH
266, FSH 398, GAM 105, GR 102, IAD
210, IDS 145, ILL 133, PH 107, MPT 110,
MUS 120, or VIS 103.
$100.00
WNM 250 Web Design 2
WNM 249
WNM 270 Type Design
WNM 282 Portfolio 1












































$100.00






WNM 282 & WNM 310
$100.00





LA 291, WNM 250, WNM 310, WNM 330,
& WNM 349 (WNM 349 may be taken
concurrently). Students seeking a 2nd
Bachelor's degree are exempt from LA 291.
$100.00





WNM 290 User Experience 2
WNM 250
$100.00





WNM 300 Interactive Applications
WNM 282
$100.00




WNM 305 Motion Graphics 2
WNM 205 or WNM 282
$100.00




WNM 310 Visual Design 2
$100.00




WNM 315 Visual Design 3
WNM 210, WNM 230, WNM 236, WNM
205, WNM 250, WNM 330, LA 291 (WNM
205, WNM 250, WNM 330, & LA 291 may
all be taken concurrently). Students
seeking their second Bachelor’s degree are
exempt from LA 291.
WNM 270, WNM 282 & WNM 310
WNM 330 Digital Imaging 2
WNM 210, WNM 230, & WNM 236
$100.00
WNM 230 Digital Imaging 1
WNM 236 Digital Photography
WNM 249 Web Design 1
$100.00
$100.00









228
WNM 335 Digital Imaging 3
WNM 330 & WNM 282 (WNM 282 may be
concurrent)
$100.00
WNM 349 Web Design 3
WNM 250
$100.00
WNM 355 Motion Graphics 3
WNM 282 & WNM 305
$100.00
WNM 358 Digital Video 1
WNM 282 & WNM 305
$100.00




WNM 369 Web Design 4
WNM 282 & WNM 349
$100.00




WNM 380 Senior Project
WNM 205, WNM 290, WNN 310 & WNM
349
$100.00



WNM 482 Portfolio 2
WNM 315 or WNM 380 (WNM 380 may be
taken concurrently)
$100.00


WNM 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.


WNM 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
WNM 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.

WNM 500 Internship in Web Design &
New Media
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.





















$100.00






WNM 600 MS: Digital Applications
$100.00






WNM 601 MS: Inside Programming
$100.00






WNM 605 MS: Typography for Digital
Masters
$100.00


















WNM 606 MS: Principles of UX
WNM 600. Must be a WNM major
$100.00
WNM 608 MS: Web Technology 1
WNM 601, WNM 605 & WNM 606 (WNM
605 & WNM 606 may be taken
concurrently)
$100.00
WNM 613 MS: Topics in Motion Graphics
WNM 601 (may be taken concurrently)
$100.00






WNM 617 MS: Mobile Web Technology
WNM 608
$100.00






WNM 618 MS: Web Technology 2
WNM 608
$100.00






WNM 619 MS: Advanced Digital Imaging
WNM 600, WNM 601, WNM 605, & WNM
606.
$100.00
















WNM 622 MS: Digital Capture
$140.00
WNM 642 MS: Time Based Media
WNM 601
$100.00
WNM 643 MS: Interactive Design &
Concepts
WNM 601, WNM 605, WNM 606, & WNM
608
$100.00
WNM 645 MS: Time Based Media
Scripting
WNM 661 MS: Interactive InfoGraphics
WNM 642
$100.00




WNM 608
$100.00




WNM 663 MS: Advanced Topics in
Motion Graphics
WNM 613
$100.00




WNM 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
$100.00
WNM 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
WNM 800 MS: Directed Study
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.
WNM 801 MS: Group Directed Study
WNM 802 MS: Thesis Forum
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review. / Note: Course fees and
prerequisites will vary by topic.












$100.00


Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review and Department Director
approval.
229
WNM 805 MS: Continued Group Directed
Study
Graduate students with an approved Final
Thesis Project proposal and Department
Director approval
WNM 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.
WRI 144 Imagination
WRI 166 Crafting the Short Film Script

On campus English as a second language
students must pass LA 108 or take LA 108
concurrently






On campus English as a second language
students must pass LA 108 or take LA 108
concurrently.




