Have a Play Day in the Land of Dinosaurs! JAN 31 MAY 3

Natural Newsline
WINTER / SPRING 2015 ISSUE
The Natural Newsline is a
publication of the Mississippi
Museum of Natural Science Foundation,
delivering seasonal news, events,
and activities for the whole family!
TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S
COVER
Special Exhibit
2
Special Exhibit (cont.)
3
Awards
4
MMNS Foundation
5
Museum
6-9
Calendar
10
Volunteers
11
Collections
12
Research
13
In Memoriam
14
Supporters
BACK COVER
About MMNS
Have a Play Day
in the Land of Dinosaurs!
JAN
31
THROUGH
MAY 3
2 015
C
harles Knight, Museum Director, invites you to encounter touchable
dinosaurs of all shapes and sizes and investigate clues about what the dinosaurs
left behind! The latest exhibit transports families back to the Cretaceous Period
(145 – 65 million years ago), the time when dinosaurs last lived on earth.
Children will go face-to-face with the prehistoric world. The dinosaur exhibit,
created for children ages 3–10, will feature two distinct environments and a variety
of activities. A Field Research Station allows children to step into the role of a
paleontologist by uncovering fossils with brushes and creating drawings of the
dinosaur environment using fossil rubbings and tracings! Dinosaurs: Land of Fire
and Ice is the first child-centered exhibit in the country dedicated to expanding
the understanding on dinosaur habitat and range.
While the warm environment is based on content that is familiar to most,
the cold environment incorporates recent scientific research about dinosaurs
that lived in cold climates like Alaska. (continue reading on pg 2)
LATEST AWARDS:
FOU N DAT ION
Thank you for your support in making the Museum shine this past year! The Museum
was recently named the 2014 Escape to the Southeast Travel Attraction of the Year,
the Best Museum in Mississippi, Best Museum for Kids, Best Nature Attraction,
and a Certified Hospitality Specialist Property of the Year! “NatureFEST!” was named
a “Top 20 Event” in the Southeast USA! And, Conservation Educator Jonathan Harris
was named Mississippi’s Project WILD Facilitator of the Year! (see awards on pg 5)
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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Special Exhibit
MAJOR SPONSORS
Special exhibits would not be possible
without the generous support
of our sponsors and donors.
We sincerely thank you!
DINOSAURS: LAND OF FIRE AND ICE
Mississippi Museum
of Natural Science Foundation
Sanderson Farms, Inc.
Field Co-Operative Association, Inc.
The Walker Foundation
Trustmark
Steve & Chris Zachow
Wesley Ellis
Halla Jo & Norman Ellis
Meaningful Souvenirs
GIFT SHOP HOURS :
Mon-Sat 9:00am-4:00pm Sun 1:00-4:00pm
The Museum offers a thoughtful selection of gift items
that coordinate with the special exhibit
Dinosaurs: Land of Fire and Ice.
FEATURED ITEMS :
Have a Play Day
in the Land of Dinosaurs!
(cont.)
The steamy “Land of Fire”
connects visitors with the
prehistoric home of the
Triceratops and T-Rex.
Children can circle the land
in insect costumes, buzz
through a volcano with oozing
lava, work through a swampy bog
and identify an ecosystem of animals
and plants. No coats are needed for a trip
across the “Land of Ice” where visitors
meet two dinosaurs, a Troodon and
Edmontosaurus, who made their homes
in the cold climate of Alaska. Activities
include: climbing rocky steps, breezing
down an icy slide, and hopping across
stepping stones in an icy river.
Dinosaurs: Land of Fire and Ice
utilizes new research about climates in
which dinosaurs were able to survive
and thrive. The discovery of numerous
species of dinosaurs in the arctic is causing
scientists to reconsider old theories about
dinosaurs only living in tropical climates.
It is now known that many dinosaurs,
including Edmontosaurus and Troodon,
lived in cold weather climates for at least
part of the year.
See calendar for opening day
presentation at 11am by Paleontology
Curator George Phillips. (see pg 6)
Dinosaurs: Land of Fire and Ice, created by the Minnesota Children’s Museum, is sponsored locally
by the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science Foundation, Sanderson Farms, Inc., Field Co-Operative
Association, Inc., The Walker Foundation, Trustmark, Steve and Chris Zachow, Wesley Ellis, Halla Jo
and Norman Ellis, and other generous supporters.
VELOCIRAPTOR (AURORA) $12.99
DINOSAUR T-SHIRT (YOUTH ONLY) $15.99
DON’T FORGET, FOUNDATION MEMBERS RECEIVE A 10% DISCOUNT!
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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MMNS Foundation
The Mississippi Museum
of Natural Science Foundation
was established to support
the mission of the Museum
through fundraising
and volunteer efforts.
We invite you to join us in preserving
the best of Mississippi’s natural world.
Individual memberships start at $40
(see page 11).
For more information on joining, visit
www.MMNSFOUNDATION.com
FOU N DAT ION
F O U N DAT I O N S TA F F
OFFICERS
Chris Zachow
PRESIDENT
Alex Alston, Jr.
VICE PRESIDENT
Janice Larson
SECRETARY/TREASURER
From Our Foundation President
Dear Members,
Thank you for your Membership and support last year!
2014 was an award-winning year for the Museum topped off
by being named the “Escape to the Southeast Travel Attraction
of the Year” out of twelve southern states by the Southeast
Tourism Society! We are proud of the Museum staff for this
CHRISTINE Z ACHOW,
remarkable achievement and thankful to our donors for
MUSEUM FOUNDATION PRESIDENT
helping us bring excellent exhibits and programs to the Museum.
This truly is a top honor! Please see inside this newsletter for additional recognition
that the Museum and staff received this past year on the local and state level.
On behalf of the Museum staff and
MMNS Foundation Board of Directors,
I’d like to thank everyone who visited
and enjoyed the Animal Grossology
exhibit and to thank our donors who
made it possible to bring this engaging,
educational exhibit to the Museum:
Gertrude C. Ford Foundation, Sanderson
Farms, Nissan North America, Inc.,
Regions Bank, and other generous
supporters.
A new, short Museum overview film
FOUNDATION BOARD MEMBERS AT THE
is playing in the Rotwein Theater thanks
ANIMAL GROSSOLOGY E XHIBIT PREMIERE
to the support of Atmos Energy. Be sure
to view it on your next visit and let our two youth volunteer narrators take you on a
Museum adventure. You’re sure to discover several things you didn’t know about the
Museum’s collections, exhibits, staff, and research activities!
