Section 1.07: Appraisal Guidelines | 01/30/2015

Section 1.07 – Appraisal Guidelines
In This Policy
Section
This policy section contains the following topics.
Overview ......................................................................................................................... 2
Introduction .................................................................................................................. 2
Guideline Summary ..................................................................................................... 2
Related Bulletins ............................................................................................................. 6
Appraisers ....................................................................................................................... 7
Appraiser Qualification Criteria .................................................................................... 7
Supervisory or Review Appraiser Update ................................................................... 8
Ineligible Appraisers .................................................................................................... 9
Government Appraisal Approved Lists ........................................................................ 9
Appraiser Independence Requirements ....................................................................... 10
Review of Appraised Values ......................................................................................... 13
General ...................................................................................................................... 13
Ineligible Appraisal Reports ....................................................................................... 13
Exceptions to Ineligible Appraisal Reports ................................................................ 14
Communication with the Appraiser ............................................................................ 14
Underwriter Responsibility ......................................................................................... 14
Borrower Receipt of Appraisal ...................................................................................... 15
Second Appraisals ........................................................................................................ 16
Determining Equity on Previous Home......................................................................... 17
Non-Arm’s Length/Conflict-of-Interest Transactions .................................................... 17
Property-Flipping Guidelines ........................................................................................ 18
Overview .................................................................................................................... 18
Owner of Record ....................................................................................................... 19
Underwriting Analysis ................................................................................................ 19
Field Review Appraisal .............................................................................................. 20
SunTrust Mortgage Declining Market Index ................................................................. 21
Markets with Declining Values ...................................................................................... 21
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits .................................................................................... 22
Appraisal Upgrades ................................................................................................... 35
Appraisal Analysis ....................................................................................................... 36
General Information ................................................................................................... 36
Uniform Appraisal Dataset (UAD) ............................................................................. 36
FHA UAD Compliance ............................................................................................... 37
VA UAD Compliance ................................................................................................. 38
Uniform Collateral Data Portal (UCDP) ..................................................................... 69
Appraising Energy Efficient Properties ......................................................................... 70
Transfer / Re-assignment of Appraisal Reports ........................................................... 72
Field Reviews ............................................................................................................... 72
Representations and Warrants ..................................................................................... 72
Compliance ................................................................................................................... 72
Requests for an Updated Value and Re-Certification of Value .................................... 73
Appraisal Date Requirements ....................................................................................... 74
Electronic Transmission................................................................................................ 79
Exhibit I: SunTrust Ineligible List ................................................................................. 79
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 1 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Overview
Introduction
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The safety and soundness of mortgage loans secured by real estate depends
upon the adequacy of the underwriting supporting the transaction.
A valuation of the real estate collateral is an essential component of this process
and shall consist of a real estate appraisal.
Most real estate collateral valuation requirements are imposed by banking
regulations, appraisal standards and statutes/ordinances (i.e., Title XI of the
Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989, or
“FIRREA,” as amended, the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal
Practice, or “USPAP,” etc.). Many of these requirements are incorporated within
these guidelines.
The purpose of these guidelines is to describe prudent and appropriate valuation
practices for use by Correspondent Lenders of SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.
These guidelines are intended to incorporate requirements to promote
compliance with policies guidance issued by the various regulatory agencies.
References:
 See the topic Appraisal Analysis subsequently presented for additional
guidelines and requirements on property appraisals.
 See the specific product descriptions (i.e. Key Loan Program, Agency, etc.) in
the online seller guide under the Products tab for specific appraisal report
requirements.
Guideline
Summary
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All extensions of credit by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. shall be supported by a real
estate appraisal.
All conventional and supplemental appraisal reports must meet Appraiser
Independence Requirements.
Note: Supplemental appraisal reports include:
 1004D/442 Appraisal Update and/or Completion Report
 1007/100 Single Family Comparable Rent Schedule
 216/998
Operating Income Statement
 HUD 92051 Compliance Inspection Report
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All FHA appraisals are subject to compliance with HUD Mortgagee Letter 200928: Appraiser Independence.
VA appraisal reports are ordered through the Veterans Administration.
Exceptions to this requirement may exist for certain loan programs. Below are
some examples of guidelines that may be specifically identified in product
descriptions:
 The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) requires an appraiser who is
approved by HUD and identified on the FHA Roster to complete the
appraisal.
 The Veterans Administration (VA) requires an appraiser who is assigned by
VA, to complete the appraisal.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 2 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Overview, Continued
Guideline
Summary,
(continued)
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All conventional and FHA appraisals must include color photographs as part of
the appraisal exhibits.
Note: FHA has required color photographs as part of the Appraisal Exhibits
since 06/29/2000 (Notice H 00-12 section 4-1).
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Delegated correspondent Lenders are responsible for representing and
warranting that the loan file was reviewed and underwritten with color
photographs.
 Non-delegated Correspondent Lenders must provide color appraisal
photographs in the credit loan package delivered to SunTrust Mortgage.
 Closed loan packages imaged in black and white will continue to remain
acceptable, provided the appraisal photographs are legible.
For all loan programs, facsimile (faxed) appraisal reports are not acceptable.
At a minimum, regulations require that real estate appraisals utilized in
connection with federally related transactions be performed in accordance with
the appraisal standards published by the Appraisal Standards Board of the
Appraisal Foundation.
The Appraiser Independence Requirements are intended to reinforce the
independence of the appraiser and establishes requirements governing
appraisal selection, solicitation, compensation, conflicts of interest and corporate
independence.
These regulations require SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. to maintain appraisal policies
to ensure that appraisals reflect base level professional competence, negate any
direct or indirect interest, financial or otherwise, in the property or transaction,
and to facilitate the reporting of estimates of market value upon which institutions
rely to make lending decisions. In the interest of safety and soundness,
SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. will maintain prudent underwriting policies.
Appraisals are an essential component of the loan underwriting process because
appraisal reports contain the estimates of collateral values.
A real estate appraisal must convey in writing an independent, impartial opinion
of value of a particular property and is the result of a complete appraisal
assignment performed by a state licensed or certified appraiser (as mandated
under Title XI) in compliance with Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal
Practice, or USPAP.
Federal agencies require that an institution, or its agent, directly engage the
appraiser for the appraisal assignment. SunTrust requirements prohibit the
borrower, lender, or any other interested party from influencing the selection of
the appraiser.
In the interest of safety and soundness, SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., requires
lenders to use prudent underwriting policies.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 3 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Overview, Continued
Guideline
Summary,
(continued)
Information Provided to the Appraiser
Non-AUS
 Any and all information about the subject property that the lender is aware of
must be disclosed to the appraiser. The appraiser must determine if the
information could affect either the marketability of the property or the opinion of
the market value of the property.
 Sales Contract Information
 All appropriate financing data and sales concessions for the subject property
that will be or have been granted by anyone associated with the transaction
must be disclosed to the appraiser. Typically, this information is provided in
the sales contract. Therefore, the lender must provide, or ensure that the
appraiser is provided with, a copy of the complete, ratified sales contract and
all addenda for the property that is to be appraised. If the contract is
amended, the lender must provide the updated contract to the appraiser to
ensure that the appraiser has been given the opportunity to consider any
changes and their effect on value. If the lender is aware of additional
pertinent information that is not included in the sales contract, the lender
must provide this information to the appraiser.
 Financial Information
 The list below includes items that must be disclosed, if applicable:
 settlement charges,
 loan fees or charges,
 discounts to the sales price,
 interest rate buydowns,
 below-market-rate financing,
 credits or refunds of borrower expenses,
 absorption or monthly payments,
 assignment of rent payments, and
 any other information not listed above that impacts property value.
 Property Information
 The list below includes items that must be disclosed, if applicable:
 condo or PUD fees,
 non-realty items included in the transaction,
 any environmental hazard in or on the subject property or in the vicinity
of the property that the lender is aware of or learns from the borrower,
the real estate broker, or any other party to the transaction, and
 any other items that affect the safety, soundness, or structural integrity of
a property of which the lender may be aware.
Fannie Mae DU
Follow DU requirements, which are the same as Non-AUS guidelines.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 4 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Overview, Continued
Guideline
Summary,
(continued)
Freddie Mac LP
 Follow LP requirements, which are noted below:
 The Lender warrants that they or a third party specifically authorized by the
Lender provided the following information on the subject property, as
applicable, to the appraiser in conjunction with all appraisal requests:
 the complete legal description,
 the complete sales contract (a sales contract on a new home should
state the base price of the house and itemize each option),
 all financing terms, financing and sales concessions granted by anyone
associated with transaction, and any gifts, buydowns and down
payment assistance provided by anyone on behalf of the borrowers,
whether for purchase or refinance transactions,
 income and expense statements, property leases and a list of nonrealty items that are included in the transaction, and
 any other information that the Lender knows that may affect the value or
marketability of the property. This information includes, but is not limited
to, an affiliation between the property seller and purchaser, proposed
changes to the use of the property, and the presence of any
contaminated site or hazardous substance affecting the property or the
neighborhood in which the property is located.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 5 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Related Bulletins
General
Related bulletins are provided below in PDF format. To view the list of published
bulletins, select the applicable year below.
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2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 6 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisers
Appraiser
Qualification
Criteria
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SunTrust does not require pre-approval of individual appraisers, but has
established recommended minimum criteria that all appraisers should meet
SunTrust may request the Correspondent lender to discontinue use of an
appraiser whose work is found to be inconsistent with Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac
standards despite any designation the appraiser may hold.
The appraiser must meet the following conditions:
 be currently licensed and/or certified by the state in which the property is
located,
 have a minimum of one (1) year experience as a residential appraiser,
 must appraise full-time (at least seventy five (75%) of their income must
come from appraising residential properties),
 be current with the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice
(USPAP), and those of the secondary market,
 meet educational and experience criteria required by professional appraisal
organizations and/or the qualifications criteria as established by the
Appraiser Qualifications board of the Appraisal Foundation,
 show a track record of continued education to stay abreast of current
appraisal standards,
 carry Errors and Omission Insurance with a minimum of $250,000 coverage
(if applicable),
 have specific appraisal experience that is appropriate for a particular
appraisal assignment, and
 must not be listed on any of the following:
 Freddie Mac’s Exclusionary List.
 SunTrust Ineligible List,
 FHA’s Procurement List, and
 an Investor’s specific Appraiser Exclusionary List.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 7 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisers, Continued
Supervisory or
Review
Appraiser
Update
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A licensed or certified supervisory or review appraiser may continue to sign the
appraisal completed by an employee; however, the licensed or certified
appraiser must complete the physical inspection of the subject property.
When a licensed/certified supervisory or review appraiser signs the appraisal
report on the left hand side of the report form as the appraiser, the
supervisory/review appraiser must have performed the inspection of the subject
property.
The licensed/certified supervisory or review appraiser must not be on the
SunTrust Ineligible List.
Please see table below for a list of scenario examples to help explain the
requirements.
Scenario
Unlicensed/uncertified
(trainee) employee
completes the majority
of the appraisal work
Unlicensed/uncertified
(trainee) employee
completes the majority
of the appraisal work
Licensed/certified
appraiser completes
the appraisal work
Licensed/certified
appraiser completes
the appraisal work.
Individual Eligible to
COMPLETE the
Appraisal Report
If state law allows, both
an unlicensed/uncertified
(trainee) appraiser and a
supervisory appraiser
Location of Signature(s)
on the Appraisal Report
Individual Eligible
To Inspect the
Subject Property
Licensed/Certified
appraiser and
unlicensed/
uncertified (trainee)
appraiser.
A licensed/certified
appraiser
Unlicensed/uncertified
(trainee) appraiser signs on
the left hand side as the
“Appraiser” and a state
licensed or certified
appraiser must sign as the
supervisory appraiser on
the right hand side of the
appraisal
On the left hand side as the
“Appraiser”
The licensed/certified
appraiser
On the left hand side as the
“Appraiser”
Licensed/Certified
appraiser
Licensed/certified
appraiser and a
supervisory appraiser
Licensed/certified appraiser
on the left hand side of the
appraisal and the
supervisory appraiser signs
the report signs on the right
hand side of the appraisal
Licensed/certified
appraiser
Licensed/certified
appraiser
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 8 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisers, Continued
Ineligible
Appraisers
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While SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. does not require pre-approval of individual
appraisers, SunTrust does maintain a list of ineligible appraisers and appraisal
companies.
Any appraisers or appraisal companies identified on the list are not eligible to
perform appraisal assignments, either directly or indirectly, on properties that
secure loans to be funded or purchased by SunTrust.
Any appraiser or appraisal company that is currently on the SunTrust Ineligible
List and would like information on how to be removed from the list should contact
the SunTrust Fraud and Collateral Risk Management Department at 901
th
Semmes Avenue, 4 Floor, Mail Code CS-MTG-1934, Richmond, VA 23224.
The appraiser’s and supervisory appraiser’s names, if applicable, and company
for every loan needs to be checked against this list prior to ordering or accepting
an appraisal report. Correspondent lenders warrant that no person or company
on the SunTrust Ineligible List is involved in whole or part in the origination of a
loan funded by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.
The SunTrust Ineligible List contains confidential information and is only for use
by Correspondent lenders of SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. in connection with
transactions with SunTrust.
Due to the confidential nature of the information contained therein, distribution of
the SunTrust Ineligible List is strictly prohibited. By accessing or using the
SunTrust Ineligible List, the user agrees to indemnify SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. for
any loss, damage, or expense resulting from the user’s failure to maintain the
confidentiality of the information it contains.
Click here to access the SunTrust Ineligible List.
Government
Appraisal
Approved Lists
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For FHA loans, all appraisers must be listed on the FHA Roster as provided by
HUD.
For VA loans, all appraisers are assigned by VA in conjunction with ordering
case numbers.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 9 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraiser Independence Requirements
Scope of the
Code
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The Appraiser Independence Requirements are is intended to reinforce the
independence of the appraiser. They establish requirements governing:
 appraiser selection,
 solicitation,
 compensation,
 conflicts of interest, and
 corporate independence.
The Appraiser Independence Requirements are not intended to establish any
new
requirements or obligations that require a lender to:
 obtain an appraisal or use any particular method of property valuation,
 determine an acceptable scope of work for an appraiser in connection with a
particular appraisal assignment, or
 take any action prohibited by federal and/or state law or regulation.
Appraiser
Engagement
Any employee of the lender that is responsible for selecting an appraiser or appraisal
company must be trained and qualified to review an appraisal and be completely
independent of the loan and production staff process.
Appraiser
Requirements
An appraiser must be licensed or certified by the state in which the subject property
is located.
Reference: See the Appraiser Qualification Criteria section in these Appraisal
Guidelines for additional information.
In-house Staff
Appraisers
Notwithstanding the guidelines above, the lender may use an in-house staff
appraiser to order appraisals, conduct appraiser reviews, perform quality control
tasks, develop, deploy or use internal Automated Valuation Models; or prepare
appraisal for transactions that do not include mortgage origination, such as workout
loans, if it complies with the terms of the Appraiser Independence Requirements.
Continued on next page
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Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 10 of 79
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Appraiser Independence Requirements, Continued
Appraiser
Compensation
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The lender is responsible for selecting and compensating the appraiser.
Appraisers are prohibited from accepting compensation for the appraisal
assignment directly from the borrower, broker, real estate agent or any third
party, with the exception of an Appraisal Management Company.
Reference: See the Transfer / Re-assignment of Appraisal Report topic,
subsequently presented in this document for additional information.
Settlement
Services
Provider
The lender is not allowed to use an appraisal report prepared by an entity that is
affiliated in any way with the company providing the settlement services unless the
entity that supplies the appraisal has established formal written policies and
procedures implementing the Appraiser Independence Requirements which include
adequate training and disciplinary rules on appraiser independence. The disciplinary
rules must include reporting and disciplining anyone who violates these policies and
procedures.
Prohibited
Activities
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All members of the lender’s production staff are not allowed to select, retain,
recommend or influence the selection of an appraiser for a specific appraisal
assignment.
No employee, director, officer or agent of the lender, or any third party acting as
a joint venture, shall influence the results of an appraisal.
Examples of such behavior includes the following.
 Withholding or threatening to withhold future business from an appraiser, or
demoting or terminating or threatening to demote or terminate an appraiser.
 Excluding an appraiser from consideration for future engagement because
the appraiser reports a value of a subject property that does not meet or
exceed a minimum threshold.
 Telling an appraiser an anticipated, estimated, encouraged or desired value
for the subject property or a proposed or target amount to be loaned to the
borrower, except that a copy of the sales contract for purchase transactions
may be provided.
 Withholding or threatening to withhold timely payment or partial payment for
an appraisal report.
 Conditioning the ordering of an appraisal report or the payment of an
appraisal fee or salary or bonus on the opinion, conclusion, or valuation to
be reached, or on a preliminary value estimate requested from an appraiser.
 Express or imply a promise of future business, promotions or increased
compensation.
 Requesting an appraiser to provide an estimated, predetermined or desired
value or comparable sales prior to the appraiser completing the appraisal,
 Removing an appraiser from a list of qualified appraisers or adding an
appraiser to an exclusionary list of ineligible appraisers in connection with
the influencing or attempting to influence an appraisal.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 11 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraiser Independence Requirements, Continued
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Prohibited
Activities,
(continued)
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Providing to an appraiser, appraisal company, appraisal management
company, or any entity or person related to the appraiser, appraisal
company, or appraisal management company, stock or other financial or
non-financial benefits.
 Any other act or practice that impairs or attempts to impair an appraiser’s
independence, objectivity or impartiality or violates law or regulation
including, but not limited to. the Truth-in-Lending Act (TILA), Regulation Z or
the Uniform Standard of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP).
 Ordering or using a second appraisal unless:
 there is documented evidence that the original appraisal was flawed, or
 a second appraisal is required per the loan program.
If absolute lines of independence cannot be achieved as a result of the lender’s
size or limited staff, the lender must be able to clearly document that it has
safeguards to isolate its collateral evaluation process from influence or
interference from its loan production process.
Note: The lender is allowed to request an appraiser to provide additional
information and/or explain the basis of the valuation or correct factual errors in
the appraisal report.
Misconduct
Any lender that reasonably believes an appraiser or appraisal company has violated
applicable laws or is engaging in unethical practices must refer the matter to the
applicable state appraiser certifying and licensing agency or other relevant regulatory
bodies.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 12 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Review of Appraised Values
General
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Ineligible
Appraisal
Reports
The Underwriter must pay particular attention and apply extra due diligence for
loans in which the appraised value is believed to be excessive or where the
value of the property has experienced significant appreciation in a short period of
time since the previous sale.
If the underwriter has concerns with any aspect of the appraisal report that
questions the reliability of the opinion of market value, the issues must be
addressed with the original appraiser.
Changes in the opinion of market value must be based on material and
substantive issues and cannot be solely based on the appraisal report not
supporting the proposed loan amount.
There are three options the Correspondent lender has for addressing concerns:
 contacting the original appraiser to address the deficiencies in the report,
 ordering a field review of the original appraisal, or
 ordering a new appraisal report.
If a second appraisal is ordered, the replacement appraisal service must be
based on the same level of inspection as the original appraisal.
For either a field review appraisal or a new appraisal, the appraiser must be
licensed or certified in the state in which the property is located.
Whenever a field review appraisal or a new appraisal is ordered, the
opinion of market value as stated in the new appraisal report must be used
on the transaction. The original appraisal is no longer eligible as it has
been deemed defective.
The opinion of value may not be arbitrarily changed, nor is it acceptable to
average the two opinions of market value in order to arrive at a final value
conclusion.
Appraisal reports prepared by the following are not allowed:
 any employee of the lender (full time, part time, or contractor),
 any affiliate of the lender,
 any entity that is owned, in whole or in part, by the lender,
 any entity that owns, in whole or in part, the lender, and
 appraisers selected, retained or compensated in any manner by any third party
(including mortgage brokers and real estate agents).
Continued on next page
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Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 13 of 79
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Review of Appraised Values, Continued
Exceptions to
Ineligible
Appraisal
Reports
Exceptions to the above Ineligible Appraisal Report restrictions are acceptable as
follows:
 An appraiser employed by the lender that is not affiliated with the sales and
production departments of the company.
 Employees in the sales and production functions of the lender that do not have
ANY involvement in the approval, selection, recommending, retaining or
influencing the selection of the appraiser or adding/deleting an appraiser to an
approved or disapproved appraiser list.
 Employees in the sales and production functions that are not allowed to have
any substantive communications with the appraiser, appraisal company or
appraisal management company.
 An appraiser employed by the lender who’s compensation does not depend on
the subject properties determined value or the closing of the subject property
loan transaction.
 The lender’s appraisal functions are annually audited by an external auditor or
are subject to federal or state regulatory examination. The lender must promptly
report any adverse, negative or irregular findings of non-compliance to Fannie
Mae or Freddie Mac, whichever is applicable and is not prohibited by law.
Communication
with the
Appraiser
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Underwriter
Responsibility
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All members of the loan production staff are not allowed to have any
communications with an appraiser or appraisal management company relating to
or having an impact on valuation.
Production staff includes, but is not limited to, the following employees:
 Loan Officers,
 Loan Officer Assistants,
 Account Executives,
 Sales Managers, and
 Operations or Branch Managers.
When an appraisal is ordered, an underwriting condition should be added to the
file requiring one of the 2 following forms:
 Appraisal Report Waiver form which is required at least three (3) business
days prior to closing, or
 the executed Appraisal Report Acknowledgement form.
The loan cannot be purchased by SunTrust without one (1) of these two (2)
executed documents.
Reference: See the following topic, “Borrower Receipt of the Appraisal” for
additional information.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 14 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Borrower Receipt of Appraisal
General
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The Correspondent lender must provide a copy of any and all completed
(approved, defective) appraisal report(s) and all property valuation(s) to the
borrower(s) promptly, but not less than three (3) business days prior to closing
the loan transaction. If the transaction is denied, withdrawn, and/or cancelled,
any completed appraisal and/or property valuation must be sent to the borrower
within 30 days of denial, withdrawal, and/or cancellation, if not sent prior to the
status change.
Note: An example of how the three (3) days are counted is as follows:
 The borrower receives the appraisal on Tuesday.
 The three (3) day count begins on Tuesday. The days counted would be
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.
 Borrower can close on Thursday.
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The borrower is responsible for the initial cost of the appraisal, but the lender
cannot charge the borrower for a copy of the appraisal.
One of the following forms MUST be signed by all borrowers on the loan
transaction and included in the loan file prior to purchase:
 Appraisal Report Waiver – This form allows the borrowers to waive their right
to receive a copy of the appraisal report three (3) business days prior to loan
closing. This form must be signed by at least one borrower and may be
signed anytime as early as loan origination, but not later than three (3)
business days prior to closing. This form cannot be signed less than
three (3) business days prior to closing or at closing.
 Appraisal Report Acknowledgement – This form must be signed by at least
one borrower to acknowledge their receipt of the appraisal report. This form
cannot be pre-dated or pre-signed prior to the borrower’s actual receipt of
the appraisal report.
If the borrower(s) sign the Appraisal Report Waiver form waiving their right to a
copy of the appraisal report no less than three (3) business days prior to closing,
the Appraisal Report Acknowledgement form is not required and vice versa.
Only one of these executed forms is required to be in the loan file at the time of
purchase by SunTrust.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 15 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Second Appraisals
General
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A second appraisal is only allowed to be ordered if:
 there is reasonable basis to believe that the initial appraisal was flawed or
tainted and the basis is clearly documented in the loan file, or
 a second appraisal is a requirement of the loan program.
If an appraisal report is not acceptable, the underwriter may require the appraiser
to provide additional information regarding how the value was determined and/or
require the appraiser to correct material errors within the appraisal report.
The underwriter is responsible for determining if an appraisal is defective.
If a second appraisal or field review is required by the loan program, the
second appraisal or field review ensures that the appraisal is an accurate
representation of value. If the opinion of value is different than the original
appraisal, the lowest of the original appraisal, field review or second appraisal or
sales price (for purchases) is used to calculate the LTV ratios.
If an additional appraisal service is ordered because the first appraisal was
deemed deficient, the underwriter must use the value of the second appraisal in
determining the LTV/TLTV, regardless if the market value is higher or lower than
the original appraisal. However, if the second appraisal is also deemed deficient,
the loan will be ineligible for sale to SunTrust.
Note: Desk Review Appraisals are not eligible as an additional appraisal service.

