GREAT APES & US

SHARING
FORESTS
GREAT APES & US
2
SHARING FORESTS
THE GREAT APES AND US
3
A WORD FROM
GRASP
The Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP) is a unique alliance of 98
national governments, conservation organizations, research institutions,
United Nations (U.N.) agencies, and private companies committed to the
long-term protection of great apes and their habitats in Africa and Asia.
Protected areas comprise a
tiny fraction of the equatorial
landscape across Africa and
Asia, yet they are vital to the
conservation of great apes.
From rainforests in the Congo
Basin to the rich peat swamps
of Sumatra, the six projects
managed by the Great Apes
Survival Partnership (GRASP)
on behalf of the Spain-UNEP
Partnership for Protected Areas
in Support of LifeWeb helped to
conserve some of the earth’s
rarest species and most fragile
habitats.
LifeWeb is based upon a simple
fact: many of the world’s most
precious biodiversity hotspots
lie in countries burdened with a
lack of capacity and governance.
Finding a way to raise the
benefits for livelihoods and
ecosystems in those nations is
the key, which in turn raises the
social and economic value of
biodiversity.
Through LifeWeb’s revolutionary
approach to global health,
GRASP was able to promote
protected areas conservation
and community development
through technical, educational,
and financial assistance. As a
result, chimpanzees, gorillas, and
orangutans became drivers of
engagement and change.
More than 1 billion people
globally depend on protected
areas for their livelihoods. The
Spain-UNEP LifeWeb initiative
promoted human development
even as it protected ecosystem
health, striking a unique balance
that should conserve the planet’s
natural assets for current and
future generations.
GRASP was founded in 2001 by the UN Environment
Programme (UNEP), which co-hosts the Secretariat with
the UN Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization
(UNESCO). GRASP managed six projects under the
Spain-UNEP LifeWeb Partnership from 2011-2014,
each of which emphasized community engagement to
support great ape conservation. GRASP works regularly
to conserve chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and
bonobos at the highest political levels by focusing
on issues like illegal trade, habitat loss, disease
monitoring, sustainable development, and transboundary
collaboration.
©Flickr/Reflexiste
PROGRAMME COORDINATOR
Doug Cress
PROJECT MANAGER
2 INTRODUCTION
Dr. Johannes Refisch
GRASP emphasized community engagement
and local support in order to promote great ape
conservation.
COPY, LAYOUT, DESIGN
Laura Darby
3 ABOUT GRASP
Michael Omare
Julien Simery
6 ABOUT LIFEWEB
7 TAKAMANDA
RESERVE
Cameroon’s newest park offered GRASP
and the Wildlife Conservation Society an
opportunity to focus on UN-REDD benefits to
preserve the habitat of Africa’s rarest ape: the
Cross River gorilla.
8 KAHUZI-BIEGA
NATIONAL PARK
Grauer’s gorillas, chimpanzees, and other
endangered wildlife were central to the
community support GRASP and the Wildlife
Conservation Society emphasized in eastern
Democratic Republic of Congo.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF
9 GARAMBA
NATIONAL PARK
GRASP and the African Parks Foundation
worked to conserve endangered species
such as chimpanzees and elephants in the
Democratic Republic of Congo in one of
Africa’s oldest parks.
12 NOUABALE-NDOKI
NATIONAL PARK &
LOSSI FAUNA RESERVE
The Wildlife Conservation Society worked
with GRASP to promote human health and
community engagement in the last stronghold
of Western Lowland gorillas, which is also
home to the naive chimpanzees of Goualougo
Triangle in the Republic of Congo.
SHARING FORESTS
GREAT APES & US
Great ape conservation focuses on forests, but also
increasingly on the communities that depend on those
forests for survival. Through emphasis upon local
engagement, LifeWeb projects promoted capacity,
governance, and sustainability in Protected Areas to
conserve apes and other endangered species.
18 GUNUNG LEUSER
NATIONAL PARK
GRASP and UNESCO collaborated to
counter development pressure and promote
reforestation in one of Indonesia’s largest
Protected Areas, home to orangutans, tigers,
rhinos, and elephants.
Flickr/Reflexiste
CIFOR
Julien Simery
Johannes Refisch
Joe McKenna
Flickr/Yasa
Bobby Padavick
Ian Redmond
Flickr/Wildcatsff
OFFICE
United Nations Environment
Programme (UNEP)
PO Box 30552
Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: +254 20 762 6712
info@un-grasp.org
www.un-grasp.org
@graspunep
6
SHARING FORESTS
THE GREAT APES AND US
PROJECT
IMPLEMENTATION
© Nuria Ortega
The Spain-UNEP Partnership for Protected Areas in support of LifeWeb initiative is a joint
contribution to improve the impact and effectiveness of both new and existing Protected Areas,
recognizing them as a key tool for biodiversity conservation. Spain, through a strategic partnership
with UNEP, provided $8 million USD to support Protected Areas through direct management support
and enhanced enabling conditions such as support to policy processes, stakeholder participation,
and increased awareness of the benefits for livelihoods and ecosystems.
TAKAMANDA
FOREST
RESERVE
These forests are home to significant populations of Cross
River gorillas – the world’s rarest great ape, with a population
estimated at no more than 300 -- along with endangered forest
elephants, chimpanzees, and mandrills.
The Takamanda National Park in
Cameroon lies along the western
border with Nigeria and features
high biological diversity.
WILDLIFE
CONSERVATION
SOCIETY
www.wcs.org
AFRICAN PARKS
NETWORK
UNESCO
www.african-parks.org
www.unesco.org
United Nations Educational,
Scientific, and Cultural Organisation
Habitat destruction and hunting
represented the biggest threats
to Cross River gorillas. Genetic
analysis of the population
revealed a reduction in gorilla
numbers over the last 200
years that is most likely due to
hunting, and the fragmentation
of the forest habitat is caused
by farming, road-building,
and the burning of forests by
pastoralists.
The Spain-UNEP LifeWeb project
conducted a REDD (Reduced
Emissions from Deforestation
and Degradation) feasibility
study to assess the value of
carbon stocks in the forest,
and evaluated rates of land
use change and development.
Initial results indicated that
revised models of land-use could
dramatically reduce harmful
carbon dioxide emissions in
Takamanda by as much as 5 ½
million tonnes over the next 20
years.
©Flickr/CIFOR
7
THE GREAT APES AND US
In a country troubled by decades
of civil war and corruption, the
conservation and protection of
biodiversity can be a daunting task.
The Democratic Republic of Congo
– despite some of the richest
forest ecosystems on the planet - is
a sharp illustration of that reality.
“Before we created the conservation
communities, we would go mostly to
the forest to extract resources, including
bamboo and charcoal, and we would poach.”
--- Oscar Maregani
(Bougobe Community, DR Congo)
The two LifeWeb projects in
the Garamba and Kahuzi-Biega
National Parks, in the eastern part
of DR Congo, proved that involving
communities and local populations
in the protection of their natural
habitats can have long-lasting,
positive social and economical
impacts, while contributing to the
protection of charismatic species,
including the critically endangered
Grauer’s gorilla.
©Joe McKenna
KAHUZIBIEGA
NATIONAL
PARK
Microcredit loans have
made it possible for
villagers to live without
taking from the forest
realised that law enforcement
was only part of the solution to
address their problems. By using
conflict-sensitive approaches for
the rehabilitation of the Nindja
corridor in Kahuzi-Biega, the
LifeWeb project strengthened
dialogue between park managers
and local communities and created
alternative livelihoods opportunities
such as farming and ecotourism, to
reduce reliance on forest resources.
In total, 180 people abandoned
illegal activities and now manage
small-scale businesses through
© Nuria Ortega
In Kahuzi-Biega, park authorities
9
GARAMBA
NATIONAL PARK
JULIA
TIBALANGE
Microcredit farmer
Through a loan provided by the
LifeWeb project, Julia Tibalange
has a thriving farm that enables
her to give up exploiting
resources from the national park
a micro-credit programme. Illegal
activities, such as hunting, dropped
by 40 percent in the corridor and
the project was able to regain 23
square kilometers of land through
voluntary resettlement.