Looking forward to seeing you in 2015,
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
George Allen
Betsy Creekmore
Opal Dakin
Marianne Dempsey
Halla Jo Ellis
Sean Wesley Ellis
Dick Hall
Matt Holleman, III
LoRose Hunter
Ashley Parker
Avery Rollins
Ollye Brown Shirley
Sheila Smith
Phillip Street
CHRISTINE ZACHOW
PRESIDENT
MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATURAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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From Our Museum Director
Museum
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATURAL SCIENCE
IS A DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT
OF WILDLIFE, FISHERIES, AND PARKS.
M D W F P S TA F F
ADMINISTR ATION
Dr. Sam Polles
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
COMMISSIONERS
Bryan Jones
CHAIRMAN
Robert L. Cook
Charles Rigdon
Michael Bolden
Bill F. Cossar
Billy Deviney
Clay Wagner
DEPUTY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
DIRECTOR, ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
Larry Castle
DIRECTOR, TECHNICAL PROGRAMS
VICE-CHAIRMAN
Libby Hartfield
DIRECTOR, EDUCATION &
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
The mission of the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science
is to promote understanding and appreciation of Mississippi’s
biological diversity through collections, research, scientific databases,
education, and exhibits; and to inspire the people of our state
to respect the environment and to preserve natural Mississippi.
M M N S S TA F F
DIRECTORS
E D U C A T I O N ( C ON T. )
MUSEUM DIRECTOR
CONSERVATION EDUCATOR
Charles Knight
Angel Rohnke
ASSISTANT MUSEUM DIRECTOR
ADMINISTR ATION
AND SUPPORT
Raven Ashley
Jennifer Jerrolds
Brook Nash
EDUCATION ASSISTANT
Nicole Smith
SPECIAL EVENTS
Debora Waz
ADMISSIONS
OUTREACH CONSERVATION
EDUCATOR
Cindy Bearden
Charles Williams
GIFT SHOP ASSISTANT
Harold Garner
FACILITIES MAINTENANCE
MANAGER
Charles Jeffcoat
CUSTODIAN
Mary Jenkins
SPECIAL PROJECTS OFFICER
Rebecca Jones
GIFT SHOP MANAGER
Hallie Hodges
ADMISSIONS
Ann Taylor
VOLUNTEER SERVICES
Tracy Reid
GIFT SHOP ASSISTANT
Mary Stripling
VOLUNTEER LIBRARIAN
Charles Williams
EDUCATION ASSISTANT
Corey Wright
CONSERVATION EDUCATOR
EXHIBIT
MANAGEMENT
Sam Beibers
EXHIBITS SUPERVISOR
NATUR AL HERITAGE
Andy Sanderson
NATURAL HERITAGE
PROGRAM COORDINATOR
DATABASE TECHNICIAN
Kyle Swanier
Ted Olack
ZOOLOGIST
BOTANIST
BIOLOGIST
RESEARCH
AND COLLECTIONS
Matt Roberts, Ph.D.
AQUARIST
RESEARCH/COLLECTIONS
COORDINATOR
EDUCATION
RESEARCH TECHNICIAN
Megan Fedrick
EDUCATION COORDINATOR
Lisa Dickens
EDUCATION ASSISTANT
Jessica Eaves
OUTREACH CONSERVATION
EDUCATOR
Joan Elder
PRESCHOOL SUPERVISOR
Jonathan Harris
CONSERVATION EDUCATOR
Yolanda Hawkins
Chazz Coleman
MAT T ROBERTS,
RESE ARCH/COLLECTIONS
COORDINATOR
Jeremy Copley
RESEARCH/COLLECTIONS
ASSISTANT
Sheena Feist
GENETICIST
R.L. Jones, Ph.D.
HERPETOLOGIST
Scott Peyton
COLLECTIONS MANAGER
George Phillips
PALEONTOLOGY CURATOR
RESERVATIONIST
Kathy Shelton
Jackie Henne-Kerr
LaToya Turner
OUTREACH CONSERVATION
EDUCATOR
DIRECTOR
MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATURAL SCIENCE
Celebrating Careers
Adrianne Clark
AQUATIC BIOLOGIST
James Hill
CHARLES KNIGHT
Aaron Francois
Heather Sullivan
AQUATIC BIOLOGIST
DATABASE TECHNICIAN
AQUARIUMS
AQUARIST
See you at the Museum,
Rachel Smart
Tom Mann
John Hardy
Thank you for your support in making 2014 an outstanding
year for the Museum! I couldn’t be more proud of our staff
and the work which they accomplished that helped us to be
named the “2014 Escape to the Southeast Travel Attraction of the
Year” out of twelve southern states. A key factor in the Museum’s
selection was the role that Museum staff has played in creating
CHARLES KNIGHT,
partnerships with local attractions to cross-promote one another
MUSEUM DIRECTOR
and to develop new collaborative tourism products. Other factors
included the Museum’s outstanding programming, fascinating exhibits, and dedication
to tourism staff training. The Museum was also honored with other top awards at the
local and state level last year!
Our gross friends from the Animal Grossology exhibit left a slimy trail behind
as they exited the building recently! Museum members, visitors, summer campers,
volunteers, and staff enjoyed playing and learning with this disgusting science filled
exhibit that provided a unique perspective on the animal kingdom. Last summer’s
“Ice Cream Grossial” event was a huge success and meeting Her Grossness, Sylvia Branzei,
was the cherry on top! Thank you for visiting and thank you to our donors who made
it possible for us to bring this exhibit to the Museum.
We are looking forward to a fun 2015 and are excited to share with you a new year
of exciting programs, special events, and the groundbreaking Dinosaurs Land of Fire
and Ice and Wolf to Woof: The Story of Dogs exhibits. Please read the Newsline calendar
and remember to check our website and social media for additional events and details as
the year progresses.
EXHIBITS SUPERVISOR
RECEPTIONIST
Karen Dierolf
Dear Members,
BIOLOGIST
LABORATORY ASSISTANT
Nicholas Winstead
ORNITHOLOGIST
R ACHEL SMART,
E XHIBITS SUPERVISOR
Dr. Matt Roberts has been promoted from Curator of Fishes
to Research Coordinator, leading the Museum’s Research
Section. Roberts looks forward to meeting the challenge
of making the important information generated by Museum
scientists regarding Mississippi’s flora and fauna more
accessible so it can be fully used. “That means finding more
ways for folks to access those data, such as making reports
and records available online, and working with our education
and exhibits staff to bring new findings to the public.” Roberts
holds a Ph.D. in Fish Biology from Mississippi State University.