Examples of a flawed appraisal may consist of:
 inappropriate comparable sales,
 unsupported adjustments,
 comparable sales outside the market area,
 miscalculated square footage, and
 erroneous room counts.

Loan program requirements for second appraisals are as follows:
Loan Program
Appraisal Requirements
1
Key Loan
Loan amount or combined total loan amount, including
second mortgages and home equity lines of credit <
$1,500,000 require one (1) full appraisal.,2
Key Loan
Loan amount or combined total loan amount, including
second mortgages and home equity lines of credit >/=
$1,500,000
1
For HELOCs, the total line of credit must be included (for qualifying) in the
combined loan amount.
2
Two full appraisals are required on family transfer transactions when the loan
amount or combined loan amount is >/= $1,000,000.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 16 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Determining Equity on Previous Home
General



Some loan products may require documentation to establish equity in a
borrower(s) current primary residence to reduce the amount of assets required in
a purchase transaction for a new primary residence.
Examples includes:
 The borrower is purchasing a new primary residence; however their current
residence is under contract but will not close prior to the new loan
transaction closing,
 The borrower is converting their current primary residence into a second
home and is purchasing a new primary residence.
 The borrower is converting their current primary residence into an
investment property and needs to use the rental income for qualifying.
To document the equity in the current primary residence, the Correspondent
lender must order an appraisal for the current primary residence to determine
current amount of equity in the property.
Non-Arm’s Length/Conflict-of-Interest Transactions
General
Reference:
See Section 1.40: Non-Arm’s Length/Conflict-of-Interest of the
Correspondent Seller Guide for specific appraisal requirements.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 17 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Property-Flipping Guidelines
Overview









Property-flipping is defined as the purchase of an existing property with the
intention of quickly reselling the subject property for a considerable profit.
For the purposes of these guidelines, a “quick sale,” is defined as any property
resold six (6) months or less from the date of acquisition by the seller.
The underwriter has discretion to require any and/or all of the provisions
contained in these guidelines (regardless of the time frame) in order to
substantiate the appraised value.
Property-flipping, in and of itself, is not illegal; however, when an immediate
resale is accompanied by acts of fraud or misrepresentation (appraisals with
inflated property values and other misleading or fraudulent documentation), it
can result in a predatory transaction.
For the purposes of these guidelines, “assignments of a contract for sale” fall
under the definition of a property-flip and are not allowed unless used for loan
transactions involving an employee being relocated.
These guidelines apply to conventional loans only. For government loans, refer
to FHA and VA guidelines for specific requirements.
SunTrust Mortgage (SunTrust) strictly prohibits unacceptable property-flipping
schemes; however, recognizes that there are legitimate business practices of
buying real estate at a wholesale or discounted price and reselling it for the
property’s fair market value.
In order for SunTrust to consider these types of transactions, all of the
requirements in this section must be met.
The following resale transactions are not defined as property flips; however, the
property seller MUST be the owner of record in all cases:
 property obtained through an inheritance,
 property that is part of a settlement in a divorce agreement,
 property that is part of an employee relocation program, and
 property that is resold by a lender/servicer after acquisition of the property
from a foreclosure or deed in lieu of foreclosure. Agents or subsequent
owner(s) of the property that acquired the property directly from the lender
are not considered the lender.
Notes:
 In cases of employee relocation programs, “assignments of contract for sale”
are common and may be necessary. An “assignment of contract for sale”
with a special Power of Attorney (POA) gives the relocation company limited
ability to negotiate, execute and deliver real estate contracts for the subject
property on behalf of the property seller (the employee). In these situations,
the seller (the employee) remains the owner of record and it is acceptable for
the relocation company to be identified as the seller on the sales contract.
Therefore, execution of documents may be done by the relocation
company/POA instead of the seller (the employee) of the property.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 18 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Property Flipping Guidelines, Continued

Overview,
(continued)
Owner of
Record




Underwriting
Analysis




If an “assignment of contract for sale” is exercised due to an employee
relocation program, documentation such as, but not limited to the following
must be included in the loan file to evidence the “assignment.”
 copy of the Assignment of Contract for sale,
 copy of Power of Attorney (if applicable),
 copy of Appointment of Special Agency and Assignment of Proceeds
form, and
 copy of Employer Relocation Policy.
The property seller in a purchase money transaction or borrower in a refinance
transaction must be the owner of record.
Examples of acceptable documentation, to be placed in the loan file include:
 the appraisers analysis and conclusions in the appraisal report,
 a copy of the recorded deed or mortgage,
 a recent property tax bill or tax assessment notice,
 a title report,
 a title commitment or binder, or
 a property sale history report.
This documentation is especially important for transactions involving “back-toback,” “simultaneous closings,” or “double” transaction closings to support the
property acquisition, financing and closing.
In instances when the transaction is part of a corporate relocation, the relocation
company may be the assignee of the seller, which should be indicated on the
sales contract. Additionally, the appraiser must comment on this condition in the
appraisal report.
A detailed underwriting analysis of the appraisal must be performed that
includes:
 the current contract for sale, including all addendums, for the subject
property,
 the current offering or listing for sale for the subject property, if sold utilizing
a realtor,
 the current ownership of the subject property, and
 a three (3) year sale (or transfer) history of the subject property and a one
(1) year sales history of the comparable sales.
If, during the brief period of ownership (six-month quick resale), the seller
renovated the subject property resulting in a twenty percent (20%) or twenty
thousand dollars ($20,000) increase over the previous sales price, the appraiser
must provide interior photographs reflecting the recent improvement(s) described
in the appraisal report.
It is critical to analyze and review the sales of the subject property and the sale
price trend in relation to the appraiser’s opinion of value to confirm that they are
reasonable and representative of the market.
On those transactions where the appraisal was assigned to SunTrust Mortgage
(SunTrust), the underwriter may elect to require a new appraisal to substantiate
the above requirements.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 19 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Property Flipping Guidelines, Continued
Field Review
Appraisal
The following guidelines apply for non-Agency conventional loan transactions only:
 For properties resold ninety (90) days or less following the date of acquisition
by the seller and the sales price has increased by twenty percent (20%), or
twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) (whichever is higher), then SunTrust
requires that a Field Review Appraisal be obtained.
 The “acquisition date” is defined as the date of settlement on the seller’s
purchase of the subject property.
 The “resale date” is defined as the date of execution of the sales contract, by the
buyer.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 20 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
SunTrust Mortgage Declining Market Index
Overview







The SunTrust Mortgage Declining Market Index must be reviewed for all loan
transactions to determine if the subject’s market is experiencing declining values.
SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. will publish the SunTrust Mortgage Declining Market
Index, which is a list of soft or declining markets, quarterly, or as market
conditions change.
The individual reviewing and/or approving the appraisal must review the
SunTrust Mortgage Declining Market Index to determine if the subject property is
impacted.
It is imperative that the individual reviewing and/or approving the appraisal
review the SunTrust Mortgage Declining Market Index and be familiar with the
index as it relates to their local market.
If the subject property is identified on the SunTrust Mortgage Declining Market
Index, then the Declining Market Guidelines must be followed.
The SunTrust Mortgage Declining Market Guidelines do not apply to Agency,
FHA or VA transactions.
If the loan transaction requires mortgage insurance, the more restrictive of the
SunTrust or MI Company Declining Markets Guidelines will apply.
Reference: See Section 1.09: Declining Market Guidelines of the Correspondent
Seller Guide for declining market appraisal guidelines.
Markets with Declining Values
Overview


A property shall be deemed to be located in a declining market if any of the
following apply:
 The appraiser has marked the appraisal that property values are declining or
referenced that values are declining in the appraisal comments, OR
 The SunTrust Mortgage Declining Market Index indicates a declining market.
If it has been determined that the subject property is located in a declining
market, the guidelines in the Declining Market Guidelines must be followed.
Reference: See Section 1.09: Declining Market Guidelines of the Correspondent
Seller Guide for declining market appraisal guidelines.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 21 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits
Overview









Appraisal forms are designed for specific property types. The current version is
dated March 2005.
Lenders and appraisers are able to determine which report form should be used
based on the type of property and property inspection required.
Each of the appraisal report forms includes the purpose of the appraisal, scope
of work, intended use, intended user, definition of market value, statement of
assumptions and limiting conditions and appraiser certification.
In addition, to support appraiser compliance with the Uniform Standards of
Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP), the revised appraisal forms include
the following:
 expanded comments areas,
 sections to report the sales and listings histories of both the subject property
and comparable sales,
 direct questions that require the appraiser to report his/her analysis and
conclusions on key area in a clear and concise “yes/no” format, and
 expanded appraiser certification.
The lender must provide the appraiser with the sales contract and all addenda in
order for the appraiser to consider the financing and sales concessions in the
transaction.
If the sales contract is amended during the processing of the loan, the lender
must provide the updated contract to the appraiser.
SunTrust does not allow all comparable sales be provided by the builder and/or
developer who have a financial interest in the sale or financing of the subject
property; however:
 when appraising new construction, the appraiser may need to rely solely on
the builder of the property to provide comparable sales data, as this data
may not yet be available through typical data sources such as public records
or multiple listing services.
 As such, it is acceptable for the appraiser to verify the transaction of the
comparable sale by viewing a copy of the HUD-1 Settlement Statement from
the builder’s file.
If the appraiser utilizes comparable sales outside of the subject’s neighborhood
when closer comparable sales appear to be available, the appraiser must
provide an explanation as to why he/she used the specific comparable sales.
All new construction requires a full appraisal (Fannie Mae 1004/Freddie Mac
Form 70). Reduced appraisals are not allowed on new construction
property.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 22 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Uniform
Residential
Appraisal
Report (Fannie
Mae 1004/
Freddie Mac
Form 70) (UAD)
Purpose
The Uniform Residential Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae 1004/Freddie Mac Form 70)
form is used to report an appraisal, based on an interior and exterior inspection of
the following properties:
 One-unit properties,
 Units in planned unit developments (PUDs), and
 A one unit property with an accessory unit.
Notes:

The appraiser must include an adequate description of the project,
information about the homeowner’s association fees and the quality of the
project maintenance.

Applicable to manually underwritten and AUS (DU and LP) processed
transactions,
Note: This form is not to be used to report an appraisal of a unit in a cooperative
project. SunTrust does not currently offer financing for units in a cooperative project.


All new construction requires a full appraisal. Reduced appraisals are not
allowed on new construction property.
The Uniform Residential Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae 1004/Freddie Mac Form
70) form must be UAD-compliant.
Reference: See "Uniform Appraisal Dataset (UAD)” within the topic “Appraisal
Analysis” for additional information.