WRI 233 Writing Shorts for Production
WRI 166 & LA 108. LA 108 may be taken
concurrently.




WRI 239 Feature Film 1: Story
Development
WRI 233, LA 108, & either LA 202 or LA
280. WRI 233 & either LA 202 or LA 280
may be taken concurrently.




WRI 244 Dialogue 1
WRI 166, LA 108, and either WRI 144 or
MPT 133. LA 108 may be taken
concurrently.

WRI 250 TV Drama 1: Spec Script 1
WRI 233 & either LA 202 or LA 280

WRI 266 The Short Film Rewrite
WRI 233, LA 108, & either LA 202 or LA
280. LA 202 or LA 280 may be taken
concurrently.



WRI 269 Feature Film 2: Writing Act 1
WRI 239, WRI 266, and either LA 202 or
LA 280



WRI 277 Web Drama 1: Staff Writing 1
WRI 250
WRI 280 TV Comedy 1: Spec Script 1
WRI 233 & either LA 202 or LA 280
WRI 288 Web Comedy 1: Staff Writing 1
WRI 280
WRI 295 Pitch 1
LA 291, WRI 239, WRI 266, and either WRI
250 or WRI 280
WRI 297 Writing for Film Genre
WRI 166, WRI 233, & LA 108. Both WRI
233 & LA 108 may be taken concurrently.
WRI 320 TV Comedy 2: Spec Script 2
WRI 280
WRI 322 Web Comedy 2: Production 1
WRI 288
WRI 323 Adaptation
WRI 239 & either LA 202 or LA 280
WRI 339 Feature Film 3: Writing Acts 2 &
3
WRI 344 Dialogue 2
WRI 269
WRI 350 TV Drama 2: Spec Script 2
WRI 250
WRI 355 Web Drama 2: Production 1
WRI 277
WRI 369 Feature Film 4: The Feature
Film Rewrite
WRI 339
$150.00
WRI 370 TV Drama 3: Spec Script 3
WRI 350
$125.00
WRI 377 Web Drama 3: Staff Writing 2
WRI 355 or WRI 344
WRI 380 TV Comedy 3: Spec Script 3
WRI 320
WRI 388 Web Comedy 3: Staff Writing 2
WRI 322 or WRI 344
WRI 420 TV Comedy 4: Spec Script 4
WRI 380
WRI 422 Web Comedy 4: Production 2
WRI 388
WRI 439 Feature Film 5: Writing the
Second Script
WRI 369 & either WRI 297 or WRI 323
$150.00
WRI 450 TV Drama 4: Spec Script 4
WRI 370
$125.00





$150.00










WRI 244

$100.00
$100.00


230
WRI 455 Web Drama 4: Production 2
WRI 377
WRI 469 Feature Film 6: Rewriting the
Second Script
WRI 439
WRI 479 TV Drama: Pilot in Production
Department Director Approval Required
WRI 489 TV Comedy: Pilot in Production
Department Director Approval Required
WRI 490 Portfolio Enhancement
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
WRI 495 Pitch 2
WRI 439 & either WRI 370 or WRI 380
WRI 498 Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
WRI 499 Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
WRI 500 Internship in Writing for Film,
Television & Digital Media
Students must have Senior status, a
minimum 3.0 GPA, and obtain department
director approval.
WRI 615 MS: Imaginative Scene Writing
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.
WRI 622 MS: Screenwriting: Adaptation
$150.00

On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.
WRI 625 MS: Mastering Dialogue
WRI 615
WRI 628 MS: Writing for Film Genres
Either accepted WRI student or MPT 600.
On campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.
WRI 630 MS: TV Comedy 1: The Half
Hour Script
WRI 615 & WRI 628
WRI 632 MS: Web Comedy 1: Writers'
Room
WRI 630
WRI 635 MS: TV Comedy 2: The Original
Series Pilot
WRI 632
WRI 637 MS: Web Comedy 2: Writing in
Production 1
WRI 632
WRI 640 MS: TV Drama 1: The One-Hour
Script.
WRI 615 & WRI 628
WRI 642 MS: Web Drama 1: Writers'
Room
WRI 645 MS: TV Drama 2: The Original
Series Pilot
WRI 640
WRI 647 MS: Web Drama 2: Writing in
Production 1
WRI 642
WRI 660 MS: The Feature Film 1:
Ideation to Outline
Either accepted WRI student or MPT 619.
MPT 619 may be taken concurrently. On
campus English as a second language
students must pass EAP level 604.
WRI 665 MS: Feature Film 2 - Going to
Script
WRI 660
WRI 670 MS: Feature Film 3: Completing
the First Draft
WRI 665
WRI 680 MS: The Art of the Pitch
WRI 665 and either WRI 630 or WRI 640
WRI 695 MS: Collaborative Project
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
WRI 699 MS: Special Topics
Note: Course fees and prerequisites will
vary by topic.
WRI 642