In Garamba, better road access and
new infrastructure developments,
such as schools and health
facilities, directly provided active
support to populations and
helped implement community
conservation and environmental
education programmes. Local
communities benefit greatly from
living near a protected area, which
creates an environment more
conducive to positive change for
the future.
Communities receive improved
healthcare from the new clinic
at Garamba National Park, built
with support from the LifeWeb
project
10
SHARING FORESTS
THE GREAT APES AND US
A local schoolteacher in the
communities surrounding Virunga
National Park in Rwanda
11
SHARING FORESTS
THE GREAT APES AND US
Nouabalé-Ndoki is
the last stronghold of
the Western Lowland
gorilla
The Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park
(NNNP), located in the Republic
of Congo, is a rare example of an
intact forest, and is one of the last
remaining strongholds for Western
Lowland gorillas. It is also home
to some of the last populations
of “naive” chimpanzees in the
Goualougo Triangle, who do not
exhibit fear towards human visitors.
This area is not only a regionally
and globally important area for
biodiversity, but has been a model
for collaboration and sustainable
approaches to the conservation of
wildlife and wild places.
NOUABALE
NDOKI
NATIONAL
PARK
Bomassa, previously a major
center for poachers in the area,
and now an engaged community
that facilitated the very creation
of NNNP. Many hunters are
now employed as game guards,
maintenance staff, and forest
guides.
With support from LifeWeb,
GRASP partnered with the
Wildlife Conservation Society to
increase the capacity of these
eco-guards, and established and
conducted new protocols for
anti-poaching patrols. WCS also
established preventative health
and safety regulations to ensure
the sustainability of the ecotourism
project there, one that greatly
contributes to the livelihoods
and investment of the people of
Bomassa.
Western Lowland Gorilla at
Noubalé-Ndoki National Park
(NNNP)
Eco-Guards at NNNP
©Johannes Refisch
Local communities benefit directly from the development
of ecotourism, and visitor fees contribute to the well-being
of the village
13
The closest village to NNNP is
©Johannes Refisch
12
©Flickr/Wildcatsff
14
SHARING FORESTS
JUST
LIKE US
Young chimpanzees like the one pictured here live with
their families and spend their days playing and feeding
THE GREAT APES AND US
15
SHARING FORESTS
WORD
SEARCH
AFRICA
APE
ASIA
BONOBO
CAMEROON
CARBON
CHIMPANZEE
COMMUNITY
CONGO
CONSERVATION
ECOSYSTEM
EDUCATION
FOREST
GORILLA
HABITAT
INDONESIA
ORANGUTAN
©Bobby Padavick
16
©Julien Simery
A wild infant orangutan
in Gunung Leuser
National Park, Sumatra
GUNUNG
LEUSER
NATIONAL
PARK
In the last 35 years alone, Sumatra has lost over 50% of its forest
cover and 90% of its orangutan population, due to agricultural
encroachment and logging, some of it conducted illegally.
Orangutans once thrived on the
island of Sumatra, but experts
estimate the current wild
population to be no more than
6,600 individuals. The conservation
and management of Protected
Areas has been a challenge for park
authorities and local communities,
who previously had a low sense of
ownership over the management of
parks.
Two-thirds of the orangutan
habitat is situated within the
Leuser Ecosystem and Gunung
Leuser National Park in the
two northernmost provinces of
Sumatra: Aceh, and North Sumatra.
With LifeWeb funding, UNESCO
has been able to work with park
authorities and local conservation
organisations to improve the
management of the park, restore
degraded forest areas, and engage
with local communities to turn
conservation and protection of
nature into opportunities.
Local people are taught how to create their own organic
gardens, helping them to find sustainable and ecofriendly livelihoods outside of tourism, which can be a
fragile industry, or oil palm, which can be damaging.
PANUT
HADISISWOYO
Senior researcher,
organic farming project (right)
The villages in the buffer zone
of the Gunung Leuser National
Park subsist mostly from farming,
including oil palm, rubber, and
fruit. One such village, Tangkahan,
realised its potential for tourism
and now offers a range of naturebased activities, such as forest
hikes, elephant treks, river rafting,
and visits to caves. The LifeWeb
project encouraged the initiative
by providing support to improve
ecotourism planning, helping
to promote Tangkahan as an
ecotourism destination through
the development of promotional
videos, books, and the Tangkahan
website, and creating new incomegenerating activities. Villagers
benefit greatly from ecotourism
and it helped make them more ecoconscious, reducing poaching and
other illegal activities in the park.
THE GREAT APES AND US
15 FACTS
ABOUT
GREAT APES
DARK
FUTURE
OLD
TIMERS
Every species
of great ape
is listed as
“endangered” or
“critically endangered”
The average
lifespan of great
apes varies from
35 to 50 years in the
wild
7
No great apes
have a tail
-- if you see a
primate that has a tail,
it is a monkey!
3
FLANGED
MALES
Male
orangutans
grow a beard
and moustache when
they become adults,
some male orangutans
also grow “flanged”
cheek pads
1
FIVE
SPECIES
“Great Apes”
refer to the four
great apes we
know -- chimpanzees,
gorillas, bonobos,
and orangutans -- but
the fifth great ape is
HUMANS!
2
CHIMPANZEES
Chimpanzees
share more DNA
with humans—
about 98.6%—than they
do with gorillas
4
12
TOOL
MAKERS
GRACEFUL
BONOBO
NO
MONKEYS
MOTHERLY
LOVE
Great apes and
their infants
share incredibly
close bonds. Infants
usually are not weaned
from their mother’s
milk until they are 4 or 5
years of age
5
Great apes can
grasp things
with their hands
like people, but they can
use their feet too!
8
6
LEADING
LADIES
Some of the
very first great
ape researchers
were women - Jane
Goodall, Dian Fossey,
and Biruté Galdikas
pioneered the field in the
1960’s
10
PASS
IT ON
GORILLA
NOSES
Every
gorilla has
a distinctive
nose print
-- scientists
Bonobos look
so much like
chimpanzees
that they used to
be called “pygmy
chimpanzees”. They may
look similar but they
behave very differently!
For a long time,
many people
believed that
humans were the only
primates who made and
used tools, until Jane
14
9
GRASPING
HANDS
studying them in the wild
use nose prints to tell
individual gorillas apart
21
Great apes
are one of the
most intelligent
animals on earth. They
can learn and pass
information to other
apes
11
BIG, BIGGER,
BIGGEST
The male gorilla
is the largest
great ape with
an average weight of
172 kilos (380 pounds)
13
Goodall discovered that
chimpanzees did as well!
We now know that all
great apes make and use
tools
LIVING
SOCIAL
15
Great apes live in
different social
structures.
Gorillas live in small
groups with a single
31
adult male as leader,
while chimpanzees
and bonobos live in
large social groups, and
orangutans are solitary
PRIMATE
PUZZLER
SOLUTION
Did you find all
the words in this
conservation
conundrum?
LIFE WITH
PARADISE | HIDDEN | LOW WORKSPACE | TANGGUL MENTANOI
BEST
NATURE
10
BEST
DESTINATION
uisque auctor, lacus sed fermentum volutpat,
neque nisl rhoncus nisi, ac vulputate libero
AMAZING
FOREST
PARTAGER
NOS FÔRETS
uisque auctor, lacus sed fermentum volutpat,
neque nisl rhoncus nisi, ac vulputate libero
LES GRANDS SINGES ET NOUS
8
TH
Partenariat Espagne-PNUE pour les Aires Protégées en soutien à LifeWeb
24
PARTAGER NOS FÔRETS
EN SAVOIR PLUS SUR
GRASP
Le Partenariat pour la Survie des Grands Singes (GRASP) est une alliance
unique de nations partenaires, d’instituts de recherche, d’agences des
Nations Unies, d’organisations dédiées à la préservation de l’environnement,
et de sponsors issus du secteur privé, travaillant ensemble pour protéger
les grands singes et leurs habitats en Afrique et en Asie.
Le GRASP travaille au plus
haut niveau politique pour la
conservation des chimpanzés,
gorilles, orangs-outans et bonobos
sur des problématiques variées
telles que le trafic illégal, la perte
des habitats, le suivi des maladies,
le développement durable, et la
collaboration transfrontalière.