The appraiser MUST report the overall condition of the property or unit using
Overall condition rating (C1, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6).
 The appraiser must select one of the above ratings that best describes the
overall condition of the subject property or unit. Only one selection is
permitted. The rating for the subject property must match the overall
condition rating that is reported in the Sales Comparison Approach section.
 The appraiser must indicate ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ if there has been any material work
done to the kitchen(s) or bathroom(s) in the prior 15 years. If ‘No’, the text
should read ‘No updates in the prior 15 years’. If ‘Yes’, additional
information for kitchens and bathrooms must be provided. The appraiser
must identify any work completed in the kitchen(s) and bathroom(s) along
with the timeframes in which the work was completed. The appraiser must
select one value for the Level of Work Completed (not updated, updated,
remodeled) for both the kitchen(s) and bathroom(s). Timeframes (less than
one year ago, one to five years ago, six to ten years ago, eleven to fifteen
years ago, or timeframe unknown) represent the time period in which the
majority of the improvements were completed.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 23 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Uniform
Residential
Appraisal
Report (Fannie
Mae 1004/
Freddie Mac
Form 70)
(UAD),
(continued)
Required Exhibits
 A street map that shows the location of the subject property and of all
comparables that the appraiser used,
 The building sketch shall include all completed levels above grade within the
dwelling, all basement area (both finished and unfinished) and any finished living
areas that were not included in gross living area, but were given value by the
appraiser, such as detached accessory units, carriage houses, living area above
detached garages/barns, pool houses, game rooms, studios, etc.
 A floor plan/building sketch with exterior dimensions is required on all
transactions.
 If the floor plan is atypical or functionally obsolete, thus limiting the
market appeal for the property in comparison to competitive properties in
the neighborhood, a detailed floor plan sketch showing interior walls,
doors, and interior dimensions is required.
 The appraiser must also include calculations to show how they arrived at the
estimate for gross living area,
 Clear, descriptive photographs (in color) that show the front, back and a street
scene of the subject property, and that are properly identified. Photographs
must be originals that are produced either by photography or electronic imaging,
 Clear descriptive INTERIOR photographs of the following:
 kitchen,
 all bathrooms
 main living room
 examples of physical deterioration, if present, and
 examples of recent updates, such as restoration, remodeling and
renovations, if present.
 Clear, descriptive photographs (in color) that show the front of each comparable
sale and that are appropriately identified. Generally, photographs should be
originals that are produced by photography or electronic imaging; however,
copies of photographs from a multiple listing service or from the appraiser’s files
are acceptable if they are clear and descriptive.
 Closely cropped photographs are not acceptable unless accompanied by a full
explanation as to why the photographs are being presented in this manner.
 Any other data, as an attachment or addendum to the appraisal report form that
are necessary to provide an adequately supported opinion of market value.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 24 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Market
Conditions
Addendum to
the Appraisal
Report (Fannie
Mae 1004MC/
Freddie Mac
Form 71)
The Market Conditions Addendum to the Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae 1004MC/
Freddie Mac 71) form is required for all conventional, FHA and VA appraisals,
regardless of property type, for both traditionally underwritten and AUS loans.
 The form is used to include local market condition information regarding the
property such as:
 inventory analysis,
 median sale and list price,
 seller concessions, and
 foreclosure sales.
 The following appraisal forms will be impacted by this new addendum
requirement:
 Uniform Residential Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae 1004/Freddie Mac 70)
 Small Residential Income Property Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae
1025/Freddie Mac 72)
 Individual Condominium Unit Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae 1073/Freddie
Mac 465)
Note: The Market Conditions Addendum to the Appraisal Report is not
required for DU Property Inspection Waivers (PIWs) or DU Property
Fieldwork Waivers (PFW).








This addendum provides the appraiser with a structured format to report the data
and to more easily identify current market trends and conditions.
The “Inventory Analysis’ section must include the comparable data that reflects
the total pool of comparable properties from which a buyer may select a property
in order to analyze the sales activity and the local housing supply.
The “Median Sales and List Price, Days-on-Market (DOM), Median Sale Price as
a “Percentage of List Price” section allows the appraiser to analyze additional
trends, including the changes in median prices and days on the market for both
sales and listings as well as a change in list-to-sales price ratios.
The “Overall Trend” section is designed to reflect potential positive, neutral or
negative trends in inventory, median sale and list price, days on market, list-tosale price ratio and seller concessions.
If data sources provide the required information as an average instead of the
median, the appraiser should report the available figure and identify it as an
average.
The appraiser must explain in detail the seller concession trends for the past
twelve months. Items the appraiser should consider include, but are not limited to:
 mortgage payments,
 points and fees,
 homeowner fees, if applicable, and
 any other third party fee.
The appraiser must report the presence and extent of foreclosure/REO sales in
addition to existing pending sales.
The appraiser’s conclusions regarding trends that are obtained from the 1004MC
Form must be reported in the “Neighborhood” section of the appraisal report.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 25 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Market
Conditions
Addendum to
the Appraisal
Report (Fannie
Mae 1004MC/
Freddie Mac
Form 71),
(continued)



In situations when there is not sufficient data to provide a meaningful analysis for
the defined neighborhood, the form must be completed based on the information
available, and an explanation must be provided. The appraiser cannot complete
that section of the form with “not applicable” or “N/A.”
In any scenario, the Neighborhood section of the appraisal report must include the
appraiser’s conclusions regarding the housing trends.
The following table shows the definitions of terminology used on the Market
Conditions Addendum to the Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae 1004MC/Freddie Mac
71/) form.
Terms
Absorption
Rate
Definition
The total number of settled sales divided by the time frame being
analyzed.
Housing
Supply
Example: If there are 60 sales during a 6 month period, the
appraiser would divide 60 by 6 to equal10 sales per month or 10 as
the absorption rate.
The number of months of housing based on the total listings for the
applicable period divided by the absorption rate.
Example: If there were 240 active listings, divide 240 by the 10
absorption rate to equal 24 months housing supply.
Median
Note: In reporting the number of listings, the appraiser should only
report the listings for a specific timeframe, (i.e.,) the 0-3 month
period should only include properties listed in that specific 3 month
timeframe, 4-6 months should only include properties in that 3 month
timeframe.
The middle number in a range of numbers.
Examples:
 The following sales settled in the previous 6 months.
950,000
500,000
550,000
475,000
525,000
450,000
In this example, the range is an even number of values; therefore,
the appraiser would take the two (2) middle numbers ($525,000 and
$500,000), add together and divide by two (2). The median value is
$512,500.

The following sales settled in the previous 6 months.
950,000
500,000
550,000
475,000
525,000
In this example, the range is an odd number of values; therefore, the
appraiser would take the middle number in the range. The median
value is $525,000.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 26 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Individual
Condominium
Unit (Fannie
Mae 1073/
Freddie Mac
465) (UAD)
Purpose
The Individual Condominium Unit (Fannie Mae 1073/Freddie Mac 465) form is used
to report an appraisal, based on an interior and exterior inspection, of the following
properties:
 a unit in a condominium project, or
 a condominium unit in a planned unit development (PUD)
Notes:
 For ALL appraisal reports on condominium projects, the appraiser must
provide certification in the appraisal report that the subject property is not a
condotel.
 The Individual Condominium Unit (Fannie Mae 1073/Freddie Mac 465) form
is not to be used to report an appraisal of a unit in a cooperative project.
 The Uniform Residential Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae Form 1004/Freddie
Mac Form 70) may be used on detached “site” condos when the project
consists solely of detached condominiums. The appraiser must include the
project information in the appraisal report.

The Individual Condominium Unit (Fannie Mae 1073/Freddie Mac 465) form
must be UAD-compliant.
Reference: See "Uniform Appraisal Dataset (UAD)” within the topic “Appraisal
Analysis” for additional information.


The appraiser MUST report the overall condition of the property or unit using
Overall condition rating (C1, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6).
 The appraiser must select one of the above ratings that best describes the
overall condition of the subject property or unit. Only one selection is
permitted. The rating for the subject property must match the overall
condition rating that is reported in the Sales Comparison Approach section.
 The appraiser must indicate ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ if there has been any material work
done to the kitchen(s) or bathroom(s) in the prior 15 years. If ‘No’, the text
should read ‘No updates in the prior 15 years’. If ‘Yes’, additional
information for kitchens and bathrooms must be provided. The appraiser
must identify any work completed in the kitchen(s) and bathroom(s) along
with the timeframes in which the work was completed. The appraiser must
select one value for the Level of Work Completed (not updated, updated,
remodeled) for both the kitchen(s) and bathroom(s). Timeframes (less than
one year ago, one to five years ago, six to ten years ago, eleven to fifteen
years ago, or timeframe unknown) represent the time period in which the
majority of the improvements were completed.
The appraisal of an individual condominium unit in a condominium project
requires the appraiser to:
 analyze condominium projects as well as the individual units,
 pay special attention to the location of the individual unit within the project,
 pay special attention to the project’s amenities,
 pay special attention to the amount and purpose of the owners’ association
assessment since marketability and value of the individual units in a project
depend on marketability and appeal of the project,
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 27 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Individual
Condominium
Unit (Fannie
Mae 1073/
Freddie Mac
465) (UAD)
(continued)
Purpose, continued


indicate whether the developer/builder is in control of the Homeowner’s
Association (HOA), and
indicate if there is any commercial space in the project. If Yes, the appraiser
MUST describe and indicate the overall percentage of the commercial
space.
New Projects
 For units in new (or recently converted) condominium projects, the appraiser
must compare the subject property to other properties in its general market area
as well as to properties within the subject project.
 The comparison should help demonstrate market acceptance of new
developments and the properties within them.
 Generally, the appraiser should select one comparable sale from the subject
project, one comparable sale from outside the subject project, and one other
comparable sale, which can be from inside or outside of the subject project, that
the appraiser considers to be a good indicator of value for the subject property.
 In selecting the comparables, the appraiser should keep in mind that re-sales
from within the subject project are preferable to sales from outside the project as
long as the developer or builder of the subject property is not involved in the
transaction.
Established Projects
 For units in established condominium projects (those that have re-sale activity),
the appraiser should use comparable sales from within the subject project if
there are any available. Re-sale activity from within the subject project should
be the best indicator of value for properties in that project.
 If the appraiser uses sales of comparable properties that are located outside of
the subject neighborhood, they must include an explanation as to why the
specific comparable was used.
Required Exhibits
 A street map that shows the location of the subject property and of all
comparables that the appraiser used.
 A sketch of the subject unit that must indicate interior perimeter unit dimensions
rather than exterior building dimensions. Generally, the appraiser must also
include calculations to show how they arrived at the estimate for gross living
area; however, for a unit in a condominium project, the appraiser may rely on the
dimensions and estimate for gross living area that is shown on the plat. In such
cases, the appraiser does not need to provide a sketch of the unit as long as
they include a copy of the plat with the appraisal report.
 A floor plan/building sketch with exterior dimensions is required on all
transactions
 If the floor plan is atypical or functionally obsolete, thus limiting the
market appeal for the property in comparison to competitive properties in
the neighborhood, a detailed floor plan sketch showing interior walls,
doors, and interior dimensions is required.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 28 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Individual
Condominium
Unit (Fannie
Mae 1073/
Freddie Mac
465) (UAD)
(continued)
Required Exhibits, continued
 Clear, descriptive photographs (in color) that show the front, back and a street
scene of the subject property, and that are appropriately identified.
 Clear descriptive INTERIOR photographs of the following:
 kitchen,
 all bathrooms,
 main living room,
 examples of physical deterioration, if present, and
 examples of recent updates, such as restoration, remodeling and
renovations, if present.
 Clear descriptive photographs (in color) that show the front of each comparable
sale and that are appropriately identified.
Note: Photographs of comparable rentals and listings are not required.

Any other data, as an attachment or addendum to the appraisal report form, that
is necessary to provide an adequately supported opinion of market value.
Reference: See Section 1.06: Condominium and PUD Approval Requirements for
additional information regarding appraisal requirements for condominium reviews.
Small
Residential
Income
Property
(Fannie Mae
1025/Freddie
Mac 72)
Purpose
The Small Residential Income Property (Fannie Mae 1025/Freddie Mac 72) form is
used to report an appraisal, based on an interior and exterior inspection, of the
following properties:
 a two- to four-unit property, or
 a two- to four-unit property in a planned unit development (PUD)
Note: A two- to four-unit property located in a condominium or cooperative
project requires the appraiser to inspect the project and complete the project
information section of the Individual Condominium Unit Appraisal Report or the
Individual Cooperative Interest Appraisal Report and attach it to this report.
Required Exhibits
 A street map that shows the location of the subject property and of all
comparables that the appraiser used.
 The building sketch shall include all completed levels above grade within the
dwelling, all basement area (both finished and unfinished) and any finished living
areas that were not included in gross living area, but were given value by the
appraiser, such as detached accessory units, carriage houses, living area above
detached garages/barns, pool houses, game rooms, studios, etc.
 A floor plan/building sketch with exterior dimensions is required on all
transactions.
 If the floor plan is atypical or functionally obsolete, thus limiting the
market appeal for the property in comparison to competitive properties
in the neighborhood, a detailed floor plan sketch showing interior walls,
doors, and interior dimensions is required.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 29 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Small
Residential
Income
Property
(Fannie Mae
1025/Freddie
Mac 72),
(continued)
Required Exhibits, continued







The appraiser must also include calculations to show how they arrived at the
estimate for gross building area.
An Operating Income Statement (Form 216) is required if the property is an
investment property (including a two- to four-family property in which the
applicant will occupy one unit as a principal residence).
The lender should make sure the appraiser has operating statements; expense
statements related to mortgage insurance premiums, owner’s association dues,
leasehold payments, or subordinate financing payments; and any other pertinent
information related to the property.
Clear, descriptive photographs (in color) that show the front, back and a street
scene of the subject property, and that are appropriately identified.
Clear descriptive INTERIOR photographs of the following:
 kitchen
 all bathrooms
 main living room
 examples of physical deterioration, if present, and
 examples of recent updates, such as restoration, remodeling and
renovations, if present.
Closely cropped photographs are not acceptable unless accompanied by a full
explanation as to why the photographs are being presented in this manner.
Clear, descriptive photographs (in color) of the front of each comparable sale
and that are appropriately identified.
Note: Photographs of rentals and listings are not required.