Our new Exhibits Supervisor, Rachel Smart, possesses
a wealth of museum experience and exhibit management skills.
Smart learned the exhibits trade, from murals and mosaics
to fabricating for dioramas, at the Anniston Museum
of Natural History and enhanced her collections management
and mount making skills at the Mississippi Department
of Archives and History. Smart holds a degree in Fine Arts
with honors from Jacksonville State University. “I am so happy
to be here and I am looking forward to working with such a
wonderful crew!” says Rachel.
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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Awards
L O C A L LY & S TAT E W I D E
We appreciate all of the support and
recognition that comes with these awards!
BEST MUSEUM
Mississippi Magazine
BEST NATURE ATTRACTION
Jackson Free Press newspaper’s
Best of Jackson Awards
BEST MUSEUM FOR KIDS
Parents & Kids Magazine
2014 Family Favorite
BEST MUSEUM (2ND PLACE)
Jackson Free Press newspaper’s
Best of Jackson Awards
“CERTIFIED HOSPITALITY SPECIALIST
PROPERTY OF THE YEAR”
Jackson Convention & Visitor Bureau
NATUREFEST–TOP 20 EVENT
IN THE SOUTHEAST
Southeast Tourism Society
MISSISSIPPI’S PROJECT WILD
FACILITATOR OF THE YEAR
Jonathan Harris, Conservation Educator
The Southeast’s Best Attraction
Museum named 2014 Travel Attraction of the Year
among 12 states
T
he Museum was named the “2014 Escape to the Southeast
Travel Attraction of the Year” by the Southeast Tourism
Society (STS) at the Shining Example Awards Banquet
in Charleston, South Carolina on October 15, 2014.
STS is a non-profit organization dedicated to the
promotion and development of tourism throughout
the Southeast. The Shining Example Awards recognize
outstanding contributions in tourism in twelve Southeastern
states.
The MMNS Foundation supports the Museum’s education,
research, and tourism efforts. “We are proud of the Museum staff for
this remarkable achievement and thankful to our donors for helping us bring excellent
exhibits and programs to the Museum,” stated Chris Zachow, President of the MMNS
Foundation Board of Directors.
In addition to outstanding programming, fascinating exhibits, and dedication
to tourism staff training, a key factor in the Museum’s selection was the role
that Museum staff has played in creating partnerships with local attractions
to cross-promote one another and to develop new collaborative tourism products.
“Shining Example Awards highlight some of the best work in travel
and tourism, and winners truly set examples that others in the industry can follow,”
said Bill Hardman, STS President and CEO. “Showcasing great work is important
because tourism is the largest, second-largest, or third-largest industry in every
Southeastern state.”
“We are honored to be recognized as the best among so many outstanding
nominees and I could not be prouder of our staff!” said Charles Knight, Museum
Director. “The promotional support we receive is vital to our success and we thank
our donors, the MMNS Foundation, the Jackson Convention & Visitors Bureau
(Jackson CVB), Visit Mississippi, and STS. We also thank our local attractions
partners who inspire us to enhance Jackson’s tourism product through collaboration.”
The staff at Visit Mississippi spreads awareness of the Museum nationally
and internationally. “This award underscores the important and collaborative efforts
of one of Mississippi’s most important cultural institutions and the dedicated mission
of exploring and highlighting Mississippi’s unparalleled natural beauty and resources,”
said Malcolm White, Director of the Mississippi Development Authority’s Tourism
Division (Visit Mississippi).
The Museum also receives promotional support and leadership in developing
new tourism products from the Jackson CVB staff. “The Museum is a key part
of the capital city’s tourism product and a vital partner with the Jackson Convention
& Visitors Bureau and other local attractions. I’m especially proud of their role
in the creation of the LeFleur Museum District. The Museum’s services enhance
the quality of life for local citizens and generate a positive economic impact
for the city making them especially deserving of this coveted industry-wide award,”
said Wanda Collier-Wilson, President and CEO of the Jackson CVB.
The Shining Example Awards recognize outstanding contributions in tourism in
the Southeastern states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana,
Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.
Shining Example Awards, an industry fixture since 1985, are presented in 12 categories,
14 awards.
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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Calendar
JANUARY
JAN 31 • SAT • 11am–12noon • lecture
Mississippi 85,000,000 B.C.—Land of
Volcanoes & Dinosaurs
SPEAKER: George Phillips, MMNS Paleontology Curator
The region we call Mississippi today was a
warm, tropical environment when dinosaurs ruled the earth, and it contained at
least four different volcanoes, one of which
lies beneath our state capital. Phillips will
discuss this and reveal other little known
facts about our state’s prehistory!
FEBRUARY
JAN 15 • THU • 6–8pm • event
Family Fun Science Night
COST: $2.00 per person;
Museum Members FREE with current membership
Join us for a night of hands-on science fun!
Explore “Snowflake Science”, see STEM
demos, meet LIVE native animals, and
learn fun ways to support your child’s
interest in science. Register to win door
prizes for your science kid.
JAN 30 • FRI • 6–8pm • special exhibit premiere party
Dinosaurs: Land of Fire and Ice
Exhibit Premiere Party
For Members Only
Engaging interactive displays introduce
you to two different parts of the world
once inhabited by dinosaurs—cold polar
regions and volcanically active regions.
FEB 12 • THU • 10am–12noon
Mississippi Arbor Day Celebration
Meet Smokey Bear, be a part of our
TREE GIVEAWAY (while supplies last),
and learn more about the unsung heroes
of the natural word: trees. For more
details, visit the calendar of events page
on www.msnaturalscience.org.
FEB 3 • TUE • 12noon–1pm • naturalist lecture
An Update on Gulf Sturgeon
of Western Gulf of Mexico Drainages
SPEAKER: Todd Slack, Ph.D., U.S. Army Engineer Research
and Development Center Waterways Experiment Station EE-A,
Vicksburg
Dr. Slack will provide an update on the
status of Gulf sturgeon in the Pearl and
Pascagoula River drainages based on
collaborative research efforts that he has
been involved with over the past five years.
These efforts include several telemetry
based projects within both systems and
at Ship Island as part of the Mississippi
Coastal Improvement Program’s
restoration efforts at Camille Cut.
So You Think You Can Fish?