Le GRASP a été créé en 2001 par
le Programme des Nations Unies
pour l’Environnement (PNUE),
qui tient le Secrétariat du GRASP
conjointement avec l’Organisation
des Nations unies pour l’éducation,
la science et la culture (UNESCO).
six projets sous l’égide du
Partenariat Espagne-PNUE pour
les aires protégées en soutien à
LifeWeb, qui se concentrent sur
l’engagement des communautés
pour la conservation des grands
singes. Ces projets sont conduits
au Congo, au Cameroun, en
République Démocratique du
Congo, et en Indonésie, et mettent
en avant les modes d’existence
alternatifs, les services de santé
pour les communautés, et de
meilleures techniques d’utilisation
des terres pour diminuer la
pression sur les habitats des
grands singes.
Le GRASP a été créé en 2001 par le Programme des
Nations Unies pour l’Environnement (PNUE), qui assure le
Secrétariat du GRASP conjointement avec l’Organisation
des Nations unies pour l’éducation, la science et la
culture (UNESCO). Depuis 2011, le GRASP gère six projets
sous l’égide du Partenariat Espagne-PNUE pour les aires
protégées en soutien à LifeWeb. Chacun d’eux met en
avant l’engagement des communautés pour soutenir
la conservation des grands singes. Le GRASP travaille
au plus haut niveau politique pour la conservation des
chimpanzés, gorilles, orangs-outans et bonobos sur des
problématiques variées telles que le trafic illégal, la perte
des habitats, le suivi des maladies, le développement
durable, et la collaboration transfrontalière.
Certaines activités récentes du
GRASP incluent la publication du
rapport ‘Singes volés’, le premier
rapport sur le commerce illégal
de grands singes; l’annonce
des lauréats du prix GRASP-Ian
Redmond pour la conservation
au Cameroun, Nigéria, et en
Indonésie; et le lancement de
l’application mobile apeAPP.
Depuis 2011, le GRASP gère
©Flickr/Reflexiste
COORDONATEUR DE PROGRAMME
Doug Cress
24
CHARGÉ DE PROJET
INTRODUCTION
Dr. Johannes Refisch
Le GRASP met l’accent sur l’engagement auprès
des communautés et sur le soutien local afin de
promouvoir la conservation des grands singes.
EDITION, MISE EN PAGE ET DESIGN
A PROPOS DU
25 GRASP
Partenariat Espagne-PNUE pour les Aires Protégées en soutien à LifeWeb
Le plus récent des parc camerounais a offert
l’opportunité au GRASP et à la Société pour
la Conservation de la Vie sauvage (WCS) de
tirer avantage du programme ONU-REDD pour
préserver l’habitat du plus rare des singes
d’Afrique, le gorille de la rivière Cross.
30 PARC NATIONAL DE
KAHUZI-BIÉGA
Les gorilles des plaines orientales, les
chimpanzés et d’autres espèces sauvages
en voie de disparition ont été au centre des
efforts de soutien aux communautés fournis
par le GRASP et le WCS dans l’Est de la
République Démocratique du Congo.
Michael Omare
Julien Simery
A PROPOS DE
28 LIFEWEB
29 RÉSERVE DE
TAKAMANDA
Laura Darby
CRÉDITS PHOTOGRAPHIQUES
31 PARC NATIONAL DE
GARAMBA
Le GRASP et la Fondation des Parcs Africains
ont travaillé pour conserver des espèces
en danger, tels que les chimpanzés et les
éléphants, dans l’un des plus vieux parcs
d’Afrique en République Démocratique du
Congo.
34 PARC NATIONAL DE
NOUABALÉ-NDOKI ET LA
RÉSERVE DE FAUNE DE
LOSSI
Le WCS a collaboré avec le GRASP pour
promouvoir l’accès à des services de santé
et engager les communautés locales dans
le dernier bastion des gorilles de plaine de
l’ouest et les chimpanzés naïfs du triangle de
Goualougo en République du Congo.
PARTAGER NOS FÔRETS:
LES GRANDS SINGES & NOUS
La conservation des grands singes se concentre sur les
forêts, mais aussi de plus en plus sur les communautés qui
dépendent de ces forêts pour leur subsistence. En mettant
l’accent l’engagement local, les projets LifeWeb promeuvent
le développement des capacités, une meilleure gouvernance
et une meilleure durabilité des aires protégées pour conserver
grands singes et autres espèces en danger.
40 PARC NATIONAL DE
GUNUNG LEUSER
Le GRASP et l’UNESCO ont collaboré pour réduire les
pressions dues au développement et promouvoir la
restoration de l’une des plus grandes aires protégées
d’Indonésie, qui habrite des orangs-outans, des tigres,
des rhinocéros et des éléphants.
Flickr/Reflexiste
CIFOR
Julien Simery
Johannes Refisch
Joe McKenna
Flickr/Yasa
Bobby Padavick
Ian Redmond
Flickr/Wildcatsff
BUREAU
Programme des Nations Unies
pour l’Environnement (PNUE)
PO Box 30552
Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: +254 20 762 6712
info@un-grasp.org
www.un-grasp.org
@graspunep
28
PARTAGER NOS FÔRETS
IMPLÉMENTATION
DES PROJETS
LifeWeb est une initiative du gouvernement espagnol pour améliorer l’impact et l’efficacité
des Aires Protégées, anciennes et nouvelles, en reconnaissant leurs rôle moteur dans la
conservation de la biodiversité. Grâce à un partenariat stratégique avec le PNUE, LifeWeb a
dédié 7.2 millions de dollars US pour soutenir des Aires protégées avec un soutien direct à la
gestion et l’amélioration des conditions, tels que l’amélioration des processus de gestion, la
participation des parties prenantes et une meilleure sensibilisation des bénéfices pour les modes
de subsistances et les écosystèmes.
RÉSERVE
FORESTIÈRE DE
TAKAMANDA
© Nuria Ortega
Ces forêts habritent une population importante de gorilles de
la rivière Cross, le grand singe le plus rare avec une population
estimée à 300 individus, mais aussi d’autres espèces en danger
dont des éléphants de forêt, des chimpanzés, et des mandrills.
WILDLIFE
CONSERVATION
SOCIETY
www.wcs.org
AFRICAN PARKS
NETWORK
www.african-parks.org
UNESCO
Organisation des Nations Unies
pour l’éducation, la science et la
culture
www.unesco.org
Le parc national de Takamanda au
Cameroun se situe à la frontière
ouest avec le Nigeria et présente
une riche diversité biologique.
La destruction des habitats
et la chasse représentent les
plus grandes menaces pour le
gorille de la rivière Cross. Des
analyses génétiques conduites
sur les populations ont révélé une
réduction du nombre de gorilles
ces 200 dernières années, à cause
de la chasse, la fragmentation des
habitats forestiers, la construction
de routes, et le brûlage des forêts
par les pastoralistes.
Le projet LifeWeb de l’Espagne et
du PNUE a conduit une étude de
faisabilité basée sur une approche
REDD (réduction des émissions
liées à la déforestation et à la
dégradation des forêts) pour une
évaluation de la valeur en carbone
des forêts, et déterminer le taux de
changement d’utilisation des terres.
Les résultats initiaux indiquent que
les modèles révisés d’utilisation des
terres pourraient réduire de façon
drastique les émissions nocives de
dioxide de carbone de Takamanda
de plus de 5,5 millions de tonnes
sur les 20 prochaines années.
©Flickr/CIFOR
LES GRANDES SINGES ET NOUS
“Avant de former les comités de
conservation communautaires, les gens
d’ici allaient dans la forêt pour en soutirer
les ressources, entre autres les bambous,
la braise, et donc on faisait le braconnage.”
Oscar Maregani (Représentant des habitants
de Bougobé, RD Congo)
Pourtant, deux projets LifeWeb dans
les parcs nationaux de Garamba
et Kahuzi-Biega, dans la partie
est de la RD Congo, prouvent que
l’engagement des communautés
et des populations locales dans
la protection de leurs habitats
naturels peut avoir des impacts
sociaux-économiques durables
tout en contribuant à la protection
d’espèces charismatiques, tel que le
Gorille des plaines orientales.