Any other data, as an attachment or addendum to the appraisal report form, that
is necessary to provide an adequately supported opinion of market value.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 30 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Exterior Only
Inspection
Residential
Appraisal
Report (Freddie
This form is not eligible on Loan Prospector (LP) loans.
Mac 2055 (UAD)
Exterior-Only
Inspection
Condominium
Unit Appraisal
Report (Freddie
This form is not eligible on Loan Prospector (LP) loans.
Mac 466) (UAD)
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 31 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Appraisal
Update and/or
Completion
Report (Fannie
Mae
1004D/Freddie
Mac Form 442)
Conventional Non-AUS
Purpose
 The Appraisal Update and/or Completion Report (Fannie Mae 1004D/Freddie
Mac Form 442) form is intended to provide an exterior inspection update of a
prior appraisal and/or to report a certification of completion.
 This form can be used to update an existing appraisal if the property has not
declined in value since the date of the original appraisal report, and/or confirm
that the requirements or conditions established in an appraisal report have been
met.
 The appraiser MUST research, verify AND analyze current market data in
order to determine if the property has declined in value since the effective
date of the original appraisal. If the value has declined, a new appraisal is
required.
 This form may be used for all property and inspection types.
Required Exhibits
 At a minimum, when completing the Appraisal Update portion of the report, a
photograph of the front of the subject property must be included.
 For a completion report, clear, descriptive photographs (in color) of the
completed improvements must accompany this report form.
 Any other data, as an attachment or addendum to the appraisal report form, that
is necessary to provide an adequately supported opinion of market value.
Fannie Mae DU
Non-AUS guidelines apply.
Freddie Mac LP
Non-AUS guidelines apply, with the following exceptions:
 An appraisal update must be performed and reported as follows:
 an appraisal update reported on Form 442, Appraisal Update and/or
Completion Report with, at a minimum, a photograph of the front of the
subject property,
 a new appraisal based on an exterior-only inspection with, at a minimum, a
photograph of the front of the subject property, and reported on the
appropriate Freddie Mac form based on the property type, or
 a new appraisal based on an interior and exterior inspection and reported on
the appropriate Freddie Mac form based on the property type.
Key Loan Program and Jumbo Solution Second Mortgage
 The Appraisal Update and/or Completion Report (Fannie Mae 1004D/Freddie
Mac Form 442) form is intended to provide an interior and exterior inspection
update of a prior appraisal and/or to report a certification of completion.
 This form can be used to update an existing appraisal if the property has not
declined in value since the date of the original appraisal report, and/or confirm
that the requirements or conditions established in an appraisal report have been
met. If the property value has declined in value, a new appraisal is required.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 32 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Appraisal
Update and/or
Completion
Report (Fannie
Mae
1004D/Freddie
Mac Form 442)
(continued)
Key Loan Program and Jumbo Solution Second Mortgage, continued
 Required Exhibits
 At a minimum, when completing the Appraisal Update portion of the report, a
photograph of the front of the subject property must be included.
 For a completion report, clear, descriptive photographs (in color) of the
completed improvements must accompany this report form.
 Any other data, as an attachment or addendum to the appraisal report form,
that is necessary to provide an adequately supported opinion of market
value.
Requirements for FHA Loans
 Loans with an FHA case number assigned prior to February 15, 2010, are not
eligible to use the Appraisal Update and/or Completion Report (Fannie Mae form
1004D/Freddie Mac form 442).
 The Appraisal Update and/or Completion Report (Fannie Mae form
1004D/Freddie Mac form 442) may only be used when ordered by a lender who
is identified as an intended user in the original appraisal report, unless the
appraiser incorporates the original report being updated as an attachment, rather
than as a reference.
 When a “Summary Appraisal Update Report,” is issued, the appraiser must
include a completed Market Conditions Addendum (Fannie Mae form
1004MC/Freddie Mac form 71) for the subject property that is reflective of the
current market conditions as of the effective date of the Appraisal Update and/or
Completion Report (Fannie Mae form 1004D/Freddie Mac form 442).
 Current guidelines allow for an original appraisal report’s expiration date to be
extended by 30 days, at the option of the lender, in certain situations. This
guidance is not applicable to transactions that utilize a “Summary Appraisal
Update Report,” as the effective date must be on or before the original expiration
date of the appraisal report being updated.
Fannie Mae’s
DU Property
Inspection
Waiver (PIW)
Fannie Mae’s Desktop Underwriter (DU) Property Inspection Waiver (PIW) is a
fieldwork recommendation that results in an offer to waive both the property
inspection and the appraisal for certain lower risk transactions.
References:
 See Section 2.01: Agency Loan Programs of the Correspondent Seller Guide for
additional information regarding Fannie Mae’s Property Inspection Waiver (PIW).
 See Section 1.06: Condominium and PUD Approval Requirements for appraisal
requirements for condominiums and attached PUDs.
 A full appraisal is required if the subject property being purchased is a short sale
property. See Section 1.28: Short Sale and Restructured Mortgage Loans for
additional information.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 33 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
One-Unit
Residential
Appraisal Field
Review Report
Purpose
 This report is an exterior-only property inspection.
 This form is used for appraisal field reviews for one-unit appraisal reports.
(Fannie Mae
Form
2000/Freddie
Mac Form 1032
Required Exhibits:
 A street map that shows the location of the subject property and of all
comparables included in the appraisal report under review and any additional
comparable sales provided by the review appraiser.
 Clear, descriptive photographs (in color) that show the front, back, and a street
scene of the subject property, and that are appropriately identified. Photographs
must be originals that are produced either by photography or electronic imaging.
 Closely cropped photographs are not acceptable unless accompanied by a full
explanation as to why the photographs are being presented in this manner.
 Clear, descriptive photographs (in color) that show the front of each comparable
sale included in the appraisal report under review and any additional comparable
sales described in the appraisal field review report. Generally, the photographs
should be originals that are produced by photography or electronic imaging;
however, copies of photographs from a multiple listing service or from the appraiser’s
files are acceptable if they are clear and descriptive.
Two- to FourUnit Residential
Appraisal Field
Review Report
Purpose
 This report is an exterior-only property inspection.
 This form is used for appraisal field reviews for two- unit to four-unit appraisal
reports.
 It is designed to complement the Small Residential Income Property Appraisal
Report (Fannie Mae Form 1025/Freddie Mac Form 72), which is a streamlined
appraisal report form for two- unit to four-unit properties.
(Fannie Mae
Form 2000A/
Freddie Mac
Form 1072)
Required Exhibits:
 A street map that shows the location of the subject property and of all
comparables included in the appraisal report under review and any additional
comparable sales provided by the review appraiser.
 Clear, descriptive photographs (in color) that show the front, back, and a street
scene of the subject property, and that are appropriately identified. Photographs
must be originals that are produced either by photography or electronic imaging
 Closely cropped photographs are not acceptable unless accompanied by a full
explanation as to why the photographs are being presented in this manner.
 Clear, descriptive photographs (in color) that show the front of each comparable
sale included in the appraisal report under review and any additional comparable
sales described in the appraisal field review report. Generally, photographs
should be originals that are produced by photography or electronic imaging;
however, copies of photographs from a multiple listing service or from the
appraiser’s files are acceptable if they are clear and descriptive.
 Any data necessary to provide an adequately supported estimate of market value.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 34 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Reports and Exhibits, Continued
Operating
Income
Statement
(Fannie Mae
Form
216/Freddie Mac
Form 98)
AND
Single-Family
Comparable
Rent Schedule
(Fannie Mae
Form 1007)




Earthquake
Insurance
Analysis
Addendum
An Operating Income Statement (Fannie Mae Form 216/Freddie Mac Form 98)
is required for investment property, including a 2-4 unit in which the borrower
occupies one unit as a principal residence, regardless of whether the income is
being used to qualify.
The form may be prepared by the borrower or appraiser, provided the following:
 When the borrower prepares the Operating Income Statement, the
appraiser’s comments on the reasonableness of the projected operating
income must be included on the form.
 When the appraiser prepares the Operating Income Statement, the
borrower must supply the necessary expense related statements
(mortgage insurance premiums, HOA dues, leasehold payments, any
subordinate financing payments, and any other pertinent information
related to the property) for the appraiser.
A Single-Family Comparable Rent Schedule (Fannie Mae Form 1007) is
required if the property is a single-family investment property.
The lender must ensure that the appraiser has operating statements; expense
statements related to mortgage insurance premiums, homeowner’s association
dues, leasehold payments, or subordinate financing payments; and any other
pertinent information related to the property.
If a Freddie Mac loan, the Earthquake Insurance Analysis Addendum (Freddie Mac
465S), is required if the property is a condominium unit in a California moderate-risk
code.
(Freddie Mac
465S)
Appraiser
Certification to
the Appraisal
Report
Each of the appraisal report forms includes the appraiser’s certification.
Appraisal
Upgrades




Upgrading does not occur on traditionally underwritten loans, as reduced
appraisals are not eligible.
If a loan is resubmitted through DU/LP and the Report upgrades the appraisal,
the appraisal must be upgraded to the form identified in the new Report, even if
it has been ordered and received on a different form.
Underwriters may also upgrade an appraisal if deficiencies are noted in the
initial report.
Limited representations and warranties still apply if the appraisal is upgraded.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 35 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis
General
Information




Uniform
Appraisal
Dataset (UAD)
The appraisal should be completed in an objective manner so that a third party
can follow the appraiser’s reasoning in arriving at the estimate of market value.
The appraisal must establish the risk of value and evaluate the present value of
the property as well as the likelihood that the property will maintain such value in
the future.
The appraiser is responsible for completing the appraisal form in its entirety.
The Appraisal Review Checklist (COR 0049) assists the underwriter in reviewing
the appraisal and may be used as an underwriting tool.
Overview
UAD was developed in an effort to improve the quality and consistency of appraisal
data on loans and defines all fields required for an appraisal submission for specific
appraisal forms. UAD standardizes the input values for certain elements, such as
specific date and dollar amount formats and the definitions for select key appraisal
data elements, such as property condition and quality of construction on the four
UAD appraisal report forms listed below:
 Uniform Residential Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae Form 1004/Freddie Mac
Form 70)
 Individual Condominium Unit Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae Form 1073/Freddie
Mac Form 465)
 Exterior-Only Inspection Individual Condominium Unit Appraisal Report (Freddie
Mac Form 466)
 Exterior-Only Inspection Residential Appraisal Report (Freddie Mac Form 2055)
Notes:
 All UAD-compliant appraisals MUST be completed on the correct form (identified
by “UAD version 9/2011” in the footer of the form.)
 SunTrust Mortgage does not accept the Exterior-Only Inspection Individual
Condominium Unit Appraisal Report (Freddie Mac Form 466) or the Exterior-Only
Inspection Residential Appraisal Report (Freddie Mac Form 2055).
Definitions of Property Condition and Quality of Construction
The UAD Specification provides standardized definitions for property condition and
construction quality. The new definitions are expressed as a rating. Property
condition will be rated C1 through C6 and quality of construction will be rated Q1
through Q6.
 Condition ratings C1 through C4 will be eligible in “as-is” condition. Condition
ratings C5 and C6 will apply if the appraiser identifies physical deficiencies that
affect the soundness, structural integrity, or livability of the subject property. If
the condition rating is C5, the property will be eligible only if the repairs
necessary to resolve the stated deficiencies are completed prior to closing and
the file contains a final inspection that reflects a revised condition rating of C4 or
better. If the condition rating is C6, the property does not meet eligibility
requirements.
 Construction quality ratings Q1 through Q5 will be eligible; however, properties
with a quality rating of Q6 do not meet eligibility requirements.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 36 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Uniform
Appraisal
Dataset (UAD),
continued
Additional Information on the Appraisal Reports
New information will need to be provided on the form that was never explicitly
requested before the UAD. For example, the following data points are now required:
 Days On Market (DOM) and Sale Type for the subject property and each
comparable property
 Specifically defined Condition and Quality ratings
 Status of improvements to kitchen and bathrooms for the subject property
Frequently Asked Questions about UAD
Click here to access the FAQ document.
FHA UAD
Compliance

HUD appraisal types that must be UAD-compliant are:
 Uniform Residential Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae 1004/Freddie Mac 70)
 Individual Condominium Unit Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae 1073/Freddie
Mac 465)

All Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac UAD guidelines remain in effect with the exception
of those listed below:
 The following table identifies HUD-specific compliance requirements:
UAD Field Specific
Requirement
Select relevant subject
condition rating
Appraisal Form
Section
Improvements
Sales Comparison
Input room count and
Grid Basement &
finished/unfinished
Finished Rooms
basement areas
Below Grade
Appraisal made “as-is,” Reconciliation Section
“subject to”...
Enter Appraiser Trainee Appraiser Certification
and Supervisory
Section (Pg. 6)
Appraiser Information

FHA Requirement
“Subject to” select the asrepaired condition
Enter only verifiable data and
cite source in the addendum
“As-is” only for HUD REO or
PFS properties
Supervisory appraisers and
trainees are not permitted
In all cases, a property’s compliance with FHA Minimum Property Standards
(new construction) and HUD Minimum Property Requirements (existing
construction) must be thoroughly addressed by the appraiser. FHA Roster
appraisers are reminded that the Statement of Insurability is also required for all
appraisals performed on HUD REO properties.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 37 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
VA UAD
Compliance



VA appraisal types that must be UAD-compliant are:
 Uniform Residential Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae 1004/Freddie Mac 70)
 Individual Condominium Unit Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae 1073/Freddie
Mac 465)
 Exterior-Only Inspection Residential Appraisal Report - (Freddie Mac 2055)
(used for liquidation appraisals only)
 Exterior-Only Inspection Individual Condominium Appraisal Report - (Freddie
Mac 466 (used for liquidation appraisals only)
VA rescinded the following in order to comply with UAD requirements:
 The requirement that only the “Department of Veterans Affairs” be entered in
the Lender/Client field of the appraisal form. Instead, the appraiser enters
the lender’s name in this field, as well as the “Department of Veterans
Affairs” as the client of this field.
 The requirement that “Intended User: Any VA Approved Lender” be entered
in the Address field for the lender. Instead, the appraiser now enters the
address of the lender from the appraisal assignment report in this field.
 The requirement that “Any Qualified Veteran” be entered in the Borrower
field of the appraisal report. The appraiser now enters the name of the
Veteran purchaser in this field.
All Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac UAD guidelines remain in effect with the exception
of those listed below:
 VA Fee Appraisers will continue to complete VA appraisal reports in
accordance with the requirements of the VA Lender’s Handbook (VA
Pamphlet 26-7, Revised) and instruction and guidelines from VA. Fee
Appraisers are reminded that completion of the data fields of the appraisal
report does not relieve them of the duty to provide adequate explanations in
the addendum to provide clarity and justification.
 Appraisal reports will continue to be quality-reviewed for compliance with VA
requirements.
 While the UAD may allow for the use of unsettled sales in the sales
comparison grid, VA requires that only settled sales be used.
 UAD requires appraisers to provide specific information regarding
remodeling in the past 15 years; VA expects Fee Appraisers to recognize
and describe remodeling or updating and to make appropriate adjustments.
On VA appraisals, Fee Appraisers should also report UAD information
concerning the remodeling if it is available in the “normal course of business”
within VA timeliness requirements for completion of the appraisal.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 38 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Subject
Property












This section provides the following information:
The appraiser must enter an address that conforms to the United States Postal
Service (USPS) address standards. The subject address must be populated
consistently throughout the form. The following address elements must be
included in these fields:
 Street Number
 Street Name (including pre-directional indicator suffix, post-directional
indicator, and unit number when applicable)
 City
 USPS two letter state abbreviation or territory representation
 5-digit Zip Code or Zip + 4 code (either with or without dash)
 County - If the subject property is not located in any county (the subject
property is located in an independent city), enter the name of the local
municipality or district in which the property is located.
Assessor Parcel number should be formatted exactly the same as the taxing
agency does, including all spaces and dashes as applicable. If no parcel
number is available, then enter “none.”
Tax Year, Real Estate Taxes and Special Assessments - The appraiser should
report the amount of the taxes / assessments payable on the subject property as
an annualized amount. If real estate taxes are payable to more than one entity,
the appraiser should enter the sum of all real estate taxes / assessments in an
annualized amount. In the event the subject does not have taxes and/or
assessments, then a numeral zero must be entered.
Neighborhood Name – The appraiser should enter a neighborhood name. It
may be a name recognized by the municipality in which the property is sited,
such as a subdivision name. If there is not a neighborhood name recognized by
the municipality, enter the common name by which residents refer to the
location.
Project Name – The appraiser must enter the legal name of the project for the
subject project and each comparable property.
Occupant – The appraiser must indicate whether the subject is occupied by the
owner or a tenant, or is vacant as of the effective date of the appraisal. Only one
selection is permitted. For properties that are comprised of one unit with an
accessory unit, the selection must reflect the occupancy status of the main unit.
PUD (Indicator) – The appraiser must indicate if the property is located in a
Planned Unit Development (PUD). If the checkbox is selected, the appraiser
must select ‘yes’ or ‘no’ in response to the question, “Is the developer / builder in
control of the Homeowners Association (HOA)?” located in the PUD Information
section.
HOA Fees - The appraiser must enter all applicable association (HOA) fees
applicable to the subject property, and if none, must enter a numerical zero.
Assignment type – The appraiser must indicate the transaction type for the
assignment – Purchase, Refinance, or Other. Only one selection is permitted. If
‘Other” is selected, a description must be provided.
Lender/Client - The Appraiser must enter the name of the lender. Any applicable
AMC name should only be entered in the Appraiser Certification Section.
Description of the property rights (i.e., “fee simple” or “leasehold”) to be
appraised.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 39 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Subject
Property,
(continued)