$100.00
$125.00
$150.00











231
WRI 730 MS: TV Comedy 3: The Second
Half-Hour
WRI 635
$100.00
WRI 732 MS: Web Comedy 3: The
Writers' Room 2
WRI 632 and either WRI 637 or MPT 619
WRI 735 MS: TV Comedy 4: Spec Script
for Representation
WRI 730
WRI 737 MS: Web Comedy 4: Writing in
Production 2
WRI 732
WRI 740 MS: TV Drama 3: The Second
One-Hour
WRI 645
WRI 742 MS: Web Drama 3: The Writers'
Room 2
WRI 642 and either WRI 647 or MPT 619
WRI 745 MS: TV Drama 4: Spec Script for
Representation
WRI 740
WRI 747 MS: Web Drama 4: Writing in
Production 2
WRI 742
WRI 760 MS: Feature Film 4: Rewrite &
Polish
WRI 670
$150.00
WRI 765 MS: Feature Film 5: Advanced
Screenwriting
WRI 760
$150.00
WRI 770 MS: Feature Film 6: Advanced
Rewriting
WRI 765
$150.00
WRI 780 MS: The Business of the
Business
WRI 680 and either WRI 735 or WNM 745.
Either WRI 735 or WRI 745 may be
concurrent.
WRI 900 MS: Internship
Graduate students must have passed their
Midpoint review, a minimum of 3.0 GPA,
and Department Director approval.
$100.00
$125.00
$125.00