PARC
NATIONAL DE
KAHUZI
BIEGA
©Joe McKenna
À Kahuzi-Biega, les autorités du parc
Les micro-crédits ont
permis aux villageois de
vivre sans puiser dans la
forêt.
national se sont rendu compte que
l’application des lois n’était qu’une
partie de la solution pour résoudre
les problèmes du parc. En utilisant
des approches prenant en compte
la résolution des conflits dans le
couloir naturel de Ningja à KahuziBiega, le projet LifeWeb a permis
de renforcer le dialogue entre
les gestionnaires du parc et les
communautés locales et a permis
de créer de nouvelles opportunités
de revenus, comme l’agriculture
et l’écotourisme, pour réduire la
dépendance aux ressources tirées
des forêts. Au total, 180 personnes
ont abandonné leurs activités
illégales pour créer des petites
PARC NATIONAL DE
GARAMBA
© Nuria Ortega
Dans un pays ravagé par des
décénnies de guerre civile et de
corruption, la conservation et
la protection de la biodiversité
sont des tâches particulièrement
laborieuses. La République
Démocratique du Congo - bien
qu’elle compte certains des
écosystèmes les plus riches de la
planète - est une illustration parfaite
de cette réalité.
31
JULIA
TIBALANGE
Fermière bénéficiant d’un microcrédit:
Grâce au prêt obtenu avec le
projet LifeWeb, la ferme de Julia
Tibalange est en plein essor ce
qui lui permet de ne plus exploiter
les ressources du parc national.
entreprises grâce à un programme
de micro-crédit. Les activités
illégales, telles que la chasse, ont
baissé de 40% dans le couloir et le
projet a permis de regagner 23 km2
de terres grâce à des relogements
volontaires.
À Garamba, les améliorations à
l’accés routier et le développement
de nouvelles infrastructures, comme
des écoles et des centres de
santé, ont directement soutenu les
populations et aidé à implémenter
des programmes d’éducation sur
l’environnement et la conservation
par les communautés. Les
communautés locales bénéficient
largement du fait qu’elles se
situent dans les environs d’une Aire
Protégée, ce qui en retour permet
de créer un environnement plus
favorable à la conservation.
Parc national de Garamba: Les
communautés reçoivent de meilleurs
services de santé dans la nouvelle
clinique du Parc national de Garamba,
construit avec le soutien du projet
LifeWeb.
32
AfricanFORESTS
Parks est une organisation non lucrative qui
SHARING
prend en charge la réhabilitation et la gestion à long
terme de parcs nationaux et autres Aires Protégées en
partenariat avec des gouvernements africains.
Sécuriser sept des derniers havres de vie sauvage en Afrique
THE GREAT APES AND US
33
LES GRANDES SINGES ET NOUS
Noubalé-Ndoki est le
dernier bastion des
gorilles des plaines de
l’ouest.
Le parc national de Nouabalé-Ndoki
en République du Congo est l’une
des rares forêts restées intactes,
et il s’agit du dernier bastion des
gorilles des plaines de l’ouest. La
forêt abrite également les dernières
populations de chimpanzés dit
‘naïfs’ du triangle de Goualougo
et qui n’expriment pas de peur à
la vue des visiteurs. Cet endroit
est non seulement important pour
sa biodiversité au niveau régional
et global, mais aussi il a été un
modèle pour la collaboration et
la mise en place d’approches
durables pour la conservation des
espèces et des espaces sauvages.
PARC
NATIONAL DE
NOUABALE
NDOKI
Les communautés locales bénéficient directement du
développement de l’écotourisme, et les droits de visite
contribuent directement au bien-être du village.
Bomassa est le village le plus
proche du parc, il s’agissait
Gorilles des plaines de l’ouest au
parc national de Nouabalé-Ndoki.
35
auparavant d’un lieu de
rassemblement pour les
braconniers de la région. Grâce
à au soutien des communautés,
il a finalement permis de faciliter
la création du parc national.
La plupart des chasseurs sont
maintenant employés en tant que
gardes de chasse, employés pour
la maintenance du parc ou comme
guides pour les visiteurs.
Avec le soutien de LifeWeb, le
GRASP est entré en partenariat
avec la Société pour la
Conservation de la Vie sauvage
(WCS) pour améliorer la capacité
des éco-gardes et établir et
mettre en place de nouveaux
protocoles pour les patrouilles
anti-braconnage. La WCS a
aussi mis en place des mesures
préventives de santé et de sûreté
pour assurer la pérennité du projet
d’écotourisme, qui a grandement
contribué aux sources de revenus
et aux investissements des gens de
Bomassa.
Des éco-gardes du parc
national de NouabaléNdoki.
©Johannes Refisch
PARTAGER NOS FÔRETS
©Johannes Refisch
34
©Julien Simery
36
PARTAGER NOS FÔRETS
VIVRE
ENSEMBLE
Les communautés vivant autour des Aires protégées
ont une relations avec les forêts qui n’est pas forcément
durables lorsques ces communautés s’agrandissent.
Trouver des modes de vie alternatifs n’aident pas
seulement les grands singes, mais permet aussi à ces
communautés de prospérer.
LES GRANDES SINGES ET NOUS
Les communautés
habitant dans les
environs de la région
des volcans aux
Virungas vivent à
côté des gorilles des
montagnes, la deuxième
espèces de grands
singes la plus en danger
37
38
SHARING FORESTS
MOTS
MÉLANGÉS
10/30/2014
Word Search Generator :: Make your own printable word searches @ A to Z Teacher Stuff
MAKE YOUR OWN WORKSHEETS ONLINE @ WWW.ATOZTEACHERSTUFF.COM
NAME:_______________________________ DATE:_____________
X
L
F
V
R
P
C
O
N
G
O
Y
O
G
I
V
B
E
Z
Z
G
A
A
E
N
B
R
E
R
N
E
O
C
I
S
C
S
H
M
J
Y
A
C
C
D
AFRIQUE
ASIE
BONOBO
CAMEROUN
CARBONE
CHIMPANZE
D
G
O
D
I
A
I
B
R
E
Q
O
O
C
O
U
C
S
G
N
R
E
C
W
B
R
N
F
F
N
C
H
Y
O
G
B
S
C
Z
A
S
O
A
Z
E
A
I
S
R
E
O
E
W
N
E
R
F
U
U
S
T
M
T
I
N
N
Y
G
R
E
R
H
H
N
I
I
P
E
L
T
E
O
V
T
I
F
B
A
R
E
COMMUNAUTE
CONGO
CONSERVATION
ECOSYSTEME
EDUCATION
FORET
O
A
M
L
V
U
A
L
Q
I
X
O
B
D
G
N
N
E
E
T
T
L
U
U
N
W
N
I
Y
R
S
Z
I
A
I
G
E
W
T
S
I
O
T
T
R
F
E
N
O
L
L
H
N
K
U
Y
B
A
Z
V
V
G
N
O
A
C
J
K
H
J
Y
O
T
B
R
GORILLE
HABITAT
INDONESIE
ORANGOUTAN
SINGE
AFRIQUE
ASIE
BONOBO
CAMEROUN
CARBONE
CHIMPANZE
COMMUNAUTE
CONGO
CONSERVATION
ECOSYSTEME
EDUCATION
FORET
GORILLE
HABITAT
INDONESIE
ORANGO
SINGE
©Bobby Padavick
La Société pour la conservation de la vie sauvage préserve la faune et les espaces sauvages
dans le monde entier. Notre action s’exerce grâce à la science, la conservation mondiale, la
sensibilisation et la gestion du plus vaste système au monde de réserves naturelles en milieu
urbain menée sous la bannière du Bronx Zoo à New York. Toutes ces activités permettent
de modifier les comportements vis à vis de la nature et aident les personnes à imaginer les
espèces sauvages et les humains vivant en harmonie.
T
R
M
G
C
O
M
M
U
N
A
U
T
E
U
40
PARTAGER NOS FÔRETS
LES GRANDES SINGES ET NOUS
©Julien Simery
Un jeune orang-outan
sauvage au Parc
national de Gunung
Leuser à Sumatra
41
PARC
NATIONAL DE
GUNUNG
LEUSER
En seulement 35 ans, Sumatra a perdu plus de la moitié de sa
couverture forestière et 90% de sa population d’ourang-outans
à cause de l’extension des terres agricoles et de l’exploitation
forestière, parfois conduites de façon illégale.