Dinosaurs: Land of Fire and Ice
Exhibit Opens
Growing Up WILD Plus Workshop
Features Growing Up WILD activities
plus additional activities designed
to stimulate young children in new
and exciting ways while connecting
them to nature and many of its wonders.
Call Joan at 601-576-6000 for
registration details.
MARCH
Feb 7 • SAT • 9am–12:30pm • event
JAN 31 • SAT • special exhibit
FEB 7 • SAT • 9am–2pm • teacher workshop
Join Mississippi Outdoors host Randy
Newell and several professional anglers
to learn about catfishing (including hand
grabbing) and crappie fishing in
Mississippi. This annual program,
formerly known as “Got Fish?”, provides
useful information for seasoned as well
as novice fishermen. Also, meet a fishing
guide, enjoy behind-the-scenes aquarium
tours, watch an interactive fish
feeding, and see an airboat! Get important
information on fishing license sales and
boating safety. For more details,
visit the calendar of events page on
www.msnaturalscience.org.
MAR 1 • SUN • summer camp
Go Outdoors ... Camp!
(SUMMER DAY CAMP REGISTRATION OPENS)
Campers will fish, boat, hike, and explore
the outdoors! Compare habitats and the
plants and animals living in them, and
learn outdoors safety practices and skills.
Try your hand at archery, net aquatic
species, track woodland animals, and
munch some wild edibles. Ready for
an adventure? “Go Outdoors … Camp!”
Cost: $150 (Members) & $175 (Non-Members)
June 1-5: Jr. Naturalist (6th - 9th)
Monday-Wednesday 8:00am–4:00pm
Thursday 8:00am with a sleepover
Pick up on Friday 10:00am
June 8-11: K – 1st
June 15-18: 2nd – 3rd
June 22-25: 4th – 5th
Camp is from 9:00am–5:00pm
Drop off from 8:00am–9:00am
Pick up from 5:00pm–5:30pm
Visit www.msnaturalscience.org to register.
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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Calendar
M A R C H ( C O N T. )
MAR 9-13 • MON-FRI • 9am–3pm • teacher workshops
Teacher Workshops
MAR 3 • TUE • 12noon–1pm • naturalist lecture
Robert Galli, MD Snakes and Snake Bites
‘and Maybe a Bit on Spiders’
Professor Emergency Medicine Medical Toxicology SPEAKER: Robert Galli, MD., Professor Emergency Medicine,
Medical Toxicology, University of Mississippi Medical Center,
Jackson
Snakes “and Maybe a Bit on Spiders” Why do snakes have venoms anyways? Learn how dangerous Mississippi snakes really are. What to do if you are bitten and the definitive care. Why do snakes have venoms anyway?
Learn how dangerous Mississippi snakes
really are, what to do if you are bitten, and
the definitive care.
The Museum will offer a different environmental education programs, each day with
CEU credits available. For more details
and to register, visit the calendar of events
page on www.msnaturalscience.org.
APRIL
APR 5 • SUN • holiday
Museum Closed
APR 11 • SAT • 10am–5pm • event
NatureFEST!
(NAMED A TOP 20 EVENT IN THE SOUTHEAST!)
Don’t miss this award winning, activity
filled, family fun event! Grant Kemmerer,
III returns with lots of exotic animals
from The Wild World
of Animals! His
entrancing and fast
paced edutainment program, with live
animals from around the world and plenty
of audience participation, is recognized
as one of the top education and teaching
shows in the world and has been featured
on national television. And that’s just the
beginning of the wildness in store for the
whole family at NatureFEST!
APR 7 • TUE • 12noon–1pm • naturalist lecture
MAR 7 • SAT • 10am–3pm • event
Fossil Road Show
Pack up your fossils and hit the road!
Bring your fossil discoveries and get
expert opinions about their ages and
identities from our team of scientists!
In addition to the Museum fossil
collection, there will be collector
displays and institutional exhibitors.
Assorted activities including a museum
scavenger hunt, fossil crafts, and puzzles.
So, go through your “rock boxes” and
challenge our staff with your prehistoric
oddities. Who knows what might turn up
this year?
THERE IS NO FEE, OTHER THAN REGULAR MUSEUM ADMISSION,
TO ATTEND THE EVENT AND APPOINTMENTS ARE NOT REQUIRED.
Terns, Skimmers, and Plovers, On My!
Audubon Mississippi’s Coastal Bird
Stewardship Program
SPEAKERS: Jay Woods, Executive Director, Audubon MS
Sarah Pacyna; Director, Audubon Mississippi Coastal Bird
Stewardship Program (AMCBSP)
Allison Anholt; Lead Biologist, AMCBSP, Moss Point
The AMCBSP promotes the management
and conservation of coastal shorebirds
through volunteer-driven, citizen
science, outreach, education, and capacity
building, and strategic partnerships with
federal, state, and local agencies, local
academic institutions, and community
organizations. Employing a grassroots
approach to conservation, the program
works to build constituents and advocates
for healthy populations of shorebirds and
protection of the habitats and ecosystems
on which they depend. This work is being
supported by a grant from the National
Fish and Wildlife Foundation through
the Mississippi Department of
Environmental Quality.
Learn about and touch live Mississippi reptiles, see SCUBA divers feeding
fish in our giant 100,000-gallon aquarium
system, take a behind-the-scenes tour of
the Museum and collections and visit with
top scientists, and travel back in time to
explore the Dinosaurs: Land of Fire and Ice
exhibit.
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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Calendar
A P R I L ( C O N T. )
MAY 30 • SAT • special exhibit
Wolf to Woof: The Story of Dogs
Exhibit Opens
Outdoor enthusiasts can explore
our Native Plant Garden and nature trails
or take part in guided tours. Aquatic
adventurers can hop in a canoe and paddle
down the Pearl River with John Rusky
of the Quapaw Canoe Company.
Check www.msnaturalscience.org
and Facebook.com/msnaturalscience for
updates on NatureFEST! activities.
M AY
MAY 2 • SAT • 10am–3pm • event
International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD)
Bird watching, nature hikes, and hands-on
activities help families, scouting groups,
and students celebrate Bird Day, an event
that focuses on an important and
spectacular experience in a bird’s life:
Migration. Girl Scouts of Greater
Mississippi earn the IMBD patch, while
Webelos Cub Scouts earn components
of the Naturalist badge.
