GeoTour Passport. - Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment

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Passport to Exploring the Gulf of Maine
Explore the
Gulf of Maine as you
search for 25 geocache sites
in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick,
Maine, New Hampshire and
Massachusetts.
www.gulfofmaine.org/geocache
Welcome to the Gulf of Maine Council GeoTour
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment is celebrating its 25th Anniversary with a
geocache tour of the Gulf of Maine Watershed.
The Gulf of Maine Council GeoTour was created to encourage people to get out, learn about and
experience the beauty and value of the Gulf of Maine for themselves.
The GeoTour is like a scavenger hunt, but instead of visiting locations to collect objects, participants
will be finding answers to site specific questions and collecting points. The treasure, a limited edition
Gulf of Maine Council 25th Anniversary Geocoin, is available to participants who collect enough points
and send in their GeoTour Passport.
The Gulf of Maine Council has partnered with organizations and geocachers in each of the five
provinces and states that border the Gulf of Maine to create the GeoTour. Sites were selected to
highlight just some of the important natural, historic, cultural or economic features in the region. Five
sites are located in each of the five provinces or states that border the Gulf of Maine – Nova Scotia,
New Brunswick, Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts – making twenty-five sites to celebrate
twenty-five years of the Gulf of Maine Council.
What is a GeoTour?
A GeoTour or GeoTrail is a series of geocaches connected by one or more common themes
(location, terrain type, heritage, etc.). Often the series has an accompanying brochure or
passport containing guidelines, space to record finds, and can be kept as a memento. Prizes –
such as geocoins – are often awarded for meeting certain milestones on the GeoTour.
What is Geocaching?
Thousands of people all over the world are discovering a new pastime known as geocaching
(pronounced JEE-oh-kash-ing). This adventure hobby involves the use of a GPS (Global
Positioning System) enabled device, and coordinates provided on the official geocaching
website (http://geocaching.com). The GPS receiver guides its operator to hidden treasures
just waiting to be found all over the countryside. A typical geocache consists of a waterproof
container, a log book, and trinkets for trading. Once the log book is signed and trinkets
exchanged, the container is put back in exactly the same place it was found, to await the next
finder.
Geocaching is an entertaining high-tech treasure hunt. It has grown into a worldwide
phenomenon catching the interest of everyone from adventure travelers to families looking for
ways to spend more time together. The craze began in 2000, when a group of GPS
enthusiasts began creating “adventures” using latitude and longitude coordinates as clues.
Today, more than 5 million people worldwide have joined in the Geocaching fun. All you need
is a map, a GPS device and a sense of adventure!
Every geocache hunt can be a completely different experience. In many cases, the trip leads
the geocacher to new and unusual places they may never have seen if they hadn’t been
guided by their GPS receiver and the geocache hider’s directions. Geocaching is a great
family activity! Getting started is easy. All you need is a handheld GPS receiver or a GPS
enabled smartphone and internet access.
About the Gulf of Maine Council GeoTour
The Gulf of Maine is one of the largest semi-enclosed coastal seas in North America, and is
recognized as one of the world’s richest marine ecosystems. Over 3,000 marine species and birds call
the Gulf of Maine home. Coastal marshes and estuaries serve as nurseries and feeding grounds for
fish, crabs, and shellfish, and abundant plankton provide the base of a rich food web all the way up to
large fish, seals and whales. The Gulf of Maine provides a sanctuary for more than 30 species at risk,
including the roseate tern and the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale. The initial influx of
people to the Gulf of Maine began approximately 12,000 years ago and the first European settlements
began to appear in the region in the early 1600s. Now, over 10 million people live in the Gulf of Maine
watershed. Along its shores lie the cities and towns of coastal Massachusetts, New Hampshire,
Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. The Gulf has supported a long tradition of fishing, marine
transportation, coastal development, and recreation, and continues to be a valuable resource for the
people who live and work in the region.
The Gulf of Maine Council GeoTour was created to highlight just some of the areas and features that
make this region so important. It provides an opportunity for you to get out, learn more about and
experience the beauty and value of the Gulf of Maine for yourself. The GeoTour includes a total of 25
sites around the Gulf of Maine for you to visit; five sites in each of the five provinces or states that
border the Gulf of Maine. GPS coordinates will lead you to the site and a 1-page site description
provides you with interesting information and facts about each site. To add to the adventure, we have
included a question about each site for you to answer. By answering the question, you will accumulate
points and with enough points you will be eligible to collect a limited edition Gulf of Maine Council
Geocoin.
To Participate in the Gulf of Maine Council GeoTour
Before you begin, there are a few things you should know:

Protect yourself
You may encounter things like poison ivy, briars, ticks, mosquitoes or larger wildlife on your
adventure. Weather can also change quickly in the region.

Be aware of tides
At some of the sites you may visit, tides can and will come in fast and get very high. Always
consult tide tables for predicted tide times and heights these sites

Be visible
Some of the sites you may visit are open to hunting and fishing at certain times of the year.
Some sites, such as in federal, state or provincial parks, may also require or suggest that you
check in with staff before into the site.

Step carefully and leave no trace
Some of the sites that you may visit are sensitive or protect important species and their habits.
Obey signs and regulations to avoid impacting or damaging these areas. Always remember to
carry out what you have carried in.

Have fun!
Here is what you will need:
1. A GPS unit or mobile device with GPS capability.
2. A copy of the GeoTour with the 1-page description for the site(s) you plan to visit.
3. A copy of the Passport.
4. The GPS coordinates for the site(s) that you plan to visit entered into your GPS unit or mobile
device
For the sites that use existing geocaches, you can log in to http://www.geocaching.com, search
the geocode, and automatically download the GPS coordinates to you device.
Here is how to play:
1. Using the GPS coordinates that you have entered into your GPS or mobile device, find and
visit as many of the Gulf of Maine GeoTour geocaches as you can.
2. Read the question(s) for the site that you are visiting, find the answer(s), and record your
answers in the Passport.
Each question is worth points that you can accumulate towards a prize. Your goal is to
accumulate 100 points
3. Once you have accumulated 100 points in the Passport, email a copy of the Passport with your
answers to [email protected]
Don’t forget to send your mailing address.
4. Once we have verified your answers, a limited edition Gulf of Maine Council 25th Anniversary
Geocoin will be mailed to you*.
* Geocoins will be awarded in the order the Passports are received, while supplies
last. The Gulf of Maine Council is not responsible for Passports that are lost. The
Gulf of Maine Council reserves the right to limit or revise this offer at any time.
Additional terms and condition may apply.
5. Once you receive a geocoin, activate it.
How To Activate My Coin?
All geocoins are inscribed with a unique tracking number that allows the owner and other
players to track its journey from geocache to geocache. This cannot be done, however, until
the geocoin has been ‘activated’ and its web page created.
To retrieve the activation code for the Gulf of Maine Council 25th Anniversary geocoin just surf
to http://phdcoins.ca and click on the Activation Codes link on the left hand menu. Select the
name of the coin (Gulf of Maine Council 25th Anniversary Geocoin) from the dropdown list and
type the tracking number in the proper field. Then just click on the Get Activation Code button
and it will be displayed on the next screen. If you entered your email address in the space
provided it will also be emailed to you.
To activate your coin you now have to surf to geocaching.com and login with your geocaching
account username and login. Follow the links under the Play tab to Find Trackables and click
on Geocoin Home. There you will find a button labeled Activate a Geocoin. After pressing the
button, just follow the instructions to activate your geocoin and create its web page.
You can now keep your geocoin as a souvenir of your participation in the Gulf of Maine
GeoTour, or you can hide your geocoin in a geocache of your choice and track its travels on
Geocaching.com as it is found and re-hidden by other geocachers. To track the travels of your
geocoin, you will need to become a member of Geocaching.com.
If you are registered with Geocaching.com, don’t forget to log your finds to participate in the broader
geocaching adventures.
Site Descriptions and Passport
Nova Scotia





Cape Forchu
Light, Yarmouth
Annapolis Royal
Marsh,
Annapolis Royal
Grand Pré
National Historic
Site/World
Heritage Site,
Grand Pré
Burntcoat Head,
Burntcoat
Joggins Fossil
Cliffs, Joggins
New Brunswick





Sackville
Waterfowl Park,
Sackville
Shepody Bay
National Wildlife
Area, Harvey
Fundy National
Park, Alma
Musquash
Estuary Marine
Protected Area,
Musquash
St. George
Gorge, St.
George
Maine





Cobscook Bay
State Park,
Dennsyville
Colonial Pemaquid
State Historic Site,
Bristol
Wolfe’s Neck
Woods State
Parks, Freeport
Scarborough
Marsh,
Scarborough
Wells National
Estuarine
Research Reserve,
Wells
New Hampshire





Bunker Creek,
Durham
North Mill Pond,
Portsmouth
Odiorne Point,
Rye
Awcomin
Marsh, Rye
Great Bay
Discovery
Center
Massachusetts





Newbury Marsh,
Newbury
Belle Isle Marsh,
East Boston
Boston Harbor,
Boston
Sandy Neck’s Great
Marsh, Barnstable
Cape Cod Tidal
Flats, Brewster
The following pages include information about each of the twenty-five (25) sites. The sites and their
descriptions are organized by province and state, starting in the north with Nova Scotia and ending in
the south with Massachusetts.