Les orang-outans ont longtemps
prospéré sur l’île de Sumatra,
mais les experts estiment que la
population sauvage ne compte
pas plus de 6600 individus. La
conservation et la gestion des
Aires Protégées a toujours été un
challenge pour les autorités des
parcs naturels et les communautés
locales, qui ressentent peu d’intérêts
à préserver les parcs.
Les deux tiers de l’habitat des
orangs-outans se situent dans
l’écosystème de Leuser et le parc
national de Gunung Leuser dans
les deux provinces les plus au
nord de Sumatra: Aceh et Sumatra
du Nord. Avec le financement de
LifeWeb, l’UNESCO a pu travailler
avec les autorités du parc et
les organisations locales de
conservation pour améliorer la
gestion du parc, restorer des zones
de forêt dégradées et impliquer
les communautés locales pour
transformer la conservation et
la protection de la nature en
opportunités.
Les villages dans la zone tampon
du parc national de Gunung Leuser
Nous avons formé les locaux à créer leur propre jardin
biologique, ce qui leur permet de générer de nouveaux
revenus de façon durable et écologique en dehors du
tourisme, qui reste une industrie fragile, et du palmier à
huile, qui peut avoir des conséquences désastreuses.
PANUT
HADISISWOYO
Chercheur senior,
projet d’agriculture biologique
subsitent majoritairement de
l’agriculture, en particulier grâce aux
plantations de palmiers à huile, la
culture de l’hévéa et la production
arboricole. Parmis eux, le village
de Tangkahan a pris conscience
de son potentiel touristique et
a commencé à offrir un certain
nombre d’activités de nature, tels
que les marches de forêt, treks à
dos d’éléphant, rafting et canyoning.
Le projet LifeWeb a encouragé
cette initiative en fournissant un
soutien pour mettre en place de
meilleurs plans de développement
du tourisme, en aidant à promouvoir
Tangkahan comme une destination
d’écotourisme grâce à la création
d’un site internet, de livres et
vidéos sur Tangkahan, et en aidant
à créer de nouvelles activités
génératrices de revenus. Les
habitants bénéficient directement
de ces nouvelles opportunités, ce
qui a aidé à les rendre beaucoup
plus conscients de la nécessité de
protéger le parc et réduisant de ce
fait le braconnage et autres activités
illégales au sein du parc.
PARTAGER NOS FÔRETS
LES GRANDES SINGES ET NOUS
FUTUR
INCERTAIN
Toutes les
espèces de
grands singes
sont en danger ou
en danger critique
d’extinction.
7
1/2
Les ‘grands singes’
correspondent
aux quatre
grands singes que nous
connaissons, chimpanzés,
gorilles, bonobos et orangoutans, mais le cinquième
grand singe est l’Homme.
2
CHIMPANZÉS
Les chimpanzés
ont plus d’ADN
en commun avec
les humains environ 98.4% - qu’avec
les gorilles.
4
NEZ DE
GORILLES
Chaque gorille présente
une empreinte nasale
unique -- les scientifiques
étudiant les gorilles
dans leur milieu sauvage
Les grands
singes peuvent
appréhender
des objets avec leurs
mains comme le font les
humains, mais il peuvent
aussi utiliser leurs pieds!
8
6
utilisent les
empreintes nasales pour
les identifier.
FEMMES
A LA POINTE
Les premiers
chercheurs
spécialisés sur
les grands singes
sont presque tous des
femmes - Jane Goodall,
Dian Fossey et Biruté
Galdikas ont lancé la
discipline dans les années
60.
10
LE PLUS
GRAND
Le gorille mâle
est le plus grand
des grands
singes avec un
poids moyen de 172
kilos.
13
jusqu’à ce que Jane
Goodall découvre que les
chimpanzés le pouvaient
aussi! On sait maintenant
que tous les grands
singes en sont en fait
capables.
VIE EN
SOCIETÉ
Les grands singes
vivent au sein
de structures
sociales différentes.
Les gorilles vivent en
petit groupe dirigé
15
PASSE
L’INFO
par un adulte mâle,
les chimpanzés et les
bonobos vivent en larges
groupes sociaux, et
les orang-outans sont
solitaires.
SOLUTION DE
31
Les grands singes
font partis des
animaux les
plus intelligents
de la planète. Ils sont
capables d’apprendre
et de transmettre des
informations à leurs
congénaires.
11
MAKE YOUR OWN WORKSHEETS ONLINE @ WWW.ATOZTEACHERSTUFF.COM
CINQ
ESPÈCES
DES MAINS
AGILES
NAME:_______________________________
Word Search Generator :: Make your own printable word searches @ A to ZDATE:_____________
Teacher Stuff - 15 words in the grid
1
5
9
NAME:_______________________________ DATE:_____________
Les mâles
orang-outans
développent une
barbe et une moustache
à l’âge adulte, chez
certains mâles, une
excroissance des joues
se développe.
Les grands
singes et
leurs enfants
forment des liens
incroyablement étroits.
Les enfants ne sont
sevrés de leur mère qu’à
partir de 4 ou 5 ans.
Pendant
longtemps,
beaucoup ont
cru que les humains
étaient les seuls primates
capables de fabriquer
et utiliser des outils,
14
MOTS
MÉLANGÉS
Avez-vous réussi à
trouver les mots sur la
conservation dans ce
mélange de lettres?
MAKE YOUR OWN WORKSHEETS ONLINE @ WWW.ATOZTEACHERSTUFF.COM
MÂLE
JOUFFLU
AMOUR
MATERNEL
Les bonobos
ressemblent
tellement à des
chimpanzés qu’on avait
l’habitude de les appeler
‘chimpanzés pigmés’. Ils
se ressemblent beaucoup,
mais leurs comportements
sont très différents.
FABRICANT
D’OUTILS
T X V E D U C A T I O N S F V
ORANGOUTAN
AFRIQUE
O R A N G U T A N D J K P R B
AFRICA
GORILA
SINGE
R L B O G C H I M P A N Z
E G
ASIE HABITAT
NAME:_______________________________
DATE:_____________
G
G
N
E
C
O
S
I
S
T
E
M
A
W
O
ASIA
C O S Y S T E M E I N N
BONOBO
B OM
V FE E
D U
C
A
C
I
O
N
C
A
S
BONOBO
INDONESIA
I ND AGV OA RT IQ IL YL QE A BOSQUE
O O
CAMEROUN
P R GT V
M Z
Q E
ORANGUTAN
P I CK R
U Z
B O
O EM
SS XTI GVSUT T I E CAMERUN
E
C
O N
J
S NIWONEB G
LM AA I NCARBONE
N L OA PF G
R IA
B O
A
EO CEWKUHET F GT CARBONO
C AROC BN
G N
W
C CA
LI CM O J CHIMPANZE
C A R B O N O H C O X G R V V
CHIMPANCE
M
C
A
S
I
E
S
E
Y
O
A
L
E
H
J
I
M
F
M
I
N
D
O
N
E
S
I
A
L
A
COMMUNAUTE
J I H A B I T A T V N Z B U Z
COMUNIDAD
M O A W
H B
NC KA N WCONGO
U CA CR W
B GO VN L OUB WO CONGO
R
U H C O M U N I D A D G Z C N
M R
C
H W
I ZM NP RA TN QC UE TA KI HE K DCONSERVATION
F
C O UN N
S E
E R
V
A
C
I
O
N
O
W
P
CONSERVACION
J E B A E E I I N S U J
ECOSYSTEME
A
M
E
R
U
N
F
V
S
I
O
B
C
N
M Y NE G
B N
D IC
N
D
O
N
E
S
I
A
F
ECOSISTEMA
Y AQ
FORXRLWA I N EDUCACION
YG YU T AEDUCATION
Q C AH O
I B
M P
E R
W
OU U
D
B NRXC SB
WR
N
U Y R IA O
O NA OU FJ HI BE OD NU OC BA OC I OFORET
N
T O E C O F A U H A B I T A T
GORILLE
G
S
B
R
W
S
S
S
I
M
I
O
I
B
M
E G R R
C C
Q FP ZV UN NC RO DMY U TN ZI BD A DHABITAT
I
U I N S
D O
U NF EO SJ IG EI GH RA RB VI RT A TINDONESIE
R
T E C L J G O R I L A X B K Y
3
12
1/2
Les grands
singes n’ont pas
de queue, si vous
apercevez un
primate avec une queue,
il s’agit d’un singe.