232
INDEX
A
Academic Probation, 33, 37
Academic Standing, 33
Academy Resource Center, 45, 47, 50, 71, 143
Accommodations, 50, 51
Accommodations for Students with Disabilities, 50
Accounts Receivable, 22, 45, 66, 67
Accreditation, 7
Add Classes, 44
Admissions Requirements, 10
Appeals and Grievances, 67
Application, 10, 20, 21, 26
Architecture Students, 15
Art Teaching Credential, 8, 20, 28
Associate of Arts Degree (AA), 27, 32, 37
Attempted Units, 39
Attendance, 46, 54, 57
G
GPA, 32, 33, 34, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 57, 58, 59
Grade Change, 59, 60
Grade Exclusion, 38, 58, 59
Grade of Incomplete, 32, 38, 39, 59
Grades, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61
C-, 38, 57, 58, 59
D-, 39, 57, 59
“F”,, 40
“W”, 38, 39, 40, 46, 58
“WF”, 38, 39, 40, 45, 46, 57, 58, 59, 61
Grading Criteria, 57
Grading Policy, 60
Graduate Students, 27, 31, 32, 40, 44, 57
Graduation, 27, 28, 32, 38
Grievance Committee, 34, 50, 60, 61, 67, 68, 87
H
B
Holidays, 18, 46
B.Arch, 8, 28, 162
Bachelor of Architecture, 8, 40
Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (BFA), 28
C
Campus Security, 67
Change of Final Grade, 60
Changing Degree Programs, 26
Changing Majors, 26
CIDA Accreditation, 7
Classroom Services, 50, 51, 92
Complaints, 68, 85
Completed Units, 39
Completion Rate, 32, 34, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 45, 46, 58,
59
Course Cancelation, 45
Course Learning Outcomes, 57, 60
Course Numbers, 29
Credit Hours, 30, 31
Curriculum Changes, 26
D
Declaring a Major, 26
Directed Study, 31, 48, 78
Dismissal, 33, 34, 87
Dress Code, 67
Drop, 21, 39, 45, 46, 47, 54, 60
I
Incomplete Grades, 58
Installment Plan, 22
International Student, 10, 13, 21, 23, 46, 48, 51, 70
International Transcripts, 11
Internship, 29, 31, 48, 78
Intersession, 22, 43, 45, 78
L
Landscape Architecture Students, 15
Liberal Arts, 12, 13, 16, 154, 164, 167
M
M.Arch, 28, 48
MA, 28, 32, 37, 48
Make-Up Work, 55
Master of Architecture, 8, 28, 40
Master of Arts Degree, 28
Master of Fine Arts Degree, 28
Maximum Timeframe, 36
MFA, 7, 28, 32, 37, 48
Mid-Semester Grades, 58
Military Students, 44
Minimum Grade Requirements, 57
Mission Statement, 7
E
English as a Second Language, 11, 13, 92
Enrollment, 31, 33, 40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 58, 66, 90, 91
Enrollment Agreement, 43, 45, 47, 66
Excused Absences, 54
F
Failed Prerequisite, 45
Federal School ID, 20
Fee, 10, 11, 20, 21, 23, 45, 66
FERPA, 63
Final Grades, 33, 39, 54, 58
Final Reviews, 51
Financial Aid, 20, 22, 23, 24, 31, 33, 36, 37, 39, 40, 41, 46,
47, 58, 67, 91, 92
Foundations, 30, 31, 152, 164
Full-Time, 7, 31, 40, 71
N
NAAB Accreditation, 8
NASAD Accreditation, 8
O
Official Grades, 58
Online Class Search and Registration, 20, 43
P
Part-Time, 7, 27, 31, 71
Payment, 21, 22, 66, 82, 87
Placement, 13, 14, 15, 16
Plagiarism, 84
President, 32, 41, 43, 44, 47, 67, 84, 90, 91
President’s Honor Roll, 32
Program Learning Outcomes, 162, 163, 164, 166
Progress Grades, 58
Proof of High School Graduation, 10
233
R
T
Reapply, 78, 79
Re-Entry, 33, 34, 43, 44
Refund Policies, 23
Registration, 43
Third Attempt Courses, 40
TOEFL, 13
Transcripts, 10, 11, 12, 21, 43, 44
Transfer Policies, 12
Transfer Students, 43
Transferability, 12
Tuition, 20, 21, 22, 23
S
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), 36
Satisfactory Progress Appeal, 41
School of Acting, 8, 94, 162, 166
School of Advertising, 95, 162, 166
School of Animation & Visual Effects, 96, 162, 166
School of Architecture, 8, 11, 102, 162, 166
School of Art Education, 105, 162, 166
School of Art History, 106, 162, 166
School of Fashion, 108, 162, 166
School of Fine Art, 114, 163, 166
School of Game Development, 119, 163, 166
School of Graphic Design, 121, 163, 166
School of Illustration, 124, 163, 166
School of Industrial Design, 127, 163, 166
School of Interior Architecture & Design, 129, 163, 166
School of Jewelry & Metal Arts, 130, 163, 167
School of Landscape Architecture, 8, 130, 163, 167
School of Motion Pictures & Television, 131, 164, 167
School of Multimedia Communications, 133, 164, 167
School of Music Production & Sound Design for Visual
Media, 8, 135, 164, 167
School of Photography, 136, 164, 167
School of Visual Development, 140, 164, 167
School of Web Design & New Media, 141
School of Writing for Film, Television & Digital Media, 8
Self Service, 23, 45
Student Advisor, 43
Student Code of Conduct, 66, 81, 82, 87
Student ID, 22, 66
U
Undergraduate Architecture Students, 58
Undergraduate Grade Levels, 28
Undergraduate Residency Requirement, 12
Undergraduate Students, 26, 31, 40, 57
Unexcused Absences, 54
Use of Student Likenesses and/or Images, 66
V
Veteran Records, 63
W
WSCUC Accreditation, 7
Withdrawal, 23, 38, 39, 45, 46, 47, 57, 58
© Academy of Art University 2015
Published: January 28, 2015
Content Coordinator: Denise Cottin
http://www.academyart.edu/content/aau/en/students/my-academy/student-resources/policies.html
234