Cape Forchu
Yarmouth, Nova Scotia
Coordinates: N43°47.657 W066°09.288
Geocaching.com code: GC11K5K
Type of Cache: Earthcache*
This spot marks the most southwesterly point of
Nova Scotia. Its harbour was once the jumping off
place for ships heading to New England. Today,
fishing fleets head out into the Gulf or across the end
of Bay St. Mary to reach the Bay of Fundy. This site
embodies cultural history and physical geography in
its very accessible but stark setting at a tip of land,
the most southwest point of Nova Scotia.
This shoreline is thought to have had its first
European visitation by Leif Erickson in 1007. Samuel
de Champlain landed here in May 1604 and provided
the name, relating to its “fork” like surroundings. By
the late 19th century, Yarmouth was the second
largest port of sailing ship registry in Canada. The
wealth of the town at that time is still evident in its
residential historic district.
Sue Hutchins Photography
Geologically, you are looking at a massive volcanic
formation. At this site, if you look carefully, you will be able to find pock marks where lava “bombs” fell back to the
ground into still molten lava.
Cape Forchu has convenient parking, an interpretive centre, a small cafe, and a new coastal trail. The site is open year
round but some services are seasonal. The athletic can climb on the rugged rocks. You will observe sea birds and maybe
seals.
Learn more about this area:
www.capeforchulight.com
Thank you to: Treasurehumper (cache owner), Dan Earle (Gulf of Maine Institute)
Passport Question:
What is the name of the red boat on the “Lost to the Sea” interpretive panel?
*Please note: To log this Earthcache, please visit Geocaching.com for additional tasks or questions to be completed.
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: The Gulf of Maine Council has presented awards to many individuals who have supported the work of the Gulf of
Maine Institute: Linda Kukis Scherf (2000) for her Gulf of Maine Institute Without Walls youth stewardship program; John Terry
(2008) for his mapping programs and stewardship programs; and Roger Outhouse (2012) for the environmental work done by his Gulf
of Maine Institute youth team
Annapolis Royal Marsh
Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia
Coordinates: N44° 44.655 W065° 30.841
Geocaching.com code: GC11X03
Type of Cache: Earthcache*
The Annapolis Royal Marsh was developed through a
partnership with Ducks Unlimited and the town of
Annapolis Royal. This constructed freshwater wetland/
marsh was completed in 2002 and is primarily used to treat
the community's wastewater before it enters the Annapolis
River. However, it also provides habitat for a wide variety
of wetland species, such as frogs and muskrats, and serves
as an important breeding ground for waterfowl. Great blue
heron, sandpipers, black duck, blue and green-winged teal,
grebes, sora rails, red-winged blackbirds, song sparrows
and yellow warblers have been spotted in this marsh.
A recreational trail, French Basin Trail, surrounds the
marsh. Interpretative panels are located at various spots
along the trail during the summer season and enable
Ashley Sprague
visitors to explore the marsh and learn about the
importance of wetland conservation. The constructed
wetland has become a major attraction in the community and has made nature very accessible to residents and visitors.
The local schools are also starting to incorporate field trips to the wetland into their program of study.
Nearby, on the causeway over the Annapolis River, you can also find the Annapolis Royal Power Generating
Station (N 44° 45.222 W 065° 30.687). Opened in 1984, the generating station was initially designed as a pilot project
to determine the viability of larger tidal generation on the Bay of Fundy. This 20 MW tidal power station is currently the
only modern tidal generating station in North America and it harnesses the tidal difference created by the large tidal
range. While effectively generating enough ‘clean’ electricity to power over 4000 homes, increased river bank erosion has
been experienced both upstream and downstream and there have been two notable cases of impacts on marine life.
Learn more about this area:
www.annapolisriver.ca/frenchbasintrail.php
www.nspower.ca/en/home/about-us/how-we-make-electricity/renewable-electricity/annapolis-tidal-station.aspx
Thank you to: pharma-geologist (cache owner), Ashley Sprague (NS Dept. of Fisheries and Aquaculture)
Passport Question:
 According to the panel “The French Basin Trail”, what ship visited Port Royal in 1636?
*Please note: To log this Earthcache, please visit Geocaching.com for additional tasks or questions to be completed.
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 2002, the Gulf of Maine Council presented an award to Ducks Unlimited Canada for it efforts in impacting
17,686 hectares (43,701 acres) of wetland and associated upland habitats in Nova Scotia since the 1970′s. Their work includes creating
freshwater wetlands, conserving landscapes with wetland habitats, and working with landowners to restore riparian buffer zones,
promote soil conservation, and on wastewater management projects. In 2007 and 2009, the Gulf of Maine Council’s Habitat
Restoration Program awarded grants to the Clean Annapolis River Project for restoration planning at the French Basin Salt
Marsh and the assessment and removal of the Clementsport Dam.
Grand Pré
Grand Pré, Nova Scotia
Coordinates: N45° 06.205 W064° 18.656
Geocaching.com code: N/A
Type of Cache: Virtual
The Grand Pré area has a long and rich environmental and cultural history.
In July 2012, UNESCO recognized the Landscape of Grand Pré as a World
Heritage Site.
Grand Pré was an Acadian settlement from 1682 to 1755. Much of the low
lying agricultural lands visible from the look-off owe their origins to the
Acadian settlement. Originally salt marshes, the Acadians claimed these
fertile agricultural lands from the Bay of Fundy and its highest tides in the
world by a series of dykes and aboiteaus. These lands have essentially been
continuously farmed and augmented by generations of New England,
Loyalist, and Dutch farmers. Grand Pré National Historic Site of Canada,
operated by Parks Canada, commemorates the historical settlement, the
deportation of the Acadians between 1755 and 1762, and the role of this site
as the heart of Acadie.
For the Mi’kmaw, who have hunted and fished in these areas for millennia,
nearby Cape Blomidon, is where the legendary Kluscap (Glooscap) keeps a
watchful eye over his people.
The Minas Basin, and its beaches, shorelines, tidal flats and offshore islands,
Kathryn Parlee
also provide globally important staging and migration areas for waterfowl
and shorebirds. Evangeline Beach, located across the dykeland (N 45°
08.290' W 064° 19.143), is an ideal area to view these shorebirds including the Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris
pusilla). At the peak migratory season, flocks of shorebirds, which can number into the thousands, may be seen running
along the mud flats or flying in tight formation along the shore. Environment Canada’s Boot Island National Wildlife
Area, at the mouth of the Gaspereau River just to the southeast, also supports significant populations and breeding
colonies of Herring Gull, Great Black-backed Gull, Great Blue Heron, and Double-crested Cormorant. Due to the
significant shorebird concentrations, this area was declared a Wetland of International Importance for the protection of
shorebirds under the UNESCO International Ramsar Convention, and was also declared a Hemispheric Shorebird
Reserve as part of the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network.
Learn more about this area:
www.landscapeofgrandpre.ca/
www.pc.gc.ca/eng/lhn-nhs/ns/grandpre/index.aspx
www.ec.gc.ca/ap-pa/default.asp?lang=En&n=1AB8BA89-1
Thank you to: Geraldine Arsenault (Parks Canada), Colin MacKinnon (Environment Canada), Christophe Rivet
(Environment Canada), Kathryn Parlee (Environment Canada) and Hillary Davis
Passport Question:
 What artist’s painting depicts the collaborative building of dykes at Grand Pré during the Acadian Period? (Hint:
read the interpretive panel)
 Bonus @ Evangeline Beach: What is the peak period of shorebird migration for this area? (Hint: read the interpretive
panel)
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Burntcoat Head
Burntcoat, Nova Scotia
Coordinates: N45° 18.679 W063° 48.344
Geocaching.com code: GC3GVXH
Type of Cache: Earthcache*
Please use caution and pay attention to the tides!
Predicted tide times and heights: http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/eng/station?sid=270
Burntcoat Head, located within the Minas Basin of the Bay of Fundy, is officially recognized as having the highest tides in
the world. Over 100 billion tonnes of water flow into the Bay of Fundy every 12 hours and 25 minutes (= one tide cycle).
Between high tide and low tide, there can be as much as 16 metres (52 feet) difference in water level at this site.
During low tide, you can walk along
the beach and on the ocean floor to
explore tide pools or hunt for
fossils, rocks and shells. During
high tide, the creek and nearby
marshlands are covered by water
giving the appearance of a lake.
Burntcoat Head is also one of only
five locations in Canada where the
threatened Atlantic Mud-piddock, a
clam-like mollusc, is found.
Bill Whitman
A lighthouse was first built at Burntcoat Head in 1858 to support the booming maritime trade and wooden ship building
industries. With the end of that era, a lighthouse was no longer needed for navigational purposes and was eventually
replaced with a skeleton mast. In the 1990s, to commemorate the area’s history and its recognition as the site with the
world’s highest tides, the Burntcoat Head Park Lighthouse and Interpretive Centre was opened. The Park, opened during
the summer season, contains a replica lighthouse, walking trails and interpretive displays about the natural and human
history of the area.
Learn more about this area:
www.burncoathead.com/index.htm
www.tides.gc.ca/eng
Thank you to: Team Fährtensucher (cache owner), Burntcoat Head Park Lighthouse and Interpretive Centre, Bill
Whitman (NS Dept of Fisheries & Aquaculture)
Passport Question:
 What is the date on the concrete block near the lighthouse entrance?