L’espérance de
vie moyenne des
grands singes
varie entre 35
et 50 ans en milieu
sauvage.
DRÔLE DE
BONOBO
PAS DE
SINGES
43
VIEUX DE LA
VIELLE
10/30/2014
15 CHOSES À
SAVOIR SUR
LES GRANDS
SINGES
1/2
42
COMPARTE
LOS BOSQUES
CON LOS GRANDES SIMIOS
46
COMPARTE LOS BOSQUES
SOBRE
GRASP
Alianza para la Supervivencia de los Grandes Simios (GRASP) es una
alianza de 98 gobiernos nacionales, organizaciones para la conservación,
instituciones de investigación, agencias de las Naciones Unidas (NNUU) y
compañías privadas comprometidas con la protección a largo plazo de los
grandes simios y su hábitat en África y en Asia
GRASP trabaja para la
conservación de chimpancés,
gorilas, orangutanes y bonobos
al máximo nivel político
concentrando sus esfuerzos
en temas como el tráfico ilegal,
la pérdida de hábitat natural, el
seguimiento de enfermedades,
el desarrollo sostenible, y la
colaboración transfronteriza.
GRASP fue fundada en el
año 2001 por el Programa
de Naciones Unidas para el
Medio Ambiente (PNUMA), que
co-hospeda la Secretaría de
GRASP en la Organización de
las Naciones Unidas para la
Educación, la Ciencia y la Cultura
(UNESCO). Entre las actividades
reciente de GRASP están la
publicación “Stolen Apes”, el
primer informe sobre el tráfico
ilegal de simios; el anuncio de
los ganadores del Premio a la
Conservación de GRASP –Ian
Redmond en Camerún, Nigeria e
Indonesia; y la campaña sobre la
apeAPP una aplicación para los
teléfonos móviles.
GRASP gestionó seis proyectos
en colaboración con la alianza
España-PNUMA para las
áreas protegidas en apoyo a la
Iniciativa LifeWeb en el periodo
2011-14, cada uno de los
cuales reforzaba el compromiso
de las comunidades en el
apoyo a la conservación de
los grandes simios. Estos
proyectos se desarrollaron en
Congo, Camerún, República
Democrática del Congo e
Indonesia, promoviendo formas
de sustento alternativas,
cuidados sanitarios
comunitarios, y mejorando las
técnicas de utilización de la tierra
como medios para reducir la
presión sobre el hábitat de los
grandes simios
GRASP fue fundada en el año 2001 por el Programa de
Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA), que
co-hospeda la Secretaría de GRASP en la Organización
de las Naciones Unidas para la Educación, la Ciencia y
la Cultura (UNESCO). GRASP gestionó seis proyectos en
colaboración con la alianza España-PNUMA para las áreas
protegidas en apoyo a la Iniciativa LifeWeb en el periodo
2011-14, cada uno de los cuales reforzaba el compromiso
de las comunidades en el apoyo a la conservación de los
grandes simios. GRASP trabaja para la conservación de
chimpancés, gorilas, orangutanes y bonobos al máximo
nivel político concentrando sus esfuerzos en temas como
el tráfico ilegal, la pérdida de hábitat natural, el seguimiento
de enfermedades, el desarrollo sostenible y la colaboración
transfronteriza.
©Flickr/Reflexiste
COORDINADOR DE PROGRAMA
Doug Cress
DIRECTOR DE PROYECTOS
Dr. Johannes Refisch
46 INTRODUCCIÓN
GRASP enfatiza el compromiso de las
comunidades y el apoyo local para promover la
conservación de los grandes simios.
DISEÑO Y MAQUETACIÓN
Laura Darby
Michael Omare
47 SOBRE GRASP
Julien Simery
SOBRE
50 LIFEWEB
51 RESERVA DE
TAKAMANDA
El parque más nuevo de Camerún ofreció a
GRASP y a la Wildlife Conservation Society
una oportunidad para resaltar los beneficios
de UN-REDD en la preservación del hábitat del
gran simio más escaso de África: el gorila del
río Cross.
52 PARQUE NACIONAL DE
KAHUZI-BIEGA
GRASP y la Wildlife Conservation Society
destacaron que en la parte oriental de la
República Democrática del Congo el apoyo
de las comunidades respecto a los gorilas
de Grauer, chimpancés y la fauna silvestre
amenazada ha sido un punto central.
FOTOS CORTESÍA DE
53 PARQUE NACIONAL DE
GARAMBA
GRASP y la African Parks Foundation
trabajaron en uno de los Parques Africanos
más antiguos de la República Democrática
del Congo por la conservación de especies
amenazadas como los chimpancés y los
elefantes
56 PARQUE NACIONAL DE
NOUABALE-NDOKI &
RESERVA DE FAUNA DE
LOSSI
La Wildlife Conservation Society trabajó
con GRASP para promover la salud en la
población y el compromiso de la comunidad
en la última fortaleza de los gorilas de llanura
occidentales y los chimpancés del Triángulo
de Goualougo en la república del Congo.
COMPARTE LOS BOSQUES
CON LOS GRANDES SIMIOS
La conservación de los grandes simios se centra en las
selvas, pero cada vez más también en las comunidades
que dependen de dichas selvas para su supervivencia. A
través del refuerzo del compromiso local, los proyectos
de LifeWeb promueven la formación, la gobernabilidad y
la sostenibilidad en las Áreas Protegidas como elementos
necesarios para conservar los grandes simios y otras
especies amenazadas.
62 PARQUE NACIONAL DE
GUNUNG LEUSER
GRASP Y UNESCO colaboran para contrarrestar
la presión debida al desarrollo y promover la
reforestación en una de las mayores áreas
protegidas de Indonesia, hogar de orangutanes,
tigres, rinocerontes y elefantes.
Flickr/Reflexiste
CIFOR
Julien Simery
Johannes Refisch
Joe McKenna
Flickr/Yasa
Bobby Padavick
Ian Redmond
Flickr/Wildcatsff
Nuria Ortega
OFICINA
United Nations Environment
Programme (UNEP)
PO Box 30552
Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: +254 20 762 6712
info@un-grasp.org
www.un-grasp.org
@graspunep
50
CON LOS GRANDES SIMIOS
COMPARTE LOS BOSQUES
DESARROLLO
DEL PROYECTO
La Alianza España -PNUMA en apoyo a la iniciativa LifeWeb es una contribución conjunta
para mejorar el impacto y la efectividad de las nuevas Áreas Protegidas y las ya existentes,
reconociéndolas como herramientas clave para la conservación de la biodiversidad. España,
mediante una asociación estratégica con el PNUMA, destinó 8 millones de dólares para apoyar las
Áreas Protegidas a través de la gestión directa y mejora de otras condiciones como el apoyo en
los procesos políticos la participación de las partes implicadas y una mayor concienciación de los
beneficios para los medios de vida de las comunidades y los ecosistemas.
RESERVA
FORESTAL DE
TAKAMANDA
© Nuria Ortega
Estos bosques son el hogar de importantes poblaciones de gorilas
del Río Cross, el gran simio más escaso del mundo con una
población estimada de no más de 300 individuos, además de los
amenazados elefantes de bosque, chimpancés y mandriles. El
Parque Nacional Takamanda en Camerún se encuentra en la frontera
occidental con Nigeria y presenta una gran diversidad biológica.
WILDLIFE
CONSERVATION
SOCIETY
www.wcs.org
La destrucción del hábitat y la
caza representan las mayores
amenazas para el gorila del
Río Cross. El análisis genético
de la población revela una
reducción en el número de
gorilas en los últimos 200
años, probablemente debido a
la caza y la fragmentación del
hábitat del bosque causada
por la agricultura, construcción
de carreteras y la quema de
bosques por los pastores.