Financial data and sales concessions.
Census tract and/or MSA number.
Identification of the borrower, the name of the current owner of public record and
the client.
The appraiser must identify whether the subject property is currently offered for
sale or has been offered for sale in the twelve months prior to the date of the
appraisal by selecting either the ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ checkbox and report the data
source(s) used, offering price(s), and date(s).
 If the answer is ‘No’ the data source(s) used must be provided.
 If the answer is “Yes” the following information is required:
 Days on the Market (DOM) – The appraiser must enter the DOM for the
subject property. DOM is defined as the total number of continuous days
from the date that a property is listed or advertised for sale through the
date it is taken off the market or contracted for sale. DOM applies not
only to properties listed in a Multiple Listing Service (MLS), but also
applies to properties marketed for sale outside MLS. If the subject
property was not individually listed or advertised for sale, enter the
numeral zero (0). If the DOM is unknown, enter ‘UNK’.
 Offering Price(s) – The appraiser must report the original offering price
and a history of price changes, if any.
 Offering Date(s – The appraiser must report the date(s) that the property
was offered for sale.
 Data Source(s) Used – The appraiser must report the data source(s)
used to obtain the offering information. If the data source is MLS, the
appraiser must enter the abbreviated MLS organization name, followed
by a pound sign (#), and the specific listing identifier. If the subject
property was offered For Sale by Owner (FSBO) or otherwise marketed
for sale outside, the appraiser must report the original offering price,
history of price changes, if any, and the date(s) the property was offered
for sale, etc., to the extent that this information is known or available to
the appraiser in the normal course of business.
Review of the Subject Property section must include the following:
 The property address and the legal description match the loan application,
sales contract and title documents.
 All blanks must be completed.
 Purchases: Owner on Public Record matches property seller on the sales
contract and title documents.
 Refinances: Owner of Public Record matches the borrower on the loan
application and title documents.
 Occupancy matches transactions, i.e.; owner name matches occupant for
refinance of Primary Residence.
 There are no “For Rent” or “For Sale” signs in the photograph of the subject
property on owner occupant refinance application.
 Appraisal ordered by lender rather than another party (buyer, seller, Realtor)
to the transactions.
 Appraisal was ordered after the sales contract was written.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 40 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Contract
The appraisal is required to identify the following information from the sales contract
in effect as of the date of the appraisal:
 Verification that the appraiser analyzed the sales contract.
 The appraiser must indicate the type of sale for this transaction from the list
of valid sale types (REO sale, Short sale, Court ordered sale, Estate sale,
Relocation sale, Non-arm’s length sale, Arm’s length sale), only one type of
sale is permitted.
 After selecting a valid sale type, the appraiser must enter an explanation of
the results of the analysis of the contract or why the analysis was not
performed.
 Contract price and date must match the sales contract and must be the same as
the sales price for the subject property in the Sales Comparison Approach
section as of the effective date of the appraisal. Changes to the sales contracts
after the effective date of the appraisal may not require appraisal updates and
should be referred back to the underwriter for delegated Correspondent loans.
 Indicates whether the seller is the owner of record.
 Financial assistance (loan charges, sale concessions, gift, or down payment
assistance, etc.) to be paid by any party on behalf of the borrower,
 If the appraiser indicates ‘Yes’, enter the total dollar amount of all financial
assistance, including any closing costs or other payments from the seller or
other third party.
 If the appraiser is not able to determine a dollar amount for all or part of the
financial assistance, the number must reflect the total known dollar amount.
Leave this field blank if the entire financial assistance amount is unknown.
The appraiser may choose to state ‘There is financial assistance amount that
is unknown’ in the text field.
 Next the appraiser must provide a description of the items being paid.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 41 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Neighborhood
Analysis
General
 The purpose of this section is to identify the area that is subject to the same
influences as the subject property (i.e., common characteristics or trends) such
as typical lot sizes, land use, street patterns and architectural styles).
 The neighborhood is defined by the appraiser in the description of its
boundaries, which may include, but are not limited to streets, legally recognized
neighborhood boundaries, waterways, or other natural boundaries that define the
separation of one neighborhood from another.
 The neighborhood characteristics should be addressed by the types of structures
(detached, attached) and architectural styles (i.e., row or townhouse, colonial,
ranch , Victorian); current land use (i.e., residential, commercial, industrial);
typical site size (i.e., square feet, acres); or street patterns or design (i.e., oneway, cul-de-sac, court).
 The appraiser must make a visual inspection of the neighborhood in order to
observe these influences and identify any land use changes, if applicable.
 A neighborhood analysis considers influences of economic, governmental
and environmental forces on property values in the neighborhood.
 The racial or ethnic composition of a neighborhood or the age or sex of the
individuals who live in a particular neighborhood are not appraisal factors
and must not be considered in the valuation process (EXCEPT in the case of
age restricted communities where the appraiser would be required to
evaluate and comment on the impact, if any, of the age restriction on the
property and/or neighborhood, as compared to other neighborhoods within
the area).
 Neighborhood conditions should be reported on the appraisal in factual,
specific terms and be impartial and specific in describing favorable or
unfavorable factors.
 Changes that have occurred which might influence the marketability of the
properties within the neighborhood must be explained so as to reflect an
active, on-going market for the property.
 The appraiser must not make unsupported assumptions or interject personal
opinion or perceptions about market forces or other factors that may or may
not affect the use and value of a property.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 42 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Neighborhood
Analysis,
(continued)
Location
 This section must state the appraiser conducted a visual inspection of the market
area to observe:
 physical characteristics,
 boundaries The appraiser should provide an outline of the neighborhood
boundaries, which should be clearly delineated using ‘North’, ‘South’, ‘East’
and ‘West’. These boundaries may include but are not limited to street,
legally recognized neighborhood boundaries, waterways, or other natural
boundaries that define the separation of one neighborhood from another.
Appraisers should not reference a map or other addendum as the only
example of the neighborhood boundaries.
 identify land uses, and
 indications that the land use may change.
 Properties may be located in urban, suburban, or rural areas. Conditions exist
that are specific to location and must be viewed in context with the nature of the
area.
 All properties must be residential in nature, as reflected by the characteristics of
the subject property, zoning, and the present land use.
 Properties with outbuildings must be given special consideration. Outbuildings
that are minimal in value are acceptable if they are typical of other residential
properties in the area. Outbuildings that do not represent typical residential
improvements for the location or property type should be given minimum value.
Outbuildings that represent a significant value may represent a property that is
agricultural in nature and require careful review and consideration.
 All properties must be readily accessible by roads that meet local standards. In
addition, they must have adequate utilities available and in service.
 Properties that are not suitable for year-round occupancy are not acceptable.
Degree of Development and Growth Rate
 The degree of development of a neighborhood, which is referred to as “built-up”
on the appraisal report forms, is the percentage of the available land in the
neighborhood that has been improved.
 The degree of development of available land within the neighborhood may
indicate whether a particular property is residential in nature.
 When reviewing an appraisal on a property located in a rural or relatively
undeveloped area, the appraiser should focus on the characteristics of the
property, zoning, and the present land use to determine whether the property
should be considered residential in nature.
 Typically, agricultural properties (i.e., income producing), undeveloped land and
land-development-type properties are not acceptable.
 Special attention must be given to the appraiser’s description of the
neighborhood, zoning, the highest and best use determination, and the degree of
comparability between the subject property and the comparable sales. If the
subject property has a significantly larger site than the comparables used in the
appraiser’s analysis, the subject property may not be a typical residential
property for the neighborhood.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 43 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Neighborhood
Analysis
(continued)
Property Values
The appraisal must indicate whether property values in the subject’s neighborhood
are increasing, stable, or declining. Only one selection is permitted.
Declining Property Values
Reference: See Section 1.09: Declining Market Guidelines of the Correspondent
Seller Guide for declining property value guidelines.
Unfavorable Neighborhood Conditions
Property located in a neighborhood that has vacant or boarded up properties may
affect the value and/or marketability of the subject property. The appraiser must:
 address these conditions in the appraisal,
 use comparable sales from the same neighborhood, if available,
 address the reasons for the vacancies or boarded up properties (i.e.,
foreclosure, rates, tax sales, supply/demand), and
 address how all these factors affect the marketability of the subject property.
Demand, Supply and Marketing Time
 The appraiser must indicate whether the demand/supply in the subject property’s
neighborhood is in shortage, in balance, or over supply. Only one selection is
permitted.
 Generally, an over-supply of housing is not desirable since it indicates that
properties are selling slowly with a lot of competition. The appraiser must
comment on the reason for the over-supply and its effect on the value of the
subject property.
 The appraiser must indicate whether the marketing time is under 3 months, 3-6
months, or over 6 months. Only one selection is permitted.
 Marketing time is the average time that it takes for a reasonably priced property
to sell in the subject neighborhood. If the time exceeds six (6) months, the
appraiser must comment on the reason for the extended marketing period and
its effect on the value of the subject property.
Predominant Occupancy
 Predominant occupancy is categorized as “owner,” “tenant,” “vacant (0-5%),” or
“vacant (over 5%).”
 To assure that any effects of occupancy status will be reflected in the sales
comparison analysis, the appraiser should select comparable sales from within
the same neighborhood whenever possible.
 If vacant or vacancy over 5%, the appraiser should comment on any effect this
may have on the neighborhood.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 44 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Neighborhood
Analysis
(continued)
Conventional Non-AUS
Price Range and Predominant Price
 The appraiser must indicate the price range and predominant price of properties
in the subject neighborhood.
 The price range must reflect high and low prevailing prices for one-unit
properties, two- to four-unit properties, or condo units depending on the property
type being appraised and the appraisal form being used. Isolated high and low
extremes should be excluded from the range, which means that the predominant
price will be that which is the most common or most frequently found in the
neighborhood.
 The appraiser may state the predominant price as a single figure or as a range, if
more appropriate.
Age Range and Predominant Age
 The appraiser must indicate the age range and predominant age of properties in
the subject neighborhood.
 The age range should reflect the oldest and newest ages for one-unit properties,
two- to four-unit properties, or condo units depending on the property type and
the appraisal form being used. However, isolated high and low extremes should
be excluded from the range. The predominant age is the one that is the most
common or most frequently found in the neighborhood.
 The appraiser may state the predominant age as a single figure or as a range
when that is more appropriate.
 When the age of the subject property is significantly different than the
predominant age range, the appraiser must explain why the age is outside the
range and comment on the marketability of the property and the adjustments that
were made in the Sales Comparison Approach adjustment grid to reflect that
condition.
Fannie Mae DU
Follow DU requirements, which are the same as non-AUS guidelines.
Freddie Mac LP
 Follow LP requirements, which are noted below:
 The "Neighborhood" section of the appraisal report requires the appraiser to:
identify the neighborhood boundaries; describe the neighborhood characteristics
as either "Urban," "Suburban" or "Rural"; describe the percent built‐up as either
"Over 75%," "25‐75%" or "Under 25%"; describe the growth rate as either
"Rapid," "Stable" or "Slow"; and to report on market conditions, housing trends,
price and age ranges and present land uses for the properties in the
neighborhood.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 45 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Neighborhood
Analysis,
(continued)
Present Land Use
 The appraiser should provide the relative percentages of the developed land in
the neighborhood rather than referring to the zoning classifications.
 Percentages should be reported separately for developed single-family sites,
developed two- to four-family sites, etc.
 Undeveloped land should be reported as vacant.
 The total of the types of land uses must equal 100%.
 If land is being used for any purposes other than those listed on the appraisal
form, the appraiser should describe each purpose and indicate what percentage
of the land use this represents.
 Different land uses and/or property types should be considered neighborhood
characteristics which must be taken into consideration when performing
neighborhood analysis and defining neighborhood boundaries.
Changes in Land Use
 The appraiser must indicate whether the present land use is “likely” or “not likely”
to change or whether it is “in process” of changing.
 If the present land use is “in process” of changing, the anticipated new land use(s)
should be indicated. The appraiser should indicate the anticipated effects the
transition will have on the marketability of the property.
Competitive Properties
If the subject property is a two- to four-family property, the following is required:
 the appraiser must include at least three (3) competitive properties from the
subject neighborhood that have been selected from available listing (may be the
rental comparables or the sales comparables used later in the market data
analysis), and
 the appraiser must provide a narrative comparison of the competitive listings that
describe current market conditions and trends affecting 2-4 family properties.
Over-Improvements
 An over-improvement is an improvement that is larger or costlier than what is
typical for the neighborhood.
 Improvements can represent an over-improvement for the neighborhood, but still
be within the neighborhood price range, such as a property with an in-ground
swimming pool, a large addition, or an oversized garage in a market that does not
demand these kinds of improvements.
 The appraiser must comment on over-improvements and indicate their
contributory value in the Sales Comparison Approach adjustment grid.
 The fact that the property is an over-improvement does not necessarily make the
property ineligible. However, the Underwriter must review appraisals on properties
with over-improvements that may not be acceptable to the typical purchaser to
ensure that only the contributory value of the over-improvement is reflected in the
appraisal analysis.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 46 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Site Analysis
General
 The property site should be of a size, shape, and topography that are generally
conforming and acceptable in the market area. It must also have competitive
utilities, street improvements and other amenities.
 For sites/parcels that have an area of less than one acre, the size must be
reported in square feet.
 For site/parcels that have an area of one acre or greater, the size must be
reported in acreage to two decimal places.
 The unit of measure must be indicated as either ‘sf’ for square feet or ‘ac’ for
acres. A numeric value must be entered followed by the appropriate unit of
measure. The total size of the entire site/parcel must be entered. No other
data is permitted.
 The appraiser must provide one of the ratings (N- neutral, B- beneficial, Aadverse) to describe the overall effect on value and marketability of the view
factors associated with the subject property. The appraiser must also provide at
least one, but not more than two, view factor(s) (e.g. water view, pasture view,
woods view, park view, golf course view, city view, skyline view, mountain view,
residential view, city street view, industrial view, power lines, limited sight, other) and
provide details about the overall view rating selected. If the view factor is not on
the above list and materially affects the value of the subject property, the
appraiser must enter a description of the view associated with the property.
Descriptors such as ‘None’, ‘N/A’, ‘Typical’, ‘Average’, etc., are unacceptable.
Site section and comparable sales grid must be the same for the subject property.
 The appraiser must include the actual size of the site and not a part of the site.
For example, the appraiser may not appraise only five acres of an un-subdivided
40 acre parcel.
 It must also have competitive utilities, street improvements and other amenities.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 47 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Site Analysis,
(continued)
Zoning
 The appraisers are responsible for reporting the specific zoning classification for
the subject property and explaining the meaning of the classification. If there is no
zoning, an explanation by the appraiser is required.
 A specific statement must be included indicating whether the improvements
represent a legal use, a legal but non-conforming use or an illegal use under the
zoning regulations.
 Properties with improvements that do not constitute a legally permissible use of
the land are not acceptable except as follows:
 1-4 unit properties, including 1-4 unit properties in PUD projects, reported as
legal, but non-conforming are acceptable provided the use of the land and the
appraisal analysis reflect any adverse effect that the non-conforming use has
on the value and marketability of the property,
 if the property is a condo unit that represents a legal, but non-conforming use
of the land and the improvements can be rebuilt to current density in the event
of their partial or full destruction, and/or
 if the property is a one- to two-family property that includes an illegal
additional unit or accessory apartment (i.e., mother-in-law suite) and the
illegal use conforms to the subject neighborhood and to the market.
 Properties that are subject to certain land use regulations (i.e., coastal tideland or
wetland laws) that create setback lines or other provisions preventing
reconstruction of the property improvements if they are damaged or destroyed are
not acceptable.
 Zoning requirements should not be the basis of classifying a project as a PUD.
Highest and Best Use
 The highest and best use of a site is that reasonable and probable use that
supports the highest present value on the effective date of the appraisal.
 For improvements to represent the highest and best use of a site, they must be
legally permitted, be financially feasible, be physically possible and provide more
profit than any other use of the site would generate.
Utilities
 The appraiser must indicate for each utility whether it is ‘Public’ and/or ‘Other’.
Utilities include electricity, gas, water, and sanitary sewer. The appraiser must
also enter a description if ‘Other’ is indicated. If the utility is not present, enter
‘None’ in the description field.
 The utilities must meet community standards.
 If public sewer and/or water facilities (those that are supplied and regulated by the
local government) are not available, then community or private well and septic
facilities must be available and utilized by the subject property.
 The subject property must have a self-fueling heating system.
 If community facilities are used, the owners of the subject property must have the
right to access those facilities on an on-going basis.
 Generally, private well or septic facilities must be located on the subject site.
However, off-site private facilities are acceptable if the inhabitants of the subject
property have the right to access such facilities on an on-going basis and if there
is an adequate, legally binding agreement for their access and maintenance.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 48 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Site Analysis,
(continued)
Off-Site Improvements
 Generally, the property should front on a publicly dedicated and maintained street
that meets community standards.
 The appraiser should indicate whether the street or alley type is ‘Public’ and/or
‘Private’. Enter ‘None’ in the appropriate description field if there is no street or
alley.
 The property must have legally appropriate and adequate ingress and egress.
 If the property fronts on a community-owned or privately owned and maintained
street, there must be an adequate, legally enforceable road maintenance
agreement.
 If the property fronts on a street that is not typical of those found in the
community, the appraiser must comment on the effect of that location on the
marketability and value of the subject property.
 The appraiser must comment on any adverse conditions and address their effect
on the marketability and value of the subject property.
The Lot
 The topography, shape, size and drainage of the lot must be taken into
consideration.
 Unfavorable conditions on the lot include steep slopes (cause erosion), difficulty in
maintaining a lawn and/or difficult access to the property or to a garage.
 Drainage must be away from the improvements to avoid the collection of water in
or around them.
Additional Parcels of Land
 Each parcel must be conveyed in its entirety.
 Parcels must be adjoined to the other, unless they comply with the following
exception. Parcels that otherwise would be adjoined, but are divided by a road,
are acceptable if the parcel without a residence is a non-buildable lot (for
example, waterfront properties where the parcel without the residence provides
access to the water). Evidence that the lot is non-buildable must be included in
the loan file.
 For the standard Agency, Agency Plus, DU Refi Plus, and Texas Cash-Out
Refinance loan programs, each parcel must have the same basic zoning (for
example, residential, agricultural).
 For the Jumbo Solution Second, and Key loan programs, each parcel must be
zoned as “residential.”
 The entire property may contain only one residential dwelling unit. Limited
additional non-residential improvements, such as a garage, are acceptable. For
example, the adjoining parcel may not have an additional dwelling unit. An
improvement that has been built across lot lines is acceptable. For example, a
home built across both parcels where the lot line runs under the home is
acceptable.
 The mortgage must be a valid first lien that covers each parcel.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 49 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Site Analysis,
(continued)
Additional Parcels of Land, continued
 When analyzing the appraisal, the following additional requirements apply:
 the site description must accurately describe the land and any
improvements included in each of the parcels,
 the comparable sales should have adjoining parcels similar to the subject
property,
 differences in sites, adjustments to comparable sales, or lack of
adjustments must be explained in the appropriate section, and
 the appraisal report must evaluate the effect any additional land may have
on the subject property’s value or marketability.
Flood Hazard Area
 The lender must determine whether or not the property is located in a Special
Flood Hazard Area that is identified on the Federal Emergency Management
Agency’s (FEMA) Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM).
 The appraiser must include the specific FEMA flood zone, map number and the
map's effective date.
 If property improvements are located in a Special Flood Hazard Area (zones A,
AE, AH, AO, AR, A1-30, A-99, V, VE, VO or V1-30), flood insurance is required.
 If the land is located in a Special Flood Hazard Area but the improvements are
not, flood insurance is not required.
 The appraiser must provide a clear, detailed and accurate description of the
improvements.
The appraiser should be as specific as possible (i.e.,
commenting on needed repairs, additional features, modernization, etc.) and
should provide supporting addenda, if necessary.
 In all cases, the subject property must be habitable as a year-round residence.
Improvement
Analysis
General
 The appraiser must provide a clear, detailed and accurate description of the
improvements.
 The appraiser must indicate the number of stories/levels for the subject property.
Use of any designators or descriptors, such as ‘1 story’ or ‘one story and a half’
are not acceptable.
 The appraiser should enter an appropriate architectural design (style) type
descriptor that best describes the subject property. Valid descriptions include,
but are not limited to, ‘Colonial’, ‘Rambler’, ‘Georgian’, ‘Farmhouse’. Use of
descriptors such as ’brick’, ‘2 stories’, ‘average’, ‘conventional’, or ‘typical’ are
not acceptable as these are not architectural styles. Design style names may
vary and should be reported based upon locality.
 The appraiser should be as specific as possible (i.e., commenting on needed
repairs, additional features, modernization, etc.) and should provide supporting
addenda, if necessary.
 In all cases, the subject property must be habitable as a year-round residence;
however, acceptability of non-traditional types of housing is subject to specific
product eligibility.
 In all cases, the product description should be consulted for additional
acceptability requirements.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 50 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Improvement
Analysis,
(continued)
General, continued
 If a basement exists, the appraiser must indicate the square footage of the
basement and the percentage of the basement that is finished. If there is no
basement, enter a numerical zero (0) in both fields, not “None”.
 The appraiser should select the heating and /or cooling types. If there is no
heating or cooling source, the appraiser should indicate ‘other’ and enter ‘None’.
 The appraiser should select the appropriate checkbox(es) to indicate the
amenities available. The appraiser should enter the numerical zero (0) in the
appropriate space if there are no fireplaces or woodstoves. The appraiser
should enter ‘None’ in the appropriate space if there is no patio/deck, pool,
fence, porch, or other amenity. This must match the Sales Comparison
Approach section for the subject.
 The appraiser must indicate whether the subject has a driveway, garage, and/or
carport, or has no car storage. If the subject property has a driveway, garage,
and/or carport, the appraiser must enter the number of spaces for each type of
car storage; if none enter the numerical zero (0). This must match the Sales
Comparison Approach section for the subject property.
 If the appraiser notates in the appraisal that there is an addition(s) that does not
have the required permit, then the appraiser must comment as to the impact of
the addition on the value and marketability of the subject property, as well as its
quality and condition.
 The loan file must include a copy of the homeowner’s insurance policy that
covers the unpermitted addition, along with documentation from the
city/county that the unpermitted addition is recognized and can be rebuilt.
Conformity to Neighborhood
 The improvements should generally conform to the neighborhood in terms of
age, type, design and materials used for their construction.
 Special considerations should be given to properties that represent unique
housing for the subject neighborhood.
 Non-traditional types of housing (i.e., log homes, earth homes or geodesic
domes) may be acceptable if the appraiser has adequate information to develop
a reliable estimate of market value.
Note: Refer to the individual product description for acceptability of unique
properties under the topic “Ineligible Properties.”