 Bonus: What is written on the brass plaque on the granite monument next to the lighthouse?
*Please note: To log this Earthcache, please visit Geocaching.com for additional tasks or questions to be completed.
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Joggins Fossil Cliffs
UNESCO World Heritage Site
Joggins, Nova Scotia
Coordinates: N45° 41.756 W064° 27.029
Geocaching.com code: GCN186
Type of Cache: Earthcache*
Please use caution and pay attention to the tides!
Predicted tide times and heights: http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/eng/station?sid=215
The Joggins Fossil Cliffs are a world-class palaeontological site stretching approximately 15 kilometres (10 miles) along
the shoreline of the Bay of Fundy near the town of Joggins. The cliffs reveal the most comprehensive sampling, or fossil
record, of terrestrial life from the Carboniferous Period, some 300 million years ago. The constant erosion from the Bay
of Fundy’s tides continually exposes new fossils making the cliffs one of the easiest places in the world to find fossils. To
date, nearly 200 different species of plants, amphibians and reptiles have been
identified from the fossils found here.
The area also has a long history of coal mining, with coal seams exploited as early as
1686 by local Acadian settlers. Coal mining played an important role in the history of
the region until the 1950s when the mines were eventually closed.
Due to the global significance of this site, the cliffs were designated a Special Place
under the Province of Nova Scotia's Special Places Protection Act in 1989. In 2008,
the cliffs were also officially inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. To protect
the site for scientific research, take only pictures and leave only footprints. In Nova
Scotia, the law only lets you collect fossils if you have a Heritage Research Permit
from the provincial government.
The Joggins Fossil Centre (open April through October) was built on a brownfield site
Joggins Fossil Institute
reclaimed from the mining industry. The building itself was designed to mimic the
formations of the cliffs, and the shape of the building is reminiscent of the old Joggins No. 7 mine that once stood at the
site. To respect the natural value of the area, and to minimize the building’s footprint, the Centre incorporates many
sustainable and green building features including: a wind turbine generator; a solar hot water heating system; passive
solar heat and light collection; a green roof; and washroom fixtures that reduce water consumption. The cliffs are
accessible to the public and guided tours of the site are provided by staff from the Centre.
Learn more about this area:
jogginsfossilcliffs.net/
whc.unesco.org/en/list/1285/
Thank you to: Maritime Geocaching Association (cache owner), The Joggins Fossil Institute
Passport Question:
 Abraham Gesner (in 1836) said that “something” turned to stone…..what was that?
 Bonus: In the “evolutionary maze” in the play space at the Joggins Fossil Centre we learn about causes of extinction.
How does the maze communicate the extinction of Saber-tooth tigers?
*Please note: To log this Earthcache, please visit Geocaching.com for additional tasks or questions to be completed.
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Sackville Waterfowl Park
Sackville, New Brunswick
Coordinates: N45° 54.120 W064° 22.000
Geocaching.com code: GC11F7C
Type of Cache: Earthcache*
The Town of Sackville partnered with Environment Canada’s Canadian Wildlife Service and Ducks Unlimited to establish
the Sackville Waterfowl Park in 1988. Located in the heart of town, this 22 hectare (54 acres) wetland complex borders
the Tantramar marshes and includes 4 km (2.5 miles) of trails and boardwalks where visitors can enjoy marshes,
meadows, woodlands and ponds. The park is home to over 160 species of birds and almost 200 varieties of wild plants.
Historically, the park was part of an expansive salt marsh that was flooded daily by the Bay of Fundy tides. In the 1700s,
Acadian settlers began draining the marshes and built an extensive dyke
system to gain access to the nutrient-rich soil for farming. Several farms
still exist on the Tantramar marshes today.
The Sackville Waterfowl Park is a past winner of Environment Canada's
National Award for Environmental Achievement.
Learn more about this area:
sackville.com/visit/attractions/waterfowl
www.ducks.ca/your-province/new-brunswick/wetlands-area/sackville/
Kathryn Parlee
Thank you to: paulandstacey (cache owner), Ashley
Sprague (NS Dept of Fisheries & Aquaculture)
Passport Question:
 What is the structure located at these coordinates?
 Bonus: Who is the structure named after? (Hint: read the commemorative panel)
Kathryn Parlee
*Please note: To log this Earthcache, please visit Geocaching.com for additional tasks or questions to be completed.
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 2010, the Gulf of Maine Council presented Chris Porter with an award for his work forming the Tantramar
Wetlands Centre, a community-based centre for wetlands education.
Mary's Point - Shepody
National Wildlife Area
Harvey, New Brunswick
Coordinates: N45° 43.384 W064° 40.29
Geocaching.com code: N/A
Type of Cache: Virtual
Visitors must respect the “Do Not Cross onto the Beach” signs. These signs are
typically up for 4-6 weeks during the sandpiper migration to protect critical
shorebird roosting areas from disturbance.
Mary’s Point is a 1200 hectare (2965 acre) wetland located just outside the community of Harvey. It is located within the
Shepody Bay National Wildlife Area, which is administered by Environment Canada’s Canadian Wildlife Service.
Each summer, for 4-6 weeks beginning in mid-July, the extensive mudflats of this area, and of the upper Bay of Fundy,
provide an important stopover and refueling site for over 2 million migratory shorebirds. Semipalmated Sandpiper
(Calidris pusilla) are the most commonly observed shorebird in this area and represent approximately 70% of the
species’ world population. The area is the only stop that these birds make on a 4,000 km (2,500 mi) journey from their
summer breeding grounds in the Arctic to their overwintering home along the northern coast of South America.
In the early 1970s, naturalist Mary Majka and David Christie, along with biologists from the Canadian Wildlife Service
began conducting the first shorebird surveys at Mary’s Point. Their dedicated research confirmed the importance of
Mary’s Point as a shorebird migratory stopover area. In 1987, the area was officially named as Canada’s first Western
Hemispheric Shorebird Reserve and is now listed as a UNESCO Ramsar Wetland of International Importance.
The Mary’s Point Interpretive Centre, located at this site and open
Monday to Friday throughout July and August, offers a range of
exhibits, interpretive panels and educational materials for visitors to
learn more about the history and value of this site. The Canadian
Wildlife Service maintains a trail to access the shorebird viewing area
(please follow regulatory signs and remain on the trail to minimize
disturbance to wildlife).
Learn more about this area:
www.naturenb.ca/mpbirds/
www.ec.gc.ca/ap-pa/default.asp?lang=En&n=263DB5D8-1
Thank you to: Edith McCormack, Colin MacKinnon (Environment
Canada), Ashley Sprague (NS Dept. of Fisheries & Aquaculture)
Vishalla Singh, CWS
Passport Question:
 On the “Grindstone Conservation Easement” interpretation panel, what are two birds species represented by photos?
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know; In 1992, the Gulf of Maine Council presented an award to Peter Pearce, a marine wildlife conservation, naturalist
and educator with Environment Canada’s Canadian Wildlife Service. In 1997, the Council presented an award to Peter Hicklin, for
two decades of outstanding work with Environment Canada’s Canadian Wildlife Service on shorebirds and the ecology of the Upper
Bay of Fundy. In 1996, Mary Majka received an award in recognition of her valuable contribution to shorebird research, the
designation of Mary’s Point and for her efforts to fundraise for the Mary’s Point Interpretive Centre.
Fundy National Park
Alma, New Brunswick
Coordinates: N45° 35.973 W064° 56.883
Geocaching.com code: GC54J4Z
Type of Cache: Traditional*
Fundy National Park covers an area of approximately 207 km2 (80 sq mi). Its landscape represents the Maritime Acadian
Highlands. The Park includes the rugged coastline of the Bay of Fundy which is home to the highest tides in the world, as
well as forests of the Caledonia Highlands which is part of the Appalachian Mountain range.
Fundy National Park falls within traditional Mi’gmag territory called Sikniktewag (“drainage area”). The Mi’gmag,
Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) and Passamaquoddy Aboriginal peoples have a long history with the area and consider it part of
their traditional territory. In the 1800, the forests became attractive to a growing lumber industry. Logging and
shipbuilding were closely intertwined throughout the 1800's, and several small communities developed in the area with
saw mills, shipbuilding and fishing activities. By the mid-1920s, much of the thriving lumber and shipbuilding activities
had declined and people had left the area in search of opportunities elsewhere.
In 1948, the area was chosen as New Brunswick's first national park. Fundy is one of Canada’s few national parks to offer
both a backcountry wilderness experience and an extensive development of recreational activities. The Park includes 3
large campgrounds, a salt-water heated swimming pool, a natural playground, over 120 km (75 miles) of hiking trails, as
well as a motel and chalets provider and a nine-hole golf course. Within the Park, there are also a number of on-going
research and environmental management activities including ecological monitoring, habitat restoration and species at
risk recovery actions.
Fundy National Park also serves as the core area for the Fundy Biosphere Reserve. In September 2007, UNESCO
designated the Upper Bay of Fundy in New Brunswick as a
Biosphere Reserve because of its unique geological formations,
terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and cultural heritage. The
Biosphere Reserve includes an area of over 430,000 hectares
(1,000,000 acres) extending from the Tantramar Marsh near
Sackville to St. Martins and inland to Moncton. Fundy National
Park was also recently designated as a Dark Sky Preserve by the
Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (RASC), which means that
the Fundy National Park is one of Canada’s best places to explore
the night sky.