MAY 3 • SUN • special exhibit
Dinosaurs: Land of Fire and Ice
Exhibit Closes
MAY 5 • TUE • 12noon–1pm • naturalist lecture
The Palynology of the McNairy Sand
Member (Ripley Formation) in Alcorn
and Tippah counties Mississippi
SPEAKER: Dr. Nina L. Baghai-Riding, Professor of Biology
and Environmental Science, Delta State University, Cleveland
Exposures of the McNairy Member
(Maastrichtian) of the Ripley
Formation occur in Alcorn, Tippah,
and Union County in northeastern
Mississippi, and northward into
Tennessee, Kentucky and Missouri
where it has been assigned a formational
ranking. Her research on fossil
palynomorphs, dinoflagellates, spores,
and pollen, provide a picture of the
paleoclimate, plant diversity and local
landscapes that occurred in this area 75
million years ago. Her slides will depict
many of the 130 different species that
she recovered from the McNairy
Member: ferns, fern allies, gymnosperms,
and angiosperms.
MAY 29 • FRI • 6–8pm • special exhibit premiere party
Wolf to Woof: The Story of Dogs
Exhibit Premiere Party
For Members Only
The largest and most comprehensive
traveling exhibition ever created on the
history, biology, and evolution of dogs
comes to the Southeast’s Best Attraction!
This exhibit sniffs out the facts on the
unique role of dogs in human societies
and what makes the human/dog relationship so unique. It uses the familiarity and
love of these four-legged friends to explore
science and biological concepts.
MAY 25 • MON • holiday
Museum Closed
JUNE
JUN 2 • FRI • 10am–3pm • event
Snake Day with Lectures
“De-mystifying Mississippi Snakes”
special presentation at 10am & 12pm
(1 hour long)
Learn the value of our native snakes and
how to distinguish venomous from nonvenomous species. Live snakes will be
exhibited from 10am to 3pm. Girl Scouts
of Greater Mississippi can earn the Snake
Day patch. Boy Scouts earn components
of the Reptile & Amphibian badge.
Note: Dates and activities are subject to change.
See msnaturalscience.org for more details on events.
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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Calendar
W E E K LY F U N
PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES
MPB RADIO SHOW
Listen to State Parks Director Libby
Hartfield and local veterinarian Dr. Troy
Majure Thursday mornings at 9 a.m. as
they take call-in questions from listeners
about all of Mississippi’s critters—big or
small, furry or scaled, wild or domestic.
Join the live fun by calling 877-672-7464.
PRESCHOOL SUMMER CAMPS
(ages 3-5’s)
Topic: “AWE” - Alligators, Weather, Earthworms
This year there will be two Preschool Camps.
Each will be on Monday for three consecutive
weeks and will include a variety of hands-on
natural science experiences.
The Museum’s hands-on PRESCHOOL ROOM
is designed specifically for pre-kindergartners,
ages 3-5.
VISITOR ACCESS
PRESCHOOL CHILDREN
MON-FRI 1:00-4:00pm
SAT 9:30am-12:00pm & 1:00-4:00pm
SUN 1:00-4:00pm
FISH FEEDING
Meet some of our most fascinating aquarium
inhabitants, every Tuesday and Friday
at 10 a.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m.
P R E S C H O O L A C T I V I T I E S ( C O N T. )
TIME FOR TWOS (ages 2 & under)
2nd TUE 9:30am-12:00pm
STORY TIME (ages 3 to 5)
WED 1:15, 2:15, & 3:15pm (AUG-MAY)
TUE & THU 10:15 & 11:15am (JUN & JUL)
NOT OFFERED ON SECOND TUESDAYS
Camp Session I
June 8, 15, and 22 from 9:15-10:15am
Camp Session II
June 8, 15, and 22 from 10:45-11:45am
Cost: Museum members - FREE; non members price of admission. Call or email Joan Elder,
Preschool Coordinator, for details.
601-576-6031 / joan.elder@mmns.state.ms.us
TE ACHER ENRICHMENT
WET AND WILD CEU CREDITS
The Museum offers six teacher workshops
sponsored by Project WILD and Project WET,
with CEU credits available.
(THE PRESCHOOL ROOM IS OPEN WHEN A STAFF MEMBER OR A
VOLUNTEER IS AVAILABLE. THE SCHEDULE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.)
RESERVED GROUP ACCESS
JANUARY AND FEBRUARY CLASSES
“Many Animals Live in Trees!”
(APPRECIATE THE ABUNDANCE/VARIETY OF ANIMALS THAT LIVE IN TREES)
CREATURE FEATURES
Scheduled or spontaneous, these informal
programs feature live or mounted animals.
Scheduled every Saturday at 10 a.m. and
2 p.m., Creature Features make learning fun!
M O N T H LY E N L I G H T E N M E N T
BIRD WALKS
On the first Saturday of the month from 8 a.m. to
10 a.m. (except Dec. and Jan.), join experienced
birders and Jackson Audubon Society members
at LeFleur’s Bluff State Park Campground.
Park Fee: $3. Call 601-832-6788 for details.
NATURALIST LECTURE SERIES
Natural science lectures are offered
on the first Tuesday of the month
from 12 noon to 1 p.m. (except Dec. & Jan.).
FREE to Museum Foundation members
or regular admission visitors.
Children will be amazed at the number
and the variety of animals that share one tree.
They will be able to name many of the animals.
MARCH, APRIL AND MAY CLASSES
“You Got to Love Those Birds!”
(FUN LEARNING WHAT MAKES A BIRD A BIRD)
Children will understand why a bird is so
successful at what it does. They will note the
uniqueness of wings, hollow bones, feathers,
beaks, tails, and feet that can grip!
JUNE AND JULY CLASSES
“A Peek at Dinosaurs!”
(AN INTRODUCTION TO A GROUP OF FASCINATING ANIMALS)
Fossils are the petrified remains of plants
and animals. Children will understand that the
remains of dinosaurs are very special fossils.
They will appreciate the characteristics
and diversity of dinosaurs.
In August through May, class times are 9:00, 9:45,
and 10:30am, Monday through Friday.
In June and July, class times are the same,
but classes are offered only on Wednesday and
Friday. Call Joan Elder, Preschool Coordinator,
for reservations at 601-576-6031.
WORKSHOPS
Teacher Workshops are scheduled for
the week of March 9-13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
For topics and registration, please visit
www.msnaturalscience.org.