Dwelling units of any type should contain sufficient living area to be acceptable
to typical purchasers or tenants in the subject market area. In addition,
comparables should be of similar size to the subject property.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 51 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Improvement
Analysis,
(continued)
Actual and Effective Ages
 Actual age is the subject’s chronological age. Effective age is indicated by the
condition and utility of the property.
 The appraiser must indicate the year the subject was built. If it is unknown or
unavailable to the appraiser within the normal course of business, the appraiser
must estimate the year the subject was built.
 The relationship between the actual and effective ages of the property is a good
indication of its condition.
 A property that has been well maintained will generally have an effective age
somewhat lower than its actual age.
 If the appraiser makes a value adjustment for the effective age, the appraiser
must provide an explanation for the adjustments and the condition of the
property.
 Whenever adjustments are made to an appraisal for the year the dwelling was
built, the appraisal must provide an explanation for the adjustments.
 A property that has been poorly maintained may have an effective age higher
than its actual age.
Insulation and Energy Efficiency
 The appraiser must state the “R” value for insulation if he/she is aware of it and
comment on the adequacy of such insulation.
 Additional energy-efficient features should be listed in the “comments” area of
the appraisal report.
 An energy-efficient property is one that uses cost-effective design, materials,
equipment and site orientation to conserve non-renewable fuels. The nature of
these items and their contribution to value will vary throughout the country due to
climatic conditions and differences in utility costs.
 The subject must have a self-fueling heating system.
Layout and Floor Plans
 Unusual layouts, peculiar floor plans, or inadequate equipment or amenities
generally have limited market appeal.
 If such inadequacies will result in market resistance to the subject property, the
appraiser must make appropriate adjustments.
Unit/Room List
 The appraisal contains a “room list” section for the subject property and provides
a column for the square footage per level. In addition, it also provides a space
for a summary of the above-grade room count(s) and the above-grade gross
living area for the finished area.
 If using the Small Residential Income Property Appraisal Report, the appraisal
contains a “unit/room” list for the subject property and requires the appraiser to
indicate the square feet per unit. The appraiser may report the units individually
or as a single line entry if they are all equal in size. The total square footage
should reflect the net rentable area of the property.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 52 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Improvement
Analysis,
(continued)
Unit/Room List, continued
 Comparable sales should have a similar bedroom count as compared to the
subject property (i.e., if subject property is a two (2) bedroom, at least two (2)
comparable sales should have two (2) bedrooms).
 If two (2) comparable sales are not available, then the appraiser must provide an
explanation as to why he/she used the specific comparables.
Gross Living Area
 The most common comparison for single-family properties (including condos) is
above-grade gross living area. The appraiser must enter the total number of
bedroom(s) and full and partial bathroom(s) above grade. The number of full
and half baths must be entered, separated by a decimal. The full bath count is
represented to the left of the decimal, and half bath count is represented to the
right of the decimal. This must match the Sales Comparison Approach section
for the subject property.
 If the property is a condo unit, the interior perimeter unit dimensions must be
used to calculate the gross living area.
 If the property is not a condominium unit, the exterior building dimensions per
floor must be used to calculate the above-grade gross living area.
 Only finished above-grade areas should be used. Basements (including those
that are partially above-grade) and garages should not be included.
 A level is considered below-grade if any portion of it is below-grade, regardless
of the quality of its “finish” or the window area of any room.
 The appraiser should report a basement or other partially below-grade areas
separately and make appropriate adjustments for them on the “basement and
finished areas below-grade” line on the “sales comparison analysis” grid.
Gross Building Area
 Gross building area, which is the total finished area (including any interior
common areas, such as stairways and hallways) of the improvements based on
exterior measurements, is the most common comparison for two- to four-family
properties.
 It should include all finished above-grade and below-grade living areas but
exclude exterior common areas (i.e., open stairways).
Infestation, Dampness, or Settlement
 If the appraisal indicates that there is evidence of wood-boring insects,
dampness, or settlement, the appraiser must comment on its effect on the
marketability and value of the subject property.
 Satisfactory evidence that the condition was corrected or a professionally
prepared report, which indicates that the condition does not pose any threat of
structural damage to the improvement, must be provided.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 53 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Improvement
Analysis,
(continued)
Accessory Units
 An accessory dwelling unit (i.e., in-law suite) is an additional living area
independent of the primary dwelling unit, and includes a fully functioning kitchen
and bathroom. The accessory unit may be attached or detached from the
primary unit, or may be located within the interior of the primary unit such as the
basement, attic or a built-in living area over a garage.
 Whether a property is a one-unit property with an accessory unit or a two-unit
property will be based on the characteristics of the property, which may include,
but are not limited to, the existence of separate utilities, a unique postal address,
and whether the unit is rented.
 If the property contains an accessory dwelling unit, the property is eligible under
the following conditions:
 The property is one-unit.
 The appraisal report demonstrates that the improvements are typical for the
market through an analysis of at least one comparable property with the
same use.
 The borrower qualifies for the mortgage without considering any rental
income from the accessory unit.
 The appraiser is required to provide a description of the accessory dwelling unit,
and analyze any impact it has on the value or marketability of the subject
property.
 If it is determined that the property contains an accessory dwelling unit that does
not comply with local zoning requirements, the property may be eligible under
the following additional conditions:
 The homeowners insurance policy must cover the accessory dwelling unit,
along with documentation from the city/county that the accessory unit is
recognized and can be rebuilt;
 The use conforms to the subject neighborhood and to the market;
 The property is appraised based upon its current use;
 The appraiser must address that the improvements represent a use that
does not comply with zoning; and
 The appraisal report must demonstrate that the improvements are typical
for the market through an analysis of at least three comparable properties
that have the same non-compliant zoning use.
Continued on next page
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Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 54 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Property
Condition and
Appraiser
Comments
General
 The appraiser must express an opinion about the condition of the improvements
in factual, specific terms.
 Any condition affecting the value or marketability of the subject property must be
reported, including any detrimental condition of the improvements even if that
condition is typical for competing properties.
 Overall condition rating (C1 through C6) – The appraiser must select one of the
above ratings that bests describes the overall condition of the subject property or
unit. Only one selection is permitted. The rating for the subject property must
match the overall condition rating that is reported in the Sales Comparison
Approach section. The appraiser must indicate ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ if there has been
any material work done to the kitchen(s) or bathroom(s) in the prior 15 years. If
‘No’, the text should read ‘No updates in the prior 15 years’. If ‘Yes’, additional
information for kitchens and bathrooms must be provided. The appraiser must
identify any work completed in the kitchen(s) and bathroom(s) along with the
timeframes in which the work was completed. The appraiser must select one
value for the Level of Work Completed (not updated, updated, remodeled) for
both the kitchen(s) and bathroom(s). Timeframes (less than one year ago, one
to five years ago, six to ten years ago, eleven to fifteen years ago, or timeframe
unknown) represent the time period in which the majority of the improvements
were completed.
 If the condition rating is C5, the property will be eligible only if the repairs
necessary to resolve the stated deficiencies are completed prior to closing
and the file contains a final inspection that reflects a revised condition rating
of C4 or better.
 If the condition rating is C6, the property does not meet eligibility
requirements.
 The appraiser must select one Quality of Construction rating (Q1 through Q6) for
the subject property and each comparable property. The appraiser must indicate
the quality rating that best describes the overall quality of the property. Only one
selection is permitted. If the Quality rating is Q6, the property does not meet
eligibility requirements.
Continued on next page
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Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 55 of 79
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Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Property
Condition and
Appraiser
Comments,
(continued)
Remaining Economic Life
 The remaining economic life, although required in the appraisal report, does not
need to be considered because any related property deficiencies will be
addressed in the appropriate section of the report.
 There are no requirements that the mortgage term have any correlation to the
remaining economic life of the subject property, except as follows:
 for FHA, the remaining economic life must meet or exceed the term of the
proposed loan, and
 for VA, the remaining economic life must meet or exceed the term of the
proposed loan,
 if the appraiser reports the remaining economic life as being less than
thirty (30) years, the appraiser must adequately explain this conclusion
and cannot be arbitrarily established.
Contaminated Sites, Hazardous Substances and other Adverse Conditions
 The appraiser must note the presence of contaminated sites or hazardous
substances in the appraisal report and must:
 comment on any influence the hazard has on the property’s value and
marketability, if it is measurable through an analysis of comparable market
data as of the effective date of the appraisal, or indicate that the comparable
market data reveals no buyer resistance to the hazard; and
 make appropriate adjustments in the overall analysis of the property’s value.
 Examples of such contamination or hazardous substances include, but are not
limited to, the following:
 presence of asbestos, urea-formaldehyde or similar insulation in the
dwelling,
 presence of any hazardous waste, toxic substances or radon gas on the
subject property,
 proximity of the property and/or its neighborhood to a contaminated site,
 proximity of the property to ground water contamination, chemical or
petroleum spills, and/or
 other hazardous substances that are expected to impact the area for more
than one (1) year.
 The appraiser must also note the proximity of the property to areas that may
affect the value of marketability of the property, including, but not limited to, the
following:
 industrial sites,
 waste or water treatment facilities,
 commercial establishments (other than retail establishments that serve the
residential neighborhood),
 airport approach paths,
 flood plains,
 landslide areas, and/or
 earthquake zones.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 56 of 79
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Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Property
Condition and
Appraiser
Comments,
(continued)
Contaminated Sites, Hazardous Substances and other Adverse Conditions,
continued
 The lender must determine whether any additional inspections are necessary
based on the appraisal information of any hazardous or adverse conditions
impacting the subject property, to ensure adequacy of the property as security
for the mortgage.
Appraiser Comments
The appraiser must address any additional features, modernization, remodeling, or
needed repairs or any physical, functional or external inadequacies in the
"Comments" section.
Clarification on Minor Repairs to Existing Property
 If the appraiser reports the existence of minor conditions or deferred
maintenance items that do not affect the livability, soundness, or structural
integrity of the property, the appraiser may complete the appraisal “as is” and
these items must be reflected in the appraiser’s opinion of value.
 Minor conditions and deferred maintenance items include, but are not limited
to, worn floor finishes or carpet, minor plumbing leaks, holes in window
screens, or cracked window glass. Minor conditions and deferred
maintenance are typically due to normal wear and tear from the aging
process and the occupancy of the property.
 When there are incomplete items or conditions that affect the livability,
soundness, or structural integrity, the property must be appraised “subject to
completion” of the specific alterations or repairs.
 These items include, but are not limited to, a partially completed addition or
renovation, or physical deficiencies that could affect the soundness or
structural integrity of the improvements including but not limited to cracks or
settlement in the foundation, water seepage, active roof leaks, curled or
cupped roof shingles, or inadequate electrical service or plumbing fixtures.
 In such cases, a final inspection (Fannie Mae 1004D/Freddie Mac 442) from
the appraiser is required before the loan can close.

Valuation
Analysis


The valuation analysis allows the appraiser to develop and report in concise
format an adequately supported estimate of market value.
This analysis is based on the cost, sales comparison and income approaches to
value and, in the case of small residential income properties, on comparable
rental data.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
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Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 57 of 79
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Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Cost Approach
General
 The cost approach to value assumes that a potential purchaser will consider
building a substitute residence that has the same use as the property that is
being appraised; thereby, measuring value as a cost of production.
 Valid reproduction cost estimates, proper depreciation estimates, and accurate
site values drive the reliability of the cost approach.
 As the effective age of a property increases, the reliability of the cost approach
may decrease because of the difficulty in accurately estimating accrued
depreciation.
 If the appraiser does not develop the cost approach, an explanation of why it
was not used is required and the appraiser must provide an estimated site value.
 Regardless of whether the cost approach is required by Fannie Mae/Freddie
Mac, it may be applicable in developing credible results. The USPAP requires
the appraiser to reconcile the applicability of each approach to value. Please
note the following:
 USPAP Standards Rule 1-6(b) requires the appraiser to reconcile the
applicability and relevance of the approaches, methods and techniques
used to arrive at the final value conclusion(s).
 USPAP Standards Rule 2-2(b)(viii) requires the appraiser(s) to summarize
the information analyzed, the appraisal methods and techniques employed,
and the reasoning that supports the analysis, opinions, and conclusions;
exclusion of the sales comparison approach, cost approach, or income
approach must be explained.
 The appraiser should state whether reproduction cost or replacement cost was
used in developing the cost approach because the two terms are not
synonymous.
 Reproduction Cost: The cost of duplicating the subject property structure
completely using the original construction methods and materials.
 Replacement Cost: The cost of building a similar structure, but using modern
construction methods and materials.
 The appraiser’s analysis and comments for the cost approach should be
consistent with comments and adjustments mentioned elsewhere in the
appraisal report.
 There are three types of depreciation considered in the cost approach - physical,
functional and external.
Physical Depreciation
 Physical depreciation, which is traditionally referred to a physical deterioration, is
a loss in value that is caused by deterioration in the physical condition of the
improvements.
 Physical deterioration is classified as "curable" or "incurable".
 Curable physical deterioration refers to items of deferred maintenance, such as
painting or items currently in need of repair (a broken stair rail, for example).
 Incurable physical deterioration refers to other items that currently are not
practical or feasible to correct.
Continued on next page
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January 30, 2015
Page 58 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Cost Approach,
continued
Functional Depreciation
 Functional depreciation, which is traditionally referred to as functional
obsolescence, is a loss in value caused by defects in the design of a structure
(i.e., inadequacies in the architecture, floor plan, or sizes and types of rooms).
 Changes in market preferences that result in some aspect of the improvements
considered obsolete by current standards (i.e., location of a bedroom on a level
with no bathroom or access to a bedroom through another bedroom) may also
cause functional depreciation.
External Depreciation
 External depreciation, which is traditionally referred to as economic
obsolescence, is a loss in value that is caused by negative influences that are
outside of the site (i.e., economic factors or environmental changes).
 Shopping centers, expressways or factories that are adjacent to the subject
property are examples of external depreciation.
Comparable
Rent Data



If the subject property is a two- to four-family investment property, the most
current and most comparable rental properties that are available should be used
to develop an estimated market rent for the subject property.
Three rental comparables should be provided and are not required to be the same
comparables used in the sales comparison approach.
The appraiser should provide support for the estimated market rents for the
individual subject units, with information about lease dates, number of vacant
units, actual rents and estimated market rents for the subject property.
Continued to the next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 59 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Sales
Comparison
Approach
General
 The sales comparison approach to value, which is traditionally referred to as the
market data approach, is an analysis of comparable sales, contract offerings and
current listings of properties that are the most comparable to the subject
property.
 The Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) require the
appraiser to report a minimum three year prior sales history for the subject
property. The appraiser’s analysis of a property must take into consideration all
factors that have an impact on value and recognize that a well-informed or welladvised purchaser will pay no more for a property than the price of a similar
property of equal desirability and utility if it were purchased without undue delay.
 The appraiser must be consistent throughout the appraisal with all information as
some information flows to the Sales Comparison Approach section (i.e. address,
sales price, sale or financing concessions, data source, site, view, condition
rating, room count, gross living area, etc.)
 If subject property and/or any of the comparable properties have a sales price
that is not in whole numbers the appraiser should round the sales price to the
nearest whole dollar. If any of the comparable properties are a listing or pending
sale, the appraiser must enter the offering price or contract price as applicable.
 The appraiser must analyze the closed or settled sales, the contract sales, and
the offering or listings of properties that are the most comparable to the subject
property in order to identify any significant differences (or elements of
comparison) that could affect his or her opinion of value for the subject property.
 This is particularly important in declining markets because the competing listings
and contract sales probably reflect the upper-end of the value for the subject
property as of the effective date of the appraisal.
 This analysis will result in more accurate reporting on market conditions,
including trends that indicate sales prices for contract sales and asking prices for
recent offerings or listings that have declined.
 The comparable market must be verified, analyzed and adjusted for differences
between the comparable properties and the subject property.
Selecting the Comparables
 SunTrust requires the appraiser to research, analyze and consider influences
that may affect value based on market evidence, such as closed sales, contract
sales and properties for sale in the market area.
 It is important that the appraiser establish the true market value of the subject
property by encompassing all available sales, which include REO/foreclosed
properties.
 If the appraiser believes a foreclosure sale or a short sale is an appropriate
comparable, then the appraiser must identify and consider any differences from
the subject property, such as the condition of the property. The appraiser cannot
assume it is equal to the subject.
 A foreclosure or short sale property may be in worse condition when compared
to the subject property, especially if the subject property is new construct ion or
was recently renovated.
Continued on next page
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Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
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Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Sales
Comparison
Approach,
(continued)
Selecting the Comparables, continued
 If the property is located in or close to a neighborhood that includes areas such
as an airport, hazardous waste site, relatively high property taxes or vacant and
boarded up properties, SunTrust expects the appraiser to research, analyze and
use comparables sales from the same neighborhood or affected area (whenever
possible) in the appraisal analysis. This will ensure that any effect of these
value-influencing characteristics is taken into consideration in the development
of the opinion of the value for the property.
 The appraiser must select one location rating (N-Neutral, B- Beneficial, AAdverse) to describe the overall effect on value and marketability of the location
factor(s) associated with the subject property and each comparable property.
The appraiser must also select at least one, but not more than two, location
factors ( Res- residential, Ind- industrial, Comm- commercial, BsyRd- Busy
Road, WtrFr- water front, GlfCse- golf course, AdjPrk- Adjacent to park, AdjPwradjacent to power lines, Lndfl- Landfill, PubTrn- Public Transportation, Otherappraiser must enter a description that fits in the allowable field space.
Descriptors such as ‘None’, ‘N/A’, ‘Typical’, ‘Average’, etc. are not acceptable.
Click here to access a glossary of abbreviations used in Data Standardization
Text.