Learn more about this area:
www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/nb/fundy/visit.aspx
fundy-biosphere.ca/en/
www.rasc.ca/dark-sky-site-designations
Parks Canada
Thank you to: Cache Up NB (cache owner), Matt Klem (Cache Up NB), Nadine Gauvin (Parks Canada), Livia
Goodbrand (Parks Canada)
Passport Question:
Who lived in the house near this site and what were they the first of?
*Please note: This geocache is part of the Cache Up NB/ Fundy National Park Geocaching Program and the Fundy
National Park Passport 2014. For more information on this Passport visit: http://www.cacheupnb.com/fundy-park/
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Musquash Estuary
Musquash, New Brunswick
Coordinates: N45˚09.210 W066˚13.745
Geocaching.com code: GC5789N
Type of Cache: Traditional
More than 85% of the original salt marshes in the Bay of Fundy have been altered or destroyed by humans over the past
300 years. The Musquash Estuary, located about 20 kilometres (12 miles) southwest of Saint John, is one of only a few
remaining in the region that has not been significantly impacted by human development. It is the largest undeveloped,
natural estuary in the Bay of Fundy. This productive estuary and saltmarsh is home to many birds, mammals, fish,
invertebrates, and marine plants. Over 290 species of birds have been spotted in the Estuary, including abundant
waterfowl and shorebirds. Beaver, fox, deer, moose, muskrat, harbour seal and even the occasional porpoise can also be
found in the area.
The Musquash Estuary plays an important role in the
region’s heritage. Aboriginal groups are thought to have
established seasonal camps along its shores. French
settlers and, later, United Empire Loyalists have also
been associated with early settlements in the area.
In 1998 the Conservation Council of New Brunswick
(CCNB), with support from the Fundy North
Fishermen’s Association and the local community,
proposed the Musquash Estuary and surrounding
intertidal area as a candidate Marine Protected Area
(MPA) under the Oceans Act. In December 2006 the
Canadian Hydrographic Service
Musquash Estuary, including the waters, marshes, and
intertidal zone, received formal designation as a protected area. The Musquash MPA and administered intertidal area are
managed by Fisheries and Oceans Canada in collaboration with an advisory committee composed of representatives from
government, non-government organizations, First Nations, industry, and local community groups. In recognition of the
importance of the area, complimentary conservation efforts by the Nature Conservancy of Canada, Ducks Unlimited, and
the Province of New Brunswick have led to the protection of the majority of the lands surrounding the Estuary, as well as
the watershed that feeds the Estuary.
This geocache was created by the CCNB specifically for this GeoTour. A detailed description on how to find the site is
available on geocaching.com.
Learn more about this area:
www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/oceans/marineareas-zonesmarines/mpa-zpm/atlantic-atlantique/musquash-eng.htm
www.conservationcouncil.ca/our-programs/fundy-baykeeper/musquash-marine-protected-area/
Thank you to: Matt Abbott (Conservation Council of New Brunswick), Tanya Koropatnick (Fisheries & Oceans Canada)
Passport Question:
 What colour string is securing the cache in place?
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 2004 and 2006, the Gulf of Maine Council’s Habitat Restoration Program awarded grants to Ducks Unlimited
Canada for restoration, research and monitoring within the Musquash Marsh. In 2007, the Gulf of Maine Council presented an award
to the Friends of the Musquash for facilitating the creation of a Marine Protected Area in the Musquash Estuary, which was
declared the first Marine Protected Area in New Brunswick and the Bay of Fundy.
St. George Gorge
St. George, New Brunswick
Coordinates: N45° 07.669 W066° 49.548
Geocaching.com code: GC3JPHC
Type of Cache: Traditional
The Magaguadavic River runs through the town of St. George and dramatically falls 21 metres (69 feet) into the gorge.
This picturesque site has a significant and varied industrial history and many of the original buildings are still operating.
Since 1784, hydro power generated from the gorge has powered industries such as shipbuilding, lumbering, saw and pulp
mills, and an electrical power plant. The first dam, constructed in the 1860s, was originally used for lumbering purposes
and was later modified for use in the granite
and pulp and paper industries. Since 2004, the
dam has been used as an electrical power
generating plant.
Shortly after the dam was built, the salmon
ladder was installed to benefit stocks of wild
salmon that migrate up the Magaguadavic
River to spawn. The ladder has assisted a
serious conservation effort to protect and
enhance the wild salmon populations.
This site is also home to the ‘Old Pine Tree’
which overlooks the gorge and is thought to be
one of the oldest living trees in the province.
Learn more about this area:
www.town.stgeorge.nb.ca/gorge.htm
www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/placelieu.aspx?id=6732
Thank you to: forestfauna (cache owner), Mark McGarrigle, Jason Naug (Fisheries & Oceans Canada)
Passport Question:
 What Color is the railing going down to the river?
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Mark McGarrigle
Cobscook Bay State Park
Dennysville, Maine
Coordinates: N44° 50.580 W067° 09.534
Geocaching.com code: GC4B1WW
Type of Cache: Traditional*
This 888 acre (360 hectare) park, founded in 1965, is situated on part of the Moosehorn National Wildlife refuge and
overlooks Cobscook Bay. Cobscook, the Maliseet-Passamaquoddy tribal word for "boiling tides", describes this setting
where the tidal range averages 24 feet (7 metres).
Nutrient-rich salt water flowing in from the Gulf of
Maine stimulates plankton growth, which in turn feeds
a vast array of invertebrates (such as shellfish and
marine worms). Eagles, ospreys, seals, otters and even
the occasional bear enjoy the Bay's abundant fish,
including smelt, alewives, shad, sea-run brook trout,
striped bass and the Atlantic salmon.
Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands
Attracted by Cobscook Bay's sheltered coves, mudflats,
and eelgrass beds, thousands of shorebirds stop over
each fall to rest and forage as they migrate south from
northern breeding grounds. The Bay's inner coves
support a quarter of Maine's wintering black ducks and
the state's highest concentration of bald eagles. A free
birding list for the Cobscook Bay region is available at
the Park entrance.
The park's geology is shaped by three primary forces:
Cobscook Bay's powerful tides; the underlying bedrock
(a volcanic tuff-breccia that dates back to the Silurian Age roughly 420 million years ago); and the glacial action from the
Wisconsinan ice sheet (approximately 12,000-18,000 years ago)- which deposited mud and an assortment of rock, sand,
silt and clay known as glacial till. Where the bedrock is exposed, grooves left by the ice sheet (known as glacial striations)
are visible on rock surfaces. For more information on this geologic legacy visit the park’s Ice Age Trail. (Excerpts largely
taken from Cobscook Bay State Park on Maine.gov)
Learn more about this area:
www.maine.gov/cobscookbay
www.fws.gov/northeast/moosehorn/
Thank you to: Maine State Parks (cache owner), Gary Best (Maine State Parks)
Passport Question:
 The Bay is home to a variety of wildlife and bird watchers can expect to see many birds in the area. According to the
educational card and fun facts hidden in the geocache, how many bird species can be counted in this area?
*Please note: This geocache is part of the Maine State Parks GeoTour. Why not take part! For more information on
this GeoTour visit: www.maine.gov/dacf/parks/discover_history_explore_nature/activities/geocaching.shtm
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Colonial Pemaquid State
Historic Site
Bristol, Maine
Coordinates: N43° 52.717 W069° 31.311
Geocaching.com code: GC4B1YH
Type of Cache: Traditional*
Colonial Pemaquid State Historic Sites
displays one of northern New England's
earliest communities. Visitors can use a
telescopes onsite to observe the area and
imagine what it was like in the 17th
century, guarding the waters to the
Pemaquid River and beyond.
The Fort House was built in the last
quarter of the 18th Century by Alexander
Nickels Jr., the son of Fort Frederick's last
commander. Today the first floor of this
building is open to the public. Inside you
will find the period room or parlor which is
decorated similar to how it may have been
in the early 1800's, a library, exhibit room
and archaeological laboratory. The Fort
House was renovated through the efforts of
the Friends of Colonial Pemaquid.
Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands
Near Colonial Pemaquid is the Salt Pond
Preserve which honors environmental pioneer
Rachel Carson. She is credited with initiating the environmental movement. In an earlier work, The Edge of the Sea, Ms.
Carson details her tide pool research on the shore of Muscongus Bay, near the southeastern tip of Pemaquid Point. This
spot was designated as the Rachel Carson Salt Pond Preserve by The Nature Conservancy in 1966. The Wells Reserve and
nearby Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge is another site to visit in this passport. (Excerpts largely taken from
Colonial Pemaquid State Historic Site on Maine.gov)
Learn more about this area:
www.maine.gov/colonialpemaquid
Thank you to: Maine State Parks (cache owner), Gary Best (Maine State Parks)
Passport Question:
 What is the name of the ship referred to in the education sheet hidden in the Maine State GeoTour cache?
*Please note: This geocache is part of the Maine State Parks GeoTour. Why not take part! For more information on
this GeoTour visit: www.maine.gov/dacf/parks/discover_history_explore_nature/activities/geocaching.shtm
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 2004 and 2006, the Town of Bristol and the Pemaquid Watershed Association received grants from the
Gulf of Maine Council’s Habitat Restoration Program for marsh culvert replacement and salt marsh monitoring respectively.