March 9 – Project WILD
March 10 – WOW: Wonders of Wetlands
March 11 – Family Nature Detectives
March 12 – Growing Up WILD / Maggie’s
Earth Adventures
March 13 – Boater Safety
CONTACT
To learn more and/or register for a workshop,
schedule a field trip, reserve a resource kit,
download classroom materials, or help meet
your classroom needs, visit
mdwfp.com/learn-teach/for-teachers.aspx
and/or contact Megan Fedrick
at 601-576-6000.
Email: megan.fedrick@mmns.state.ms.us
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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Volunteers
Volunteer Adventures
Growing Friendships, Exploring Science,
Supporting the Museum
R
STAFF AND VOLUNTEERS AT VOLUNTEER TR AINING FOR
NATURE’S NUMBERS AND A FOREST JOURNEY,
FE ATURING A PRESENTATION BY AUTHOR SAR AH C. CAMPBELL.
ADULT VOLUNTEERS AT TISHOMINGO STATE PARK,
ALONG WITH MUSEUM STAFF DEB WA Z, ANDY SANDERSON,
JENNIFER JERROLDS, HE ATHER SULLIVAN AND ANN TAYLOR.
ANN TAYLOR ON ORIENTATION DAY
WITH THE PINE Y WOODS SCHOOL VOLUNTEER GROUP
epeating patterns in nature, repeating patterns at the Museum – last winter
and spring, volunteers learned about new topics in science and enjoyed some
great explorations around Mississippi!
Sarah Campbell, author of Growing Patterns: Fibonacci Numbers in Nature,
kicked off our volunteer training day, inspiring us with an excellent presentation
of information and activities on the subject of math in nature. After spending time
with this exhibit, we can explain Fibonacci numbers and fractals, and now
we can’t help noticing them all around as well! Sarah’s new book, Mysterious
Patterns: Finding Fractals in Nature is out now, also, but we were fortunate to enjoy
a sneak peek early last year. Each new traveling exhibit brings new and interesting
topics for volunteers and staff to learn and share with others. After a short break
for coffee and snacks, we switched modes somewhat to think about forests
and went on our own “Forest Journey” with Natural Heritage Program botanist
Heather Sullivan. Her presentation showed the diversity of plant communities
on Lefleur’s Bluff, mirroring the Forest Journey exhibit’s exploration of diverse
forest habitats around the world.
In March, adult volunteers headed north to Tishomingo State Park for a two day
adventure in the northeastern corner of Mississippi. On the way to the park, we visited
the Natchez Trace Parkway Visitor Center at Tupelo, toured the excellent exhibits
and saw a video interpreting the history of the Natchez Trace. Retired teacher and
current volunteer, Mary Wakefield, was pleasantly surprised to find the ranger on duty
was one of her former students!
Located in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, Tishomingo State Park
features rolling hills and lots of interesting rock formations covered in mosses and ferns.
Thanks to the salamander finding skills of MMNS Heritage Program Coordinator
Andy Sanderson, we also saw some beautiful little salamanders along the trails.
In addition to exploring in the park, we toured the National Park Service Civil War
Museum at Corinth, and got a guided tour of the Whitten Lock and Dam on the
Tennessee-Tombigbee River. Another highlight of the trip was dinner at Pizza Grocery
in Corinth!
Also in March, we welcomed a new group of students as official Museum
volunteers. 15 high school students from The Piney Woods School completed volunteer
training. Nine of these new volunteers began their service at NatureFEST in April.
Get ready to travel back in time to the land of the dinosaurs! Dinosaurs: Land
of Fire and Ice opens January 31st, and we invite you to join our volunteers in helping
our visitors investigate clues about what the dinosaurs left behind. Contact volunteer
coordinator Ann Taylor at 601-576-6000 to get started.
We’re looking forward to another season of learning and fun!
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Collections
Fossil Collectors
Preserving Mississippi’s Paleontological Heritage
M
DAVIS DE AR AND HER GR ANDFATHER HARVE Y HUFFSTATLER FOUND
THIS FOSSIL LOBSTER ON FAMILY PROPERT Y NE AR BLUE SPRINGS,
MISSISSIPPI. THE DISCOVERY OF THIS AND NUMEROUS OTHER
MARINE FOSSILS IN NORTHERN MISSISSIPPI ME ANS THAT THE
GULF OF ME XICO ONCE COVERED MUCH OF OUR STATE.
FOSSIL COLLECTOR JEFF MCCR AW’S PREFERRED ME THOD OF
COLLECTING FOSSILS WHILE ENJOYING MISSISSIPPI’S MANY
SCENIC STRE AMS.
ROGER R AINS OF WAYNESBORO E XPLORING FOSSIL-BE ARING
SEDIMENT FOR THE FR AGMENTARY REMAINS OF 25-28 MILLION
YE AR OLD TERRESTRIAL MAMMALS, LIKE THE TEE TH PICTURED
IN THE INSE T IMAGE (LOWER LEF T).
ississippi’s rich fossil heritage would be poorly known to us if it weren’t for
the regular donations of generous collectors all over the state. Museums across
the country depend on donations to supplement the knowledge gained
by paid museum personnel only. Collectors from novice to advanced have made
some of the most spectacular discoveries on record. The contributions of fossil collectors
to science and the public trust cannot be overstated.
Recent fossil donations to the Museum of Natural Science include those
from the counties of Union, Lowndes, Smith, Warren, and Wayne. Museum member
Harvey Huffstatler’s granddaughter recently donated a 69 million year old fossil
from Blue Springs in Union County. Although missing its appendages, 6th grader
Davis Dear of Flowood, Mississippi, knew when she picked it up in a creek bed
that she had found some sort of crustacean—and even suspected it might be a fossil
lobster. Her suspicions were confirmed upon visiting the Museum, but she was a bit
startled to learn how old it was.
On November 15th, 2003, while on a fossil collecting expedition to a lime pit
near Bay Springs with the Mississippi Gem & Mineral Society, Charlie Audirsch
of Houma, Louisiana, found something stupendous—a 3½-inch tooth of a ~30 million
year old shark. The tooth is serrated like a steak knife and belongs to an extinct genus
known as Carcharocles, which reached lengths up to 35 feet long. Charlie’s shark tooth
is now on display in the public exhibits in the Oligocene section.
One of our regular and most appreciated donors, Jeff McCraw of Bay Springs,
regularly brings in fossils for identification, many of which MMNS curator George
Phillips has never seen before and thus require a bit of research. Jeff has donated
numerous bones of Pleistocene (“Ice Age”) mammals, like giant ground sloth and
extinct bears. However, his most significant discovery was that of an early form of whale
with well-developed hind limbs, which is currently being studied at George Mason
University and the Smithsonian. Jeff has given educational programs about the fossil
history of Smith County to area schools and has constructed a small museum
at his home to educate family, friends, and visitors to the area.