The appraiser must select one Quality of Construction rating (Q1 through Q6) for
the subject property and each comparable property. The appraiser must indicate
the quality rating that best describes the overall quality of the property. Only one
selection is permitted. If the Quality rating is Q6, the property does not meet
eligibility requirements.
The appraiser must report the actual age of the subject property and each
comparable property. For new construction that is less than one year old, enter
the numeral zero (0). No additional information such as ‘years’ or other
descriptors are permitted. If the actual age is unknown, enter the estimated age.
The appraiser must report total square footage of the property improvements
below grade on line 1 – if there is no basement, enter numeral zero (0). No
other information may be entered. On line 2 the appraiser must report the
number of each type of finished rooms in the basement with the room type (RRrecreation room, br- bedroom, ba- bathroom, o- other. If there are no rooms of a
particular type, the appraiser will enter zero (0).
The appraiser must enter any energy efficient items for the subject property and
each comparable property. If there are no energy efficient items, enter ‘None”.
The appraiser must indicate the total number of off-street parking spaces
associated with the subject property and each comparable property. If there is
no off-street parking, enter ‘None.’
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 61 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Sales
Comparison
Approach,
(continued)
Selecting the Comparables, continued
 The comparables must be within reasonable proximity to demonstrate similar
market conditions. The appraiser must enter the proximity of the comparable
sales to the subject property, expressed as a distance in miles. The distance
between the subject property and each comparable property is to be measured
using a straight line between the properties. The direction of the comparable
property in relation to the subject property must be expressed (north, south, east,
and west).
 If the area is urban or suburban, a reasonable distance may be up to one (1)
mile.
 If the area is rural or if the property is unique, the appraiser may have to go
farther than is typically acceptable. An explanation should be provided when
distance comparables are used.
 The appraiser must enter the financing type, on line 2 of the concessions
section, (FHA, VA, Conv-Conventional, Seller, Cash, RH- USDA- Rural Housing,
Other – appraiser must fit description of other financing in allowable space) and
the total amount of any concessions, if any, for each settled sale.
 It is preferable for the appraiser to provide comparables from the subject’s
neighborhood; however, the appraiser may need to use comparables from
competing neighborhoods to perform an accurate analysis.
 The appraiser must not expand the neighborhood boundaries just to encompass
the comparables selected.
 The appraiser must indicate the comparables that are from a competing
neighborhood and provide an explanation of any differences that exist between
the neighborhoods. In addition, the appraiser must explain why he/she used the
specific comparable sales.
 At least three (3) comparable sales must be used as part of the sales
comparison approach. More than three (3) may be used; however, the appraiser
must have at least three (3) that are settled or closed sales.
Note: The subject property may be used as a fourth comparable sale or as
supporting data if it was previously sold and closed within the last 12 months
prior to the closing date. However, in no instance may the appraiser create
comparable sales by combining vacant land sales with the contract purchase
price of a home (although this type of information may be included as additional
supporting documentation).

Generally, the comparable sales must have settled or closed within the last
twelve (12) months prior to the date of the appraisal. However, the best and
most appropriate comparable sales may not always be the most recent sales.
An older sale may be more appropriate in situations when market conditions
have impacted the availability of recent sales as long as the appraisal reflects
the changing market conditions. Additionally, the appraiser may use older
comparable sales as additional supporting information if he/she believes that it is
appropriate and selects comparable sales that are the best indicators of value for
the subject property.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 62 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Sales
Comparison
Approach
(continued)
Selecting the Comparables, continued
 For unique properties:
 It is acceptable if the appraiser cannot locate recent comparable sales of the
same design and appeal, but is able to determine sound adjustments for the
differences between the comparables that are available and the subject
property and demonstrate the marketability of the property based on older
comparable sales, comparable sales in competing neighborhoods, the existence
of similar properties in the market area, and any other reliable market data.
 If the appraiser is not able to find any evidence of market acceptance, and
the characteristics of the property are so significantly different that he or she
cannot establish a reliable opinion of market value, the property is not
acceptable.
 For Jumbo Solution Second and Key Loans, the appraiser must comment on the
reasons for using any comparable sales that are more than six (6) months old.
 If the subject property is located in an established subdivision, condominium
project or PUD project, the appraiser should use comparable sales from within
the same subdivision or project if there are any available. Generally, re-sales
from the subject’s subdivision or project provide the best indication of value in
that subdivision or project. The appraiser should comment on the use of
comparable sales from outside of the subject neighborhood.
 If the subject property is located in a new subdivision, condominium project or
PUD project, the appraiser must compare the subject property to other
properties in its general market area as well as to properties within the subject
subdivision or project. At least one (1) comparable sale should be selected from
within the subject subdivision or project and one (1) from outside. The third
comparable can be from inside or outside the subdivision or project.
 When the appraiser is provided with comparables sales data by a party that has
a financial interest in the transaction, SunTrust requires the appraiser to verify
the data with a disinterested party.
 Data and/or verification sources for each comparable sale must be reported on
the appraisal report form. The appraiser must provide the data source(s) utilized
to obtain the data for each comparable sale. When using MLS as the data
source, the MLS organization acronym or abbreviations followed by ‘#” and the
listing identifier (numbers and letters) must be reported. If the appraiser utilizes
additional data sources that do not fit into this data field, they must be provided
in the comments section or addenda in the appraisal report. The appraiser must
also provide the DOM (Days on Market) for each comparable sale for the latest
time period that the property was listed or advertised for sale. For each
comparable property, the appraiser must first identify the status type (Active,
Contract, Expired, Withdrawn, Settled sale). Status type using acceptable
abbreviation (‘c’ – contract date, ‘w’- withdrawn date, ‘s’ – settlement date, ‘e’ –
expiration date) followed by the corresponding date in mm/yy format.
 Verification sources include but are not limited to, the buyer, seller, listing agent,
selling agent, and closing documents in certain situations.
 Regardless of the sources used, there must be sufficient data to understand the
conditions of sale, existence of financing concessions, physical characteristics of
the subject property and whether it was an arms-length transaction.
Continued on next page
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Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
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Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Sales
Comparison
Approach,
(continued)
Selecting the Comparables, continued
 When appraising new construction, the appraiser may need to rely solely on the
builder of the property to provide comparable sales data, as this data may not yet
be available through typical data sources such as public records or multiple
listing services. In this case, it is acceptable for the appraiser to verify the
transaction of the comparable sale by viewing a copy of the HUD-1 Settlement
Statement from the builder.
 It is considered best practice to include at least one (1) resale from the
subdivision or project. If there are no re-sales available, then the appraiser
should include new home sales from a competing homebuilder. All three
comparable sales should not be new home sales from the same builder.
 If the appraiser utilizes comparable sales outside of the subject’s neighborhood
when closer comparable sales appear to be available, the appraiser must provide
an explanation as to why he/she used the specific comparable sales.
 There may be a need for the appraiser to select comparable sales that is a
considerable distance from the subject property. In this case, the appraiser must
apply good judgment in the selection and provide an explanation as to why the
particular comparable(s) were selected in the analysis. This is particularly true in
rural markets.
 If the subject property is in a controlled market, there must be at least one
comparable sale outside the control of the developer, builder or property seller.
 If the subject property has unusual features or atypical utilities, the appraiser
must supply additional comparable sales to support marketability and
adjustments made to comparable sales.
 House numbers for each of the comparable sales must match the house
numbers in the photographs.
 Weather conditions in the photograph of the properties are appropriate for the
date of the appraisal; i.e., July photograph does not show snow on the ground for
a property in Illinois.
Comparables for Two (2)- to Four (4)- Unit Rental Properties
 The appraiser must provide analysis of the most current and most comparable rental
properties that are available to develop an estimated market rent for the subject
property.
 At least three (3) rental comparables, which do not have to be the same comparables
in the sales comparison analysis, must be reported and analyzed by the appraiser.
 The comparable rental data must support the estimated market rents for the
individual subject units and provide the following information.
 Lease dates
 Number of vacant units
 Actual rents
 Estimated market rents for the subject property.
 The appraisal report should ensure the units and properties selected as comparables
are:
 comparable to the subject property in terms of both the units and overall property,
and
 accurately represent the rental market for the subject property, unless otherwise
stated in the appraisal report.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 64 of 79
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Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Sales
Comparison
Approach,
(continued)
Rural Properties
 Due to the nature of rural property, true recent comparables may be in shortage.
Comparable sales located a considerable distance from the subject property may
be used if they represent the best indicator of value of the subject property.
 Underwriters must determine whether the property should be considered
residential in nature by focusing on:
 the characteristics of the property
 zoning, and
 the present land use.
 For example, if a single family home sitting on a two (2) acre site is typical based
on the zoning of the property, the highest and best use of the land, and the
present land use, the property is acceptable as long as the comparable sales
support the property as typical for that particular residential neighborhood.
Adjustments to Comparable Sales
 Adjustments must be made based on location, terms and conditions of sale, date
of sale, and the physical characteristics of the properties. If a feature or aspect of
the subject property differs from a feature or aspect of a comparable property and
the appraiser determines that no adjustment is warranted, the appraiser must
enter a zero (0) in the adjustment line. When the features for the subject and
comparable sale(s) are the same and no adjustment is warranted, leave the field
blank – do not enter or default to zero.
 An adjustment may be positive or negative.
 The appraisal must justify and comment on all time adjustments or the lack of a
time adjustment, if applicable.
 If the appraiser makes a date of sale adjustment, the adjustment must reflect the
difference in market conditions between the date of sale of the comparable and
the effective date of appraisal for the subject property.
 Time adjustments must be representative of the market area, supported by
comparable sales and properly documented with items such as newspaper
articles, supporting the rapid value appreciation, should be included in the file.
 Time Adjustments must reflect the difference in market conditions between the
contract date of the comparable sale and the effective date of the appraisal for
the subject property.
 An underwriter cannot require an appraiser to make a time adjustment.
However, the underwriter may request the appraiser to provide an explanation as
to why an adjustment was made or why an adjustment was not made.
 The subject property is the standard against which the comparable sales are
evaluated and adjusted. If the comparable is superior to the subject property, a
negative adjustment is required. If the comparable is inferior, a positive
adjustment is required.
 If the subject contains only one (1) or two (2) bedrooms, the comparables should
contain a similar bedroom count.
 Dollar adjustments should reflect the market’s reaction to the difference in the
properties, not on a pre-determined or assumed dollar amount.
 Net Adjustment is the sum of all adjustments, if there are not adjustments; the net
adjustment value must be zero (0).
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 65 of 79
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Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Sales
Comparison
Approach,
(continued)
Adjustments to Comparable Sales, continued
 When making dollar adjustments, the following guidelines apply:
 net adjustments for each comparable sale should not exceed 15% of the
sales price of the comparable,
 gross adjustments (determined by adding all individual adjustments without
regard to positive or negative adjustments) for each comparable sale should
not exceed 25% of the sales price of the comparable, and
 an individual line item adjustment for each comparable sale should not
exceed ten percent (10%) of the sales price of the comparable sale.
 If the individual net and/or gross adjustments exceed recommended guidelines,
an appraiser justification comment is required.
Unadjusted Units of Comparison
If the subject property is a two- to four-family property, the appraiser must report
certain unadjusted units of comparison for the subject property and comparable
sales (i.e., sales price per gross building area, sales price per unit and sales price
per room).
Sales Comparison Analysis Adjustment Grid
 The sales price of each comparable sale should be within the general range of
the estimate of market value for the subject property.
 Comparable sales should be of properties sold as arm’s length transactions in
stable market areas.
 When appraising in a depressed or declining market, the appraiser must utilize
at least two comparable sales within the same market and one outside of the
depressed market to give additional support to the valuation process.
 Sometimes it is necessary to include several comparables in order to determine
the market value of the subject property. The appraiser must provide the
additional documentation as outlined in the Declining Market Guidelines.
Reference:
See Section 1.09:
Declining Market Guidelines of the
Correspondent Seller Guide for additional information.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 66 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Sales
Comparison
Approach,
(continued)
Sales Comparison Analysis Adjustment Grid, continued
 Appraisers should be selecting comparable sales containing the same amenities
as the subject, such as basements, garages, in ground pools, and similar
acreage lots, which is significant.
 The appraiser must adjust for atypical sales or financing concessions.
Adjustments for sales or financing concessions must reflect the difference
between what the comparables actually sold for with the sales concessions and
what they would have sold for without the concessions so that the dollar amount
of the adjustments will approximate the reaction of the market to the
concessions. Positive adjustments are not acceptable.
 The appraiser must report the date of the sales contract and the settlement or
closing date for each comparable sale. Only the month and year is required.
For example, appraisers may use: “s04/10”, “c02/10” where “s” reflects the
settlement or closing date and “c” reflects the contract date. If the exact date is
necessary to understand the adjustment, it must be explained elsewhere in the
report or in an addendum. If the contract date is unavailable to the appraiser in
the normal course of business, the appraiser must enter the abbreviation “Unk”
for unknown, in place of the contact date.
Appraiser’s Comments and Indicated Value
 The appraiser must select the appropriate checkbox to indicate either ‘did’ or ‘did
not’ research prior sales or transfers of the subject property for the prior 3 years
to the effective date of the appraisal. Only one response is permitted.
 The appraiser must report the date(s) and price(s) of prior sales(s) or transfer(s)
of Subject property for the three years prior to the effective date of the appraisal.
The appraiser must report the date(s) and price(s) of prior sales(s) or transfer(s)
of any comparable property during the twelve months prior to its date of sale. If
more than one prior transfer of the subject or any of the comparable sale(s)
occurred within the applicable time period, the additional transfer(s) must be
listed and reported in the “Analysis of Prior Sale or Transfer History of the
subject property and comparable sales” field.
 The appraiser must report on each occurrence or listing and provide the data
source(s), offering prices and date(s). The appraiser must enter the data
source(s) and effective date(s) of the data source(s) associated with the prior
transfer(s) of each property. If the data source is MLS, the appraiser must enter
the abbreviated MLS organization name, followed by a pound sign (#) and the
specific listing identifier.
 The appraiser’s comments should also include a reconciliation of the adjusted
values for the comparable sales and identify the comparable(s) that were given
the most weight in arriving at the indicated value for the subject property. The
appraiser must enter the reconciled value of the Sales Comparison Approach in
whole dollars only.
 If the subject property is a two- to four-family property, the appraiser should also
provide an evaluation of the typical purchaser’s motivation for purchasing the
property and an analysis of any current agreement of sales, option, or listing for
the subject property.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 67 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Income
Approach