Wolfe’s Neck Woods
State Park
Freeport, Maine
Coordinates: N43° 49.246 W070° 04.905
Geocaching.com code: GC4B1Y0
Type of Cache: Traditional*
Wolfe's Neck Woods State Park is approx. 4.5 mi (7.2 km) from U.S. Route 1 and Freeport's bustling shopping district.
The park bears its name from Henry and Rachel Wolfe, who were the first Europeans to permanently settle here in 1733.
Most of the peninsula was cleared for farms, but over time this part returned to forest. In 1969, more than 200 acres (81
hectares) was given to the State by Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence M.C. Smith of Freeport.
The Park contains varied ecosystems, including white pine and hemlock forests, a salt marsh estuary, and the rocky
shorelines on Casco Bays and the Harraseeket River. The Park's signature residents are the ospreys who nest on nearby
Googins Island. These birds summer on the island and make their annual trek to South America each fall. The Park’s
Casco Bay Trail includes a number of interpretative panels that enable visitors to learn about the importance of the area.
Nearby, you can visit Wolfe’s Neck Farm, a non-profit
oceanfront farm on the shores of Casco Bay. The 626 acres (253
hectares), which include organic demonstration gardens,
barnyard animals and nature trails, are open daily. The farm’s
educational programs include a summer day camp, school field
trips and Teen Ag Program - teaching sustainable farming
methods while growing produce for food pantries. The farm
also hosts a series of annual events including farm-to-table
dinners, barn dances, farm festivals and pumpkin hayrides.
Learn more about this area:
www.maine.gov/wolfesneckwoods
Thank you to: Maine State Parks (cache owner), Gary Best
(Maine State Parks), Christine Tilburg (EcoSystem Indicator Partnership), and the Tilburg Family
Christine Tilburg
Passport Question:
 In May, what might you see happening with the ospreys? (Hint: read the interpretive panel located approx. 10-12 feet
from the geocache along the trail to the look-out point)
This site is part of the Gulf of Maine Council’s EcoSystem Indicator Partnership’s (ESIP) ICUC
project. It is a citizen science project to document, through photographs, the status and changes in the
environment at select sites over time. To submit a photo to the ICUC project, please put your camera directly
above the osprey picture on the left of the sign. Direct your camera so that the "keep off" sign on the adjacent
island is in the middle of your frame. To confirm photo orientation, see the photo above. Submit your photo
(with the date and time it was taken) to: [email protected]
*Please note: This geocache is part of the Maine State Parks GeoTour. Why not take part! For more information on
this GeoTour visit: www.maine.gov/dacf/parks/discover_history_explore_nature/activities/geocaching.shtml
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Scarborough Marsh
Scarborough, Maine
Coordinates: N43° 33.942 W070° 22.475
Geocaching.com code: Gc3TVV6
Type of Cache: Earthcache*
Be aware that this site is located by a busy road.
Scarborough Marsh is 3,100 acres (1,254 ha) and is the largest salt marsh in Maine. It was also one of Maine’s first
BirdLife International Important Bird Areas, part of a global effort to identify areas that are critical for bird conservation.
Scarborough Marsh formed over a long period of time. This low-lying area is relatively sheltered and less exposed to the
waves and tides that erode the coast so sediment is deposited. Over time, sediment built up and marsh plants established.
The plants trapped more sediment and gradually increased the height of the marsh and allowed it to expand. The marsh
provides critical resting, breeding and feeding habitat for waterfowl, egrets, herons, glossy ibis and other shorebird
species, and supports aquatic species.
The marsh has a long history of human use. Sokokis Indians
hunted, trapped, clammed and fished here. In the 1600s,
European settlers harvested salt hay for their livestock and used
the area for pasture land. In the 1900s, the marsh became viewed
as a cheap space to fill and develop - it was even proposed as a site
for the town dump at one point. Recognizing the value and
significant habitat the marsh provided, in 1957 the Maine Dept. of
Inland Fisheries & Wildlife began a process to acquire it.
In 1972, Maine Audubon formed a partnership with the state and
opened the Scarborough Marsh Audubon Center. Opened between
June and September, it serves as a nature center for the marsh
and provides exhibits and walks where a visitor can learn about
the natural environment and value of the marsh.
Christine Tilburg
Learn more about this area:
maineaudubon.org/find-us/scarborough-marsh/
www.maine.gov/dacf/mnap/focusarea/scarborough_marsh_focus_area.pdf#sthash.TepX0BFs.dpuf
Thank you to: eebee (cache owner), Christine Tilburg (EcoSystem Indicator Partnership), and the Tilburg Family
Passport Question:
 What two mammals are at the top of the "life in a Maine salt marsh" sign?
This site is part of the Gulf of Maine Council’s EcoSystem Indicator Partnership’s (ESIP) ICUC
project. It is a citizen science project to document, through photographs, the status and changes in the
environment at select sites over time. To submit a photo to the ICUC project, walk through the interpretive
center to the back deck. Place your camera on the top horizontal edge of the "Scarborough Marsh" sign above
the "S". To confirm photo orientation, see the photo above. Submit your photo (with the date and time it was
taken) to: [email protected]
*Please note: To log this Earthcache, please visit Geocaching.com for additional tasks or questions to be completed.
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Wells National Estuarine
Research Reserve
Wells, Maine
Coordinates: N43° 19.926 W070° 33.313
Geocaching.com code: GC2V8TA
Type of Cache: Traditional
Estuaries are the transition between the land and the sea. These coastal ecosystems are where fresh water from rivers and
salt water from the sea mix, and they are some of the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Estuaries provide important
habitat for many plants and animals, they provide natural flood protection for our coastal communities, and also help to
protect coastal water quality by filtering land-based pollutants from water as it passes through the estuary. However,
estuaries are vulnerable to pollution, sedimentation, climate change, invasive species and other threats which can affect
their health and long-term survival.
In 1984, the estuary was designated a National Estuarine Research Reserve by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA). The Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve is part of a system of 28 Reserves around the
country. The Wells Reserve protects 2,250 acres (910 ha) of dunes, beaches, salt marshes, freshwater wetlands, forest
and fields within the watersheds of the Little River, Webhannet River, and Ogunquit River. It is a regional center for
education, training and outreach, and also conducts and supports research, studies and monitoring. The Wells Reserve is
open every day and offers public access to its grounds. The historic buildings of Laudholm Farm, also on the National
Register of Historic Places, serve as an educational and research center for visitors and scientists.
Nearby you will also find the Rachel Carson
National Wildlife Refuge. The Refuge was
established in 1966 by the US Fish and Wild Service
in cooperation with the State of Maine to protect
valuable salt marshes and estuaries for migratory
birds. It was named after Rachel Carson, a worldrenowned marine biologist, author and
environmentalist. In 1962, she published the book
Silent Spring, which linked the use of post-World
War II chemical pesticides and impacts to the
environment and wildlife. She has been credited
with launching the contemporary environmental
movement and awakening the concern of
Americans for the environment
Learn more about this area:
www.wellsreserve.org/
www.fws.gov/refuge/rachel_carson/
Wells NERR
Thank you to: geosula (cache owner), Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve
Passport Question:
 The sign on the railing at this site refers to which exotic plant that can invade a marsh when tidal flow is blocked?
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 2003 and 2006, the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve received grants from the Gulf of Maine
Council’s Habitat Restoration Program for oyster habitat establishment and for salt marsh monitoring and management at Drakes
Island. The Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve also received an award from the Council for its excellence in science,
communication, partnerships, education, and stewardship of the Gulf of Maine coastal ecosystems in 2009.
Bunker Creek
Durham, New Hampshire
Coordinates: N43° 08.279 W070° 53.250
Geocaching.com code: GC16W54
Type of Cache: Traditional*
Bunker Creek has three major wildlife habitat attractions. The shoreline along Bunker Creek is prime waterfowl nesting
habitat. The large white pine trees along the creek are potential eagle perch sites. The upland is maintained as shrub
habitat, being rotationally mowed to sustain this
habitat type, important to so many wildlife species.
The Great Bay began to shape 15,000 years ago,
when the last glacier retreated, leaving behind a
flooded valley that became Great Bay. This
remarkable estuary, with fresh water from seven
rivers and numerous creeks, creates a watershed
that drains one-quarter of New Hampshire (930
square miles / 2400 square kilometres), before it
meets up with tidal waters and empties into the
Gulf of Maine. These lands are home to many
species of wildlife, making Great Bay one of the
most productive estuaries along the East Coast.
The Bunker Creek trail, located on this property,
begins behind the barn and will lead you to the
Bunker family graveyard. (Text above taken with
permission from The Great Bay National Estuarine
Research Reserve geocache passport).
Blake Grumprecht
Learn more about this area:
www.greatbay.org/
To view how the seasons affect the creek over the year visit Blake Gumprecht photo stream:
www.flickr.com/photos/gumprecht/sets/72157623166537668/page3/. His photos are also for sale.
Thank you to: horseshoe crab (cache owner), Great Bay Discovery Center
Passport Question:
 When did Valentine Bunker die? (Hint: Make your way to the Graveyard, behind the barn to the right)
*Please note: This site is also part of the Great Bay Geocache Passport. Download your copy here:
http://greatbay.org/documents/greatbaypassport.pdf Also make sure to punch your Great Bay Geocache Passport
with the special hole punch found in the cache.