Andy Weller of Waynesboro, assisted by his buddy Roger Rains, has donated
numerous fossils from an extraordinary deposit in southwest Mississippi that has
yielded many broken bones and teeth of early mammals, like the anthracothere
Arretotherium, which left behind no living related counterpart. The largest mammals
represented in Andy’s fossil samples are an extinct species of dugong and an early type
of rhino, although his samples include smaller things, too, like the teeth of a weasel-like
creature and mouse-sized rodents. Andy’s and Roger’s donations are being studied by
several researchers located throughout the eastern United States.
Other fossil donors in recent months include Carol Ishee of Pelahatchie,
Shane Parrish of SoSo, and Joe Gibson of Columbus. All of the aforementioned
donations and past ones are allowing MMNS and its collaborating institutions
and researchers to gain a better understanding of Mississippi’s paleontological heritage.
THE HIPPO-LIKE ARRETOTHERIUM AND THE SMALLER DEER-LIKE
NANOTRAGLUS ARE JUST T WO OF SE VER AL DOZEN SPECIES OF
ANIMALS RECENTLY DISCOVERED IN WAYNE COUNT Y.
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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Research
Mississippi’s 13 Year Cicadas
Museum Scientists Investigate Brood XXII
H
CICADA WATERCOLOR BY SAM BEIBERS
ave you ever found the shed skin of a cicada stuck to the side of a tree?
Perhaps you picked one up as a child and wore it like a stick pin on the front
of your shirt. Or maybe you were apprehensive, and the last thing you wanted
to do was touch it. Have no fear, cicadas and the skins they leave behind are harmless.
There are over 150 species of cicadas in North America, and well over 2,000
species on the planet. Some species stay underground for only a year, while others
may live underground for 13 or 17 years depending on the species. Mississippi is home
to several of the 13 year variety.
In May and June of this year, Brood XXII emerged and made its way into the
treetops to sing, to court, lay eggs, and die after a 2-3 week adult life. Then the larvae
hatch and drop to the ground, where they burrow under and live for the next 13 years
until they come out and start the reproductive cycle all over again.
A science team from MMNS made its way to western Mississippi to document
the range of the three species of cicadas that make up Brood XXII. By listening and
pinpointing where the insects were singing and where they were not, the researchers
were able to map the cicadas’ range. The range in Mississippi runs from Warren
and Hinds counties south to Wilkinson and Amite counties, then goes south
into Louisiana to south of Baton Rouge. In Louisiana, the brood apparently occurs
in the river parishes on the west side of the Mississippi River. They discovered
that the brood seems relatively healthy since the last time it was seen in 2001.
On a hot and humid June day, and at several intervals along the route,
Dr. Bob Jones, Scott Peyton, and Jeremy Copley, equipped with insect nets
and plenty of water to keep them hydrated, parked the truck, tromped along
the roadside and collected between 100-150 cicadas to be kept in the museum
collection as sample specimens.
The species of cicadas that were netted on this trip were Magicicada tredecassini,
M. tredecim, and M. tredecula. They are dark colored species, with red eyes.
Some of their bellies are striped with orange, and some, particularly the larger females,
have almost completely solid orange bellies.
Other than enjoying their sounds, and their comical appearance and habits,
why should we care anything about cicadas? By studying cicadas we learn what effects
they and other species have on the environment. Cicadas are a good food source
for many species of animals, including man. Cicada nymphs aerate soil as they dig
their tunnels, influencing soil ecology and plant growth.
Sometimes broods, like XXI and XI, become extinct. Whether it is by disease,
loss of habitat, or by being covered with concrete and blacktop, something interrupts
the foothold of the cicadas and they don’t recover enough for their tribe to survive.
Brood XXIII will emerge in 2015. And it’s a big one! Much of the state
will enjoy its alienlike whirring chorus among the treetops of summer.
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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In Memoriam
The Legacy of Dr. Ted Alexander
Museum Loses Longtime Friend
I
DR. TED ALE X ANDER (2ND FROM LEF T),
CEO OF THE LOWER PE ARL RIVER VALLE Y FOUNDATION,
PRESENTED A GR ANT CHECK TO CHARLES KNIGHT, DIRECTOR
OF THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE IN 2009.
WITH THEM ARE, FROM LEF T, ASSISTANT MUSEUM DIRECTOR
ANGEL ROHNKE, CONSERVATION EDUCATOR CORE Y WRIGHT
AND EDUCATION COORDINATOR MEGAN FEDRICK.
t has been said that we should never underestimate the power of what one person
can do and that adage certainly applied to Dr. Ted Alexander.
After the loss of Dr. Alexander last July, he was celebrated for his many public
accomplishments related to his successes in building the community college system
as President of the Pearl River Community College as well as many other civic,
health and education related accomplishments. What is less well-known is the quiet
work he did on behalf of the youngest children in Mississippi.
For nearly ten years, the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (MMNS)
has worked to successfully bring live animals, teachers and resources to Mississippi
classrooms where children and schools who might not be able to visit the
Mississippi Museum of Natural Science. Thousands of children are reached
by this program through classroom visits every year. And because of Dr. Alexander,
thousands of these children are from Pearl River and Hancock Counties.
Because of him, children have an opportunity to pet an alligator, learn about
endangered species and their natural Mississippi.
The MMNS contacted Dr. Alexander who was CEO for the Lower Pearl River
Valley Foundation to explain the need to deliver
more hands-on classroom instruction for natural science education in this area
of the state. Dr. Alexander wanted to make sure that Pearl River Valley area students
had the same opportunities as other students. But he was especially concerned
that children whose lives had been ravaged by Hurricane Katrina should have the
opportunity to engage with the natural world in happier ways. As part of his work
to raise $2.3 million to serve 6,000 area children in Safe Harbor post-Katrina
summer camps, he and the Lower Pearl River Valley Foundation board brought
MMNS teachers and resources to classrooms to help students reconnect to their
natural environment.
Dr. Alexander grew up poor in Clarksburg, Mississippi but left home at 16
and worked three and four jobs to put himself through Millsaps College, later
Mississippi College for a Master’s degree, finally earning a doctorate from University
of Southern Mississippi. Along the way, he earned a certification in biological sciences
and later taught biology and physical science before he began a long career as nationally
recognized education leader in McComb public schools and higher education.