Final
Reconciliation








Appraisers that rely solely on the income approach to value as an indicator of
value are not acceptable. The appraisal report must include the appropriate
supporting comparable rental and sales data and the calculations used to
determine the gross rent multiplier.
The income approach is required if the subject property is a 2-4 unit property and
the determined value must support the sales comparison approach.
The appraiser should supply unadjusted units of comparison.
For purchase transactions, the appraisal should indicate what factors in the
market investors consider most important.
The income approach to value is based on the assumption that market value is
related to the market rent or income that a property can be expected to earn.
Generally, it is appropriate in neighborhoods of single-family properties that have
a substantial rental market, as well as for two- to four-family properties. It is not
appropriate in areas that consist mostly of owner-occupied properties.
To calculate the indicated value by the income approach, the appraiser multiplies
the total gross estimated monthly market rent (based on an analysis of
comparable rentals) for the subject property by a reconciled gross monthly rent
multiplier (determined by dividing the sales prices of the comparables that were
rented by the time of sale by their monthly market rent).
The reconciliation is where the final opinion of market value is provided.
The appraiser must select either the ‘as is’ or at least one of the ‘subject to’
checkboxes. If any of the ‘subject to’ checkboxes are selected, a detailed
description is required.
The appraiser must enter the value of the subject property. The value of the
subject property must match the appraised value of the subject property in the
Appraiser Certification section.
In the final reconciliation of the appraisal report, the appraiser must reconcile the
reasonableness and reliability of each approach to value and the
reasonableness and validity of the indicated values and available data.
The appraiser must explain any material differences in the property information
or information about the transaction that is not typical for the market.
The approach or approaches that were given the most weight are then selected
and reported.
The final reconciliation is never an averaging technique.
The effective date of the appraisal is dated after ratification of the sales contract.
The appraiser must enter the date of the inspection, which is the effective date of
the appraisal in mm/dd/yyyy format.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 68 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Analysis, Continued
Uniform
Collateral Data
Portal (UCDP)
Overview
As part of the critical appraisal data standardization effort by Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac, the UCDP will:
 provide lenders with greater confidence in loan quality by offering enhanced
appraisal data quality and integrity checks,
 create efficiency and consistency in appraisal reviews by offering appraisers and
lenders an improved view and understanding of GSE appraisal data
requirements, and
 support processes to manage and mitigate valuation risk by resolving
inconsistencies with appraisal data, including formatting, terminology, and use of
specific descriptions.
The following appraisal types are required to be submitted to the UCDP:
 Uniform Residential Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae Form 1004/Freddie Mac
Form 70) (UAD form),
 Small Residential Income Property (Fannie Mae 1025/Freddie Mac 72),
 Individual Condominium Unit (Fannie Mae 1073/Freddie Mac 465) (UAD form),
 Exterior-Only Inspection Condominium Unit Appraisal Report (Freddie Mac 466)
(UAD form), and
 Exterior Only Inspection Residential Appraisal Report (Freddie Mac 2055) (UAD
form).
Note: SunTrust Mortgage does not accept the Exterior-Only Inspection Individual
Condominium Unit Appraisal Report (Freddie Mac Form 466) or the Exterior-Only
Inspection Residential Appraisal Report (Freddie Mac Form 2055).
Process
 It is the responsibility of the Correspondent Lender to supply SunTrust Mortgage
with both a “Successful” Summary Submission Report and Doc File ID for all
conventional loan files, including the Key Loan Program. FHA and VA
appraisals are currently exempt from UCDP submission.
 The “Successful” Summary Submission Report MUST be from the FINAL
version of the appraisal used for the final loan decision.
Note: If there are subsequent revisions to the appraisal report, the final version
of the report that was utilized in making the underwriting decision must be
submitted through UDCP.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 69 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraising Energy Efficient Properties
General


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
Insulation and
Infiltration
A lender may consider a newly constructed dwelling as energy-efficient if:
 it is built in compliance with qualifying energy conservation programs that the
National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) classifies as meeting the
NAHB Thermal Performance Guidelines, or
 it is constructed in a manner that meets or exceeds the standards
established by the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1992
Model Energy Code.
New construction, as well as existing homes, may also be qualified as energyefficient through an appraiser’s or an energy consultant’s development of an
energy-efficient rating by using the rating from the Energy Rated Homes of
America.
The appraiser must include an evaluation of the energy-efficient characteristics
of the property and an overall rating of “high,” “adequate,” or “low” for the energy
efficient of the dwelling in the applicable appraisal report form.
The appraiser must consider the reaction of the market to the energy-efficient
improvements (or proposed alterations) and reflect their contributory value in the
“sales comparison analysis” grid. This adjustment must be based on the
appraiser’s analysis of comparable sales.
The lender may take the energy savings into consideration when evaluating the
borrower’s debt-to-income ratio, if the property receives an overall rating of
“high.” Generally, a dwelling must include features from each of the following
three major categories to receive a “high” rating:
 insulation and infiltration,
 windows and doors, and
 heating and cooling systems.
Insulation with adequate “R” values and infiltration barriers in the form of the
following are required:
 insulation in ceilings, roofs, or attic floors that are over conditioned spaces, in
exterior walls, under floors that cover unheated areas, around slabs, around
heating and cooling ducts or pipes that run through unconditioned spaces,
around the sill area, and around the water heater,
 special fireplace devices or features, such as combustion-air and flue dampers,
and a fire door,
 sealing of the sole plate and penetration of the exterior shell, and
 dampers for exhaust fan.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 70 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraising Energy Efficient Properties, Continued
Windows and
Doors
The dwelling would be required to have:
 either double-pane or triple pane windows or storm windows,
 either storm doors or insulated doors, and
 window and door areas must be caulked and have weather-stripping around
them.
Heating and
Cooling
Systems
The following heating and cooling systems are required:
 new efficient heating and cooling systems, or appropriate modifications to an
existing system,
 zoned heating and/or air conditioning,
 automatic set-back thermostats, or
 solar equipment or design.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 71 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Transfer / Re-assignment of Appraisal Reports
General



SunTrust Mortgage will not accept a conventional appraisal transferred to the
Correspondent lender from another lender.
Conventional transferred appraisal reports will not be eligible for purchase by
SunTrust Mortgage.
Conventional appraisals must be in the name of the lender who closes the
mortgage loan.
Field Reviews
Guidelines
Correspondent lenders must refer to the specific product description for field review
requirements. If a field review is required, the Correspondent lender is responsible
for ordering and absorbing the costs associated with obtaining the field review.
Representations and Warrants
Representations and
Warrants
The Correspondent lender shall certify, represent and warrant that all appraisals are
obtained in compliance with the Appraiser Independence Requirements.
 If it is determined the Correspondent lender is in breach of a material aspect of
the Appraiser Independence Requirements, SunTrust will enforce all applicable
rights and remedies, including suspension or termination of the lender’s eligibility
to sell loans to SunTrust.
Compliance
General
Correspondent Lenders must adopt written policies and procedures implementing
Appraiser Independence Requirements as published in Fannie Mae’s
Announcement SEL-2010-14. This may require adequate training to employees and
establishing disciplinary rules on appraiser independence.
As a reminder,
Correspondent Lenders are responsible for adhering to all regulatory lending
guidelines. SunTrust relies upon the Correspondent Lender’s representations and
warranties that the loans delivered to SunTrust are enforceable in accordance with
the terms of the Conventional Loan Purchase Agreement.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 72 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Requests for an Updated Value and Re-Certification of Value
General
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

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
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
An Appraisal Update and/or Completion Report (Fannie Mae 1004D/Freddie
Mac Form 442) is used by an appraiser to confirm whether conditions of a prior
appraisal have been met or to re-certify the value. Conditions of an appraisal
are subject to completion for new construction or subject to repairs for existing
properties. A re-certification DOES NOT change the effective date of the original
appraisal report or the value opinion.
An Appraisal Update and/or Completion Report (Fannie Mae 1004D/Freddie
Mac Form442) is also used when a lender seeks a more current value. This is
not an extension of the prior appraisal assignment that has been completed,
but is a new request. This occurs when the appraisal report is older than the
allowed time frame for the underwriting or closing process and the appraiser
must determine if the value of the subject property is unchanged or has declined
from the original estimate of value. The same requirements apply when
appraising or analyzing a property that was the subject of a prior appraisal
assignment.
The Appraisal Update and/or Completion Report (Fannie Mae 1004D/Freddie
Mac Form 442) must contain sufficient information to be meaningful and not
misleading. The appraiser must, at a minimum:
 concur with the original appraisal,
 perform an exterior inspection of the subject property from at least the street,
and
 research, verify, and analyze current market data in order to determine if the
property has declined in value since the effective date of the original
appraisal.
For new or proposed construction, clear, descriptive photographs (in color) of the
completed improvements must accompany this report form.
Any other data, as an attachment or addendum to the appraisal report form, that
is necessary to provide an adequately supported opinion of market value, must
also be included,
Lenders may experience an increase in the fee charged by an appraiser to issue
an update. Lenders may want to inquire prior to the request regarding the fees.
If the original appraiser is not available to provide an update of value, a request
for an update to a qualified appraiser will constitute a new request and a full
appraisal fee may be charged.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 73 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Date Requirements
Guidelines
Agency Loan Programs
Non-AUS
 Properties must be appraised within the 12 months that precede the date of the
note and mortgage.
 For new construction and existing properties, the appraisal report cannot be
more than four months old on the date of the note and mortgage.
 When an appraisal report will be more than four months old on the date of the
note and mortgage, regardless of whether the property was appraised as
proposed or existing construction, the appraiser must inspect the exterior of the
property and review current market data to determine whether the property has
declined in value since the date of the original appraisal. This inspection and
results of the analysis must be reported on the Appraisal Update and/or
Completion Report (Form 1004D).
 If the appraiser indicates on the Form 1004D that the property value has
declined, then the lender must obtain a new appraisal for the property.
 If the appraiser indicates on the Form 1004D that the property value has not
declined, then the lender may proceed with the loan in process without
requiring any additional fieldwork.
Note: The appraisal update must occur within the four months that precede the
date of the note and mortgage. See the Appraisal Update and/or Completion
Report (Fannie Mae Form 1004D/Freddie Mac Form 442) subtopic for additional
information.

The original appraiser should complete the appraisal update; however, lenders
may use substitute appraisers. When updates are completed by substitute
appraisers, the substitute appraiser must review the original appraisal and
express an opinion about whether the original appraiser’s opinion of market
value was reasonable on the date of the original appraisal report. The lender
must note in the file why the original appraiser was not used.

Use of an Appraisal for a Subsequent Transaction
 The use of an origination appraisal for a subsequent transaction is allowed if
the following requirements are met:
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 74 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Date Requirements, Continued
Guidelines,
continued





The subsequent transaction must be a limited cash-out (rate/term)
refinance.
The appraisal report must not be more than 12 months old on the note
date of the subsequent transaction.
If the appraisal report is greater than 4 months old on the date of the
note and mortgage, then an appraisal update is required.
The lender must ensure that the property has not undergone any
significant remodeling, renovation, or deterioration to the extent that the
improvement or deterioration of the property would materially affect the
market value of the subject property.
The borrower and the lender/client must be the same on the original and
subsequent transaction.
Note: The appraisal must comply with all other appraisal requirements.
Fannie Mae DU
Follow DU requirements, which are the same as Non-AUS guidelines, except as
outlined below:
 For new construction and existing properties, the appraisal report cannot be
more than 120 days old as of the date of the note and mortgage.
 When an appraisal report will be more than 120 days old as of the date of the
note and mortgage, regardless of whether the property was appraised as
proposed or existing construction, the appraiser must inspect the exterior of the
property and review current market data to determine whether the property has
declined in value since the date of the original appraisal. This inspection and
results of the analysis must be reported on the Appraisal Update and/or
Completion Report (Form 1004D).
 If the appraiser indicates on the Form 1004D that the property value has
declined, then the lender must obtain a new appraisal for the property.
 If the appraiser indicates on the Form 1004D that the property value has not
declined, then the lender may proceed with the loan in process without
requiring any additional fieldwork.
Note: The appraisal update must occur within the 120 days that precede the date of
the note and mortgage.
Freddie Mac LP
Follow LP requirements, which are outlined below:
 For new construction and existing properties, the appraisal report cannot be
more than 120 days old before the note date.
 If the effective date of the appraisal report is more than 120 days before the note
date, and not more than 12 months before the note date, an appraisal update is
required.
Reference: See the Appraisal Update and/or Completion Report (Fannie Mae
Form 1004D/Freddie Mac Form 442) subtopic for additional information.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 75 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Date Requirements, Continued
Guidelines,
continued


If the value of the subject property has declined, the lender must adjust the terms
of the mortgage transaction as appropriate and resubmit the loan to LP.
Re-use of an appraisal report for a subsequent transaction
 When an appraisal is required for a subsequent transaction secured by the
mortgaged premises, the prior appraisal report may be re-used if an
appraisal update is obtained and the following requirements are met:
 The borrowers on the new transaction must be the borrowers on the
prior transaction.
Note: The only exception is in the event of a divorce or legal separation.
The borrower for the new transaction must be one of the borrowers on
the prior transaction, and the file must document that the borrower for
the new transaction obtained the property through a divorce or legal
separation.



Since the effective date of the prior appraisal report, the mortgaged
premises must not have undergone any substantial rehabilitation or
renovation or have been affected by disaster to the extent that the
improvement or deterioration of the property would affect marketability or
market value
The new transaction may not be a purchase transaction, a cash-out
refinancing, or a payoff of secondary financing.
The appraisal report from the prior transaction must meet all the
following requirements:
 The effective date of the appraisal report from the prior transaction
must not be more than 12 months prior to the note date of the
subsequent transaction.
 The lender/client is the seller of the loan to the GSE or a third party
specifically authorized by the seller of the loan to the GSE.
 The appraisal update must meet all other appraisal requirements
and reflect the mortgage transaction (e.g., the current borrowers, the
appropriate transaction type, owner of record, lender/client).
Key Loan Program and Jumbo Solution Second Mortgage Loans
 Reuse of an unexpired appraisal when the initial transaction has closed is
permitted as long as the following requirements are met:
 The subsequent transaction must be a limited cash-out (rate/term) refinance.
The borrower and the lender/client must be the same on the original and
subsequent transaction.
 The original appraisal must be dated within 90 days prior to the note date of
the subsequent transaction; and
 An appraisal update (form 1004D) must be fully completed to ensure that the
property has not undergone any significant remodeling, renovation, or
deterioration of the property that would materially affect the market value of
the subject property. Recertification of value is not acceptable.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 76 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Date Requirements, Continued
Guidelines,
continued
Existing Properties
 The appraisal report cannot be more than 120 days old prior to the Note date.
 If prepared more than 120 days but less than 365 days prior to the Note date,
the original appraiser (if available) or a qualified appraiser must inspect the
exterior of the property and review current market data to determine whether the
property has declined in value since the original appraisal date.
 if the appraiser indicates that the property has declined in value, a new
appraisal is required.
 if the appraiser indicates that the property has not declined in value,
recertification or update to the original appraisal, based on the appraiser’s
exterior inspection of the property and knowledge of current market
conditions, is required. The inspection and appraisal update must occur
within the 120 days (for existing and new construction) that precede the Note
date and security instrument.
 If the loan does not close within 90 days of the initial recertification, an
additional recertification must be performed along with two (2) new
comparables.
 If the appraisal is more than 365 days old, a new one is required.
 The Key Loan Program must follow the appraisal date requirements outlined
below.
 The appraisal report must be dated within 90 days prior to the Note date.
 If prepared more than 90 days but less than 365 days prior to the Note date,
the original appraiser (if available) must inspect the exterior of the property
and review current market data to determine whether the property has
declined in value since the original appraisal date.
 if the appraiser indicates that the property has declined in value, a new
appraisal is required.
 if the appraiser indicates that the property has not declined in value,
recertification or update to the original appraisal, based on the
appraiser’s exterior inspection of the property and knowledge of current
market conditions, is required. A completed Appraisal Update and/or
Completion Report (Fannie Mae 1004D/Freddie Mac form 442) must be
included in the loan file.
 if the loan does not close within 90 days of the initial recertification, an
additional recertification must be performed along with two (2) new
comparables.
Continued on next page
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 77 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Appraisal Date Requirements, Continued
Guidelines,
continued
New Construction Properties
 If construction of the subject property is completed after loan application, the
appraisal report must be dated within 120 days prior to the date of loan closing
except for the following loan products:
 The appraisal report must be dated within 90 days prior to the date of loan
closing for the Key Loan Program.
 If the appraisal is over 120 days but less than one year, a new appraisal is not
necessarily required; however, a completed Appraisal Update (Fannie Mae form
1004D/Freddie Mac form 442) must be in the file.
 For all loan products, if the loan does not close within 90 days of the initial
recertification, an additional recertification must be performed along with two (2)
new comparables.
 Under no circumstances may the appraisal be dated more than twelve (12)
months prior to the date of loan closing.
 The Key Loan Program must follow the appraisal date requirements outlined
below.
 The appraisal report must be dated within ninety (90) days prior to the date
of loan closing.
 If prepared more than ninety (90) days but less than twelve (12) months prior
to the date of loan closing, the original appraiser (if available) must inspect
the exterior of the property and review current market data to determine
whether the property has declined in value since the original appraisal date.
 if the appraiser indicates that the property has declined in value, a new
appraisal is required.
 if the appraiser indicates that the property has not declined in value,
recertification or update to the original appraisal, based on the
appraiser’s exterior inspection of the property and knowledge of current
market conditions, is required. A completed Appraisal Update and/or
Completion Report (Fannie Mae 1004D/Freddie Mac form 442) must be
included in the loan file.
 if the loan does not close within 90 days of the initial recertification, an
additional recertification must be performed along with two (2) new
comparables.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 78 of 79
Broker Seller Guide
Electronic Transmission
Electronically
Transmitted
Appraisals



SunTrust Mortgage will accept appraisals e-mailed to the following address:
[email protected]
Each appraisal must clearly identify the following information:
 loan number,
 borrower (s) name (s),
 correspondent name, and
 lender contact information.
The Correspondent lender must warrant that the subject property value is
supported. This type of appraisal is acceptable for all Fannie Mae and/or
Freddie Mac loan products. All other loan products are subject to the individual
appraisal guidelines in the product description.
Exhibit I: SunTrust Ineligible List
Click here for instructions on accessing the SunTrust Ineligible List.
Section 1.07
Appraisal Guidelines
Correspondent Seller Guide
January 30, 2015
Page 79 of 79
Broker Seller Guide