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: The University of New Hampshire(UNH) is located in the town of Durham (near Bunker creek). The UNH Marine
Docents won an award from the Gulf of Maine Council in 2000, for 20 years of increasing public awareness of the marine
environment through their volunteer efforts as trained community outreach volunteers.
North Mill Pond
Portsmouth, New Hamsphire
Coordinates: N43° 04.291 W070° 46.343
Geocaching.com code: GC34HAH
Type of Cache: Traditional
North Mill Pond is a shallow urban, tidal pond
that receives freshwater mainly from Hodgson
Brook and regular tidal flow from the
Piscataqua River. The land surrounding the
North Mill Pond is among the most significantly
impacted in the Portsmouth region, as it was
one of the first areas to experience development.
Due to hard work by many volunteers and
organisations, by the early 1980s the North Mill
Pond was slowly becoming a functioning tidal
marsh again. There were sightings of horseshoe
crabs, egrets, gulls, night herons, and numerous
small birds, especially on the mud flats at low
tide. A local resident group, the Advocates for
the North Mill Pond (ANMP) formed to protect
and restore North Mill Pond.
ANMP recognized that in order to improve the
condition of the Pond, they also needed to focus
NE DES Coastal
restoration efforts on Hodgson Brook. With
Program
support from the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services and the City, the Hodgson Brook Restoration
Project was launched in 2004.Many Portsmouth area businesses and community members have contributed to The
Hodgson Brook Restoration Project by providing office space, donations that have funded projects and volunteering to
work on efforts such as residential rain garden installations and stream cleanups. In 2014, with funding from the Gulf of
Maine Council on the Marine Environment and the Royal Bank of Canada Blue Water Project, the Hodgson Brook
Restoration Project restored 700 feet (213 metres) of urban stream and installed a tree box filter in the Hodgson Brook
watershed.
Learn more about this area:
des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/water/wmb/was/hodgson/advocates.htm
des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/water/wmb/was/hodgson/index.htm
Thank you to: 21alpine (cache owner), Jeanne and Joseph C Beland, Kevin Lucey (NH Dept. of Environmental
Services)
Passport Question:
 Over time, there have been many people, groups and organizations involved in restoring and preserving North Mill
Pond. What school is specifically mentioned, on the interpretive panel, for its help in restoration efforts such as
reseeding ribbed mussel beds?
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 1998, the Gulf of Maine Council presented an award to the Advocates for the North Mill Pond of Portsmouth
for their on-going dedication to the protection, restoration and enhancement of the North Mill Pond estuary, including: an annual
shoreline cleanup, salt marsh restoration through grass planting and mussel seeding, water quality monitoring, storm drain stenciling,
community awareness and outreach, and publication of the study entitled “The State of the North Mill Pond. In 2004, Tricia Miller,
Advocates for the North Mill Pond, was given a Gulf of Maine Council award for her numerous contributions to the work of the
Advocates for the North Mill Pond (Portsmouth) and other seacoast environmental organizations .
Odiorne Point
Rye, New Hamsphire
Coordinates: N43° 02.459 W070° 42.863
Geocaching.com code: GC15NZJ
Type of Cache: Earthcache*
Please use caution and pay attention to the tides!
Predicted tide times and heights:
http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaatidepredictions/viewDailyPredictions.jsp?Stationid=8424601
Near Odiorne Point State Park in Rye, is the drowned forest (sunken forest). A forest of trees extended to the east from
here to the Isles of Shoals and perhaps beyond. Using carbon dating, geologists have determined that 3,400 years ago the
ice-age glaciers had melted enough that the sea-level rose close to its present level, drowning the trees. Trunks and root
systems of the trees may be seen today at low tide in the “Drowned Forest” at the southern rim of the park. The roots of
different coniferous trees (including white pine and
hemlock) are visible at most low tides.
Near this location is the Seacoast Science Center.
Seacoast Science Center is a non-profit marine science
education organization located on the New Hampshire
coast. Since 1992 the Center's programs and exhibits
have informed people, from toddlers to grandparents,
about why a healthy ocean is important. Their mission
is ocean education. “We educate to motivate. We want
everyone to recognize and understand that what we
do every day has an impact on the health of the ocean
and that ocean health impacts our daily lives. A
healthy ocean drives our quality of life today and will
for future generations.”
Learn more about this area:
www.nhstateparks.com/odiorne.html
www.seacoastsciencecenter.org
Karen Provazza
Thank you to: geogirl06 and Davidmnh2 (cache owners)
Passport Question:
 Look around for a green bench under a red cedar tree on the lawn behind you. Whose name is on the bench?
*Please note: This site is also part of the Great Bay Geocache Passport. Download your copy here:
greatbay.org/documents/greatbaypassport.pdf
To log this Earthcache, please visit Geocaching.com for additional tasks or questions to be completed.
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 1991, the Gulf of Maine Council presented an award to the Friends of Odiorne for their efforts at fundraising
and sponsorship of coastal education programs. The University of New Hampshire Maine Docents group also won a Gulf of
Maine council award in 2000. The Docents act as field guides and instructors at the Seacoast Science Center in Rye, and the Sandy
Point Discovery Center in Stratham on Great Bay
Awcomin Marsh
Rye, New Hampshire
Coordinates: N43° 00.170 W070° 45.145
Geocaching.com code: GCXOJX
Type of Cache: Multicache
Awcomin Marsh is located on Route 1A in Rye, directly across from
Rye Harbor Marina and just south of Rye Harbor State Park.
The Awcomin Marsh restoration project began in November 2001 and
aimed to restore 30 acres of salt marsh. During the scope of this
project, fill was removed, appropriate marsh elevations were reestablished, and a new tidal creek system was created. Many people
and organizations were also involved in restoring the marsh
The community was very involved in planting the re-vegetation. In the
summer of 2002, approximately 30 volunteers, scientists and resource
managers worked together to re-vegetate Awcomin Marsh with native
plants. The University of New Hampshire's Jackson Estuarine
Laboratory spearheaded the re-vegetation effort. Though some areas
were re-vegetated with the help of volunteers, much of the marsh is
seeing natural re-vegetation by pioneer salt marsh plants such as
common glasswort (Salicornia europaea) and Atlantic sea blite
(Sueda linearis).
NHDES Coastal Program
Learn more about this area and it restoration:
des.nh.gov/organization/commissioner/pip/factsheets/cp/documents/cp-11.pdf
Thank you to:
Kevin Lucey (NH Dept. of Environmental Services)
Passport Question:
 The telephone pole immediately south of the Awcomin trailhead is numbered (with metal numbers). What is the
three digit number on the bottom row?
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 1994, the Gulf of Maine Council presented an awared to the Awcomin Marsh Restoration Project for its
efforts in protecting 100 acres of wetlands by restring tidal flow in a salt marsh.
Great Bay Discovery Center
Greenland, New Hampshire
Coordinates: N43° 03.355 W070° 53.801
Geocaching.com code: GC16W4R
Type of Cache: Traditional*
Welcome to the Great Bay Discovery Center, education headquarters of the Great Bay National Estuarine Research
Reserve. Come visit this land, where the past meets the present. Walk in the footsteps of the Native People and European
settlers who made these shores their home while living off the bounty of the Bay.
While visiting the reserve, know that you
are just one of many who have been
fortunate enough to benefit from Great
Bay’s abundant natural resources. The
self-guided 1,700-foot boardwalk trail
begins and ends in the upland forest.
Stop at benches along the way to look for
birds, berries and new buds in the
changing habitats. Access the shore at
the boat ramp to see Great Bay up close;
hold a mud-snail in the palm of your
hand, listen to the wing beats of a passing
flock of geese and imagine the journeys
of the old Great Bay gundalow captains
(excerpts above taken with permission
from The Great Bay National Estuarine
Research Reserve geocache passport).
Great Bay Discovery Center
Learn more about this area:
www.greatbay.org/
Thank you to: horseshoe crab (cache owner), Great Bay Discovery Center
Passport Question:
 What is the emblem on the end of the boat shed awning?
*Please note: This site is also part of the Great Bay Geocache Passport. Download your copy here:
greatbay.org/documents/greatbaypassport.pdf
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 2007, the Great Bay Stewards received an award from the Gulf of Maine Council for their dedication to the
long-term protection of Great Bay by supporting education, research and lasting stewardship of the estuary. The University of New
Hampshire Maine Docents group also won a Gulf of Maine council award in 2000. The Docents act as field guides and instructors
at the Seacoast Science Center in Rye, and the Sandy Point Discovery Center in Stratham on Great Bay
Newbury Marsh
Newbury, Massachusetts
Coordinates: N42° 47.840 W070° 49.373
Geocaching.com code: GC3335C
Type of Cache: Earthcache*
Newbury Marsh, part of Great Marsh, is a complex ecosystem comprised of upper and lower marshes, salt pans and
barrier beaches.
Great Marsh is the largest saltwater marsh in New England and the Gulf of Maine and one of the most important coastal
ecosystems in northeastern United States. It is part of the largest contiguous salt marsh north of Long Island, New York.
It extends from southern New Hampshire down the northern coast of Massachusetts and is fed by numerous river
systems including: Merrimack River, Parker River,
Ipswich River, Rowley River and Essex Bay.
The Great Marsh is a globally important foraging and
resting spot for migrating birds along the Atlantic
flyway. The area supports more than 67,000
shorebirds representing 30 species. The
Commonwealth of Massachusetts designated Newbury
Marsh an Area of Critical Concern (ACEC) because of
its quality and uniqueness as well as the significance of
the natural and cultural resources.