Dr. Alexander never forgot the pain of poverty. He never forgot the value
of education as a ticket to a better life. He never forgot his early interest in
natural science and the pleasure it gave him for a lifetime. He never forgot the need
for enhancing learning resources for engaging students. He never forgot the pleasure
of exploring jellyfish, crabs, fish and sharks in coastal habitats with his children
and grandchildren. He just wanted these experiences for all children so that the
natural world could be their “safe harbor” as well. Because of Dr. Alexander
and the support from the Lower Pearl River Valley Foundation, that vision
and legacy has continued.
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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Supporters
PA S T E X H I B I T S P O N S O R S
ANIMAL GROSSOLOGY
MMNS Foundation
Sanderson Farms
Gertrude C. Ford Foundation
Nissan
Regions Bank
Chris and Steve Zachow
A FOREST JOURNEY & NATURE’S NUMBERS
MMNS Foundation
Sanderson Farms
The Walker Foundation
Feild Cooperative Association
Paul Benton
Plum Creek
Trustmark Bank
Chris and Steve Zachow
Opal Dakin
REPTILES: THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE DEADLY
MMNS Foundation
Sanderson Farms
Gertrude C. Ford Foundation
Janet and Luther Ott Charitable Fund of the
Community Foundation of Greater Jackson
Nissan
Regions Bank
Ergon
Chris and Steve Zachow
Marianne and Jack Dempsey
Sheila Smith
RAINFOREST ADVENTURE
MMNS Foundation
Sanderson Farms
The Walker Foundation
Trustmark Bank
Paul Benton
Chisholm Foundation
Feild Cooperative Association, Inc.
Chris and Steve Zachow
Brunini, Grantham, Grower and Hewes
Sean Wesley Ellis
Jackie and Avery Rollins
Karen Whitworth
Opal Dakin
Janice Larson
Halla Jo Ellis
Matt Holleman III
Steadfast Supporters
$100,000-$200,000
Abe Rotwein Family
The Chisholm Foundation
Regions Bank
Deposit Guaranty/AmSouth Foundation
Ergon
Bryant Mather
Mississippi Museum of Natural Science
Foundation
$50,000-$100,000
BellSouth
Magalen O. Bryant &
Tara Wildlife Management
Chevron
Entergy
Environmental Protection Agency
Friede Goldman
Gannett Foundation/The Clarion-Ledger
Institute of Museum and Library Services
Mr. & Mrs. Dudley Hughes
$25,000-$50,000
Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi
Bureau of Land Management
Delta and Pine Land Company
Feild Cooperative Association, Inc.
Foundation for the Mid South
Georgia-Pacific Corporation
International Paper Foundation
Merrill Lynch
MS Department of Environmental Quality
Mississippi Power Company
Mississippi Valley Gas Company
Molpus Woodlands Group
$10,000-$25,000
The Armstrong Foundation
AT&T
BancorpSouth Foundation
Howard Industries, Inc.
Mississippi Arts Commission
Mississippi Forestry Association
Mississippi Forestry Foundation
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
The Bower Foundation
Community Foundation
of Greater Jackson
Gertrude C. Ford Foundation
Jackson Convention & Visitors Bureau
Phil Hardin Foundation
The Walker Foundation
Irby Companies
Richard McRae, Jr., Family
Mississippi Chemical Corporation
Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation/
Shell Marine Habitat Program
Dr. & Mrs. Steve Zachow
Sanderson Farms
Trustmark Bank
Yazoo Mississippi Delta Levee Board
Paul T. Benton
Plum Creek Foundation
Pruet Companies
U.S. Department of Transportation
U.S. Forest Service
Mr. & Mrs. William J. Van Devender
Dr. & Mrs. Julian Wiener
Weyerhaeuser Company Foundation
Betsy & Wade Creekmore
C-Spire Foundation
Nissan of North America, Inc.
National Geographic
Society Education Foundation
Soterra LLC
Sprint PCS/US Unwired
St. Dominic Health Services
The Straddlefork Foundation
Wild Turkey Federation
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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The MS Museum of Natural Science
Stay in Touch
A near-magical place for children and adults alike
T
he Mississippi Museum of Natural Science is located in the heart of the
LeFleur Museum District in Jackson, Mississippi, tucked within historic
LeFleur’s Bluff State Park - an ideal location for a museum whose mission
is focused on the promotion and protection of Mississippi’s natural landscape
and its inhabitants. The Museum gives families the opportunity to engage
and learn while having fun! Exciting and educational activities such as the popular
creature features and SCUBA diver fish feedings are offered weekly at the Museum.
Monthly lectures address a variety of natural science topics that compliment current
exhibitions and Museum programming. We offer numerous yearly special events
that are perfect for the whole family. Join us and learn something new today!
FOU N DAT ION
We’re saving resources by
GOING PAPERLESS!
Don’t miss out.
Visit www.MMNSFOUNDATION.com
today and sign up to receive Museum
and Foundation news by email.
We also have a social circle
you can follow for daily announcements
on Museum events and activities.
Enjoy all the great things our Museum offers everyday:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
300 acres of beautiful natural landscape within LeFleur’s Bluff State Park
100,000 gallon aquarium network housing over 200 living species
30,000 square feet of exciting life-size displays and permanent exhibits
Over 800,000 scientific plant and animal specimens
1,700 square foot greenhouse called “The Swamp”
2.5 miles of walking trails, a Native Plant Garden, and open-air amphitheater
Unique gifts and Mississippi made items in the Dragonfly Gift Shoppe
Exciting short film in the Rotwein Theater featuring a volunteer’s journey through the Museum
Preschool Discovery Room with sliding pond tree
Come Visit The Museum
The Museum is open 7 days a week
and located in the heart of
Jackson, Mississippi’s
LeFleur Museum District.
Mon-Fri 8 am -5pm
Sat 9am -5pm; Sun 1pm -5pm
S
RAL CIE
M
NCE
NATU
2148 Riverside Drive, Jackson, MS 39202
USEUM
Members: FREE
Children under 3: FREE
Children 3-18: $4
Adults: $6
Senior Citizens 60+: $5
Groups: call for rates
MUSEUM ACCREDITATION:
Accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and a member
of the Association of Science - Technology Centers, the Mississippi
Museum of Natural Science is a credible learning institution and
a recognized attraction offering membership benefits.
THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF NATUR AL SCIENCE FOUNDATION • NATUR AL NEWSLINE • VOLUME 32 • NUMBER I
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