AFRICAN PARKS
NETWORK
www.african-parks.org
UNESCO
Organización de las Naciones
Unidas para la Educación, la
Ciencia, y la Culture
www.unesco.org
El proyecto España-PNUMA en
apoyo a LifeWeb llevó a cabo
un estudio de viabilidad REDD
(Reducción de Emisiones por
Deforestación y Degradación)
para evaluar el valor de las
reservas de carbono en el
bosque y las tasas de cambio
en el uso de la tierra y opciones
de desarrollo. Los resultados
iniciales indican que los
cambios en los modelos del
uso de la tierra podrían reducir
drásticamente las emisiones de
dióxido de carbono dañino en
Takamanda en 5,5 millones de
toneladas en los próximos 20
años.
©Flickr/CIFOR
51
COMPARTE LOS BOSQUES
CON LOS GRANDES SIMIOS
En un país afectado durante
décadas por guerra civil y la
corrupción, la conservación y
protección de la biodiversidad
puede ser una tarea desalentadora.
“Antes de que creásemos las comunidades
de conservación, íbamos a la selva sobre
todo para extraer los recursos-incluyendo
bambú y carbón de leña- y a cazar.”
La República Democrática del
Congo – a pesar de ser uno
de los ecosistemas forestales
más ricos del planeta – es
una ilustración lacerante de
esa realidad. Sin embargo, los
proyectos de LifeWeb en los
Parques Nacionales de Garamba y
Kahuzi-Biega -en la parte oriental
de la RD del Congo- demostraron
que involucrar a las comunidades
y a las poblaciones locales en la
protección de su hábitat natural
puede tener impactos económicos
y sociales duraderos y positivos
contribuyendo a la protección de
especies carismáticas, incluido
el gorila de Llanura Oriental, una
especie críticamente amenazada.
PARQUE
NACIONAL DE
KAHUZIBIEGA
©Joe McKenna
--- Oscar Maregani (Representante de la
comunidad de Bougobe)
53
El préstamo de
microcréditos ha hecho
posible que los habitantes
de la zona vivan sin hacer
uso de los recursos del
bosque
Las autoridades del parque de
Kahuzi-Biega descubrieron que
reforzar las leyes era sólo una parte
de la solución a sus problemas.
Mediante el uso de enfoques de
resolución de conflictos para la
rehabilitación del corredor Nindja
de Kahuzi-Biega, el proyecto
LifeWeb fortaleció el diálogo entre
los responsables del parque y las
comunidades locales, y generó
oportunidades de subsistencia
alternativas como la agricultura
y el ecoturismo, reduciendo así
PARQUE NACIONAL DE
GARAMBA
© Nuria Ortega
52
JULIA
TIBALANGE
Granjera beneficiaria de un
microcrédito
A través de un préstamo
concedido por el proyecto
LifeWeb, Julia Tibalange tiene una
próspera granja que le permite
dejar de explotar los recursos del
parque
la dependencia de los recursos
forestales. En total, 180 personas
abandonaron las actividades
ilegales y ahora gestionan negocios
de pequeña escala a través de
un esquema de micro crédito.
Actividades ilegales como la caza
se redujeron en un 40 % en el
corredor y el proyecto fue capaz de
recuperar 23 km2 de tierra a través
de reasentamiento voluntario.
En Garamba, el mejor acceso por
carretera y nuevas infraestructuras
tales como escuelas y un pequeño
hospital proporcionan una
ayuda directa a las poblaciones
y facilitaron el desarrollo de
programas de educación ambiental
y conservación comunitaria. Las
comunidades locales se benefician
enormemente al vivir cerca de
un área protegida, la cual crea un
ambiente más propicio para un
cambio positivo para el futuro.
Las comunidades reciben mejor
atención médica de la nueva
clínica del Parque Nacional de
Garamba, construida con el
apoyo del proyecto LifeWeb
54
Parques Africanos es una sociedad sin ánimo de lucro
SHARING
FORESTS
comprometida
con la rehabilitación y la gestión a largo
THE GREAT APES AND US
plazo de los parques nacionales y otras áreas protegidas,
trabaja en colaboración con los gobiernos africanos
Protegiendo los últimos siete refugios de vida silvestre de Africa
A local schoolteacher in the
communities surrounding Virunga
National Park in Rwanda
55
COMPARTE LOS BOSQUES
CON LOS GRANDES SIMIOS
Nouabalé-Ndoki es
el último reducto del
Gorila de Llanura
Occidental.
El Parque Nacional de NouabaléNdoki (PNNN), situado en la
República del Congo, es un inaudito
ejemplo de un bosque intacto y
uno de los últimos reductos para
los gorilas de Llanura Occidentales.
También es hogar de algunas
de las últimas poblaciones de
chimpancés “naïve” en el Triángulo
de Goualougo, que no tienen miedo
de los visitantes humanos.
PARQUE
NACIONAL DE
NOUBALÉNDOKI
Las comunidades locales se benefician directamente del
desarrollo de ecoturismo y las tarifas de los visitantes
contribuyen directamente al bienestar de la población.
Esta área no es sólo una zona
de gran importancia en términos
de biodiversidad regional e
internacionalmente, sino que
además es un modelo en la
colaboración de las iniciativas
sostenibles para la conservación
de la fauna y áreas silvestres.
Western Lowland Gorilla en el
Parque Nacional de Noubalé-Ndoki
57
El pueblo más cercano al
parque nacional es Bomassa.
Anteriormente era un importante
centro de cazadores de la
zona y ahora es una población
comprometida que ha facilitado
la creación del Parque Nacional.
Actualmente, muchos cazadores
trabajan como guardas de caza,
personal de mantenimiento o guías
en el bosque.
Con el apoyo de LifeWeb, GRASP
y la Wildlife Conservation Society
reforzaron las patrullas de los ecoguardas, y establecieron nuevos
protocolos para las patrullas anti
caza furtiva.
WCS también implantó protocolos
de salud y seguridad preventivas
para garantizar la sostenibilidad
del proyecto de ecoturismoque
contribuye enormemente a la
subsistencia y las inversiones de la
población de Bomassa.
Eco-Guardas en el NNNP
©Johannes Refisch
56
© Nuria Ortega
58
COMPARTE LOS BOSQUES
EDUCAR
PARA
EL FUTURO
Desarrollar programas de educación ambiental entre las
poblaciones locales es una garantía para la conservación
de las Áreas Protegidas y su mantenimiento en el futuro.
CON LOS GRANDES SIMIOS
59
60
SHARING FORESTS
SOPA DE
LETRAS
10/30/2014
Word Search Generator :: Make your own printable word searches @ A to Z Teacher Stuff - 15 words
MAKE YOUR OWN WORKSHEETS ONLINE @ WWW.ATOZTEACHERSTUFF.COM
NAME:_______________________________ DATE:_____________
X
S
I
W
S
O
E
A
C
A
A
F
A
T
J
S
I
M
I
O
R
M
R
O
S
B
C
M
C
L
J
N
T
V
D
A
C
B
S
I
I
Z
E
O
B
ÁFRICA
SIMIO
ASIA
BONOBO
CAMERÚN
G
D
A
Q
W
N
O
O
I
A
T
H
R
N
O
Z
O
A
U
T
G
M
N
S
L
A
O
U
S
N
C
N
F
R
C
U
U
O
T
E
T
U
N
E
O
I
E
R
F
H
T
N
L
E
D
U
N
J
R
B
X
S
I
D
I
A
I
F
M
U
R
F
A
V
O
E
I
C
Y
M
N
D
B
A
C
H
C
B
A
C
CARBONO
CHIMPANCÉ
COMUNIDAD
CONGO
CONSERVACIÓN
B
A
A
C
P
C
A
W
T
A
U
O
O
C
Q
N
X
I
B
A
W
D
I
U
C
O
N
S
I
W
V
A
L
S
N
I
L
W
X
I
G
G
Q
O
B
K
G
H
I
C
I
S
J
V
O
I
O
U
N
P
M
G
D
U
E
E
B
C
E
N
G
B
E
V
A
ECOSISTEMA
EDUCACIÓN
BOSQUE
GORILA
HABITAT
AFRICA
ASIA
BONOBO
BOSQUE
CAMERUN
CARBONO
CHIMPANCE
COMUNIDAD
CONGO
CONSERVACION
ECOSISTEMA
EDUCACION
GORILA
HABITAT
INDONESIA
©Bobby Padavick
La Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) se fundó en 1985 como New York
Zoological Society (NYZS) y actualmente trabaja para la conservación de más de
dos milliones de millas cuadradas de áreas silvestres en todo el mundo. Con base
en Bronx Zoo, la organización participa aproximademente en 500 proyectos de
conservación en 65 países y cuenta con 200 cientifícos en su plantilla
E
G
O
R
I
L
A
C
E
G
H
F
C
O
B
62
COMPARTE LOS BOSQUES
CON LOS GRANDES SIMIOS
©Julien Simery
Un pequeño orangután
en el parque nacional de
Gunung Leuser, Sumatra
63
PARQUE
NATIONALE DE
GUNUNG
LEUSER
Tan sólo en los últimos 35 años, Sumatra ha perdido más del 50%
de su cobertura forestal y el 90% de su población de orangutanes
debido a la expansión agrícola y la tala de árboles, algunas
realizadas ilegalmente
Hace un tiempo había abundantes
orangutanes en la isla de Sumatra.