Efforts are underway to study the feasibility of eelgrass
(Zostera marina) restoration in Plum Island Sound
which partly protects Newbury Marsh. The area
currently faces several challenges, including the threat
of Phragmites australis, an invasive species that
S. Gersh
spreads rapidly and competes with native plants. This
fragile environment supports local fish and shellfish industry and provides a recreational paradise for kayaking,
canoeing, hiking, boating and birding.
Learn more about this area:
www.whsrn.org/site-profile/great-marsh
Thank you to: roadwanderer (cache owner), Prassede Vella (MA Office of Coastal Zone Management)
Passport Question:
 What type of fish has a catch size limit of 28"?
 What letter corresponds with "Eelgrass" in the list of plants
*Please note: To log this Earthcache, please visit Geocaching.com for additional tasks or questions to be completed.
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: The Gulf of Maine Council, through its Habitat Restoration Grant Program, has funded several restoration projects
within Great Marsh. In 1993, the Merrimack River Watershed Council received an award from the Gulf of Maine Council for its
protection of the Merrimack River and its watershed.
Belle Isle Marsh
East Boston, Massachusetts
Coordinates: N42° 23.508 W070° 59.413
Geocaching.com code: GC48HCH
Type of Cache: Traditional
The 241 acre (97 hectare) Belle Isle Marsh is the largest surviving salt marsh in Boston, a true gem in the midst of the
large urban center. Belle Isle Marsh exemplifies the type of wetlands that once lined the Massachusetts Bay shore and
showcases plants and wildlife now rare to the Metropolitan
area. With saltwater, freshwater, and meadow areas, this
coastal marsh is a critical habitat for diverse wildlife and
vegetation. Tall reeds provide cover for muskrats, opossums,
snapping turtles, and garter snakes, and the grasslands are
home to meadow voles, monarch butterflies, and songbirds.
The protected waters are nurseries to fish and shellfish and are
critical habitat to many salt marsh plants and wildlife rare to
the area.
The marsh has a long history of human use. During the 1600s,
the marshlands were use as pasture land for livestock and the
salt marsh grasses were harvested for hay. By the mid-20th
century, parts of the marsh had been filled and developed with
a few homes, businesses, industrial structures and a fuel tank
farm. The Suffolk Down race track and the Suffolk Downs
Drive-in theatre were also were built on filled marshland. In
1986, a substantial wetland reconditioning program was begun.
In the late 1970s, 152 acres (62 hectares) of the marsh was
acquired from the Massachusetts Port Authority and
established as the Belle Isle Marsh Reservation. The reservation
is administered by the Massachusetts Dept. of Conservation
and Recreation. The public park, which opened in 1985, allows
visitors to stroll along Belle Isle Marsh's winding pathways, sit
quietly and enjoy the natural surroundings, or take in the wide
ocean view from the observation tower. The park is open yearround from 9:00 a.m. to dusk.
Joan Leblanc
Learn more about this area:
www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/dcr/massparks/region-north/belle-isle-marsh-reservation.html
friendsofbelleislemarsh.org/
Thank you to: Bumble! (cache owner), Joan Leblanc (Gulf of Maine Council), Prassede Vella (MA Office of Coastal
Zone Management)
Passport Question:
 How many steps are there going up the tower?
 How many benches are there between the walking bridge and the tower?
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Boston Harbor
Boston, Massachusetts
Coordinates: N42° 21.649 W071° 03.004
Geocaching.com code: N/A
Type of Cache: Virtual*
Boston has long been considered the first and most important trading post in coastal New England. Beginning with the
Northwest fur trade in the 1630s, to the China and East India trades, through the whaling period and Don McKay’s
famous clipper ships of the 1800s, Boston has been used continuously for trade and commerce in New England.
According to the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority: it
was only a little over 20 years ago that Boston Harbor was
known as the “dirtiest harbor in America.” Today, it’s "a Great
American Jewel." The $3.8 billion invested in the treatment
facilities at Deer Island have proven to be a great success and the
harbor clean-up is widely recognized as one of the nation’s
greatest environmental achievements.
Learn more about this area:
bostonharborislands.org/how-island-cache
Thank you to:
Prassede Vella (MA Office of Coastal Zone Management)
Passport Question:
 Name the oldest—and longest—wharf in America—the
historic “nucleus of maritime trade” and take a photo of your
gps on this wharf
William Price
*Please note: This cache is not part of Geocaching.com. It is part of the Island Cache Program and is part of a
separate GeoTour offered by the national park area of Boston Harbor Island.
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 2001, the Gulf of Maine Council presented an award to Vivien Li, who as the executive director of The Boston
Harbor Association, has played a defining role in considering all interests while advocating a clean and accessible waterfront, and has
advanced educational, marine debris clean-up and beach improvement program
Sandy Neck’s Great Marsh
Barnstable, Massachusetts
Coordinates: N41° 43.913 W070° 21.147
Geocaching.com code: GC1058Q
Type of Cache: Traditional
Do not venture into the dunes. Also be careful on the beach during nesting
season and watch for Piping Plover
Sandy Neck saltmarsh is characterized by
sand dunes and coastal thickets. The beach
provides important nesting and feeding
habitat for migrating shorebirds and the
federally threatened piping plover.
Diamondback terrapin turtles also nest and
feed in the dunes and saltmarsh. Sandy Neck
is managed by the Town of Barnstable.
Barnstable Great Marsh is an integral part of
the ecologically significant 3,800 acre (1500
hectare) Sandy Neck salt marsh and barrier
beach system. Along with the expansive salt
marsh views, the sanctuary features two open
ponds, shady oak woodlands, and numerous
wildlife. Three species of owls commonly
inhabit the sanctuary in winter, and five
species of turtles nest there in summer.
Learn more about this area:
www.townofbarnstable.us/Conservation/Trai
lGuides/HikersGuides/Sandy%20Neck%20B
rochure4client.pdf
E. Thomas
Thank you to:
Jeepingino, Nuttman and Buddy the Pug (cache owner), Prassede Vella (MA Office of Coastal Zone Management)
Passport Question:
 What is the animal depicted in the lower left hand corner of the interpretive sign about Sandy Neck’s Great Marsh?
(Hint: see the first sign on the right on the Main Trail)
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 2003, the Gulf of Maine Council’s Habitat Restoration Program awarded grants to the Town of Barnstable and
the Barnstable County Resource Development Office for restoration projects at Bridge Creek Salt Marsh and Sesuit Creek.
Cape Cod Tidal Flats
Brewster, Massachusetts
Coordinates: N41° 46.632 W070° 05.593
Geocaching.com code: GC1E67W
Type of Cache: Earthcache*
Please use caution and pay attention to the tides! The ideal time to search for this
cache is the 2 hour period beginning 1-hour before low tide and ending 1-hour after
the low tide. However, the creeks may still require wading even at low tide.
Predicted tide times and heights:
http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaatidepredictions/viewDailyPredictions.jsp?Stationid=8447241
Cape Cod is the southern end of the Gulf of Maine. The tidal flats of Cape Cod Bay are a unique environment. It is said
that the Brewster Flats are the widest expanse of tidal flats in North America, with only a location in Brazil almost on par.
The presence of tidal flats in the coastal environment is very important to shorebirds and wading birds. The invertebrates
of the flats provide an abundant food source for shorebirds. Adjacent upland and transitional habitats provide areas for
nesting and roosting. Tidal flats are also a source of nitrogen to the ecosystem since the blue-green algae that comprise
the algal mat convert atmospheric nitrogen into nitrogen that can be used by other plants.
Tidal flats are made up of three zones: subtidal, intertidal, and supratidal. The intertidal zone, also known as the
seashore, is the area that is above water at low tide and under water at high tide (in other words, the area between tide
marks). Due to the natural cycles sand channels appear across
the flat. Organisms that live in this area are used to various
extremes harsh sun when dry in the summer, freezing in the
winter, flooded for half the day and wave action moves them
around. The supratidal zone is the area above the high tide.
It is sometimes splashed, but not submerged by ocean water. It
is only flooded during spring or storm tides. This zone is
divided into vegetated and non-vegetated intertidal mud flats
and sand. The non-vegetated part may have algae. The life here
must survive fresh water floods from land and salt splashing
from the ocean. The organisms are also prey to land animals.
Learn more about this area:
www.cctrails.org/lng%20brewbeach.htm
Thank you to: Prassede Vella (MA Office of Coastal Zone
Management)
Weigle
Passport Question:
 Identify at least one type of marine life occupying the tidal flats and submit a photo
 Bonus: Identify the intertidal and supratidal areas using the above info and submit a photo of both
*Please note: To log this Earthcache, please visit Geocaching.com for additional tasks or questions to be completed.
The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment’s (GOMC) 2012-2017 Action
Plan identifies goals for three broad issues that benefit significantly from regional collaboration:
1. Restore and conserve habitat
2. Environmental and human health
3. Sustainable communities
More information on the GOMC, its partners and its activities can be found at www.gulfofmaine.org
Did You Know: In 1999, Maria Burks, Superintendent of the Cape Cod National Seashore, received a Gulf of Maine Council award
for her recognition of the delicate balance between the social, political and environmental aspects of responsible stewardship. In 2013,
the Council also presented an award to Jeremy M. Bell for his exceptional leadership on some of the most complex coastal
restoration projects in New England, including the NOAA stimulus-funded Stony Brook Restoration Project in Brewster, MA and the
NRCS Cape Cod Water Resources Restoration Project. In 2006 and 2007, the Association to Preserve Cape Cod received grants
from the Council’s Habitat Restoration Program for salt marsh and creek restoration and monitoring activities.
PASSPORT:
GULF OF MAINE COUNCIL GEOTOUR
Site
Cape Forchu
Annapolis
Royal Marsh
Grand Pre
Burntcoat
Head
Joggins Fossil
Cliffs
Prov/
State
NS
NS
NS
NS
NS
GPS Location
(Geocode)
N43°47.657
W066°09.288
(GC11K5K)
N44° 44.655
W065° 30.841
(GC11X03)
N45° 06.205
W064° 18.656
N45° 18.679
W063° 48.344
(GC3GVXH)
N45° 41.756
W064° 27.029
(GCN186)
Question
Answer
Points
(Circle)
What is the name of the red boat on the
“Lost to the Sea” interpretive panel?
15
According to the panel “The French
Basin Trail”, what ship visited Port
Royal in 1636?
15
What artist’s painting depicts the
collaborative building of dykes at Grand
Pre during the Acadian Period? (Hint:
read the interpretive panel)
15
BONUS @ Evangeline Beach: What is
the peak period of shorebird migration
for this area? (Hint: read the
interpretive panel)
5
What is the date on the concrete block
near the lighthouse entrance?
15
BONUS: What is written on the brass
plaque on the granite monument next
to the lighthouse?
2
Abraham Gesner (in 1836) said that
“something” turned to stone…..what
was that?
BONUS: In the “evolutionary maze” in
the play space at the Joggins Fossil
Centre we learn about causes of
extinction. How does the maze
communicate the extinction of Sabertooth tigers?
15
2
Sackville
Waterfowl Park
NB
N45° 54.120
W064° 22.000
(GC11F7C)
Mary's Point –
Shepody
National
Wildlife Area
NB
N45° 43.384
W064° 40.29
Fundy National
Park
NB
N45° 35.973
W064° 56.883
(GC54J4Z)
Musquash
Estuary
NB
St George
Gorge
NB
N45˚09.210
W066˚13.745
(GC5789N)
N45° 07.669
W066° 49.548
(GC3JPHC)
Cobscook Bay
State Park
ME
N 44° 50.580
W 067° 09.534
(GC4B1WW)
Colonial
Pemaquid
State Historic
Site
ME
N43° 52.717
W069° 31.311
(GC4B1YH)
Wolfe's Neck
Woods State
Park
ME
N43° 49.246
W070° 04.905
(GC4B1Y0)
What is the structure located at these
coordinates?
15
BONUS: Who is the structure named
after? (Hint: read the commemorative
panel)
2
On the “Grindstone Conservation
Easement” interpretation panel, what
are two birds species represented by
photos?
15
Who lived in the house and what were
they the first of?
15
What colour string is securing the cache
in place?
15
What colour is the railing?
15
According to the educational card and
fun facts hidden in the geocache, how
many bird species can be counted in
this area?
15
What is the name of the ship referred to
in the education sheet hidden in the
Maine State GeoTour cache?
15
In May what might geocachers see
happening with the ospreys? (Hint:
read the interpretive panel)
15
BONUS: Submit a photograph for the
ESIP ICUC project (write date and time
submitted as your answer)
10
N43° 33.942
W070° 22.475
(GC3TVV6)
What two mammals are at the top of
the "life in a Maine salt marsh" sign?
15
BONUS: Submit a photograph for the
ESIP ICUC project (write date and time
submitted as your answer)
10
Scarborough
Marsh
ME
Wells National
Estuarine
Research
Reserve
ME
N43° 19.926
W070° 33.313
(GC2V8TA)
The sign on the railing at this site refers
to which exotic plant that can invade a
marsh when tidal flow is blocked?
15
Bunker Creek
NH
N43° 08.279
W070° 53.250
(GC16W54)
Find the date when Valentine Bunker
died
15
North Pill Pond
NH
N43° 04.291
W070° 46.343
(GC34HAH)
What school is specifically mentioned,
on the interpretive panel, for its help in
restoration efforts such as reseeding
ribbed mussel beds?
15
Odiorne Point
NH
N43° 02.459
W070° 42.863
(GC15NZJ)
Look around for a green bench under a
red cedar tree on the lawn behind you.
Whose name is inscribed on it?
15
Awcomin
Marsh
NH
N43° 00.170
W070° 45.145
(GCXOJX)
The telephone pole immediately south
of the Awcomin trailhead is numbered
(with metal numbers). What is the
three digit number on the bottom row?
15
Great Bay
Discovery
Center
NH
N43° 03.355
W070° 53.801
(GC16W4R)
What is the emblem on the end of the
boat shed awning?
15
What type of fish has a size limit of 28"?
15
MA
N42° 47.840
W070° 49.373
(GC3335C)
BONUS: What letter corresponds with
"Eelgrass" in the list of plants?
2
Newbury
Marsh
Belle Isle
Marsh
MA
N42° 23.508
W070° 59.413
(GC48HCH)
How many steps are there going up the
tower?
How many benches are there between
the walking bridge and the tower?
15
2
Boston Harbor
Sandy Neck’s
Great Marsh
Cape Cod Tidal
Flats
MA
N42° 21.649
W071° 03.004
Name the oldest—and longest—wharf
in America—the historic “nucleus of
maritime trade.” Take a photo of your
GPS on this wharf
15
MA
N41° 43.913
W070° 21.147
(GC1058Q)
What is the animal depicted in the
lower left hand corner of the
interpretive sign about Sandy Neck’s
Great Marsh? (Hint: The first sign on
the right on the Main Trail)
15
Identify at least one type of marine life
occupying the tidal flats and submit a
photo
15
BONUS: Identify the intertidal and
supratidal areas using the above info
and submit photos of both
5
MA
N41° 46.632
W070° 05.593
(GC1E67W)
Subtotal
Total points from all sites visited and questions/tasks completed
One Time Bonus
Site found and visited in one or more provinces or states, or in the other country.
Total
Subtotal plus One Time Bonus (if applicable)
25
To earn a limited edition Gulf of Maine Council 25th Anniversary Geocoin, your goal is to accumulate 100 points.
Once you have visited enough sites and completed enough questions/tasks to total 100 points, email a copy of the passport with your
answers to [email protected]
Don’t forget to include your mailing address.
Once we have verified your answers, a geocoin will be mailed to you.*
When you receive your geocoin, visit www.gulfomaine.org/geocache for information on how to activate it.
*Geocoins will be awarded in the order the passports are received, while supplies last. The Gulf of Maine Council is not responsible for passports that are lost in the mail.
The Gulf of Maine Council reserves the right to limit or revise this offer at any time. Additional terms and condition may apply.
Disclaimer:
To participate in the Gulf of Maine Council GeoTour, users may register at Geocaching.com, which is
a third party website owned operated by Groundspeak, Inc. which is the primary facilitator for the
Geocaching community worldwide. Please be advised that Geocaching.com / Groundspeak Terms of
Service (http://www.geocaching.com/about/termsofuse.aspx) and Privacy Statement
(http://www.geocaching.com/about/privacypolicy.aspx) applies to your use of these services. The links
to Geocaching.com are provided for participation and informational purposes only, and they do not
indicate the Gulf of Maine Council’s endorsement, sponsorship of, or affiliation with Geocaching.com
or Groundspeak Inc. or content of those websites, including any advertisements that may be posted.
The Gulf of Maine Council, nor any individual member or organization of the GOMC or any volunteer
who has contributed to this GeoTour, has no control over, makes no representation or warranty and
bears no responsibility for the accuracy, legality or content of the externally linked sites.
Any person or entity that participates in the Gulf of Maine Council GeoTour does so at his or her own
risk. Geocaching, hiking, backpacking and other outdoor activities involve risk to both persons and
property. There are many variables including, but not limited to, weather, fitness level, terrain features
and outdoor experience, that must be considered prior to seeking or placing a cache. Be prepared for
your journey and be sure to check the current weather and conditions, as well as tide times and
heights, before heading outdoors. Always exercise common sense and caution. Cache seekers
assume all risks involved in seeking a cache.
Individual geocaches are owned by the person(s) who physically placed the geocache and/or
submitted the geocache listing to geocaching.com. This GeoTour uses existing geocaches and
assumes that the individuals who have places the geocaches have done so with the knowledge and
permission of the property owner and have followed the rules, requirements and guidelines from
Geocaching.com (http://www.geocaching.com/about/guidelines.aspx)
Acknowledgements:
Many thanks to the people and organizations were involved in the creation of the Gulf of Maine
Council GeoTour. In particular, we would like to extend a special thank you to the individual geocache
owners, who have kindly given us permission to use their caches as part of the GeoTour and to those
individuals, who helped prepare site write-ups, provided site specific questions or supplied site photos
(see the 1-page write ups for those who provided assistance). In addition, we would like to extend
thank you to the following people, who without their help, this project would not have been completed:
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Gulf of Maine Institute, and specifically Dan Earle
Nova Scotia Department of Environment, and specifically Sophia Foley and Chuck Sangster
Environment Canada, and specifically Kathryn Parlee
US Geological Survey