Actualmente los expertos estiman
que la población silvestre no
supera los 6.600 individuos. La
conservación y manejo de áreas
protegidas ha sido un reto para
las autoridades del parque y las
comunidades locales.
Dos tercios de la población de
orangutanes se encuentran dentro
del ecosistema de Leuser y el
Parque Nacional de Gunung Leuser,
en las dos provincias más al norte
de Sumatra, Aceh y Sumatra del
norte. Con financiación LifeWeb,
la UNESCO ha trabajado con
las autoridades del parque y las
organizaciones conservacionistas
locales para mejorar la gestión
del parque, recuperar las áreas
forestales degradadas einvolucrar a
las comunidades en oportunidades
de desarrollo que comporta la
conservación y la protección de la
naturaleza.
Los pueblos de la zona de
amortiguación del Parque Nacional
La población local recibe formación para crear sus
propios huertos ecológicos, y conseguir medios de vida
sostenibles y respetuosos con el medio ambiente fuera
del turismo, un mercado volátil, o el aceite de palma, que
puede dañar el medioambiente
PANUT
HADISISWOYO
Investigador del proyecto
de granjas orgánicas
de Gunung Leuser subsisten en su
mayoría gracias a la agricultura,
incluyendo el aceite de palma,
caucho y frutas. Una de estas
aldeas, Tangkahan, entendió su
potencial turístico y ahora ofrece
una amplia gama de actividades
basadas en la naturaleza tales
como caminatas por el bosque,
excursiones siguiendo la senda
de los elefantes, descenso
en el río y visitas a cuevas. El
proyecto LifeWeb financió la
iniciativa proporcionando apoyo
para mejorar la planificación del
ecoturismo, ayudar a promover
Tangkahan como un destino
de ecoturismo desarrollando la
web de Tangkahan, así como
libros y videos promocionales,
y creando nuevas actividades
generadoras de ingresos.
Los habitantes se benefician
enormemente del ecoturismo,
mejora su conocimiento sobre el
entorno y disminuye la caza y otras
actividades ilegales en el parque.
COMPARTE LOS BOSQUES
CON LOS GRANDES SIMIOS
15 DATOS
SOBRE LOS
GRANDES
SIMIOS
FUTURO
INCIERTO
3
MACHOS CON
PROTUBERANCIAS
A los
orangutanes
machos les
crece barba
y bigote cuando son
adultos y algunos
también desarrollan
protuberancias en las
mejillas
1
CINCO
ESPECIES
“Grandes
Simios” se
refiere a los
cuatro grandes simios
que conocemos-chimpancés, gorilas,
bonobos y orangutanes
– pero el quinto gran
simio es ¡el HUMANO!
2
CHIMPANCÉS
Los chimpancés
comparten más
ADN con los
humanos —
sobre un 98.4%—que
con los gorilas.
4
El promedio
de vida de los
grandes simios
varía de 35 a 50 años en
el medio silvestre.
12
FABRICANTES DE
HERRAMIENTAS
GRÁCIL
BONOBO
AMOR
MATERNAL
Los grandes
simios y sus
crías mantienen
vínculos muy estrechos.
Las crías generalmente
no dejan de tomar leche
materna hasta los 4 o 5
años.
5
6
Durante mucho
tiempo, mucha
gente creía que
los humanos eran
los únicos primates que
fabricaban y utilizaban
herramientas ¡Hasta que
14
9
MANOS QUE
AGARRAN
¡Los grandes
simios pueden
agarrar cosas
con sus manos
como las personas, pero
también pueden utilizar
sus pies!
8
MUJERES
LIDERANDO
Algunas de
las primeras
investigadoras en
grandes simios
fueron mujeres, Jane
Goodall, Dian Fossey, y
Biruté Galdikas, pioneras
en los trabajos de campo
en los años 60.
10
CORRAN
LA VOZ
HUELLA DE
GORILLA
Cada gorila
tiene una
huella nasal
distintiva
– los
Los bonobos
se parecen
tanto a los
chimpancés que
solían llamarles “los
chimpancés pigmeos”.
Pueden parecer
similares pero se
comportan de manera
muy diferente.
científicos que
los estudian en el
terreno utilizan sus
huellas nasales para
identificarlos.
Los grandes
simios son unos
de los animales
más inteligentes de la
tierra. Pueden aprender
y pasar información a
otros simios.
11
EL MÁS
GRANDE
El gorila macho
es el simio más
grande con un
promedio de peso de
172 kilos (380 libras).
13
Jane Goodall descubrió
que los chimpancés
también lo hacían! Ahora
sabemos que todos los
grandes simios fabrican y
utilizan herramientas.
VIDA
SOCIAL
Los grandes
simios viven
con diferentes
estructuras sociales. Los
gorilas viven en grupos
pequeños con un solo
15
macho adulto como
líder, los chimpancés y
los bonobos viven en
grandes grupos sociales,
y los orangutanes son
solitarios.
SOLUCIÓN DEL
31
MAKE YOUR OWN WORKSHEETS ONLINE @ WWW.ATOZTEACHER
. Ningún gran
simio tiene
cola--¡Si ves un
primate que tiene, es un
mono!
VETERANOS
Todas las
especies de
grandes simios
están catalogadas
como “amenazadas”
o “críticamente
amenazadas”.
7
NO
MONOS
65
LOS
S UJ TGA ZN C
X PE RB B N V AFRICA
K M
O R EA X
N G
D JI K
NAME:_______________________________
G S I N D O N E S I A X DATE:______
A G G
G
G
N
E
C
O
S
I
S
T
E
M
A
W
O
ASIA
M UT CAA AC F
R N
I CC AA S I L BONOBO
H D
B O OV IE D
I O
P R RT W
M Q
A TF Q
I EV NQA UV R
D IY YC Q B S BOSQUE
I U
P I IK S
U BO O
O M
ED NWO E
O SIS XM
I GPSU AT N
E CAMERUN
M
A I
TB C
H
C E
N L A F R IA CC A OC N
B A
G EO CWK HE F T CARBONO
M O
L
O
R
A
N
G
U
T
A
N
C
W
I
I
E
C A R B O N O H C O X G R V V
CHIMPANC
I
D
I A
A E M IC M
O F
M M
U N
IN D
AO DN LE S B
J I H A B I T A T V N Z B U Z
COMUNIDA
W
B G
ON IB W
O CONGO
C
A N
R U
B NU
OI A
ND R
O
L
FO ZBNCW
J C
U H CC A
O M
A D
CS VH
P N
A OANWTCP UE X
A CONSERVA
IV E K
I A ISC M
T
E
M
C O EN C
S EO R
I O
R SUU ICNAAFF CV IS ECOSISTEM
IO N
O B
S ICI NA D M
LO E
M Y GE A
B D
N ED
Q C H I M P
E W
D AB N XC B
W OU UOR RL A N EDUCACIO
G U T
H
A
B
I
T
A
T
U
R
H
U
O
G
I
G
J FI CE OD NU G
C A
C I
F F C IZ O
H A
O U N
O B
M IU E
O I
C A M GE S
R B
U R
N JW AS BS OS SI Q
O T C RO Q
N P
S V
E R
N VC AO CM IU O
N IN V
D A
B J L SB U
O F
N O B
J O
G CI QH W
A B
B IP A
T A
T E C L J G O R I L A X B
64
PUZZLE DE
PRIMATES
¿Has encontrado
todas las palabras de
este enigma sobre la
conservación?